microlearning http://feed.informer.com/digests/YSR1RQYXXH/feeder microlearning Respective post owners and feed distributors Thu, 02 Aug 2018 18:55:21 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ A Quality Improvement Project Using Microlearning to Increase Provider Adherence to Extragenital Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening Guidelines in Men Who Have Sex With Men. https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ccm&AN=156702305&site=ehost-live microlearning on 2018-08-02 03:03 PM urn:uuid:97f00cd3-b93f-f96c-2f2c-da8fb56646de Thu, 01 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 JANAC: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care; 09/01/2022<br/>The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend screening men who have sex with men who are living with HIV for sexually transmitted infections at appropriate extragenital contact sites for bacterial sexually transmitted infections. In an effort to increase provider adherence to CDC recommended guidelines at a Ryan White Clinic, microlearning educational sessions were used. A quality improvement project was designed to determine the rate of provider adherence to CDC guidelines pre/post microlearning sessions. Student t -test was used to compare the number of patients who received urine and extragenital screening to those who received urine-only screening, to before and after the microlearning sessions. The rate of extragenital screening significantly increased after the microlearning sessions (4/460 vs. 70/507, p <.0001). The rate of urine screening remained unchanged (p = 1). Although extragenital screening significantly increased, it remained low. A decision tree in the electronic medical record to prompt providers to screen was developed.<br/>(AN 156702305); ISSN: 10553290<br/>CINAHL Complete Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&CSC=Y&MODE=ovid&PAGE=fulltext&NEWS=n&D=emedx%2cemexb%2cempp&AUTOALERT=293676100%7c1 microapprentissage urn:uuid:7dc7e395-588e-52af-434d-97fbdafd4cd7 Thu, 19 May 2022 08:27:43 +0000 <div class="field" > <strong>Author Names:</strong> <span>Cevallos M.,Atkinson M.,Nguyen D.,Somaratna A.</span> </div> <div class="field" > <strong>Database Source:</strong> <span>Embase Daily Updates</span> </div> <div class="field" > <strong>Journal Title:</strong> <span>FASEB journal : official publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology</span> </div> <div class="field" > <strong>Article Title:</strong> <span><a href="http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;CSC=Y&amp;MODE=ovid&amp;PAGE=fulltext&amp;NEWS=n&amp;D=emedx%2cemexb%2cempp&amp;AUTOALERT=293676100%7c1">Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help</a></span> </div> <div class="field" > <strong>Year:</strong> <span>2022</span> </div> <div class="field" > <strong>Issue:</strong> <span>Supplement 1</span> </div> <div class="field" > <strong>Volume:</strong> <span>36</span> </div> <div class="field" > <strong>Abstract:</strong> <span>Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase. &lt;br/&gt;METHOD(S): One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey. &lt;br/&gt;RESULT(S): From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding &quot;NO used TC&quot; was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group &quot;YES used TC,&quot; 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9. &lt;br/&gt;CONCLUSION(S): The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded &quot;Content&quot; helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.&lt;br/&gt;Copyright &amp;#xa9; FASEB.</span> </div> Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220516201210&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:05411907-be57-5e01-8e1a-7f700695ac03 Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">METHODS: One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">RESULTS: From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding "NO used TC" was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group "YES used TC," 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220516201210&v=2.17.6">35555786</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841>10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841</a></p></div> Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517042942&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:519c9025-ce27-bb22-516a-e11ef99871f1 Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">METHODS: One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">RESULTS: From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding "NO used TC" was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group "YES used TC," 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517042942&v=2.17.6">35555786</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841>10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841</a></p></div> Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517123738&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:59fcf029-f422-118d-8190-e02111c3cfb6 Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">METHODS: One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">RESULTS: From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding "NO used TC" was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group "YES used TC," 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517123738&v=2.17.6">35555786</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841>10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841</a></p></div> Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517152036&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:670eeb29-fa79-4494-0d02-d34befb1b3f8 Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">METHODS: One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">RESULTS: From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding "NO used TC" was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group "YES used TC," 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517152036&v=2.17.6">35555786</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841>10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841</a></p></div> Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517200844&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:6bc93b7f-af06-26fb-7075-ff3d495ee974 Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">METHODS: One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">RESULTS: From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding "NO used TC" was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group "YES used TC," 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517200844&v=2.17.6">35555786</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841>10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841</a></p></div> Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518033128&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:4d60450f-7b46-9476-350c-1417716616a3 Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">METHODS: One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">RESULTS: From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding "NO used TC" was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group "YES used TC," 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518033128&v=2.17.6">35555786</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841>10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841</a></p></div> Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518092356&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:902d28b0-d179-0171-c26a-e7133497c3c4 Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">METHODS: One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">RESULTS: From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding "NO used TC" was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group "YES used TC," 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518092356&v=2.17.6">35555786</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841>10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841</a></p></div> Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518185859&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:3f0cbb20-d3f3-0d25-e052-bed68ebe13d5 Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">METHODS: One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">RESULTS: From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding "NO used TC" was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group "YES used TC," 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518185859&v=2.17.6">35555786</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841>10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841</a></p></div> Missing Anatomy Background: Microlearning Can Help https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518202217&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:2fa1e80b-8b66-435b-e55a-34e568b4a60c Fri, 13 May 2022 00:00:00 +0000 CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">FASEB J. 2022 May;36 Suppl 1. doi: 10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Medical schools are evolving, and admission criteria are changing. The Anatomy and Physiology course, the classic BIO 201, and BIO 202 are no longer a complete requirement in the application. It is common to find two groups of students: one with and one without anatomy background in the first year. The MS1 class from 2021 who had exposure to the previous anatomy courses accounted for only 50% of students (Intro. to Anatomy-18%, A&amp;P-15%, Neuroanatomy-9%, Gross anatomy-8%). The microlearning method is a learning technique that uses small and specific information quickly, usually not over 10 minutes. It can use material such as videos, flashcards, or training quizzes, and it can be used on any screen device. The microlearning activity was designed and evaluated to identify satisfaction in MS1 students and the advantages and disadvantages of this learning technique. The final goal will be to assess outcomes in a second phase.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">METHODS: One hundred MS1 students were invited to explore the microlearning method using Talent Cards (TC) as a learning platform. The topics selected were basic concepts in anatomy and were divided into four modules: anatomic position, planes, directions, and movements. After the course, voluntary students answered a survey.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">RESULTS: From 100 MS1 students, 35 students answered the survey. Nineteen students did not use the app. Based on the TC login data, 21 students used the app; only 16 of the students using the app answered the survey. The main reason for the group responding "NO used TC" was lack of interest (82%), followed by basic information (they already know that information), frequent app technical malfunctions, and lack of interactivity (71%, 52%, 59%, respectively). However, when asked if they would be interested in future use, 62% answered maybe and 25% yes. From the group "YES used TC," 68% responded that the app helps achieve goals. However, from the 16 students who used the app, 73% responded that the content helps achieve goals. Exploring the downsides in the app was technical malfunctions (glitching, login, lagging), limitations in material, limitation of in-app features, not being aesthetically pleasing, and an unfriendly user interface. On the other hand, the content downside was a lack of alignment with quiz questions and poor anatomy photo quality. However, the interest in using it again was that 44% answered yes and 56% maybe. The average uses per module per student was 2.27 (range varied from 1 to 5 times). The overall experience of using TC as a platform for microlearning was 6.1/10 on average, ranging between 2 to 9.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">CONCLUSION: The microlearning method is a workable technique that has a good effect on healthcare students in multiple aspects such as studying, memorizing, and performing procedures (De Gagne, 2019). In our experience, the overall satisfaction was 6.1/10. We identified many technical issues which affected the performance of the technique. We believe that this technique can help students without previous anatomy background; 73% of students responded "Content" helped achieve goals. The next step will identify a better platform and measure outcomes between groups. REF: De Gagne JC, Park HK, Hall K, Woodward A, Yamane S, Kim SS. Microlearning in Health Professions Education: Scoping Review. JMIR Med Educ. 2019;5(2):e13997. Published 2019 Jul 23. doi:10.2196/13997.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35555786/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518202217&v=2.17.6">35555786</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841>10.1096/fasebj.2022.36.S1.L7841</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220516201210&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:d8c7df1e-e262-5a45-0be9-30bfaab88fe4 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220516201210&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517042942&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:faa1e6c1-ea1b-81f7-e7ea-c124183d46c5 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517042942&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517123738&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:86d82a66-670e-0a54-09b2-552db10b06f2 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517123738&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517152036&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:d5f087b9-1c30-99af-2935-65e24cc4b4a7 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517152036&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517200844&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:4cacf332-f681-e429-6888-29dcbd21f899 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517200844&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518033128&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:ae25aa88-f077-6804-9bf4-81e07ed8b0cb Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518033128&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518092356&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:fe536f1a-5763-80b0-4c0d-18c0a663773d Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518092356&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518185859&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:ccfd3d40-a74a-8879-9329-5857918e8456 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518185859&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518202217&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:0679309f-23ff-a744-1be7-cbe1ff363ce6 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518202217&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220519020624&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:26d3077c-8ad9-7891-33b6-27ac0107f81a Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220519020624&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220519051304&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:468d0c56-979c-11bc-1b63-1a70916aa231 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220519051304&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220519112956&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:996271eb-b32f-5cfc-cf42-a50fd555f92b Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220519112956&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220519174248&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:1d3e5ce1-43de-0768-c223-bea1caec26e4 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220519174248&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220519213902&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:c0ccf371-038e-c992-4c11-c532e70fbc57 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220519213902&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220519224739&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:1644972e-c0a7-740d-16b2-9a4ecbb890d3 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220519224739&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220520011836&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:9fd88d87-09b1-6562-ee87-3d7d1b1b9bd0 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220520011836&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220520035422&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:43a6bc51-e03f-360e-1f49-db57598e525e Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220520035422&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220520051345&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:712f9cd4-c9aa-7cb0-3245-2c225e717685 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220520051345&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220520145236&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:51bf10a2-3713-7fa9-c17f-10a81d97c2a2 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220520145236&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220520203214&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:2f4066f6-baed-4f36-3405-7e5e00ea9463 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220520203214&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220521025746&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:ff8c39bf-3e3f-f1c6-d8f9-838aff417bcc Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220521025746&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220521055938&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:ab0b4bea-7fa8-ed2a-d15e-478c12e488c7 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220521055938&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220521074736&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:0a9bb355-a7e1-10fb-e2d9-93ce74b354e8 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220521074736&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220521175940&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:2aa04c25-4263-d44b-646b-5dbc89a9d5aa Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220521175940&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220522081501&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:72e9e637-f7ac-1716-fccc-55293c76d641 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220522081501&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220522154520&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:9bdf00cf-bbb7-d112-fbfa-ca9107c54ff2 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220522154520&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220522215255&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:2ea7769a-ef99-3038-d2e6-d74489b88f6b Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220522215255&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Reimagining Faculty Development Deployment: A Multipronged, Pragmatic Approach to Improve Engagement https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220523095306&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:7466b40b-8a75-3b28-0262-e2b313e3e0f0 Wed, 20 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge. <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Acad Med. 2022 Apr 26. doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">PROBLEM: Faculty at academic health centers have many competing demands on their time, leading to high work stress, burnout, and limited capacity to meaningfully improve their teaching, evaluation, feedback, and other education-related skills. Faculty development provides a useful mechanism to assist faculty in enhancing their knowledge and skills in these areas, but engaging faculty can be a challenge.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">APPROACH: To promote engagement, the authors developed a multipronged, pragmatic approach to faculty development. They created: (1) brief videos leveraging micro-learning strategies; (2) prepackaged workshops for use during existing faculty meetings; (3) a newsletter to raise awareness of faculty development opportunities; (4) a searchable, web-based catalog to facilitate rapid retrieval of faculty development content, and (5) an academy to acknowledge engagement of individual faculty members, provide certificates, and promote a culture that prioritizes our education mission.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">OUTCOMES: Since they launched the new approach in 2017, they have developed 41 microlearning videos, 15 prepackaged workshops, and 24 issues of the newsletter. Between January 2017 and May 2021, the videos generated more than 150,055 views; the workshops were downloaded 2,850 times; and the issues of the newsletter, emailed bimonthly to 3,500 members of the faculty, had an open rate that increased from 30% in 2017 to 70% in 2021. The Academy of Educational Excellence, which was launched in 2018, grew to more than 490 members. Preliminary feedback suggests faculty and education leaders are highly satisfied with the faculty development resources and approaches to engagement.</p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">NEXT STEPS: Next steps include obtaining more user satisfaction data and evaluating whether education-related knowledge and skills have improved among faculty participants.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35442909/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220523095306&v=2.17.6">35442909</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688>10.1097/ACM.0000000000004688</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220516201210&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:424a4df0-6ca1-ba4c-8b10-8e7dd7ddde1e Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220516201210&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517042942&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:251c49de-3bf6-8ca6-acde-917f26670b4f Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517042942&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517123738&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:6e137bcc-0cfd-74e4-9342-1ef3fb67549f Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517123738&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517152036&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:22aa526c-b5eb-6e30-1a66-2f0e0c78c509 Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517152036&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220517200844&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:29bb24e5-be10-118f-e7ba-c7e449d3f863 Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220517200844&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518033128&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:95486ef1-efa2-8bc1-6324-9c684b488d44 Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518033128&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518092356&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:faf40cd8-c29b-4231-cc03-bc3d9a869c8e Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518092356&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518185859&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:4b5d9811-74b7-d551-f938-d7187320f12e Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518185859&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220518202217&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:053e053b-7d39-04bd-2948-75202d2e7572 Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220518202217&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220519020624&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:2aec2a4c-df30-4611-d241-71f25660b745 Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220519020624&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div> Perspective on pros and cons of microlearning in health education https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=None&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&fc=None&ff=20220519051304&v=2.17.6 pubmed: microlearning[tiab] urn:uuid:1020f64e-8e29-95a6-ee4d-968300f33194 Wed, 13 Apr 2022 00:00:00 +0000 Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily... <div><p style="color: #4aa564;">Essays Biochem. 2022 Apr 29;66(1):39-44. doi: 10.1042/EBC20210047.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" xmlns:p1="http://pubmed.gov/pub-one">Recently, digital technology and digital materials have started to be widely used in education from primary school to college worldwide. Microlearning is one of the innovative teaching techniques that use digital technologies. In this review, benefits and disadvantages of microlearning is discussed. Many studies show that microlearning facilitated learning by dividing into smaller pieces encourages students to study. A wide range of activities might be used in this technique and it can be easily integrated into daily routine, it allows on-demand learning for the students. On the other hand, the success of microlearning techniques is closely related to the personal characteristics of learners, teachers' prone to use digital technology and the external factors such as access to learning materials. Its effectiveness on behavior and outcome which were defined in the third and fourth levels of Kirkpatrick's learning model is still obscure. In the light of the literature, it should be decided which microlearning method will be used for which educational subjects.</p><p style="color: lightgray">PMID:<a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35415758/?utm_source=Firefox&utm_medium=rss&utm_content=1XcaM1603TGiHzx0MCdD7K0qKwcRm7neewrrh81xzGbNsEe1pa&ff=20220519051304&v=2.17.6">35415758</a> | DOI:<a href=https://doi.org/10.1042/EBC20210047>10.1042/EBC20210047</a></p></div>