BREAKING NEWS: Health (2) http://feed.informer.com/digests/CIDSENEDFL/feeder BREAKING NEWS: Health (2) Respective post owners and feed distributors Sun, 27 Jul 2014 19:07:01 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ How Heat Kills: Deadly Weather 'Cooking' People From Within https://www.webmd.com/first-aid/news/20210802/how-heat-kills-deadly-weather-cooking-people-from-within?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:f9be3513-b6bb-040c-252f-e942fa43d17f Mon, 02 Aug 2021 20:52:28 +0000 In the final week of July, the National Weather Service issued excessive heat warnings for 17 states, stretching from the West Coast, across the Midwest, down south into Louisiana and Georgia. Temperatures 10 to 15  F above average threaten the lives and livelihoods of people all across the country. <img src="https://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/blog_posts/diabetes/650x350_summer-heat.jpg" style="border:0;" alt="650x350_summer-heat" /><p>In the final week of July, the National Weather Service issued excessive heat warnings for 17 states, stretching from the West Coast, across the Midwest, down south into Louisiana and Georgia. Temperatures 10 to 15  F above average threaten the lives and livelihoods of people all across the country.</p> Earliest Childhood Memories Can Go Back Even Further https://www.webmd.com/brain/news/20210802/earliest-childhood-memories-can-go-back-even-further?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:e13230e6-a9be-4e07-a9e6-b845392aeba7 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 20:20:15 +0000 People remember events earlier in childhood than previously thought, according to new research that shows recall can be as early as age 2 and a half. <img src="https://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/quizzes/memory_rmq/650x350_memory_rmq.jpg" style="border:0;" alt="finger tied with string" /><p>People remember events earlier in childhood than previously thought, according to new research that shows recall can be as early as age 2 and a half.</p> Nearly 10% of All Home Health, Personal Care Job Postings Listed As ‘Urgent’ https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/nearly-10-of-all-home-health-personal-care-job-postings-listed-as-urgent/ Home Health Care News urn:uuid:915f4288-75d2-4103-07cb-a4014c35548a Mon, 02 Aug 2021 19:46:26 +0000 <p>The share of job postings containing words such as “hiring urgently” has risen by over 50% since the start of the year, and health care jobs are the most likely to contain them, according to the jobs site Indeed.  Specifically, jobs in home health and home care are most likely to be labeled urgent, reflecting [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/nearly-10-of-all-home-health-personal-care-job-postings-listed-as-urgent/">Nearly 10% of All Home Health, Personal Care Job Postings Listed As ‘Urgent’</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> <p>The share of job postings containing words such as “hiring urgently” has risen by over 50% since the start of the year, and health care jobs are the most likely to contain them, according to the jobs site Indeed. </p> <p>Specifically, jobs in home health and home care are most likely to be labeled urgent, reflecting the immense staffing issues that have plagued the sectors generally &#8212; and even more so during the COVID-19 crisis. </p> <p>Nearly 10% of personal care and home health care job postings are using terms like “urgent,” while around over 6% of nursing jobs are labeled as such. </p> <p>“If the pandemic taught employers anything, it would be to value their workers,” David Coppins, the co-founder and CEO of IntelyCare, told Home Health Care News in an email. “Many have left their jobs and the nursing profession altogether. Data shows 22% of nurses may leave their jobs, and nearly 60% indicated that they became more likely to leave following the start of COVID-19.”</p> <p>IntelyCare is a Boston-based health care staffing solutions platform. The management consulting company McKinsey and Company <a href="https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/healthcare-systems-and-services/our-insights/nursing-in-2021-retaining-the-healthcare-workforce-when-we-need-it-most">provided the data on workers considering leaving the workforce</a>, in a time where providers desperately need workers to enter the field. </p> <p>Those workers cited the heavy workload, the lack of sufficient staffing and the emotional toll the pandemic took on them as to why they were more likely to leave. </p> <p>Health care jobs are leading other industries in “urgent” postings both because the demand for workers has increased and because many eligible workers are turning down the jobs due to multiple reasons related to the pandemic, <a href="https://www.hiringlab.org/2021/06/24/employer-use-of-hiring-incentives-grows/">Indeed economist AnnElizabeth Konkel wrote</a>.</p> <p>Health care providers &#8212; as well as in home health &#8212; are also more likely to be including bonuses or incentives to get workers on board, according to the Indeed report. </p> <p>The share of job postings on Indeed with hiring incentives is at 4.3%, up from 1.8% in July 2020, with much of that increase coming in recent months.</p> <p>But Coppins believes in today’s landscape that may still fall short. </p> <p>“Employers can’t rely on higher pay or one-time bonuses to retain workers,” he said. “Instead, they should listen to employees and provide them with meaningful benefits while paying them what they deserve.”</p> <p>Of course, that is not always the provider’s choice. There are a lot of providers, for instance, in the Medicaid and Medicare business that aren’t able to offer workers more unless the reimbursement they receive is likewise increased. </p> <p>Unemployment benefits likewise have not helped providers’ cause. While it’s understandable why many workers were or are unable to work given the pandemic’s effects, it’s made hiring even tougher. <br></p> <p>“The thing I feel has changed the most is the lack of aides willing to work,” John Bradshaw, the CEO of Georgetown Home Care, <a href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/07/as-pandemic-eases-home-care-providers-discover-some-costs-stick/">recently told HHCN</a>. “We never really had any trouble finding aides to take jobs prior to the pandemic, but it’s near impossible now, which is dramatically driving up the cost as we pay more to get aides to come back.”</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/nearly-10-of-all-home-health-personal-care-job-postings-listed-as-urgent/">Nearly 10% of All Home Health, Personal Care Job Postings Listed As ‘Urgent’</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> Community-Based Palliative Care, Choose Home Top List of Current Home Health Policy Priorities https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/community-based-palliative-care-choose-home-top-list-of-current-home-health-policy-priorities/ Home Health Care News urn:uuid:837386df-5def-b0e9-6408-cd609e11066d Mon, 02 Aug 2021 18:47:51 +0000 <p>National Association for Home Care &#38; Hospice (NAHC) President Bill Dombi touched on the importance of recent community-based palliative care legislation during a Sunday night policy update at the Washington, D.C.-based industry group’s 2021 Financial Management Conference. The bulk of his update, however, was spent urging industry insiders to band together and throw their support [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/community-based-palliative-care-choose-home-top-list-of-current-home-health-policy-priorities/">Community-Based Palliative Care, Choose Home Top List of Current Home Health Policy Priorities</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> <p>National Association for Home Care &amp; Hospice (NAHC) President Bill Dombi touched on the importance of recent community-based palliative care legislation during a Sunday night policy update at the Washington, D.C.-based industry group’s 2021 Financial Management Conference.</p> <p>The bulk of his update, however, was spent urging industry insiders to band together and throw their support behind the Choose Home Care Act of 2021.</p> <p>“This may not look like a call to action, but this is the direction that we&#8217;re asking you to take,” Dombi said at the event. “This is about [making] noise in Washington. People listen when it’s loud. You’re not the only one asking Congress to do things. This is why you have to be extraordinarily loud.”</p> <p>Specifically, Dombi asked the industry to rally behind the bill by sending a message to their state senators, asking them to co-sponsor the legislation.</p> <p>Originally <a href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/07/snf-diversion-bill-choose-home-introduced-projected-to-save-up-to-247m-annually/">introduced Thursday</a> by U.S. Sens. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) and Todd Young (R-Ind.), Choose Home aims to support in-home care options by providing a home-based care alternative to nursing homes. If passed, the legislation would allow certain patients to receive an add-on to the existing Medicare home health benefit for 30 days after a hospital stay.</p> <p>“This is a very targeted, cost-effective benefit,” Bruce Greenstein, chief strategy and innovation officer at LHC Group Inc. (Nasdaq: LHCG), said during the FMC presentation.</p> <p>Greenstein, one of the architects of Choose Home, noted that the legislation would only apply to post-acute patients that are coming out of the hospital after at least a three-day stay. These patients must qualify for both a skilled nursing facility (SNF) stay, as well as home health services. </p> <p>“It’s not hospital-at-home. It’s not exactly SNF-at-home,” he said. “It&#8217;s patients that meet the specific criteria, but are deemed as capable and appropriate for getting their care at home.”</p> <p>Overall, there is a 34% overlap between post-acute care patients who go to a SNF and those who go to home health, according to the LHC Group executive. In many ways, the current health care environment has paved the way for Choose Home, he added. </p> <p>“That’s been going on within the federal sector through [regulatory waivers], in terms of bringing out new flexibilities like hospital-at-home, for example,” Greenstein said. “Our marketplace has been advancing quite quickly with new products and new companies. … Our industry continues to advance in terms of capabilities and acumen and taking care of more complex patients at home.”</p> <p>Additionally, Dombi believes Choose Home will be an opportunity for home-based care providers to form new partnerships.</p> <p>“If you’re a private-duty home care company that doesn’t do Medicare home health, this is a partnering opportunity for you,” he said. “This is not also for every home health [provider]. This is going to take an infrastructure change. It&#8217;s going to take enough volume to be able to handle it. Not everybody can be there, but there is room for partnering.”</p> <p>So far, Choose Home has gained the support of organizations such as AARP, LeadingAge and others.</p> <p>That said, the legislation <a href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/choose-home-bill-looks-to-make-home-health-the-center-of-the-health-care-world/">is already facing opposition </a>from some nursing home operators. </p> <p>“While we were on Capitol Hill explaining this benefit and the cost savings, we started to see questions pop up from people&#8217;s folders,” Greenstein said. “They were printouts of emails coming from nursing home operators that were already talking about the deleterious effects this will have on the nursing home industry, that it&#8217;s going to come out of their budget and that we&#8217;re taking their patients.”</p> <p>Aside from Choose Home, Dombi also touched on the need for hospice and home health providers to deliver palliative care during the policy update. </p> <p>One way to accomplish this would be to modify the standards under the Medicare home health benefit in order to allow a portion of palliative care services to be delivered by home health providers. </p> <p>Last week, SB 2565, was introduced. Broadly, the legislation would expand access to palliative care and mandate that the Centers for Medicare &amp; Medicaid Services (CMS) bring into play a demonstration program.</p> <p>“We don’t think that needs to go to Congress,” Dombi said. “That’s CMS — and CMS alone. We&#8217;ve rewritten the Medicare coverage standards, and we&#8217;ll be shortly presenting that to CMS in hopes they see the wisdom of adding the word ‘palliation’ or ‘palliative’ throughout the Medicare coverage standards.” </p> <p>Sens. Jacky Rosen (D-Nev.), John Barrasso (R-Wy.), Tammy Baldwin (D-Wisc.) and Deb Fisher (R-Neb.) are sponsors of SB 2565, the “Expanding Access to Palliative Care for Seniors Act.”</p> <p>“As someone who stepped away from my career to care for my parents and in-laws as they aged, and as a co-founder of the Senate’s Comprehensive Care Caucus, I have an insight into the challenges that seniors and families face when dealing with palliative or hospice care,” Rosen said in a statement. “This package would also reduce barriers to hospice care for seriously ill patients who rely on blood transfusions to maintain quality of life.”</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/community-based-palliative-care-choose-home-top-list-of-current-home-health-policy-priorities/">Community-Based Palliative Care, Choose Home Top List of Current Home Health Policy Priorities</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> Alliance, Royal Care Slash Caregiver Turnover by Investing in Creative Benefits https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/alliance-royal-care-slash-caregiver-turnover-by-investing-in-creative-benefits/ Home Health Care News urn:uuid:2144ff78-22b9-c4e6-b776-a404038caa47 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 18:41:33 +0000 <p>Home care hasn’t always had a reputation for great employee perks or benefits packages, but a handful of providers are beginning to change that. In other sectors, including the technology and startup worlds, perks like free daily meals, access to wellness programs and 401(k) matching, with stock options, are relatively common. Some home care operators [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/alliance-royal-care-slash-caregiver-turnover-by-investing-in-creative-benefits/">Alliance, Royal Care Slash Caregiver Turnover by Investing in Creative Benefits</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> <p>Home care hasn’t always had a reputation for great employee perks or benefits packages, but a handful of providers are beginning to change that.</p> <p>In other sectors, including the technology and startup worlds, perks like free daily meals, access to wellness programs and 401(k) matching, with stock options, are relatively common. Some home care operators have begun experimenting with similar benefits to help lessen recruitment and retention challenges, especially in light of the COVID-19 emergency.</p> <p>Overall, the median caregiver turnover rate for home care providers was 64.3% in 2020, according to <a href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/07/from-the-front-lines-to-the-corner-office-how-the-face-of-home-care-ownership-is-changing/">data from Home Care Pulse</a>. Todd Austin, the Idaho-based research and education firm&#8217;s chief operating office, has seen the increase in operators offering creative employee benefits firsthand. </p> <p>“A few that I thought that were really interesting … were things like paid school leave,” Austin told Home Health Care News. “With this, you get to attend school programs, for example. I&#8217;ve heard of a handful of agencies offering this perk to alleviate the pressure on working [parents], allowing them to attend events and be present for their children.”</p> <p>Other creative perks being offered by some home care providers, he said, include back-to-school assistance programs for caregivers with children. Some agencies have even been carving ride-share allowances into their benefits packages.</p> <p>Royal Care has been able to stand out in the crowded and highly competitive New York market due to its distinctive caregiver perks program.</p> <p>Founded in 1995, Royal Care is an in-home care agency that provides professional nursing and geriatric care, plus rehabilitation and housekeeping services. The company’s New York locations include Brooklyn, Flushing, Jamaica, Nassau and the Bronx.</p> <p>Originally established in 2016, Royal Care’s perks program gives its caregivers access to top manicurists, hair stylists, makeup artists, salon specialists and more, most of which are housed within the company’s Brooklyn-based “perks facility.”</p> <p>Put bluntly, caregiving is an unglamorous but highly necessary job. Unique programs allow caregivers, many of <a href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2020/10/poor-job-quality-low-wages-continue-to-hurt-caregiver-recruitment-in-home-care/">whom often earn low wages</a>, to have access to services that are often viewed as “indulgences,” according to Josh Klein, Royal Care’s founder and CEO.</p> <p>“We are a people company. As a people company, you have to put yourself in their shoes and try to understand what they do, then try to facilitate their needs,” Klein told HHCN. “We promote caring for home health aides.”</p> <p>Along with the beauty services, Royal Care’s perks facility also offers a certified in-house nutritionist, ESL classes, advanced home care training and various technology classes. It also comes stocked with food and beverages.</p> <p>Partly thanks to its investments around caregiver perks, Royal Care has seen a 90% retention rate over the past few years, according to Klein.</p> <p>As home care continues to prove its value when it comes to lowering rehospitalization rates and keeping seniors safe in their homes, caregivers will likely find themselves in a position to demand even more, Klein believes. </p> <p>“You need to entice them, appreciate them and pamper them,” he said. “There is no reason that it should just be big tech companies.” </p> <p>Of the hundreds of agencies that took part in Home Care Pulse’s most recent Home Care Benchmarking Study, more than half said they offered travel reimbursement as a caregiver benefit in 2020. Over 40% of agencies also said they offered benefits like PTO, health coverage and 401(k) matching.</p> <p>Just 1.3% of participating agencies said they offered child care or day care services for caregivers. Nearly one-quarter said they offered educational reimbursement.</p> <p>Other home care companies with standout benefits and perks programs that have translated to industry-low turnover rates include Care To Stay Home and Atrio Help at Home.</p> <p>Santa Ana, California-based Care To Stay Home is a 500-employee agency with offices in Southern California, Utah, Washington, Idaho and Arizona. The company’s package includes week-long catered events and 401(k) matching. </p> <p>In recent years, Care To Stay Home has gone from a turnover rate of 78% to 40%.</p> <p>Atrio Help at Home is a Grand Rapids, Michigan-based home care provider that offers health, dental, vision, disability and life insurance. The company also offers a flexible spending account​ and the option to cash out vacation days. </p> <p>Additionally, Atrio Help at Home offers a wellness program and access to a success coach. The company has achieved a 37.5% turnover rate. </p> <p>“In terms of agency size, [Royal Care, Care To Stay Home and Atrio Help at Home] are all over,” Austin said. “The commonality we saw was turnover rate. The proof is in the pudding. They’re able to keep and retain caregivers by focusing on [caregivers&#8217;] mental health, wellness and family.” </p> <p>Generally speaking, if there is a single benefit that has the ability to lower home care turnover, it’s access to child care services, according to Austin. </p> <p>“When it’s offered, it has had a huge impact on turnover rates,” he said. “Although the data is pretty limited, agencies that offered child care services to caregivers had a 30% turnover rate.” </p> <p>Like Royal Care, Alliance Homecare is another company that is no stranger to thriving in the competitive New York market. </p> <p>Founded in 2006, the Manhattan-based Alliance is a private-pay agency that operates throughout New York City and its surrounding suburbs, as well as in Bergen County, New Jersey.</p> <p>As part of its benefits and perks package, Alliance offers weekly pay, 401(k) matching, health care, covering 60% of premiums, as well as a starting pay of $17. For context, direct care workers across the country earned a median hourly wage of $12.80 in 2019. </p> <p>“We took feedback from a lot of caregivers, via Home Care Pulse,” Greg Solometo, CEO and co-founder of Alliance, told HHCN. “It allowed us to understand the needs and wants of our caregiver community. A lot of people requested that they get paid more frequently, … so we operationally set ourselves up to do that.” </p> <p>Alliance also runs “Alliance University,” a caregiver training program that allows caregivers to beef up their knowledge across various topics. </p> <p>“It&#8217;s really important for caregivers to get the opportunity to improve, learn and gain wisdom for their career &#8212; and personal lives,” Solometo said.</p> <p>Along with gaining caregiver feedback, keeping an eye on what his peers in the industry are doing in terms of perks and benefits has been a key to getting it right. </p> <p>“I&#8217;m in touch with the industry, and I do have a sense for what other companies do,” Solometo said.</p> <p>Not satisfied with resting on its laurels, Alliance has plans to further enhance its benefits package. One area the company is looking to develop is access to child care services, according to Solometo.</p> <p>“A lot of our caregivers have children,” he said. “This was especially obvious during the pandemic when the schools were not open. People that typically didn&#8217;t have childcare needs during the daytime had to figure one out. That&#8217;s something we want to try to get in front of.”</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/alliance-royal-care-slash-caregiver-turnover-by-investing-in-creative-benefits/">Alliance, Royal Care Slash Caregiver Turnover by Investing in Creative Benefits</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> Natural mineral hackmanite enables new method of x-ray imaging https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/08/210802140137.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:37f6c5fb-546c-5869-3633-f328835f5968 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 18:01:37 +0000 Researchers have discovered a new method of X-ray imaging based on the coloring abilities of the natural mineral hackmanite. The international group of researchers also found out how and why hackmanite changes color upon exposure to X-rays. Molecular switch regulates fat burning in mice https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/08/210802140132.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:d93ac4d2-f209-e831-1199-321493f6587c Mon, 02 Aug 2021 18:01:32 +0000 New research demonstrates a metabolic regulatory molecule called Them1 prevents fat burning in cells by blocking access to their fuel source. The study may contribute to the development of a new type of obesity treatment. Cutting 250 calories daily and exercising may improve heart health in obese older adults https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/08/210802140122.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:bbffc0a9-bac6-349e-3a16-78f177211819 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 18:01:22 +0000 Among older adults with obesity, combining aerobic exercise with moderate reductions in total daily calories led to greater improvements in vascular health compared to exercise alone. Reducing calorie intake by approximately 250 calories per day may lead to significant weight loss and improve vascular health in older adults with obesity. Drug-resistant germ packs punch to US travelers https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/08/210802140119.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:493044f1-624b-3210-0636-7f649b0eca68 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 18:01:19 +0000 One type of the salmonella bacteria is much more likely to cause disease and fend off frontline antibiotics when acquired in Europe, Asia, and parts of Africa rather than domestically in the United States. Nearly 9 Million Pfizer Shots in Teens, Serious Side Effects Rare https://www.webmd.com/vaccines/covid-19-vaccine/news/20210802/after-nearly-9-million-pfizer-shots-for-us-teens-serious-side-effects-rare-cdc?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:961411cc-7a1c-5208-93c7-6c4bd122ed9f Mon, 02 Aug 2021 17:35:51 +0000 Some reassuring news about COVID-19 vaccine safety in young people: After millions of teens have received Pfizer's shots, serious side effects have been rare. <img src="https://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/news/2012/07_2012/h1n1_vaccine_adverse_outcome/1800x1200_h1n1_vaccine_adverse_outcome.jpg" style="border:0;" alt="person getting a vaccination" /><p>Some reassuring news about COVID-19 vaccine safety in young people: After millions of teens have received Pfizer's shots, serious side effects have been rare.</p> Study reveals effective strategy to extend the benefit of immunotherapy for prostate cancer https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/Study-reveals-effective-strategy-to-extend-the-benefit-of-immunotherapy-for-prostate-cancer.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:50f55e10-c4cd-f631-5404-c6a8f1bf2bb1 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 17:02:56 +0000 It's a scientific riddle tangled up in a complex web. How do you turn an immune cold cancer into one that responds to immunotherapy? An ALS Drug Shows Early Promise Against Alzheimer's https://www.webmd.com/alzheimers/news/20210802/an-als-drug-shows-early-promise-against-alzheimers?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:2e317676-2816-4a73-c1a4-eb2140ed3b69 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 17:02:46 +0000 Studies show the drug Riluzole which is used to slow the progression of ALS may have positive effects on cognition in people with mild Alzheimer's. <img src="https://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/news/2015/05_2015/diabetes_and_dementia/1800x1200_diabetes_and_dementia.jpg" style="border:0;" alt="colorful brain image" /><p>Studies show the drug Riluzole which is used to slow the progression of ALS may have positive effects on cognition in people with mild Alzheimer's.</p> New discovery could pave the way towards therapeutic treatments for many cancers https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/New-discovery-could-pave-the-way-towards-therapeutic-treatments-for-many-cancers.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:2d4bcc8f-d870-161f-4aa8-c51420a07dd9 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 16:50:00 +0000 Princess Margaret Cancer Centre researchers have made new findings which provide a broader understanding of how dormant hematopoietic stem cells are activated and could pave the way towards therapeutic treatments for a number of cancers. Eczema in Hard-to-Treat Places: What Helps? https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/eczema/features/eczema-hard-to-treat-places?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:d8748ba1-f4fa-d2b2-9f41-b93122fa8254 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 16:48:39 +0000 When you’re trying to soothe eczema on the face, groin, and other sensitive areas, keep a few tips in mind for treatment and caring for your skin at home. <img src="https://www.webmd.com/" style="border:0;" alt="" /><p>When you’re trying to soothe eczema on the face, groin, and other sensitive areas, keep a few tips in mind for treatment and caring for your skin at home.</p> Analysis reveals positive association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and odds of breast cancer https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/Analysis-reveals-positive-association-between-high-sensitivity-C-reactive-protein-and-odds-of-breast-cancer.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:5f81b0ac-c7c4-1420-d5b5-60fdf37f4e35 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 16:30:00 +0000 Oncotarget published "Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and odds of breast cancer by molecular subtype: analysis of the MEND study" which reported that the authors examined the association of high-sensitivity CRP with odds of BC by molecular subtype among Nigerian women. Internet CBT for depression reviewed and analyzed https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/08/210802115010.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:8c517463-4e38-d271-8e3a-368cd03abf2c Mon, 02 Aug 2021 15:50:10 +0000 Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression is often just as effective as traditional CBT. This is clear from an international study. However, some online treatments have components that can potentially be harmful. Atomic-level, 3-D structure of MUTYH protein opens small window into DNA repair mechanism https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/08/210802114951.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:731a7ff1-6461-5af9-4ed6-99fe5d39fcfb Mon, 02 Aug 2021 15:49:51 +0000 A research team has analyzed the three-dimensional structure of a protein that suppresses the development of colorectal polyposis, MUTYH, at the atomic level and clarified the repair mechanism for DNA mispairings. Since mutations in the MUTYH gene cause heritable colorectal polyposis, which leads to colorectal cancer, the researchers expect that this work will be useful for future research on heritable colorectal polyposis associated with MUTYH. Researchers discover titanium oxide nanoparticle that recognizes SARS-CoV-2’s non-structural protein 1 https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/Researchers-discover-titanium-oxide-nanoparticle-that-recognizes-SARS-CoV-2e28099s-non-structural-protein-1.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:88ce6b20-e2a8-bfa9-6eab-18e8f619b802 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 15:06:07 +0000 A pioneering study reports on the interaction of a tailored titanium oxide nanoparticle (NP) with the full-length SARS-CoV-2 non-structural protein 1 (nsp1). This should be of value in developing new therapeutic tools against coronaviruses that act by targeting their proteins. It could also help map the structure of activated proteins. Polyuridine sequence of mouse coronavirus can be targeted to prevent host cell death https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/Polyuridine-sequence-of-mouse-coronavirus-can-be-targeted-to-prevent-host-cell-death.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:4fa7b99d-cbc8-26b5-657e-94cbb1f987a9 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 15:02:32 +0000 A new study reports the use of a modified deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) oligonucleotide that has a 3’ polyadenine (polyA) tail to bind to the 5’-polyU tract in the mouse coronavirus (MHV-A59). Treatment of mouse cells infected with MHV-A59 with this molecule led to a marked reduction in cell deaths. Could novel biosensors facilitate SARS-CoV-2 antiviral drug research? https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/Could-novel-biosensors-facilitate-SARS-CoV-2-antiviral-drug-research.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:189464e8-06a8-cdae-a682-27a3c228b0d9 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 15:00:30 +0000 An intriguing new study presents a novel approach to biosensor-based evaluation of promising drugs that could inhibit the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) via its 3C-like protease (3CLpro), a viral protease. Intradermal administration of low-dose mRNA COVID-19 vaccine induces strong immune response, study finds https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/Intradermal-administration-of-low-dose-mRNA-COVID-19-vaccine-induces-strong-immune-response-study-finds.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:76d9d43d-ff4f-1833-070b-c192e5593e0d Mon, 02 Aug 2021 14:55:53 +0000 Scientists in the Netherlands recently conducted an open-level, randomized-controlled trial to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of fractional intradermal doses of the mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccine mRNA-1273 (Moderna). The trial findings reveal that the fractional dose regimen of the Moderna vaccine is well tolerated and safe and is capable of inducing robust antibody responses in vaccine recipients. The study is currently available on the medRxiv* preprint server. Scientists develop a potent peptide inhibitor of SARS-CoV-2 in vitro https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/Scientists-develop-a-potent-peptide-inhibitor-of-SARS-CoV-2-in-vitro.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:c0473227-401d-8e3c-3073-01a1a4b07e21 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 14:45:54 +0000 In a recently published article in the journal Drugs in R&D, scientists have described the development and validation of a 13-amino acid peptide inhibitor of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Is Manscaping Safe, Healthy & Hygienic? 10 Tips To Shaving Down There https://www.medicaldaily.com/manscaping-safe-healthy-hygienic-10-tips-shaving-down-there-460396?utm_source=Public&utm_medium=Feed&utm_campaign=Distribution Medical Daily urn:uuid:c5f2be9e-738b-dbe6-3778-60564ad04ce7 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 14:39:07 +0000 Do you make the effort to regularly shave/trim your hair? Are you sure you're doing it safely and hygienically? Here are 10 manscaping trimming tips as well as where to get the best tools. Host proteins that impair Ebola virus infection identified https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/08/210802103039.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:46aa563a-8c0a-9275-4f59-3e0de8682d6a Mon, 02 Aug 2021 14:30:39 +0000 Several proteins have been identified in hosts that interact with Ebola virus and primarily function to inhibit the production of viral genetic material in cells and prevent Ebola virus infection, according to a new study. How I Manage My Psoriasis Scarring https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/psoriasis/features/psoriasis-manage-scarring?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:6ac97201-6bd2-c278-704b-2daeb4278a20 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 14:19:24 +0000 Learn how these people deal with skin scarring caused by psoriasis. <img src="https://www.webmd.com/" style="border:0;" alt="" /><p>Learn how these people deal with skin scarring caused by psoriasis.</p> HPV16 ctDNA assay predicts treatment response in metastatic head and neck cancer https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/HPV16-ctDNA-assay-predicts-treatment-response-in-metastatic-head-and-neck-cancer.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:43df01d2-e805-aa38-f55b-8e43b2a711d4 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 14:14:00 +0000 Oncotarget published "Human papilloma virus circulating tumor DNA assay predicts treatment response in recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma" which reported that despite the rising incidence of human papillomavirus related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, treatment of metastatic disease remains palliative. Study finds racial and ethnic disparities in post-operative breast cancer surgery outcomes https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210802/Study-finds-racial-and-ethnic-disparities-in-post-operative-breast-cancer-surgery-outcomes.aspx THE MEDICAL NEWS urn:uuid:1610c66e-bf6a-e4e7-5898-7ffc3483e522 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 13:45:00 +0000 Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among American women and surgery is a primary treatment for these women. Among women receiving surgery, up to 13% will have a post-operative visit to an emergency department, according to recent research. The antibody with a secret: Scientists uncover IgA antibodies' ability to fight malaria https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-08-antibody-secret-scientists-uncover-iga.html Medical Xpress - Feature story urn:uuid:68b9d75d-2786-2c11-8d4c-915afe27a6cd Mon, 02 Aug 2021 12:27:42 +0000 Antibodies have drawn a spotlight over the past year and a half as scientists and lay people alike have asked how long the infection-fighting proteins persist in the face of a formidable enemy—a pandemic virus that has been transmitted on every continent of the planet. Restoring a Sense of Belonging: The Unsung Importance of Casual Relationships for Older Adults https://khn.org/news/article/casual-relationships-vital-older-adults-sense-of-belonging-post-pandemic/ Kaiser Health News - Aging urn:uuid:66b43b8d-3504-514a-86ef-d9de71f65b52 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 09:00:00 +0000 Relationships with people you know only superficially can help develop a sense of belonging and provide motivation to engage in activities. Research has found that older adults who have a broad array of “weak” as well as “close” ties enjoy better physical and psychological well-being and live longer than people with less diverse social networks. <p>In May, Vincent Keenan traveled from Chicago to Charlottesville, Virginia, for a wedding — his first trip out of town since the start of the pandemic.</p> <p>&#8220;Hi there!&#8221; he called out to customers at a gas station where he&#8217;d stopped on his way to the airport. &#8220;How&#8217;s your day going?&#8221; he said he asked the Transportation Security Administration agent who checked his ID. &#8220;Isn&#8217;t this wonderful?&#8221; he exclaimed to guests at the wedding, most of whom were strangers.</p> <p>&#8220;I was striking up conversations with people I didn&#8217;t know everywhere I went,&#8221; said Keenan, 65, who retired in December as chief executive officer of the Illinois Academy of Family Physicians. &#8220;Even if they just grunted at me, it was a great day.&#8221;</p> <p>It wasn&#8217;t only close friends Keenan missed seeing during 15 months of staying home and trying to avoid covid-19. It was also dozens of casual acquaintances and people he ran into at social events, restaurants, church and other venues.</p> <p>These relationships with people we hardly know or know only superficially are called &#8220;weak ties&#8221; — a broad and amorphous group that can include anyone from your neighbors or your pharmacist to members of your book group or fellow volunteers at a school.</p> <p>Like Keenan, who admitted he&#8217;s an unabashed extrovert, many older adults are renewing these connections with pleasure after losing touch during the pandemic.</p> <p>Casual relationships have <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1756-2589.2009.00010.x">several benefits</a>, according to researchers who&#8217;ve studied them. These ties can cultivate a sense of belonging, provide bursts of positive energy, motivate us to engage in activities, and expose us to new information and opportunities — all without the emotional challenges that often attend close relationships with family and friends.</p> <p>Multiple studies have found that older adults with a broad array of &#8220;weak&#8221; as well as &#8220;close&#8221; ties enjoy better physical and psychological well-being and live longer than people with narrower, less diverse social networks. Also, older adults with broad, diverse social networks have more opportunities to develop new relationships when cherished friends or family members <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7424273/">move away or die</a>.</p> <p>&#8220;Feeling connected to other people, not just the people who are closest to you, turns out to be incredibly important,&#8221; said Gillian Sandstrom, a senior lecturer in the department of psychology at the University of Essex in England.</p> <p>Sandstrom&#8217;s research has found that people who <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1948550613502990">talk to more acquaintances</a> daily tend to be happier than people who have fewer of these interactions. Even talking to strangers makes people feel less lonely and more trusting, she has discovered.</p> <p>Claire Lomax, 76, of Oakland, California, who&#8217;s unmarried, has made a practice of chatting with strangers all her life. Among her greatest pleasures in recent years was volunteering at the Oakland Police Department, where she would ask patrol officers about their families or what was happening at the station.</p> <p>&#8220;I never wanted a man of my own, but I like to be around them,&#8221; she explained. &#8220;So, I got to have my guy buzz without any complications, and I felt recognized and appreciated,&#8221; Lomax told me. Since becoming fully vaccinated, she&#8217;s volunteering in person at the police stations again — a deep source of satisfaction.</p> <p>Even people who describe themselves as introverts enjoy the positivity that casual interactions can engender.</p> <p>&#8220;In fact, people are more likely to have purely positive experiences with weak ties&#8221; because emotional complications are absent, said Katherine Fiori, a prominent researcher and chair of the psychology department at Adelphi University in Garden City, New York.</p> <p>Lynn Eggers, 75, a retired psychologist in Minneapolis, loved going to coffee shops and the gym before covid hit. &#8220;In both places, you can be in a group and alone,&#8221; she told me. &#8220;You can choose to talk to someone or not. But you feel you&#8217;re part of the community.&#8221;</p> <p>At a light-rail station, Eggers would strike up conversations with strangers: two police officers who told her about growing up in Somalia, a working-class Texan whose daughter won a scholarship to Harvard, a young Vietnamese woman whose parents worried she was abandoning her culture.</p> <p>When Eggers stopped taking public transportation for fear of covid, she missed &#8220;getting these glimpses into other ways of seeing the world.&#8221; Instead, she started chatting with neighbors in daily walks around her neighborhood — another way to feel connected.</p> <p>Many people may have found that neighbors, mail carriers and delivery people became more important during the pandemic — simply because they were around when others were not, said Karen Fingerman, a professor of human ecology at the University of Texas-Austin. As pandemic restrictions lift, &#8220;the key is to get out in daily life again&#8221; and reengage with a variety of people and activities, she recommended.</p> <p>Helen Bartos, 69, a retired clinical psychologist, lives in a condominium community in Rochester, New York. &#8220;With covid, a whole group of us started getting together outside,&#8221; she told me. &#8220;We&#8217;d bring out chairs and drinks, wear masks, and sit around and talk. It was very bonding. All of these people are neighbors; now I would call some of them friends.&#8221;</p> <p>Ellie Mixter-Keller, 66, of Milwaukee, turned to social gatherings sponsored by the activity group Meetup six years ago after a divorce disrupted her life. &#8220;It was my salvation. It exposed me to a bunch of new people who I didn&#8217;t have to date or have to dinner,&#8221; she said. Now that she&#8217;s fully vaccinated, she&#8217;s busy almost every night of the week attending Meetup events and informal get-togethers arranged by people she&#8217;s met.</p> <p>In some cases, varying views of covid vaccines have made casual interactions more difficult. Patty Beemer, 61, of Hermosa Beach, California, used to go swing-dancing two or three times a week before the pandemic. &#8220;It&#8217;d be 20 seconds of chitchat and just dance&#8221; before all those events were canceled, she said.</p> <p>In the past several months, however, the swing-dance community in and around Los Angeles has split, with some events requiring proof of vaccination and others open to everyone.</p> <p>&#8220;Before, everyone danced with everyone, without really thinking about it. Now, I don&#8217;t know if it&#8217;s going to be like that. I&#8217;m not sure how much mixing is going to happen,&#8221; Beemer said. &#8220;And that sense of shared humanity, which is so meaningful to all of us, may be harder to find.&#8221;</p> <p><em>We&#8217;re eager to hear from readers about questions you&#8217;d like answered, problems you&#8217;ve been having with your care and advice you need in dealing with the health care system. Visit <a href="http://khn.org/columnists">khn.org/columnists</a> to submit your requests or tips.</em></p> <p><a href="https://khn.org/about-us">KHN</a> (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues. Together with Policy Analysis and Polling, KHN is one of the three major operating programs at <a href="https://www.kff.org/about-us/">KFF</a> (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed nonprofit organization providing information on health issues to the nation.</p><h3>USE OUR CONTENT</h3><p>This story can be republished for free (<a href="https://khn.org/news/article/casual-relationships-vital-older-adults-sense-of-belonging-post-pandemic/view/republish/">details</a>).</p> What Is A Breakthrough Infection? 6 Questions Answered About Catching COVID-19 After Vaccination https://www.medicaldaily.com/what-breakthrough-infection-6-questions-answered-about-catching-covid-19-after-460366?utm_source=Public&utm_medium=Feed&utm_campaign=Distribution Medical Daily urn:uuid:ce7cd619-7e9b-4ce5-d4d6-451d24d5c176 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 06:46:37 +0000 If you’ve been fully vaccinated against COVID-19, maybe you figured you no longer need to worry about contracting the coronavirus. But along with the rising number of new COVID-19 cases globally and growing concern about highly transmissible strains like the delta variant come reports of fully vaccinated people testing positive for COVID-19. COVID: The Beta Variant Is Surging In Mainland Europe – Should The UK Be Worried? https://www.medicaldaily.com/covid-beta-variant-surging-mainland-europe-should-uk-be-worried-460364?utm_source=Public&utm_medium=Feed&utm_campaign=Distribution Medical Daily urn:uuid:3af18c41-97d8-88b1-e913-281f66cd4b44 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 06:40:32 +0000 Most of the world, the UK included, is currently grappling with the delta variant of the coronavirus. But in parts of Europe there has also been a resurgence of an earlier variant of concern: beta (B1351). Choose Home Bill Looks to Make Home Health the Center of the Health Care World https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/choose-home-bill-looks-to-make-home-health-the-center-of-the-health-care-world/ Home Health Care News urn:uuid:263ceda9-e96d-3fe2-28d3-08abe5b4a2d1 Mon, 02 Aug 2021 00:18:20 +0000 <p>The Choose Home Care Act of 2021 was introduced in the U.S. Senate less than 72 hours ago, but it’s already creating major buzz in the senior care world. In a nutshell, Choose Home is bipartisan legislation that seeks to create an add-on payment for home health providers taking care of certain patients otherwise eligible [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/choose-home-bill-looks-to-make-home-health-the-center-of-the-health-care-world/">Choose Home Bill Looks to Make Home Health the Center of the Health Care World</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> <p>The Choose Home Care Act of 2021 was <a href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/07/snf-diversion-bill-choose-home-introduced-projected-to-save-up-to-247m-annually/">introduced in the U.S. Senate</a> less than 72 hours ago, but it’s already creating major buzz in the senior care world.</p> <p>In a nutshell, Choose Home is bipartisan legislation that seeks to create an add-on payment for home health providers taking care of certain patients otherwise eligible for nursing home-level care following a hospital stay.</p> <p>If enacted, the add-on payment would help in-home care providers offer things like meals, transportation and other services targeting activities of daily living (ADLs) and the social determinants of health.</p> <p>When positioned alongside hospital-at-home programs, community-based palliative care initiatives and similarly successful care delivery models, Choose Home has the ability to completely reshape the U.S. health care system for seniors, Bill Dombi, president of the National Association for Home Care &amp; Hospice (NAHC) told Home Health Care News.</p> <p>“The home health industry has long felt that care in the home should be the center of health care,” Dombi said. “And this is a step in that direction.”</p> <p>Not everyone is as bullish on the newly introduced legislation, however.</p> <p>The American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), a group that represents more than 14,000 nursing homes and other long-term care facilities, said it “adamantly” opposes Choose Home because it believes it would “supplant existing benefits.”</p> <p>“AHCA/NCAL strongly supports rational population health framework approaches to offer beneficiaries preferred care options,” the lobbying organization wrote. “We need proposals that add options for Medicare beneficiaries, not limit them.”</p> <p>So far, AHCA/NCAL is largely alone in its public criticism of Choose Home.</p> <p>In addition to NAHC, the bill’s supporters include the Partnership for Quality Home Healthcare, National Council on Aging, LeadingAge and AARP, the latter of which is entirely dedicated to “empowering Americans 50 and older to choose how they live as they age.”</p> <p>“The bill is about patients, not providers,” Dombi said. “What we&#8217;re asking people to do is to stand back and not listen to rhetoric from people who are concerned about their business. Instead, look at those voices that have come in on behalf of the beneficiary population. That should be the test that’s applied to evaluate this program.”</p> <p>Mechanically, Choose Home would give home health providers an add-on payment for home-based extended care services delivered on top of traditional home health services</p> <p>Medicare beneficiaries eligible for Choose Home could be able to receive a maximum of 360 hours of extended care services under the benefit. The add-on payment would be structured as a flat rate falling into one of four categories, depending on total number of hours.</p> <p>If Choose Home participants needed more than 360 hours of extended care services, they could supplement the benefit with family-caregiver support or services paid for by other means, Dombi explained.</p> <p>“There are people in nursing homes today who bring in supplemental services,” he said. “It&#8217;s not like they&#8217;re barred from having more. It&#8217;s just that the services under the benefit wouldn&#8217;t be any greater than the 360 [hours].”</p> <p>Based on its ability to mirror post-hospital skilled nursing facility (SNF) care in the home, Choose Home would generate as much as $247 million in annual savings to the Medicare system, according to health economics firm Dobson DaVanzo &amp; Associates.</p> <p>Those savings take into account new costs to the Medicare program for the add-on payments to home health providers, Dombi noted.</p> <p>“Dobson DaVanzo &amp; Associates considered the spend on the extended health care services when calculating those savings,” he said. “It wasn&#8217;t simply the reduction in skilled nursing facility [expenses]. It was a combination of a reduction in SNF spending and the increase in spending in the home setting.”</p> <p>Despite the positives highlighted in the analysis, some senior care experts have privately expressed concerns about Choose Home’s potential price tag to HHCN.</p> <p>One source, for example, predicted that many home health providers already taking care of patients outside of SNFs would try to also access the model’s add-on payments. Another speculated that home health providers would possibly over-deliver on hours of extender services to jump from a lower-paying category to a higher-paying one.</p> <p>It’s important to note that Choose Home would be for Medicare beneficiaries who come onto home health services following a hospital stay. That’s currently a minority of home health patients, as most are referred to agencies from the community.</p> <p>In 2019, 8.6% of fee-for-service (FFS) Medicare beneficiaries used home health services, according to the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC). In comparison, 4% of beneficiaries enrolled in FFS Medicare used SNF services.</p> <p>Aggregate FFS spending on post-acute care has remained stable since 2012, in part because of expanded enrollment in managed care under Medicare Advantage (MA).</p> <div class="wp-block-image"><figure class="aligncenter"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/61Nq153S0Bv715hmdolkXzcdDZspqSMciu42mk6-U1WmGUHsRWxRU4SjxGwWmQRIrAh2jBQ_Kjgw1QRsLZofHzvVRPy38xr4LHqJF0FAMKi2ef08UT6oj9IJYm4ZIuVqXyC9576H" alt="" /></figure></div> <p>The Medicare Trustees and the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) project that overall spending for Medicare between 2019 and 2029 will grow at an average annual rate of 6.8%. Medicare spending will reach $1 trillion in 2022 under both sets of projections.</p> <p>Most of that spending growth is due to America’s aging population, as the total number of people enrolled in the Medicare program is projected to increase from about 62 million in 2020 to about 78 million in 2030. That “silver tsunami” just makes Choose Home all the more important, Dombi said, noting that the legislation could create opportunities for SNF and home health operators alike.</p> <p>“[SNFs] have the option to do this themselves, too,” Dombi said. “They could become an integrated provider service, as many of today’s skilled nursing facilities already have home care arm. I think this is an opportunity they really should be looking at seriously.”</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/choose-home-bill-looks-to-make-home-health-the-center-of-the-health-care-world/">Choose Home Bill Looks to Make Home Health the Center of the Health Care World</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> ArchCare CEO: Operational Flexibility Key to PACE Model’s Long-Term Success https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/archcare-ceo-operational-flexibility-key-to-pace-models-long-term-success/ Home Health Care News urn:uuid:b731e28c-0ee4-96b8-3b01-501398d21d86 Sun, 01 Aug 2021 23:51:46 +0000 <p>There are plenty of Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) operators that embody the model’s success and recent momentum, but perhaps none greater than the New York-based ArchCare. With just under $1 billion in annual revenues, ArchCare is ​​part of the Archdiocese of New York’s large health care system. Its PACE operations began [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/archcare-ceo-operational-flexibility-key-to-pace-models-long-term-success/">ArchCare CEO: Operational Flexibility Key to PACE Model’s Long-Term Success</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> <p>There are plenty of Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) operators that embody the model’s success and recent momentum, but perhaps none greater than the New York-based ArchCare.</p> <p>With just under $1 billion in annual revenues, ArchCare is ​​part of the Archdiocese of New York’s large health care system. Its PACE operations began as a single site in Harlem in 2009, but have since expanded to multiple centers and seven overall locations in four counties.</p> <p>Today, ArchCare’s PACE segment cares for roughly 750 members, making it one of the bigger programs in the U.S. The health care organization also operates skilled nursing facilities, two hospitals, a home care agency and a number of ancillary programs, employing over 4,000 people in total.</p> <p>Since the public health emergency, the PACE model &#8212; and ArchCare &#8212; has been able to further prove its value by treating COVID-19 patients. In fact, the national PACE COVID-19 death rate was 3.8%, compared to 11.8% in nursing homes. </p> <p>“PACE was well-positioned to serve individuals during the pandemic because the model already had the structure in place to provide home-based care,” Scott LaRue, president and CEO of ArchCare, told Home Health Care News.</p> <p>Prior to the pandemic, ArchCare’s PACE enrollment was steadily growing, almost reaching 1,000 members. Once COVID-19 hit, ArchCare had to close its physical centers and shift more of its services into the home, using technology to fill any potential gaps.</p> <p>Several other PACE operators took that approach as well.</p> <p>“We put in place a telehealth platform that allowed us to interact with our members,” LaRue said. “As an example, the recreation staff could get 10 members together and play bingo [virtually], or use that same technology for one-on-one interactions with the different disciplines of the care planning team. It was a bit of a transition to a full home-based model, but PACE lent itself to be very successful.”</p> <p>Nationally, there are 140 PACE organizations operating 272 PACE centers in 30 states, serving over 56,000 participants, according to the National PACE Association.</p> <p>LaRue believes that this moment is an opportune time for PACE operators, as the COVID-19 emergency has played a major role in increasing the demand for care services delivered in the home setting. </p> <p>“They don&#8217;t want to go into institutions for a variety of reasons, and the pandemic helped people realize that you could provide high-quality, high-acuity care in a home-based environment,” he said. “I think the pandemic accelerated the transition, the consumer understanding and demand for home- and community-based services by at least 10 years.”</p> <p>PACE has been around for years, but it’s growth has been partly slowed because policymakers had often overlooked the model in the past, making it more difficult for operators to get started.</p> <p>“You hear policymakers and they’re like, ‘Jeez, I wish we had a program that could take care of the social determinants of health, provide the necessary clinical services, evaluate their home situation and coordinate all of that under one umbrella,’” LaRue said. “That’s what PACE does.” </p> <p>It’s often difficult for would-be operators to get started, as initial operating costs can be high when opening new brick-and-mortar facilities.</p> <p>Instead of building new centers from scratch, LaRue wants policymakers to give PACE programs more flexibility, especially in terms of forming partnerships across the continuum of care.</p> <p>“We&#8217;ve got to continue the effort to provide more flexibility to the rigidity of some of the PACE requirements,” he said,</p> <p>Sen. Bob Casey, a Democrat from Pennsylvania and chairman of the Senate Special Committee on Aging, introduced the “PACE Plus Act” <a href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/04/innovage-national-pace-association-applaud-pace-plus-act/">in April</a>. The aim of the legislation is to drive PACE growth by rolling out federal grants that would fund the creation of new programs and the expansion of existing ones.</p> <p>LaRue and ArchCare have been advocating on behalf of New York-specific PACE changes as well.</p> <p>“Here in New York, we&#8217;re trying to convince the Office of CMMI to allow us to offer a Medicare-only option for PACE,” he said. “Right now, PACE is for individuals who are either 100% Medicaid, or Medicaid and Medicare. What we want to be able to do is have people enroll and privately pay for the Medicaid portion of the PACE program, and to do that at a tiered level based on their needs.” </p> <p><em>Additional reporting by Robert Holly.</em></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/archcare-ceo-operational-flexibility-key-to-pace-models-long-term-success/">ArchCare CEO: Operational Flexibility Key to PACE Model’s Long-Term Success</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> Changemakers: Maureen Hewitt, President and CEO, InnovAge https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/changemakers-maureen-hewitt-ceo-innovage/ Home Health Care News urn:uuid:fe6f7faf-ddfc-23dd-7db2-d26406c8a700 Sun, 01 Aug 2021 17:32:00 +0000 <p>InnovAge (Nasdaq: INNV) is the largest provider of the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) model in the U.S., based on number of seniors served. And as more seniors desire to age in place, PACE has become a more popular option, too, with states looking to expand the program and federal lawmakers vying [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/changemakers-maureen-hewitt-ceo-innovage/">Changemakers: Maureen Hewitt, President and CEO, InnovAge</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> <p>InnovAge (Nasdaq: INNV) is the largest provider of the Program of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) model in the U.S., based on number of seniors served.</p> <p>And as more seniors desire to age in place, PACE has become a more popular option, too, with states looking to expand the program and federal lawmakers vying for its usage. </p> <p>Still, only 3% of PACE eligibles &#8212; typically seniors dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid &#8212; participate in the program. A former nonprofit turned for-profit, InnovAge’s goal is to not only expand the PACE market, but also to get more potential participants involved. </p> <p>With 18 PACE centers across five states and joint ventures with both a health system and senior living provider in California, InnovAge is hoping to capitalize off industry trends to become even more dominant in that market. </p> <p>In this Changemakers interview HHCN caught up with InnovAge’s president and CEO, Maureen Hewitt, to learn how the company plans to do that &#8212; and why that mission is so important. Highlights from the conversation are below, edited for length and clarity.</p> <h4 id="h-hhcn-you-ve-led-through-a-lot-of-change-at-innovage-what-are-some-of-the-changes-you-re-most-proud-of"><strong>HHCN: You&#8217;ve led through a lot of change at InnovAge. What are some of the changes you&#8217;re most proud of?</strong></h4> <p><strong>Hewitt:</strong> What I&#8217;m most proud of, first and foremost, is the team we’ve built at InnovAge.</p> <p>And I think it&#8217;s just been our commitment to expanding this wonderful program to more frail seniors. I&#8217;ve been really inspired by our staff &#8212; through COVID &#8212; just the way they&#8217;ve been so committed to ensuring that frail seniors have been supported during this time.</p> <p>I would also note just how important it&#8217;s been to really take care of each other during a pandemic, and our teams have done an excellent job of that. Our front-line staff, I can&#8217;t say enough about them. They have inspired me to just keep doing what we do and keep on with our mission of serving seniors.</p> <h4 id="h-the-pace-penetration-rate-is-still-not-great-there-s-a-lot-of-room-for-opportunity-and-growth-for-you-guys-how-has-it-changed-though-since-you-have-been-involved-what-was-it-like-10-years-ago"><strong>The PACE penetration rate is still not great. There&#8217;s a lot of room for opportunity and growth for you guys. How has it changed, though, since you have been involved? What was it like 10 years ago?</strong></h4> <p>PACE was really ahead of its time in many ways. I would compare it to the first electric car. It&#8217;s 100% globally capitated, at-risk, for only the frail nursing home population. </p> <p>And I think today, what we&#8217;re starting to see, is certainly not just the emphasis on making sure that all Americans get health care, but let&#8217;s get Americans into the right program. </p> <p>When you think about frail seniors, there’s just so much additional awareness that is so needed going forward. There are approximately 2.2 million PACE eligibles across the United States, but it&#8217;s continuing to grow. And I think we&#8217;ve been at the forefront of really pushing that awareness forward.</p> <h4 id="h-what-is-one-initiative-or-goal-that-you-tried-to-execute-but-failed-at-that-since-you-ve-been-in-your-role"><strong>What is one initiative or goal that you tried to execute, but failed at that since you&#8217;ve been in your role?</strong></h4> <p>I would refer back again to those 2.2 million PACE eligibles across the country that could have access to the program. I want to be able to expand more rapidly to meet this need in our country. </p> <p>But PACE is a complex program, and it&#8217;s highly regulated. And expansion takes a little bit of time. So, you know, I think over the past several years, we&#8217;ve refined our ability to build on that ability to be successful and to scale our operations. And we&#8217;re continuing to reach more seniors. But I just want to be able to do more, and I want to be able to continue to expand quicker as we look at enrollment into the PACE program.</p> <h4 id="h-it-seems-like-you-re-a-person-that-generally-runs-toward-change-as-opposed-to-away-from-it-do-you-think-that-as-an-organization-gives-you-an-advantage-over-your-industry-peers"><strong>It seems like you&#8217;re a person that generally runs toward change, as opposed to away from it. Do you think that, as an organization, gives you an advantage over your industry peers?</strong></h4> <p>I definitely embrace change. And I also believe that, whether it&#8217;s an individual or an organization, it&#8217;s important to change and to be able to transform when you have such a great product like a PACE program. </p> <p>And I think if you&#8217;re constantly trying to improve, to do better and be more consistent in your care delivery, you&#8217;re going to embrace change. I think we’ve demonstrated that. We converted our company from a nonprofit to a for profit. And recently, we took the company public. </p> <p>We also have plans to open up shop in Kentucky and launch two centers in Florida &#8212; one in Tampa and one in Orlando. We’re continuing to grow. It just requires a lot of strategic thinking and being thoughtful, embracing what we need to do in order to do the right thing for frail seniors.</p> <h4 id="h-what-has-going-public-enabled-you-to-do-as-an-organization"><strong>What has going public enabled you to do as an organization? </strong></h4> <p>We just became public, so I would say we’re at the start of our journey. And one thing about being part of the public landscape is that it allows us to create awareness around PACE. And I think now being part of the public, I&#8217;m seeing that there is an acknowledgement of just how important it is to have programs like this. It’s even more important during a pandemic.</p> <h4 id="h-if-you-could-change-one-thing-about-how-health-care-was-delivered-in-the-u-s-what-would-that-be"><strong>If you could change one thing about how health care was delivered in the U.S., what would that be?</strong></h4> <p>I think it’s really about identifying what the consumer wants and needs. What PACE does is bring together that interdisciplinary plan that is customized to the individual &#8212; that is key to serving people and doing it effectively and efficiently. </p> <p>If I were to snap my fingers, I would increase this visibility to PACE programs, not just with InnovAge, but nationally. </p> <h4 id="h-what-is-one-positive-lasting-change-that-you-think-covid-has-brought-on"><strong>What is one positive lasting change that you think COVID has brought on?</strong></h4> <p>I think what it&#8217;s done is totally reinforced the importance of human connection and spending quality time with people. I think everyone appreciates that. I think those of us that work in PACE, home care and other forms of long-term care, we recognize the social and health benefits of aging in place &#8212; letting seniors live their life, in their homes, in their communities, on their terms. </p> <h4 id="h-what-s-the-breakdown-of-how-much-you-want-to-gain-in-terms-of-market-share"><strong>What&#8217;s the breakdown of how much you want to gain in terms of market share? </strong></h4> <p>We think by fiscal year 2023, we&#8217;re going to have five new centers, and we&#8217;re going to be in more states. And it&#8217;s really been, just so you know, a passion and vision of ours as an organization to see this program scale. </p> <p>I think our scale is going to be significant. We are the largest of the PACE providers based on the number of patients served today. And you&#8217;re just going to continue to see us grow. </p> <p>Historically, it’s an approach of building de novos, organic growth, acquisitions and seeking potential joint venture partners. That’s worked very well for this organization. And we&#8217;re going to continue to do that.</p> <h4 id="h-what-is-the-biggest-barrier-to-growth-for-innovage"><strong>What is the biggest barrier to growth for InnovAge</strong></h4> <p>I think the biggest barrier to entry for PACE programs is the cash required to build a new center. It’s prohibitive to many of the nonprofit PACE providers, as it takes $10 million to 20 million to build each center.</p> <p>Centers need to be fully operational before we are allowed to enroll our first participant. Also, as a fully capitated program, PACE requires us to be fiscally sound and to ensure that we can meet our financial obligations. This requires that we be methodical in our growth strategy.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com/2021/08/changemakers-maureen-hewitt-ceo-innovage/">Changemakers: Maureen Hewitt, President and CEO, InnovAge</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://homehealthcarenews.com">Home Health Care News</a>.</p> Canada's Residential Schools Were a Horror https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/canadas-residential-schools-were-a-horror/ Scientific American - Health urn:uuid:11813f9d-4fc9-9505-f1a9-60e1583549b7 Sun, 01 Aug 2021 14:00:00 +0000 Founded to carry out the genocide of Indigenous people, they created conditions that killed thousands of children<br/> <br/> -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com<div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=WAFaEt6iOAw:LZsyTwilZPU:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=WAFaEt6iOAw:LZsyTwilZPU:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=WAFaEt6iOAw:LZsyTwilZPU:l6gmwiTKsz0"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=l6gmwiTKsz0" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=WAFaEt6iOAw:LZsyTwilZPU:gIN9vFwOqvQ"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?i=WAFaEt6iOAw:LZsyTwilZPU:gIN9vFwOqvQ" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=WAFaEt6iOAw:LZsyTwilZPU:QXVau8BzmBE"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=QXVau8BzmBE" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=WAFaEt6iOAw:LZsyTwilZPU:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=WAFaEt6iOAw:LZsyTwilZPU:ZC7T4KBF6Nw"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=ZC7T4KBF6Nw" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciam/health-and-medicine/~4/WAFaEt6iOAw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Breaking My Stress-Flare Cycle With Psoriasis https://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/psoriasis/features/psoriasis-stress-flare-cycle?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:228d55a7-e306-2547-8b9f-b66ae1eb307b Sun, 01 Aug 2021 12:54:28 +0000 Read about how these people manage their stress to help their psoriasis. <img src="https://www.webmd.com/" style="border:0;" alt="" /><p>Read about how these people manage their stress to help their psoriasis.</p> How a Remote Indigenous Community Fought the Pandemic https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-a-remote-indigenous-community-fought-the-pandemic/ Scientific American - 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The therapy also showed a benefit in overall survival. 'Greening' biomaterials and scaffolds used in regenerative medicine https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/07/210730165442.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:5dc9cfcf-b3ac-5857-7c12-013578b1972c Fri, 30 Jul 2021 20:54:42 +0000 In the biomaterials industry, electrospinning is a ubiquitous fabrication method used to produce nano- to microscale fibrous meshes that closely resemble native tissue architecture. Alas, the process has traditionally used solvents that not only are environmentally hazardous but also a significant barrier to industrial scale-up, clinical translation, and widespread use. But now, researchers report that they have developed a 'green electrospinning' process that addresses those challenges, from managing environmental risks of volatile solvent storage and disposal at large volumes to meeting health and safety standards during both fabrication and implementation. Early COVID-19 symptoms differ among age groups, research finds https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/07/210730165439.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:d00c99a2-f63c-335d-e198-a73dadfb3bde Fri, 30 Jul 2021 20:54:39 +0000 Symptoms for early COVID-19 infection differ among age groups and between men and women, new research has found. Study Finds COVID-19 May Lower Intelligence https://www.webmd.com/lung/news/20210730/study-finds-covid-19-may-lower-intelligence?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:3f7243d5-c4b1-89b4-efe3-443c1da4b044 Fri, 30 Jul 2021 20:25:35 +0000 Researchers said those who had been placed on a ventilator while ill showed the most substantial effects. On average, their score dropped 7 IQ points. <img src="https://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/blog_posts/pain-management/650x350_brain-fog.jpg" style="border:0;" alt="confused person illustration" /><p>Researchers said those who had been placed on a ventilator while ill showed the most substantial effects. On average, their score dropped 7 IQ points.</p> Biden Reverses Trump Policy Limiting U.S. Nursing Home Fines https://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/news/20210730/biden-reverses-trump-policy-limiting-us-nursing-home-fines?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:b5302fec-f77b-d8f6-eac7-aabe6159dfc6 Fri, 30 Jul 2021 19:10:52 +0000 The Biden administration has reversed a Trump policy that limited the size of fines that U.S. nursing homes could be slapped with for violating safety standards. <img src="https://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/blog_posts/webmd-doctors/1800x1200_man-talking-with-elderly-dad.jpg" style="border:0;" alt="Man talking with elderly dad" /><p>The Biden administration has reversed a Trump policy that limited the size of fines that U.S. nursing homes could be slapped with for violating safety standards.</p> Severe Opioid Overdoses Rose by Nearly a Third During Pandemic https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/news/20210730/severe-opioid-overdoses-rose-by-nearly-a-third-during-pandemic?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:9f5591a1-a011-27ac-b657-59b4522220b3 Fri, 30 Jul 2021 18:32:18 +0000 Opioid overdose-related visits to U.S. emergency departments rose by nearly one-third during the COVID-19 pandemic last year. <img src="https://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/features/visiting_the_er_for_chronic_pain_features/1800x1200_visiting_the_er_for_chronic_pain_features.jpg" style="border:0;" alt="emergency sign" /><p>Opioid overdose-related visits to U.S. emergency departments rose by nearly one-third during the COVID-19 pandemic last year.</p> What’s the Link Between Being LGBTQ+ and Mental Health? https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/features/lgbtq-mental-health?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:8d90ddce-3054-1fae-a002-14b446a20029 Fri, 30 Jul 2021 18:23:45 +0000 If you’re LGBTQ, there are issues that might affect your mental health and the care you receive for it. Here’s what to know. <img src="https://www.webmd.com/" style="border:0;" alt="" /><p>If you’re LGBTQ, there are issues that might affect your mental health and the care you receive for it. Here’s what to know.</p> Source of DNA mutations in melanoma https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/07/210730142042.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:8aa86d03-c271-0b7e-e11d-47c20850a032 Fri, 30 Jul 2021 18:20:42 +0000 The mutations that give rise to melanoma result from a chemical conversion in DNA fueled by sunlight -- not just a DNA copying error as previously believed, reports a new study. The findings upend long-held beliefs about the mechanisms underlying the disease, reinforce the importance of prevention efforts and offer a path forward for investigating the origins of other cancer types. Hydrogel Shows Promise for Safer Delivery of Cancer Drugs https://www.webmd.com/cancer/news/20210730/hydrogel-shows-promise-for-safer-delivery-of-cancer-drugs?src=RSS_PUBLIC WebMD Health Headlines urn:uuid:29d80fe3-ffb1-e62f-74a9-a9a3957eebde Fri, 30 Jul 2021 18:02:31 +0000 Imagine taking anti-cancer drugs, therapies, or procedures that don’t leave you with side effects like hair loss: This is the future that hydrogels promise. <img src="https://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/news/2021/07_2021/hydrogel/1800x1200_hydrogel.jpg" style="border:0;" alt="photo of hydrogel" /><p>Imagine taking anti-cancer drugs, therapies, or procedures that don’t leave you with side effects like hair loss: This is the future that hydrogels promise.</p> COVID, Quickly, Episode 12: Masking Up Again and Why People Refuse Shots https://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode/covid-quickly-episode-12-masking-up-again-and-why-people-refuse-shots/ Scientific American - Health urn:uuid:3d678c4b-6527-8ffe-8a1e-72a54c83133a Fri, 30 Jul 2021 17:00:00 +0000 Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series&nbsp;COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American&rsquo;s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the...<br/> <br/> -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com<div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=Jyx10yeCC4w:4dxFuClQTT0:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=Jyx10yeCC4w:4dxFuClQTT0:qj6IDK7rITs"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=qj6IDK7rITs" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=Jyx10yeCC4w:4dxFuClQTT0:l6gmwiTKsz0"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=l6gmwiTKsz0" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=Jyx10yeCC4w:4dxFuClQTT0:gIN9vFwOqvQ"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?i=Jyx10yeCC4w:4dxFuClQTT0:gIN9vFwOqvQ" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=Jyx10yeCC4w:4dxFuClQTT0:QXVau8BzmBE"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=QXVau8BzmBE" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=Jyx10yeCC4w:4dxFuClQTT0:I9og5sOYxJI"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=I9og5sOYxJI" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://rss.sciam.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?a=Jyx10yeCC4w:4dxFuClQTT0:ZC7T4KBF6Nw"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/sciam/health-and-medicine?d=ZC7T4KBF6Nw" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciam/health-and-medicine/~4/Jyx10yeCC4w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Crucial new molecular mechanisms and biomarkers in ovarian cancer https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/07/210730121427.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:67771725-2100-6978-2f8a-572904a12fc0 Fri, 30 Jul 2021 16:14:27 +0000 Medical researchers have discovered what appears to be an Achilles' heel in ovarian cancers, as well as new biomarkers that could point to which patients are the best candidates for possible new treatments. Scientists explore the latent regenerative potential of the inner ear https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/07/210730111751.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:d1639901-33e6-b5c9-1eda-e695224e10e1 Fri, 30 Jul 2021 15:17:51 +0000 Scientists have identified a natural barrier to the regeneration of the inner ear's sensory cells, which are lost in hearing and balance disorders. Overcoming this barrier may be a first step in returning inner ear cells to a newborn-like state that's primed for regeneration, as described in a new study. The study suggests new gene engineering approaches that could be used to channel some of the same regenerative capability present in embryonic inner ear cells. New research infuses equity principles into the algorithm development process https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/07/210730104308.htm Top Health News -- ScienceDaily urn:uuid:df2d249c-1b21-7db7-b15c-58b5d44de9b0 Fri, 30 Jul 2021 14:43:08 +0000 Researchers have found a new approach to incorporating the larger web of relevant data for predictive modeling for individual and community health outcomes.