News for T2 http://feed.informer.com/digests/YS0HLHWLGY/feeder News for T2 Respective post owners and feed distributors Sat, 23 Sep 2017 20:06:40 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ Leaving India and working in tech in the US changed me. I feel too foreign here and too foreign there. https://www.businessinsider.com/moved-to-us-from-india-big-tech-changed-me-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:e7eb22d8-f982-6ca6-edd0-72b60db3c840 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 11:37:30 +0000 Uday Padyana moved to the US in his 20s. Living in the US has changed him and he's experienced culture shock when visiting home. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/6699502349138fa6f6e38770?format=jpeg" height="1000" width="2000" charset="" alt="Uday Padyana"/><figcaption><p class="copyright">Courtesy of Uday Padyana, mikroman6/Getty, Petar Chernaev/Getty, Tyler Le/BI</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Uday Padyana moved from India to the US in his 20s, landing a few tech jobs in Silicon Valley.&nbsp;</li><li>Despite better growth opportunities in India, Uday prefers the work culture in the US.</li><li>He&#39;s faced challenges like maintaining relationships back home and feeling like a foreigner in the US.&nbsp;</li></ul><p><em>This as-told-to essay is based on a conversation with Uday Padyana, a mid-30s manager at a Big Tech company in Silicon Valley. The following has been edited for length and clarity.</em></p><p>When I first arrived in <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/reasons-i-left-silicon-valley-california-after-two-years-2023-12">Silicon Valley</a> in 2013 after relocating from India in my 20s, I wanted to move back.</p><p>My parents and grandmother thought it was just homesickness, but I&#39;d previously lived and worked outside of my hometown, so knew that this wasn&#39;t that feeling. It was because I knew that working in Big Tech in Silicon Valley would change me into a different person and I&#39;d never move back.</p><p>It&#39;s been 11 years since then, and I think I&#39;ve gotten happier with my life here now that I&#39;ve worked at a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/landing-job-career-big-tech-interview-amazon-meta-google-apple-2024-5">few different jobs in Big Tech</a>. But I&#39;ve also missed out on so many things back home &mdash; my family, friends, social circle, and sense of belonging.</p><h2 id="c75e447d-f472-426f-b4b8-19ef15acd002" data-toc-id="c75e447d-f472-426f-b4b8-19ef15acd002">Working in the US suits me more, although I&#39;d have more opportunities in India</h2><p>I&#39;ve interned and worked at a few other tech companies in the Valley, including <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/early-paypal-employee-sold-stock-too-soon-millionaire-2021-6">PayPal</a>, and I&#39;m currently at a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/quit-big-tech-dream-job-pay-perks-not-worth-it-2024-5">Big Tech company</a>. Prior to my current role, I also worked in Atlanta at a midsize tech firm, and outside the industry for over four years as a data analyst in Washington, DC.</p><p>There are <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/millennial-working-in-bengaluru-the-silicon-valley-of-india-2023-7">more opportunities</a> in India. The <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/heres-why-investors-say-india-tech-startup-ecosystem-booms-2022-12">tech industry&#39;s growth rate</a> has been phenomenal there, especially for the top companies. If I worked the same job for the same company in India, my salary would probably be about 60% of what I make here, yet I&#39;d probably be able to save almost twice the amount I save here.</p><p>That&#39;s because the cost of living and taxes in Silicon Valley are higher than those in India. There&#39;s no public transportation here, so people either have to have a car or pay for Uber, which is expensive compared to India. High-quality organic food and eating out here is also more expensive, and hiring cleaning services is cheaper in India. I also have higher expenses here because of my annual trips back to see family in India.</p><p>But despite this, working in the US suits me better than working in India because of my individualistic mindset. There&#39;s a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/middle-managers-great-flattening-organization-meta-tech-layoffs-firing-2023-3">flatter hierarchy</a> in general, and I respond well to environments with accountability, ownership, and independence.</p><p>I also like that there&#39;s more scope to explore restaurants with cuisines from across the world, meet people from different countries, and have access to <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/sf-hot-spots-where-founders-vc-tech-workers-hang-out-2024-7">top networking places</a>, conferences, and classes here in the US.</p><h2 id="dfe1658c-5024-4333-9878-9867140a9360" data-toc-id="dfe1658c-5024-4333-9878-9867140a9360">I had reverse culture shock when I first went home</h2><p>The first time I went back to India after three years of living in the US, I had a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/reverse-culture-shock-moving-back-to-america-asia-singapore-2023-12">hard time adjusting</a>. It was <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/india-delhi-heat-wave-record-water-crisis-2024-5">too hot for me</a> and everything felt smaller, including my own room, where I&#39;d lived for years. I was more sensitive to noise; it&#39;s quieter in the US, while India is bustling with sounds all the time, so I couldn&#39;t sleep. The air quality was also worse.</p><p>Since I was upset, I threw tantrums like a teenager. By the end of the trip, though, I realized I was at fault since I was expecting people to change their ways and norms for me when I was only visiting for a few weeks.</p><p>I decided to travel once a year to India, a promise I&#39;ve been able to keep for the most part.</p><p>Despite these regular visits, I realize I&#39;ve changed. I expect more silence and personal space. The <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/india-heatwaves-could-soon-not-be-survivable-humans-world-bank-2022-12">summers have gotten even hotter</a> in India, and I&#39;ve become accustomed to air conditioning and higher-quality wifi since we have them everywhere in the US. I&#39;ve also forgotten some customs and have done them incorrectly.</p><p>Because of my newly acquired mannerisms, preferences, habits, and life choices, it&#39;s easy for my old social circle to see me as &#34;the guy who&#39;s living abroad.&#34; If I say a word in an American way out of habit, sometimes they think that I&#39;m doing it deliberately to show off. Or if I say something authoritatively, it&#39;s assumed that I got that confidence from living in the US, not because that was always my personality.</p><p>I also see that I might come across as snobbish now, so I have to consciously think through how I&#39;m coming across before I say something. Some people back home think very competitively &mdash; they&#39;ve hinted that they think I&#39;m just plain lucky, and if they had the opportunity, they&#39;d do it too and much better.</p><h2 id="72978b4b-ce83-4e5e-a4d6-9a4c6e3aeb5e" data-toc-id="72978b4b-ce83-4e5e-a4d6-9a4c6e3aeb5e">I missed out on relationships</h2><p>My definitions of comfort, friendship, and relationships have also changed.</p><p>Texts on WhatsApp and calls back home aren&#39;t as effective as <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-deal-with-homesickness-loneliness-living-abroad-2023-11">being in person with family and friends</a>. WhatsApp calls can work for short chats but aren&#39;t as good for emotional conversations. It&#39;s difficult to assess their emotional and physical states, and there&#39;s also a higher risk of arguments due to misunderstandings.</p><p>Sometimes, friends or family don&#39;t share things with me because they think certain things would be better to be said in person. I also don&#39;t share as much about my life with them as I would&#39;ve naturally if I were around. I&#39;ve missed many occasions where people meet and reconnect &mdash; family members&#39; and friends&#39; weddings, childbirths, and other important events of their lives.</p><p>I also didn&#39;t evolve alongside my friends in India. I haven&#39;t followed their timelines and feel less peer pressure. Differences in mindsets between my old friends and I have crept up over time, from food and content preferences to outlook on life.</p><p>I feel like I could&#39;ve grown faster both materially and spiritually in the US because of the opportunities I had here, and that may not necessarily be at the same pace as the people I grew up with.</p><h2 id="8b127f72-db4a-46f9-a249-de4026d82a01" data-toc-id="8b127f72-db4a-46f9-a249-de4026d82a01">I wonder what my life would&#39;ve been like if I stayed in India</h2><p>I&#39;m generally happy with my job and my experience working in Big Tech here.</p><p>While I have no regrets about my choice to move to the US for a tech job, part of me wonders what my life would be like now had I stayed back in India. Maybe I would&#39;ve gone after dreams I aspired to as a teenager, like becoming an <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/quit-tech-job-launch-startup-now-make-400000-2024-4">entrepreneur in tech</a> or entertainment.</p><p>But perhaps this is a bit of wishful thinking. As a colleague here put it, &#34;Who knows, maybe you&#39;d have just been a failure there &mdash; so many try and fail and only a few succeed.&#34; I don&#39;t have any way of knowing what could&#39;ve been.</p><p>Living somewhere new changes you internally and makes you a different person. I feel too foreign here and too foreign there. Even if I had all the resources to go back to India, it&#39;d be different &mdash; I&#39;ve grown apart from who I was. And as much as I really like the US, I&#39;m not from here. I don&#39;t have the same upbringing as many people here, so there are subtle differences in the jokes, music, pop culture references, and even habits.</p><p>One thing I&#39;d like to do is to actualize all of my gifts and feel fully utilized, whether from a creative standpoint or a tech and business standpoint. I feel I haven&#39;t done that much and mostly have been flailing to make ends meet and get myself into a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/investing/financial-plan">&#34;safer&#34; situation</a> by having a job, insurance, and savings.</p><p>But with the recession, there&#39;s nothing safe, and I see that I could&#39;ve just taken risks in the first place &mdash; on my startup idea, trying to break into the movie industry, or even taking a break to write a novel I&#39;ve wanted to write &mdash; and I can do so even now.</p><p>When I first moved to the US, I explored different frameworks for long-term thinking, such as <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/what-you-can-learn-from-jeff-bezos-leadership-style">Jeff Bezos&#39;s</a> famous approach of <a target="_blank" href="https://www.goodreads.com/quotes/896830-i-wanted-to-project-myself-forward-to-age-80-and">looking at your life from the point of view of yourself at 80</a>. I hope I can make more conscious future choices to reach an outcome that I can be happy about when I&#39;m in my 40s, 50s, or 90s.</p><p><em>If you moved countries for a job and would like to share your story, email Jane Zhang at </em><a target="_blank" href="mailto:janezhang@businessinsider.com"><em>janezhang@businessinsider.com</em></a><em>.</em></p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/moved-to-us-from-india-big-tech-changed-me-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Some Biden allies are publicly upset and furious after he was pushed out of the race https://www.businessinsider.com/some-biden-allies-publicly-upset-furious-he-was-forced-out-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:f4731c46-5180-005b-3113-ea478ccebfb7 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 11:30:07 +0000 Not all Democrats are rallying around a message of unity after Joe Biden dropped out of the 2024 race. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669e4264fb2b6bedb0591ce1?format=jpeg" height="454" width="760" charset="" alt="Biden"/><figcaption>Joe Biden steps off of Air Force One in his last public appearance before announcing he was withdrawing his 2024 candidacy.<p class="copyright">KENT NISHIMURA via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Some of Joe Biden&#39;s allies aren&#39;t pleased he quit the race.&nbsp;</li><li>They are speaking up even as much of the party rallies around Kamala Harris.</li><li>Critics have accused Democratic elites of ousting Biden.&nbsp;</li></ul><p>When President Joe Biden announced Sunday that he was dropping out of the 2024 election, most top Democrats projected unity.</p><p>But some longtime allies of the president weren&#39;t on script, sounding angry and betrayed.</p><p>Some went so far as to accuse the party&#39;s donors and most powerful members of forcing Biden out.</p><p>These figures &#34;pushed out the only candidate who has ever beaten Trump,&#34; <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/RonaldKlain/status/1815089200133259680">wrote Ron Klain</a>, Biden&#39;s former chief of staff, disparaging what he saw as &#34;political fantasy games.&#34;</p><p>Although his message went on to promote Vice President Kamala Harris, the note of hurt was unmistakable.</p><p>Klain, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.moreradio.online/news/sky-news/betrayed-isolated-and-angry-inside-bidens-historic-decision/">according to NBC News</a>, was among those the Biden confidants urging him not to quit over the weekend.</p><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.nytimes.com/2024/07/21/us/politics/biden-withdrawal-timeline.html">According to The New York Times</a>, those urging Biden to stay on insisted there was still a path to victory despite alarming polling data in the wake of Biden&#39;s confused performance in the latest debate against Donald Trump.</p><p>Democratic Sen. Chris Coons of Delaware, co-chair of Biden&#39;s campaign openly wept as he discussed Biden&#39;s decision to withdraw.</p><p>&#34;This was a very difficult decision. And one that I think reflects the very best of who Joe Biden is,&#34; <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.thedailybeast.com/bidens-friend-sen-chris-coons-weeps-on-air-over-prez-quitting">he told CBS News on Sunday.</a></p><p>Jasmine Crockett, a Democratic Rep. from Texas, said the Democratic Party was responsible for the crisis, which saw it without a formal nominee only months before the presidential election.</p><p>Biden himself and other top Democrats Harris to take on Trump, and she <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/kamala-harris-nominee-democrats-endorse-republicans-attack-ads-2024-7">seems to have few viable rivals for her party&#39;s nomination</a>.</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669e36872d66759f66fccfdd?format=jpeg" height="683" width="1024" charset="" alt="Rep. Jasmine Crockett"/><figcaption>Rep. Jasmine Crockett, a staunch ally of Joe Biden who criticised those who had urged the president to withdraw form the 2024 race.<p class="copyright">Samuel Corum via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p>&#34;I hope the geniuses that pushed the most consequential President of our lifetime out have a plan,&#34; <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/JasmineForUS/status/1815085938822775144">said Crockett on X.</a></p><p>&#34;Joe wasn&#39;t the problem… dems were,&#34; she continued.</p><p>Crockett also supported Harris to be the new nominee, saying she would refuse to campaign if anybody else was chosen.</p><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.axios.com/2024/07/22/2024-presidential-election-biden-drops-out-trump-shooting-harris">Axios reported, citing unnamed sources</a>, that Biden himself felt isolated, frustrated, and betrayed as he reached the decision to withdraw.</p><p>&#34;It was fury for a while. Then he surrendered to reality. He&#39;s a professional,&#34; an unnamed friend of the president told the outlet.</p><p>Biden said for weeks that he wouldn&#39;t quit, but relented on Sunday, saying it was &#34;in the best interest of my party and the country&#34;</p><p>Those who media reports name as having urged him to quit or reconsider included former President <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/analysis-bidens-authority-is-draining-away-in-real-time-2024-7">Barack Obama, former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer</a>.</p><p>Even before Biden announced he was quitting the race Sunday, allies were criticizing what they characterized as a campaign by party elites to oust him.</p><p>One critic, speaking on condition of anonymity, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/joe-biden/biden-left-feeling-angry-betrayed-top-democratic-leaders-wavering-camp-rcna162635">told NBC News</a> that it may have been a double blow for Biden.</p><p>To that source, recent events felt like a rerun of 2015, when Biden was persuaded not to run in the 2016 election and Hillary Clinton secured the nomination.</p><p>Clinton crashed to a shock defeat by Trump.</p><p>Biden defeated him in 2020, and the Democrats outperformed expectations in the 2022 midterms.</p><p>&#34;Can we all just remember for a minute that these same people who are trying to push Joe Biden out are the same people who literally gave us all Donald Trump,&#34; a source close to Biden <a target="_blank" href="https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/joe-biden/biden-left-feeling-angry-betrayed-top-democratic-leaders-wavering-camp-rcna162635">told</a> NBC News.</p><p>&#34;In 2015, [Barack] Obama, [Nancy] Pelosi, [Chuck] Schumer pushed Biden aside in favor of Hillary [Clinton]; they were wrong then, and they are wrong now.&#34;</p><p>The decision throws the party into turmoil just months before the presidential election.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/some-biden-allies-publicly-upset-furious-he-was-forced-out-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Meet Kamala Harris, America's vice president, who was endorsed by Joe Biden after he dropped his reelection bid https://www.businessinsider.com/inside-life-and-career-of-kamala-harris-bidens-vp-pick-2020-8 Clusterstock urn:uuid:9b120ac6-b492-a231-decc-cdcfe5cbec08 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 11:24:23 +0000 After dropping out of the 2024 race, Joe Biden endorsed his vice president, Kamala Harris, as the Democratic nominee. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/5f3303873f7370771235b6b5?format=jpeg" height="2302" width="3069" charset="" alt="Kamala Harris Joe Biden"/><figcaption>After dropping out of the 2024 race, President Joe Biden endorsed his vice president, Kamala Harris, as the 2024 Democratic nominee.<p class="copyright">Scott Olson/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"> <li>After dropping out of the 2024 race, Joe Biden endorsed Kamala Harris as the Democratic nominee.</li> <li>Harris made history as the first vice president who is a woman, Black, or of Indian descent<strong data-stringify-type="bold">.&nbsp;</strong></li> <li>She previously served as a US senator and attorney general of California.</li> </ul><p>Joe Biden chose <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/democrats-endorsing-kamala-harris-to-replace-joe-biden-2024-7">Kamala Harris</a> as his running mate in 2020. Now, she could replace him on the ticket in 2024.</p><p>After <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-presidential-race-2024-7">dropping out of the presidential race</a>, <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-endorses-kamala-harris-after-dropping-out-2024-7">Biden endorsed Harris</a> as the 2024 Democratic nominee, saying in a statement that choosing her to be vice president was &#34;the best decision I&#39;ve made.&#34;</p><p>Here&#39;s a look at the history and career of America&#39;s groundbreaking vice president.</p><div id="slideshow"><div class="slide">Kamala Harris was born in 1964 in Oakland, California. She has one younger sister, Maya.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/5f32ffe3aee6a83f125ae01d?format=jpeg" height="1323" width="1764" charset="" alt="Kamala Harris"/><figcaption>Kamala Harris.<p class="copyright">Cliff Hawkins/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p>Harris&#39; mother, Shyamala Gopalan Harris, immigrated to the US from India, while her father, Donald Harris, immigrated to the US from Jamaica. They met as graduate students at UC Berkeley and divorced when Harris was young.</p><p>Kevin Sullivan wrote for <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/i-am-who-i-am-kamala-harris-daughter-of-indian-and-jamaican-immigrants-defines-herself-simply-as-american/2019/02/02/0b278536-24b7-11e9-ad53-824486280311_story.html">The Washington Post</a> that Harris visited India on vacations and that her mother cooked her and her sister Maya Indian food at home.</p><p>Harris spent a good portion of her childhood in Berkeley, where she attended Thousand Oaks Elementary School, <a href="https://www.berkeleyside.org/2019/01/24/did-kamala-harris-berkeley-childhood-shape-the-presidential-hopeful">Berkeleyside</a> reported. Both parents brought Harris to civil-rights protests in Berkeley as a young child. Her family lived in Montreal for a few years before returning to the US.</p></div><div class="slide">As a young child, Harris took a bus that transported her to a different neighborhood as part of desegregation efforts.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/5f3300964dca684b9c4a0bc5?format=jpeg" height="2247" width="2996" charset="" alt="Bussing berkeley"/><figcaption>A busing program in Berkeley.<p class="copyright">AP Photo/RWK</p></figcaption></figure><p>The goal of busing &mdash; transporting students to schools in different neighborhoods &mdash; was desegregation.</p><p>One of the most memorable moments of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary came during a debate when Harris, addressing Biden, said: &#34;There was a little girl in California who was part of the second class to integrate her public schools, and she was bused to school every day, and that little girl was me,&#34; before criticizing <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/newly-uncovered-letters-show-biden-opposed-school-busing-in-1970s-2019-6">Biden&#39;s opposition to federally mandated busing</a> in the 1970s.</p><p>Biden responded: &#34;I did not oppose busing in America. What I opposed is busing ordered by the Department of Education. That&#39;s what I opposed.&#34;&nbsp;</p><p>Nellie Bowles reported for <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/30/us/politics/kamala-harris-berkeley-busing.html">The New York Times</a> that Harris took a bus to a predominantly white neighborhood to attend Thousand Oaks Elementary School starting in 1970 when busing was still in its early years.</p></div><div class="slide">Harris attended Howard University and the University of California&#39;s Hastings College of Law.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669d597efb2b6bedb058ff73?format=jpeg" height="682" width="910" charset="" alt="Kamala Harris spoke at Howard University in 2017."/><figcaption>Kamala Harris spoke at Howard University&#39;s commencement in 2017.<p class="copyright">Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p><a href="https://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-kamala-harris-howard-university-20190319-story.html">The Los Angeles Times</a> reported that Harris&#39; political identity began to take shape at Howard, a historically Black university.&nbsp;</p><p>Harris was a member of the Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority at Howard. She told <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2019/09/16/kamala-harris-grew-up-mostly-white-world-then-she-went-black-university-black-city/?arc404=true" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Washington Post</a> that she &#34;became an adult&#34; as a student there.</p><p>Harris gave the commencement address at Howard in 2017.</p><p>When she became Biden&#39;s running mate in 2020, Wayne A. I. Frederick, the president of Howard, released a <a href="https://thedig.howard.edu/all-stories/howard-university-statement-senator-kamala-harris">statement</a> calling Biden&#39;s choice &#34;a milestone opportunity for our democracy to acknowledge the leadership Black women have always exhibited, but has too often been ignored.&#34;</p></div><div class="slide">Harris worked at the Alameda County District Attorney&#39;s Office in Oakland for eight years, until 1998.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669d5baf2d66759f66fcb7a3?format=jpeg" height="684" width="912" charset="" alt="Kamala Harris in 2006."/><figcaption>Kamala Harris in 2006.<p class="copyright">Christina Koci Hernandez/San Francisco Chronicle by Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p>The <a href="https://www.latimes.com/politics/la-na-pol-kamala-harris-san-francisco-20190121-story.html">Los Angeles Times</a>&#39; Michael Finnegan reported that she prosecuted murder, rape, assault, and drug cases in her first job after law school, as a deputy district attorney for Alameda County in Oakland.</p><p>At about the same time, Harris was dating Willie Brown, then the California State Assembly speaker and the future mayor of San Francisco, the <a href="https://www.sfchronicle.com/politics/article/Sure-I-dated-Kamala-Harris-So-what-13562972.php">San Francisco Chronicle</a> reported. The couple ended their relationship before Brown became mayor.</p><p>Brown wrote in the San Francisco Examiner that Harris should decline Biden&#39;s offers to join his ticket, saying that the vice presidency often ends up being a &#34;dead end,&#34; <a href="https://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/511277-willie-brown-kamala-harris-should-politely-decline-any-offer-to-be-bidens">The Hill</a> reported.</p></div><div class="slide">Harris served as district attorney of San Francisco from 2004 to 2010.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/5f3301953ad8614c810f8684?format=jpeg" height="1500" width="2000" charset="" alt="Kamala Harris district attorney"/><figcaption>Kamala Harris in San Francisco.<p class="copyright">D. Ross Cameron/MediaNews Group/The Mercury News via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p>Harris was the first woman to serve as the district attorney of San Francisco and the first Black woman and the first Indian American woman to hold that role, according to the <a href="https://oag.ca.gov/history/32harris">California Department of Justice</a>.</p><p>In 2003, while running for the office, she said she would oppose the death penalty.</p><p>She stuck to the campaign promise four months later, when police officer Isaac Espinoza was fatally shot by a gang member. Other prominent California Democrats including Dianne Feinstein and Barbara Boxer criticized the decision, which Harris defended in an op-ed&nbsp;in the <a href="https://www.sfchronicle.com/opinion/openforum/article/Justice-for-Officer-Espinoza-peace-for-the-city-2789147.php">San Francisco Chronicle</a>.</p><p>Meagan Flynn reported for <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2019/08/01/you-owe-them-an-apology-gabbards-attack-highlights-harriss-complex-death-penalty-record/">The Washington Post</a>, however, that the death penalty was a &#34;complex&#34; part of Harris&#39; legal career.</p><p>During her time as district attorney, she instituted &#34;<a href="https://bja.ojp.gov/sites/g/files/xyckuh186/files/Publications/BackonTrackFS.pdf">Back on Track</a>,&#34; a reentry program &#34;aimed at reducing recidivism among low-level drug-trafficking defendants.&#34;</p><p>The program, meant to last 12 to 18 months, set goals defined by a personal-responsibility program tailored to each person.</p><p>The program measured parenting, educational, and professional achievements and required several hundred hours of achievement. To graduate from the program, the participants were required to have secured employment, enrolled in school, and met their personalized requirements from the program.</p></div><div class="slide">In 2011, Harris became the attorney general of California.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/5f3302adf34d05606a6284a5?format=jpeg" height="1837" width="2449" charset="" alt="Kamala Harris"/><figcaption>Harris at a memorial service for the San Jose police officer Michael Johnson.<p class="copyright">Gary Reyes/MediaNews Group/The Mercury News via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p>Harris served as the attorney general of California for six years. During that time, she litigated against mortgage companies, for-profit colleges, and human trafficking, securing major settlements for the state.</p><p><a href="https://twitter.com/mviser/status/1293295507838840833">The Washington Post</a>&#39;s Matt Viser reported that President Donald Trump and Ivanka Trump donated to two of Harris&#39; bids for attorney general.</p><p>In her first year as attorney general, Harris supported a law signed by Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger that fined parents of &#34;chronically truant&#34; children several thousand dollars for missing more than 10% of school without a valid excuse. The penalty also included jail time.</p><p>At the time, Julianne Hing wrote for <a href="https://twitter.com/mviser/status/1293295507838840833">Color Lines</a> that it was &#34;likely to disproportionately affect communities of color.&#34; Harris apologized for supporting the law on a 2019 episode of &#34;<a href="https://x.com/PodSaveAmerica/status/1118544653920288769">Pod Save America</a>.&#34;</p><p>In 2018, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/05/17/opinion/sunday/kevin-cooper-california-death-row.html">The New York Times</a> columnist Nicholas Kristof called Harris a &#34;flawed political leader&#34; while discussing the case of Kevin Cooper, a death row inmate convicted of murder.</p><p>Kristof named Harris and then-Gov. Jerry Brown as lawmakers who didn&#39;t allow &#34;newly available DNA testing,&#34; and said new DNA evidence might vindicate Cooper.</p><p>That same year, Harris said California should allow DNA testing for Cooper&#39;s case, <a href="https://www.cbsnews.com/news/sen-kamala-harris-calif-should-test-dna-of-inmate-kevin-cooper-condemned-amid-controversy/">CBS News </a>reported. In 2023, DNA evidence confirmed Cooper&#39;s guilt, the <a href="https://sbcountyda.org/2023/01/30/dna-evidence-confirms-mass-murderer-kevin-coopers-guilt-again/">San Bernardino County District Attorney&#39;s Office</a> said in a statement.</p><p>In the past, civil-rights groups criticized Harris&#39; responses to instances of police shootings, saying she needed to be stricter on excessive force by police officers, the <a href="https://www.latimes.com/local/politics/la-me-pol-ca-harris-police-shootings-20160118-story.html">Los Angeles Times</a> reported.&nbsp;</p></div><div class="slide">In 2017, Harris became the second Black woman and first American of South Asian ancestry to be elected to the US Senate.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/5f3302db191824691e7c7c4f?format=jpeg" height="1355" width="1807" charset="" alt="Kamala Harris"/><figcaption>Kamala Harris at a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing.<p class="copyright">AP Photo/Alex Brandon</p></figcaption></figure><p>Harris served on multiple Senate committees &mdash; the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, the Select Committee on Intelligence, the Committee on the Judiciary, and the Committee on the Budget.</p><p>She often won praise for her prosecutorial lines of questioning during congressional hearings.</p><p><a href="https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/10/sen-harris-puts-zuckerberg-between-a-rock-and-a-hard-place-for-not-disclosing-data-misuse/">TechCrunch</a> described Harris as putting <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/mark-zuckerberg-facebook-cambridge-analytica-unanswered-questions-congressional-testimony-2018-4">Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg</a> &#34;between a rock and a hard place&#34; in an April 2018 congressional hearing on data-mining misuse.</p><p>In May 2019, her fiery line of questioning during a congressional hearing on the Robert Mueller report made several headlines &mdash; specifically her tough treatment of <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/william-barr-kamala-harris-questions-trump-2019-5">Attorney General William Barr</a>.</p><p>California Gov. Gavin Newsom appointed Alex Padilla to replace Harris&#39; Senate seat when she was elected vice president.</p></div><div class="slide">Harris launched a bid for the Democratic nomination for president in 2019, but dropped out in December.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/5f1eecba3ad8610904417553?format=jpeg" height="2000" width="2667" charset="" alt="Kamala Harris"/><figcaption>Kamala Harris launched her 2020 presidential campaign in Oakland.<p class="copyright">REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage</p></figcaption></figure><p>During her run, participants in a Business Insider poll said they viewed Harris as one of the most<a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/who-is-kamala-harris-bio-age-family-key-positions-2019-3"> progressive candidates</a> in a crowded field of Democrats.</p><p>Business Insider&#39;s Eliza Relman previously wrote that her platform expressed support for universal paid leave, better wages for teachers, and a public option for healthcare.</p></div><div class="slide">Harris married Doug Emhoff, an entertainment lawyer, in 2014.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/5f330261f0f41947280c2a0e?format=jpeg" height="1654" width="2205" charset="" alt="Kamala Harris Douglas Emhoff"/><figcaption>Doug Emhoff and Kamala Harris.<p class="copyright">Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic</p></figcaption></figure><p>Emhoff is an outspoken supporter of his wife&#39;s political career.</p><p>Emhoff was a partner at DLA Piper until he left to <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/doug-emhoff-second-gentleman-job-kamala-harris-2021-1">support Harris as vice president</a> and fulfill his duties as <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/jill-biden-first-lady-doug-emhoff-second-gentleman-gender-norms-2020-11">second gentleman</a>.</p><p>According to his company profile, which is no longer online, he represented individuals as well as corporations in complex business, real estate, and intellectual-property litigation.&nbsp;</p><p>The couple <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/kamala-harris-doug-emhoff-relationship-timeline-2020-10">met on a blind date</a>&nbsp;set up by a mutual friend. Harris is a stepparent to Emhoff&#39;s two children from a previous marriage.</p><p>In an op-ed article for <a href="https://www.elle.com/culture/career-politics/a27422434/kamala-harris-stepmom-mothers-day/">Elle</a>, Harris described her stepchildren as &#34;brilliant, talented, funny kids who have grown to be remarkable adults.&#34;</p></div><div class="slide">In 2020, Harris made history as America&#39;s first vice president who is a woman, Black, or of Indian descent.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669d656dfb2b6bedb059081b?format=jpeg" height="3044" width="4059" charset="" alt="kamala harris inauguration"/><figcaption>Vice President Kamala Harris was sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.<p class="copyright">Saul Loeb/Pool Photo via AP</p></figcaption></figure><p>On Inauguration Day in 2021, Harris was sworn in on two Bibles. One of them belonged to <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/kamala-harris-swearing-in-thurgood-marshall-bible-2021-1">Thurgood Marshall</a>, the first Black Supreme Court justice.</p><p>The other belonged to Regina Nelson, a close family friend.</p></div><div class="slide">After dropping out of the 2024 presidential race, Biden endorsed Harris as the Democratic nominee.<figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669d663080d4d5da13d5b141?format=jpeg" height="853" width="1138" charset="" alt="President Joe Biden (left) and Vice President Kamala Harris (right)."/><figcaption>President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris.<p class="copyright">Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p>&#34;My very first decision as the party nominee in 2020 was to pick Kamala Harris as my Vice President. And it&#39;s been the best decision I&#39;ve made,&#34; <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-endorses-kamala-harris-after-dropping-out-2024-7">Biden wrote on X</a>.</p><p>He added: &#34;Today I want to offer my full support and endorsement for Kamala to be the nominee of our party this year. Democrats &mdash; it&#39;s time to come together and beat Trump. Let&#39;s do this.&#34;</p><p>In a <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/kamala-harris-wants-to-unite-democratic-party-defeat-trump-biden-2024-7">statement posted to X</a>, Harris said that she was &#34;honored to have the president&#39;s endorsement&#34; and declared her intention &#34;to earn and win this nomination.&#34;</p><p>&#34;I will do everything in my power to unite the Democratic Party &mdash; and unite our nation &mdash; to defeat Donald Trump and his extreme <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/project-2025-heritage-foundation-donald-trump-elected-2024-7">Project 2025</a> agenda,&#34; she wrote.</p><p>It is still unclear if Harris will officially <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-what-happens-next-2024-7">replace Biden as the Democratic nominee</a>, though many in the party have already come out in support of her candidacy.</p><p>Delegates will select a nominee at the Democratic National Convention, which begins on August 19.</p></div></div><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/inside-life-and-career-of-kamala-harris-bidens-vp-pick-2020-8">Business Insider</a></div> The US Olympic committee is suing Logan Paul and KSI's drink brand Prime for using Olympic branding without permission https://www.businessinsider.com/prime-logan-paul-ksi-us-olympic-paralympic-committee-lawsuit-branding-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:249ac399-7512-f54b-ffe3-ade6ada3aef5 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 11:10:22 +0000 Logan Paul and KSI's drinks brand unlawfully used terms like&nbsp;"Team USA" and&nbsp;"going for gold," the USOPC said. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669e2e1ffb2b6bedb05918c3?format=jpeg" height="776" width="1024" charset="" alt="Logan Paul and KSI pose courtside during break in play between the Toronto Raptors and the Philadelphia 76ers in their basketball game at the Scotiabank Arena on October 28, 2023"/><figcaption>The US Olympic and Paralympic Committee has sued Prime for using its trademarks without permission.<p class="copyright">Mark Blinch/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>The US Olympic and Paralympic Committee has sued Prime for using its trademarks without permission.</li><li>Logan Paul and KSI&#39;s drinks brand unlawfully used terms like&nbsp;&#34;Team USA,&#34; the USOPC said.</li><li>Coca-Cola already had exclusive use of Olympic trademarks for beverages in the US, the lawsuit says.</li></ul><p>The US Olympic and Paralympics Committee is suing Prime, the drinks brand of YouTubers Logan Paul and KSI, accusing the company of using its trademarks without permission.</p><p>On the packaging of a drink featuring basketball player Kevin Durant, a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://olympics.com/en/athletes/kevin-durant">three-times</a> Olympic gold medallist, Prime unlawfully used Olympic trademarks, the USOPC said in a lawsuit filed in Colorado on Friday. </p><p>It also used the trademarks in social-media posts promoting the drink, the USOPC said.</p><p>The trademarked phrases included &#34;Olympic,&#34; &#34;Olympian,&#34; &#34;Team USA,&#34; and &#34;going for gold.&#34;</p><p>The USOPC has the rights to a range of <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.usopc.org/commercial-and-brand-usage-guidelines">Olympic terminology and imagery</a> within the US. It &#34;relies significantly&#34; on licensing its trademarks to fund the US Olympic Team, the lawsuit says.</p><p>This includes an agreement with Coca-Cola that grants the company exclusive use of Olympic trademarks, including the &#34;Olympic&#34; and &#34;Team USA,&#34; for beverages in the US, the lawsuit says.</p><p>&#34;Much of the value of the sponsorship agreement is derived from its exclusivity,&#34; the USOPC wrote in the lawsuit. &#34;The exclusivity of this agreement … is threatened when individuals and organizations use USOPC trademarks without authorization.&#34;</p><p>The lawsuit included screenshots showing examples of these phrases being used in Prime&#39;s Instagram and LinkedIn posts. At the time of writing, Business Insider could not find the posts in question on Prime&#39;s social media channels.</p><p>Seemingly the only reference to Durant on Prime&#39;s social media channels was a 17-second video clip posted on July 11 featuring him alongside Paul and streamer iShowSpeed, who is a Prime ambassador.</p><div id="1721644081134" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="custom" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="insider-raw-embed" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-media-max-width="560"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">New PRIME chain for <a href="https://twitter.com/KDTrey5?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@KDTrey5</a> Meta is still betting that Threads can beat Elon Musk's X &mdash; but Zuckerberg faces an uphill battle https://www.businessinsider.com/threads-meta-betting-defeat-x-twitter-elon-musk-mark-zuckerberg-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:ebf3d1ea-8c0a-1d3c-bcdf-7e91746f9239 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 10:41:08 +0000 Meta launched its Twitter-killer, Threads, a year ago, but overtaking X and escaping Instagram's shadow is proving to be tricky. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/650030e4112d1600192d7322?format=jpeg" height="1667" width="2500" charset="" alt="Threads"/><figcaption>Threads was launched a year ago.<p class="copyright">Onur Dogman/SOPA/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Meta&#39;s Threads just celebrated its first anniversary.</li><li>The social platform broke records when it first launched &mdash; and it&#39;s still growing.</li><li>The platform still has a long way to go if it wants to become the world&#39;s digital &#34;town square.&#34;</li></ul><p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/mark-zuckerberg">Mark Zuckerberg&#39;s</a> Twitter killer, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/threads-app">Threads</a>, celebrated its first birthday earlier this month.</p><p>The platform became the world&#39;s fastest-growing app shortly after it launched, hitting 100 million users in just five days.</p><p>A year on, Threads is still growing, albeit not as quickly. <a target="_blank" href="https://www.threads.net/@zuck/post/C89oeSORn81?xmt=AQGzya_Cp1pvllguZMsj41Ilk3MnGyQyS_Ayh75eaeRQxw">Zuckerberg said</a> last week that the X rival now has more than 175 million monthly active users.</p><p>Threads owes much of its early success to its close links with Instagram.</p><p>Users were able to sign up with their Instagram login, making it easy to create an account and find contacts. It also launched when some were seeking an alternative to Twitter following Elon Musk&#39;s takeover.</p><p>In contrast, X&#39;s growth is stalling. The platform said its number of global daily active users increased by 1.6% to 251 million in the second quarter of this year, the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.ft.com/content/1829abb6-d8d0-4d67-9b1b-628f583b3291?shareType=nongift">Financial Times reported.</a></p><p>That represents a 1.6% year-over-year increase and contrasts with the double-digit growth the platform generally posted before Musk bought it.</p><p>In a recent interview with <a target="_blank" href="https://www.platformer.news/threads-175-million-users-adam-mosseri-interview/">Platformer,</a> Threads and Instagram boss Adam Mosseri said the aim was still to overtake X. However, Threads was focusing on differentiating itself from X in a bid to win more users.</p><p>&#34;Another key focus is how do we double down on one of our differentiators, which is just to be a less angry space,&#34; Mosseri told the outlet, adding that undertaking some &#34;basic content moderation&#34; had helped.</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/668d3d19268f62ba18a857c6?format=jpeg" height="2466" width="3288" charset="" alt="Adam Mosseri at F8"/><figcaption>Meta&#39;s Adam Mosseri.<p class="copyright">Justin Sullivan/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p>Zuckerberg originally promoted Threads as a &#34;friendlier&#34; alternative to X. But a year on, it does not yet appear to have become a genuine threat to Musk&#39;s platform.</p><p>News events and chatter around them, such as <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-what-happens-next-2024-7">Joe Biden&#39;s exit from the US presidential race</a>, still centers on X. The president released his statement via his social media accounts, including Threads, but X still saw most of the action.</p><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/JoeBiden/status/1815080881981190320">Biden&#39;s letter</a> has been viewed 339 million times on X and racked up 940,000 likes. On Threads, the same statement received just 10,000 likes.</p><p>Many news outlets also cited X as the source of the news &mdash; much to the pleasure of Musk and CEO <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/elonmusk/status/1815101282367009275">Linda Yaccarino.</a></p><div id="1721643203193" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">White House aides learned Biden was dropping out by reading CD and Savings Rates Today: Secure Top Rates https://www.businessinsider.com/cd-rates-savings-rates-today-monday-22-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:4f6e2c0e-41d9-6d52-1feb-a8d0091e1ebf Mon, 22 Jul 2024 10:24:02 +0000 If you're considering opening a savings account or CD today and want a competitive rate, Business Insider did the research to help you find the best rate across popular savings accounts and CD terms. <p class="financial-disclaimer">The offers and details on this page may have updated or changed since the time of publication. See our article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/cd-rates-savings-rates-today-monday-22-2024-7" target="_blank">Business Insider</a> for current information.</p><p class="headline-regular financial-disclaimer">Affiliate links for the products on this page are from partners that compensate us and terms apply to offers listed (see our <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/our-partners" class="not-content-link" target="_blank">advertiser disclosure with our list of partners</a> for more details). However, our opinions are our own. See <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/personal-finance-editorial-standards#rating-banking-product" class="not-content-link" target="_blank">how we rate banking products</a> to write unbiased product reviews.</p><p>Banks are fighting for customer dollars right now, and people with cash to spare are well-positioned to benefit from a high rate environment. With rates rapidly changing, how can you feel confident that you&#39;re getting the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-high-yield-savings-accounts-rates-right-now">best savings account</a> or <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/who-has-the-best-cd-rates-right-now">best CD</a>?</p><p>We monitor rates from banks and credit unions daily to help you feel confident before you open a new account. Experts don&#39;t expect <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/will-cd-rates-go-up-in-2024">CD rates to go up in 2024</a>, so now could be a great time to lock in a rate if you&#39;re ready. Here are the top rates for popular savings accounts and CDs on Monday, July 22.</p><h2 style="text-align: left;"><strong>Featured Nationally Available Savings Rates</strong></h2><table style="border-collapse: collapse; width: 100%; height: 245px;" border="1"><tbody><tr style="height: 22px;"><td style="width: 42.493%; height: 22px;">Account Name</td><td style="width: 32.507%; height: 22px;">APY (Annual Percentage Yield) Accurate as of 7/22/2024</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 22px;">Minimum Account Opening Balance</td></tr><tr style="height: 47px;"><td style="width: 42.493%; height: 47px;">Western Alliance Bank High-Yield Savings Premier</td><td style="width: 32.507%; height: 47px;">5.31%</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 47px;">$500</td></tr><tr style="height: 22px;"><td style="width: 42.493%; height: 22px;">BrioDirect High-Yield Savings Account</td><td style="width: 32.507%; height: 22px;">5.30%</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 22px;">$5,000</td></tr><tr style="height: 22px;"><td style="width: 42.493%; height: 22px;">NexBank High Yield Savings Account</td><td style="width: 32.507%; height: 22px;">5.26%</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 22px;">$1</td></tr><tr style="height: 43px;"><td style="width: 42.493%; height: 43px;">Ponce Bank Money Market Deposit Account</td><td style="width: 32.507%; height: 43px;">5.26%</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 43px;">$1</td></tr><tr style="height: 67px;"><td style="width: 42.493%; height: 67px;">LendingClub High-Yield Savings Account</td><td style="width: 32.507%; height: 67px;">5.00%</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 67px;">$100</td></tr></tbody></table><h2 style="text-align: left;"><strong>Featured Nationally Available CD Rates</strong></h2><table style="border-collapse: collapse; width: 98.0892%; height: 425px;" border="1"><tbody><tr style="height: 22px;"><td style="width: 50%; height: 22px;">Account Name</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 22px;">APY (Annual Percentage Yield) Accurate as of 7/22/2024</td><td class="headline-regular headline-bold" style="width: 24.9639%; height: 22px;">Minimum Account Opening Balance</td></tr><tr style="height: 45px;"><td style="width: 50%; height: 45px;">Barclays 1 Year Online CD</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 45px;">5.00%</td><td style="width: 24.9639%; height: 45px;">$0</td></tr><tr style="height: 67px;"><td style="width: 50%; height: 67px;"><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/raisin-review">Ponce Bank 3 Month CD, powered by Raisin</a></td><td style="width: 25%; height: 67px;">5.25%</td><td style="width: 24.9639%; height: 67px;">$1</td></tr><tr style="height: 22px;"><td style="width: 50%; height: 22px;">Barclays 6 Month Online CD</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 22px;">4.85%</td><td style="width: 24.9639%; height: 22px;">$0</td></tr><tr style="height: 45px;"><td style="width: 50%; height: 45px;">SkyOne Federal Credit Union 1 Year No Penalty CD</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 45px;">4.75%</td><td style="width: 24.9639%; height: 45px;">$1</td></tr><tr style="height: 22px;"><td style="width: 50%; height: 22px;"><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/discover-bank-review">Discover 18 Month CD</a></td><td style="width: 25%; height: 22px;">4.40%</td><td style="width: 24.9639%; height: 22px;">$2,500</td></tr><tr style="height: 45px;"><td style="width: 50%; height: 45px;"><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/bread-savings-bank-review">Bread Savings 2 Year High-Yield CD</a></td><td style="width: 25%; height: 45px;">4.60%</td><td style="width: 24.9639%; height: 45px;">$1,500</td></tr><tr style="height: 45px;"><td style="width: 50%; height: 45px;">Quontic 5 Year CD</td><td style="width: 25%; height: 45px;">4.30%</td><td style="width: 24.9639%; height: 45px;">$500</td></tr></tbody></table><h2 data-toc-label="Leading Checking Account Bonus">Savings Account Bonus</h2><p><strong><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/alliant-credit-union-review">Alliant High-Rate Savings Account</a></strong></p><p>Earn a $100 bonus when you deposit at least $100 a month for 12 consecutive months and have a balance of $1,200 or more at the end of the 12-calendar-month period (offer expires December 31, 2024).</p><p class="headline-regular"><em>See more <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-savings-account-bonuses">savings account bonuses <strong>»</strong></a></em></p><h2 data-toc-label="Leading Checking &amp; Savings Combo Account Bonus">Leading Checking &amp; Savings Combo Account Bonus</h2><p><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/sofi-checking-savings-review">SoFi Checking and Savings</a></p><p>Earn up to $300 with qualifying direct deposit for eligible customers (offer expires 12/31/24, terms apply). Earn up to 4.60% APY on savings balances (including Vaults) with direct deposit.</p><p><em>See more <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-bank-account-bonuses">bank account bonuses <strong>»</strong></a></em></p><h2>About High-Yield Accounts</h2><p>High-yield savings accounts aren&#39;t the only accounts paying favorable rates right now. You&#39;ll typically see the highest rates at online or lower-profile institutions rather than national brands with a significant brick-and-mortar presence. This is normal; online banks have lower overhead costs and are willing to pay high rates to attract new customers.</p><h3>High-Yield Savings Accounts</h3><p>The best high-yield savings accounts provide the security of a savings account with the added bonus of a high APY. Savings accounts are held at a bank or credit union &mdash; not invested through a brokerage account &mdash; and are best for saving cash in pursuit of shorter-term goals, like a vacation or big purchase.&nbsp;</p><h3>High-Yield Checking Accounts</h3><p>The best high-yield checking accounts tend to pay slightly lower rates than high-yield savings, but even they are strong in today&#39;s rate environment. A checking account is like a hub for your money: If your paycheck is direct deposited, it&#39;s typically to a checking account. If you transfer money to pay a bill, you typically do it from a checking account. Checking accounts are used for everyday spending and usually come with checks and/or debit cards to make that easy.</p><h3>Money Market Accounts</h3><p>The <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-money-market-accounts">best money market accounts</a> could be considered a middle ground between checking and savings: They are used for saving money but typically provide easy access to your account through checks or a debit card. They usually offer a tiered interest rate depending on your balance.</p><h3>Cash Management Accounts</h3><p>A <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/what-is-a-cash-management-account">cash management account</a> is also like a savings/checking hybrid. You&#39;ll generally see them offered by online banks, and, unlike a checking account, they usually offer unlimited transfers. A savings account often limits the number of monthly transfers, while a checking account doesn&#39;t. Cash management accounts typically come with a debit card for easy access, but you may have to pay a fee if you want to deposit cash.</p><h3>Certificates of Deposit</h3><p>The best CD rates may outpace any of the other accounts we&#39;ve described above. That&#39;s because a certificate of deposit requires you to &#34;lock in&#34; your money for a predetermined amount of time ranging from three months to five years. To retrieve it before then, you&#39;ll pay a penalty (unless you opt for one of the <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-no-penalty-cds">best no-penalty CDs</a>). The longer you&#39;ll let the bank hold your money, the higher rate you&#39;ll get. CD rates aren&#39;t variable; the rate you get upon depositing your money is the rate you&#39;ll get for the length of your term.</p><h2>About CD Terms</h2><p>Locking your money into an account in exchange for a higher interest rate can be a big decision. Here&#39;s what you need to know about common CD terms.</p><h3>No-Penalty CDs</h3><p>Most CDs charge you a fee if you need to withdraw money from your account before the term ends. But with a no-penalty CD, you won&#39;t have to pay an early withdrawal penalty. The best no-penalty CDs will offer rates slightly higher than the best high-yield savings accounts, and can offer a substantially improved interest rate over traditional brick-and-mortar savings accounts.</p><h3>6-Month CDs</h3><p>The <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-6-month-cd-rates#faqs">best 6-month CDs</a> are offering interest rates in the mid-5% range. Six-month CDs are best for those who are looking for elevated rates on their savings for short-term gains, but are uncomfortable having limited access to their cash in the long term. These can be a good option for those who may just be getting started with saving, or who don&#39;t have a large <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/what-is-an-emergency-fund">emergency fund</a> for unexpected expenses.</p><h3>1-Year CDs</h3><p>The <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-1-year-cd-rates">best 1-year CDs</a> tend to offer some of the top CD rates, and are a popular option for many investors. A 1-year term can be an attractive option for someone building a <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/cd-ladder-what-is-it-how-does-it-work">CD ladder</a>, or for someone who has a reasonable cash safety net but is still concerned about long-term expenses.&nbsp;</p><h3>2-Year CDs</h3><p>The <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-2-year-cd-rates">best 2-year CD rates</a> will be slightly lower than 1-year and no-penalty CD rates. In exchange for a longer lock-in period, investors receive a long-term commitment for a specific rate. These are best used as part of a CD ladder strategy, or for those worried about a declining rate market in the foreseeable future.</p><h3>3-Year CDs</h3><p>The <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-3-year-cd-rates">best 3-year CDs</a> tend to have rates that are comparable to 2-year CDs. These are usually less popular for your average investor, but can be an important lever when diversifying investments and hedging against the risk of unfavorable rate markets in the long term.</p><h3>5-Year CDs</h3><p>The <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-5-year-cd-rates">best 5-year CDs</a> will offer lower rates than the other terms on our list, but are still popular options for investors. These CDs are best for those looking to lock in high rates for the long term. CDs are generally viewed as safe investment vehicles, and securing a favorable rate can yield considerable earnings in year three and beyond &mdash; even if rates fall elsewhere.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/cd-rates-savings-rates-today-monday-22-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> The Secret Service is being held to an impossible standard, says a former royal bodyguard https://www.businessinsider.com/former-royal-bodyguard-defends-trump-secret-service-agents-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:0c4b0d74-1b39-ce87-6cf2-80428eb6614f Mon, 22 Jul 2024 10:21:30 +0000 Simon Morgan, a security expert who worked for the royal family, has defended Donald Trump's Secret Service agents following the shooting last week. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669a4a5c80d4d5da13d54a97?format=jpeg" height="626" width="835" charset="" alt="Secret Service agents surrounded Trump after an assassination attempt in July 2024"/><figcaption>Secret Service agents surrounded Trump after an assassination attempt in July 2024.<p class="copyright">REBECCA DROKE/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Security expert Simon Morgan spoke to BI about the assassination attempt on Donald Trump.&nbsp;</li><li>Morgan praised the Secret Service&#39;s response but welcomed an investigation into the attack.&nbsp;</li><li>The FBI has interviewed 100 law enforcement agents and witnesses.</li></ul><p>The US is still reeling from the assassination attempt on Donald Trump more than a week ago.</p><p>The former president <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-secret-service-fantastic-job-shooting-pennsylvania-rally-despite-criticism-2024-7">praised the Secret Service agents</a> who piled in when a gunman opened fire at an election rally in Butler, Pennsylvania.</p><p>It&#39;s a completely different response to the <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-shooting-assassination-attempt-secret-service-past-scandals-2024-7">commentators</a>, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/reagan-secret-service-agent-says-trump-shooting-failure-for-agency-2024-7">security experts, </a>and ordinary observers who questioned why officials weren&#39;t able to prevent the attack from taking place at all.</p><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/royal-bodyguard-prince-harry-meghan-markle-threats-royal-life-2019-11">Simon Morgan</a>, a security expert and former bodyguard to the British royal family, said the criticism of the Secret Service hasn&#39;t been entirely fair.</p><p>Morgan worked as a protection officer at Buckingham Palace from 2007 until 2013 and now runs the private security firm Trojan Consultancy.</p><p>Speaking to Business Insider, Morgan said the Secret Service agents &#34;did exactly what they should have done&#34; because they &#34;ran towards danger&#34; and used their bodies to cover the former president.</p><p>Trump&#39;s ear was pierced by a bullet, and a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/victim-trump-rally-shooting-corey-comperatore-shielded-family-from-gunfire-2024-7">rallygoer was killed</a> while shielding his family from the bullets. Just moments later, a Secret Service sniper shot and killed the gunman.</p><p>&#34;They took him out with one shot right between the eyes,&#34; Trump said in an interview with the <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://nypost.com/2024/07/14/us-news/grateful-defiant-trump-recounts-surreal-assassination-attempt-at-rally-im-supposed-to-be-dead/">New York Post</a>.</p><p>&#34;They did a fantastic job,&#34; he said. &#34;It&#39;s surreal for all of us.&#34;</p><h2 id="62d54ab1-aa78-422c-9c9c-1946a12cf3ca" data-toc-id="62d54ab1-aa78-422c-9c9c-1946a12cf3ca">Secret Service agents were unfairly judged, Morgan said</h2><p>Morgan cautioned members of the public with &#34;limited knowledge&#34; to think twice before commenting.</p><p>&#34;The only people who can comment on what happened are those Secret Service agents,&#34; Morgan said.</p><p>&#34;We do have keyboard warriors who play &#39;Call of Duty&#39; saying, &#39;I would have done this,&#39;&#34; he said.</p><p>Nonethless, Morgan acknowledged that an investigation into how the shooter wasn&#39;t challenged before the attack will be beneficial.</p><p>The FBI announced last week that it had launched an investigation into the assassination attempt. Around 100 law enforcement agents, event attendees, and witnesses have already been interviewed, according to a<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.fbi.gov/news/press-releases/update-on-the-fbi-investigation-of-the-attempted-assassination-of-former-president-donald-trump"> statement</a> on the FBI&#39;s website.</p><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.cbsnews.com/live-updates/trump-rally-shooting-investigation/">CBS News reported</a> that Pennsylvania State Police notified the Secret Service about a suspicious individual with a rangefinder around 20 minutes before the attack. But according to a local law enforcement officer and the Butler County sheriff, law enforcement weren&#39;t aware that he also had a gun.</p><p>At least one bystander <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/cn4v7v2g5l1o">also described attempts</a> to warn law enforcement after spotting the shooter.</p><p>&#34;If you don&#39;t learn from history, you&#39;re failing to learn,&#34; Morgan said.</p><h2 id="92a5bd19-ca04-4c8a-b349-22019af34a82" data-toc-id="92a5bd19-ca04-4c8a-b349-22019af34a82">Morgan praised Trump&#39;s swift reaction to the shooting</h2><p>After the first shot was fired, the former president ducked his head before agents forced him further to the ground.</p><p>Morgan said that even though Secret Service agents would have prepared Trump for emergency scenarios, &#34;you never quite know what people are going to do&#34; when it&#39;s real.</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669351e89caa6ed01e01725c?format=jpeg" height="683" width="1024" charset="" alt="Donald Trump is rushed offstage after a shooting at a campaign rally. Secret Service members surround him as he raises his fist in the air."/><figcaption>Trump raised his fist in the air after a bullet narrowly missed his ear.<p class="copyright">Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p>&#34;He could have run away. And then you&#39;ve got a scenario where the Secret Service are chasing after him,&#34; Morgan said. &#34;He could have just stood there and not done anything and frozen, and made himself an easy target.&#34;</p><p>As the agents tried to steer Trump away from the scene, he stopped briefly to raise a defiant fist in the air. The <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-glad-he-didnt-die-to-have-iconic-picture-2024-7">photo made waves around the world</a>, but the former president was undoubtedly risking his life to get it.</p><p>&#34;Only he could answer why he did that,&#34; Morgan said.</p><p>&#34;It may be the euphoria, of &#39;Actually I&#39;m still alive.&#39; It might be, &#39;I&#39;ve got to celebrate that, and show to the outside world that I&#39;m still alive,&#39;&#34; he added.</p><p>&#34;A lot of people say it&#39;s the most iconic photo they&#39;ve ever seen,&#34; Trump told the New York Post.</p><p>&#34;They&#39;re right, and I didn&#39;t die. Usually, you have to die to have an iconic picture.&#34;</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/former-royal-bodyguard-defends-trump-secret-service-agents-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> 'House of the Dragon' surprised fans with a same-sex kiss not in the book. One of the actors said the unscripted moment happened 'organically.' https://www.businessinsider.com/house-of-the-dragon-rhaenyra-mysaria-kiss-scene-unscripted-explained-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:ac2a9351-0d2f-ab07-2fbc-f5387735ef0e Mon, 22 Jul 2024 10:21:30 +0000 Sonoya Mizuno told Vulture ahead of Sunday's "House of the Dragon" episode that the kiss scene was improvised. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669e29682d66759f66fccddb?format=jpeg" height="1618" width="2157" charset="" alt="Emma D&#39;Arcy as Rhaenyra Targaryen in &#34;House of the Dragon&#34; season two."/><figcaption>Fans have been speculating about Rhaenyra Targaryen&#39;s (Emma D&#39;arcy) sexuality in &#34;House of the Dragon&#34; season two. The latest episode finally addresses that question.<p class="copyright">Theo Whitman/HBO</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>The latest &#34;House of the Dragon&#34; episode ends with an unexpected same-sex kiss between two lead characters.</li><li>But the kiss was not in the original script, actor&nbsp;Sonoya Mizuno said.</li><li>Mizuno broke down how it came about in an interview with Variety.</li></ul><p><em>Warning: Major spoilers ahead for season two, episode six of &#34;House of the Dragon.&#34;</em></p><p>&#34;House of the Dragon&#34; may have confirmed that <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/rhaenyra-targaryen-death-house-of-the-dragon-fire-and-blood-2024-6">Rhaenyra Targaryen</a> probably isn&#39;t straight, but one of the series&#39; stars said the moment wasn&#39;t part of the original script.</p><p>In the final moments of episode six, Rhaenyra (<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/house-of-the-dragon-rhaenyra-lucerys-death-scene-director-2024-6">Emma D&#39;arcy</a>) and her close advisor, Mysaria (Sonoya Mizuno), share a tender hug and kiss after Mysaria opens up about her traumatic childhood.</p><p>The kiss is interrupted by a guard walking into the room, but fans are already obsessing over the brief moment on social media.</p><div id="1721637835135" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="custom" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="insider-raw-embed" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">and if I say that Rhaenyra and Mysaria kiss is thousand of times hotter than any of the straight sex scenes on the show then what?<br/><br/> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/HouseOfTheDragon?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#HouseOfTheDragon</a> <a href="https://t.co/pPg2HzFo4u">pic.twitter.com/pPg2HzFo4u</a></p>&mdash; dragon queen (@targrealness) <a href="https://twitter.com/targrealness/status/1815200341387874576?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 22, 2024</a></blockquote> <script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><p>Rhaenyra is not queer in the series&#39; source material, the book &#34;Fire and Blood.&#34; Still, in the first few episodes of season one, teenage Rhaenyra (Millie Alcock) has a very close relationship with her best friend <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/house-of-the-dragon-rhaenyra-and-alicent-are-a-little-bit-in-love-2022-8">Alicent Hightower</a> (Emily Carey).</p><p>This led fans to speculate that Rhaenyra and Alicent may be attracted to each other, and <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/house-of-the-dragon-milly-alcock-emily-carey-kiss-filming-2022-9">Alcock and Carey</a> told The New York Times in 2022 that they thought the friendship was homoerotic.</p><p>Fans may being wondering if the show&#39;s writers added the same-sex kiss to keep them happy, hoping it would boost the series&#39; popularity after their suspicions were finally confirmed.</p><p>However, according to Mizuno, the kiss was an organic decision made by the actors.</p><p>Mizuno told <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.vulture.com/article/sonoya-mizuno-house-of-the-dragon-mysaria-rhaenyra-kiss.html">Vulture</a> ahead of Sunday&#39;s episode: &#34;It was scripted as an intimate moment that got interrupted, and it was unknown where the scene was going to go. Emma and I both strongly felt that we didn&#39;t want it to be queer-baity in any way, and we wanted to step back, look at it, and take care of it.</p><p>&#34;But it just felt right. It <em>would</em> be a kiss.&#34;</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669e2a89fb2b6bedb0591851?format=jpeg" height="951" width="1268" charset="" alt="sonoya mizuno as mysaria on house of the dragon. she&#39;s wearing loose blue robes, standing in a candle-lit room with her arms crossed and her hair worn half-back"/><figcaption>Mysaria (Sonoya Mizuno) is the ex of Rhaenyra&#39;s current husband, Daemon Targaryen.<p class="copyright">Ollie Upton/HBO</p></figcaption></figure><p>Mizuno said D&#39;arcy decided to add the hug to the scene. According to Mizuno, D&#39;arcy thought the characters were standing too far apart, and Rhaenyra would want to hold Mysaria after hearing her &#34;vulnerable story.&#34;</p><p>&#34;The hug was so arresting because we realized that people don&#39;t really hug in this show. They don&#39;t hug in this kind of way. It was such a <em>gorgeous </em>hug, and the kiss came so organically from that,&#34; Mizuno said. &#34;It was very vulnerable and very tender, and then it was really <em>nice. </em>And then you stop thinking, and it gets really passionate.&#34;</p><p>Mizuno added later that she thought <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/house-of-the-dragon-season-2-premiere-recap-blood-cheese-2024-6">Mysaria</a> was always attracted to Rhaenyra but didn&#39;t realize it until the intimate moment.</p><p>D&#39;arcy told <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://variety.com/2024/tv/news/house-of-the-dragon-rhaenyra-mysaria-kiss-emma-darcy-sonoya-mizuno-1236078234/">Variety</a> ahead of Sunday&#39;s episode that the kiss was spontaneous for Rhaenyra, too.</p><p>&#34;They are two bodies completely overrun by touch. As soon as they embrace and their bodies are touching, I think it&#39;s pure bodily desire,&#34; they said.</p><p><em>&#34;House of the Dragon&#34; season two airs Sundays at 9 p.m. ET on HBO and is streaming on </em><a target="_blank" rel="nofollow sponsored noindex" class="" href="https://affiliate.insider.com?h=fed657e5d456898628c785351016f7b12b4d269a5d17af0f15435159aef229d0&amp;postID=669e1bca20eaab25bc1ef482&amp;postSlug=house-of-the-dragon-rhaenyra-mysaria-kiss-scene-unscripted-explained-2024-7&amp;site=bi&amp;u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.max.com%2F"><em><u>Max</u></em></a><em>.</em></p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/house-of-the-dragon-rhaenyra-mysaria-kiss-scene-unscripted-explained-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Fast-food chains are competing to offer cheaper meals. From McDonald's to Del Taco, here are the best deals. https://www.businessinsider.com/restaurants-are-competing-to-offer-the-cheapest-meals-2024-5 Clusterstock urn:uuid:c79e1118-5c32-cc05-af94-1c783c3a1cf8 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 10:01:29 +0000 Del Taco's $2-and-under value meal deal is among several discounted options offered by fast-food chains to entice price-weary customers. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/6619015016bde8d4ead8332f?format=jpeg" height="3293" width="4940" charset="" alt="The Burger King logo is seen at its fast food restaurant branch in Danville, Pennsylvania"/><figcaption>Burger King and McDonald&#39;s are both offering $5 meal deals for a limited period.<p class="copyright">Paul Weaver/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Del Taco is the latest chain to offer a new lower-price combo deal.</li><li>Other fast-food chains like Burger King and McDonald&#39;s are also involved in the value wars.</li><li>Chains are trying to lure diners back in after high fast-food prices have turned many away.</li></ul><p>The fast food wars are heating up.</p><p>In July, Del Taco became the latest chain to release a revamped value deal, offering 15 items at $2 and under.</p><p>It joins chains like <a target="_blank" rel="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/burger-king-launches-5-dollar-value-meal-before-mcdonalds-months-2024-5"><u>Taco Bell</u></a>, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/mcdonalds-mcplant-us-trial-failed-not-enough-demand-beyond-meat-2024-6">McDonald&#39;s,</a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/best-burger-king-cheeseburger-ranked-2024-6">Burger King</a> in offering new lower-priced deals as customers seek more value in the face of <a target="_blank" rel="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/fast-food-isnt-cheap-anymore-2023-11"><u>rising fast-food prices</u></a>.</p><p>Prices have remained high since the pandemic when chains <a target="_blank" rel="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/fast-food-getting-more-expensive-mcdonalds-subway-chipotle-starbucks-2022-1"><u>raised their menu prices</u></a> in response to <a target="_blank" rel="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/labor-shortage-pennsylvania-restaurant-raised-menu-prices-employment-food-chicken-2021-9"><u>soaring food and labor costs</u></a><a target="_blank" rel="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/why-fast-food-is-so-much-more-expensive-value-affordable-2024-4"><u>.</u></a> It&#39;s led some customers to order smaller portions or to start <a target="_blank" rel="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/why-fast-food-is-so-much-more-expensive-value-affordable-2024-4"><u>cooking more at home</u></a>.</p><p>To get diners back, fast-food and restaurant chains are launching more value deals. So, how do the other offers stack up?</p><h2 id="a1c3de6e-a6cf-4723-8bcc-bd8a31ec3406" data-toc-id="a1c3de6e-a6cf-4723-8bcc-bd8a31ec3406">Del Taco</h2><p>In July, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/del-taco-review-in-photos-tacos-burger-fries-2022-8">Del Taco</a> announced its &#34;Real Deal&#34; menu, which includes 15 items priced at $2 and under. The chain has added new items, such as snack-sized chips and fresh guacamole, to the deal.</p><p>The $2 and under menu also includes burritos, tacos, and cheesy nachos.</p><h2 id="8b7becb1-1368-42e0-9f21-32186d203719" data-toc-id="8b7becb1-1368-42e0-9f21-32186d203719">Taco Bell</h2><p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/review-trying-all-taco-bell-specialties-menu-ranking-2023-2">Taco Bell</a>&nbsp;has its own value deal: the $7 Luxe Craving Box, which includes a Chalupa Supreme, Beefy 5-Layer Burrito, Double Stacked Taco, alongside chips and nacho cheese sauce, and a medium drink.</p><p>The limited-time deal gives customers a 55% discount off typical menu prices, the company said.</p><p>Earlier this year, <a target="_blank" rel="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/these-taco-bell-test-kitchen-creations-should-go-national"><u>Taco Bell</u></a> overhauled its Cravings Value Menu by adding six new &#34;meal-sized&#34; items to the menu, which features items under $3.</p><h2 id="a1fc2741-2b18-4d01-83b8-d007491dc63d" data-toc-id="a1fc2741-2b18-4d01-83b8-d007491dc63d">Burger King</h2><p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/burger-king-launches-5-dollar-value-meal-before-mcdonalds-months-2024-5">Burger King</a> also announced a limited-time value offer, the &#34;<a target="_blank" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-mc0k96e30">$5 Your Way Meal</a>.&#34; It includes a choice between a Whopper Jr., Bacon Cheeseburger, and Chicken Jr., alongside fries, four-piece chicken nuggets, and a soft drink, all for $5.</p><p>This deal is set to run <a target="_blank" href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2024-05-23/burger-king-launching-5-value-meal-to-one-up-mcdonald-s?srnd=homepage-americas">for several months,</a> unlike a similar deal offered by McDonald&#39;s, Bloomberg reported.</p><h2 id="40153485-3dba-44ba-adc9-c2e9b7c6c564" data-toc-id="40153485-3dba-44ba-adc9-c2e9b7c6c564">McDonald&#39;s</h2><p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/mcdonalds-5-dollar-meal-promotion-inflation-cheaper-burger-chicken-fries-2024-5">McDonald&#39;s</a> launched its $5 offering at the end of June. It includes a choice between two of the chain&#39;s signature burgers &mdash; a McChicken or a McDouble<strong> &mdash;</strong> and a four-piece McNuggets, <a target="_blank" rel="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/mcdonalds-new-marketing-billboards-that-smell-like-its-french-fries-2024-4"><u>fries</u></a>, and a drink.</p><h2 id="ab151a85-48ac-4177-9b42-6c1ca3866bff" data-toc-id="ab151a85-48ac-4177-9b42-6c1ca3866bff"><strong>Wendy&#39;s</strong></h2><p>Other chains are expanding their existing meal deals. <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/wendys-3-dollar-breakfast-deal-rivals-mcdonalds-fast-food-wars-2024-5?mrfhud=true">Wendy&#39;s</a> has announced that it&#39;s adding to its $3 breakfast deal for a limited time. Customers can pair a small portion of seasoned potatoes with a choice between two breakfast muffins &mdash; a bacon, egg, and cheese English muffin or a sausage, egg, and cheese English muffin, the company <a target="_blank" rel=" nofollow" href="https://www.irwendys.com/news/news-details/2024/Start-Your-Day-Strong-with-Wendys-New-3-English-Muffin-Deal/default.aspx"><u>said</u></a>.</p><h2 id="d673d83e-c390-4e70-98be-de9bbfb79f3f" data-toc-id="d673d83e-c390-4e70-98be-de9bbfb79f3f">Starbucks</h2><p>Restaurant chains are also getting in on the action. Starbucks launched <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/starbucks-bundling-breakfast-combo-deals-sandwich-croissant-tea-coffee-meal-2024-6">new $5 and $6 breakfast combos</a> in June.</p><p>As part of this new &#34;pairings menu,&#34; customers can get a 12-ounce iced or hot coffee or tea paired with a butter croissant from $5, or with a breakfast sandwich from $6.</p><h2 id="9689013f-22ef-49fc-937b-028cf4cffedb" data-toc-id="9689013f-22ef-49fc-937b-028cf4cffedb">Chili&#39;s</h2><p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/chain-restaurants-vs-fast-food-value-wars-2024-4"><span>Casual dining chains like Chili&#39;s</span></a><span>&nbsp;are also rolling out more deals and portion sizes </span><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/fast-food-california-expensive-diners-could-switch-to-chilis-applebees-2024-4"><span>to capture some of fast-food&#39;s lost diners</span></a><span>.</span></p><p>Chili&#39;s <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/review-chilis-new-big-smasher-burger-2024-5">launched its new Big Smasher burger</a> earlier this year &mdash;&nbsp;the burger starts at around $12.99 when ordered its own, but comes down to $10.99 when part of the chain&#39;s &#34;3 For Me&#34; meal combo. The cheaper deals hope to capture those diners looking for value as fast-food prices creep up toward restaurant chain prices.</p><h2 id="ebfa9218-8689-4f69-96ba-ee80bd55d9d1" data-toc-id="ebfa9218-8689-4f69-96ba-ee80bd55d9d1"></h2><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/restaurants-are-competing-to-offer-the-cheapest-meals-2024-5">Business Insider</a></div> Mortgage Interest Rates Today, July 22, 2024 | Rates Are Dropping. How Low Could They Go? https://www.businessinsider.com/best-mortgage-refinance-rates-today-monday-22-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:22f3d881-eb0f-5812-4c26-6b666e28dcaf Mon, 22 Jul 2024 10:00:04 +0000 These are today's mortgage and refinance rates. Mortgage rates are likely to fall in the coming years, but how much they'll drop depends on the economy. <p class="financial-disclaimer">The offers and details on this page may have updated or changed since the time of publication. See our article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/best-mortgage-refinance-rates-today-monday-22-2024-7" target="_blank">Business Insider</a> for current information.</p><p class="headline-regular financial-disclaimer">Affiliate links for the products on this page are from partners that compensate us (see our <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/our-partners" class="not-content-link" target="_blank">advertiser disclosure with our list of partners</a> for more details). However, our opinions are our own. See <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/how-we-evaluate-mortgage-lenders" class="not-content-link" target="_blank">how we rate mortgages</a> to write unbiased product reviews.</p><p>Mortgage rates have steadily been decreasing for several months now. In April, <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/30-year-mortgage-rates">30-year mortgage rates</a> averaged 6.85%, according to Zillow data. So far in July, they&#39;ve been around 6.49%, and have trended even lower in recent weeks.&nbsp;</p><p>But it will likely take a while for rates to fully come down, and borrowers shouldn&#39;t expect them to drop to the historic lows of early 2021, when 30-year rates fell to an all-time low of 2.65%, according to <a href="https://www.freddiemac.com/pmms">Freddie Mac</a>.&nbsp;</p><p>If inflation continues to slow and the Federal Reserve is able to start lowering the <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/what-is-the-federal-funds-rate">federal funds rate</a>, it&#39;s possible mortgage rates could finally dip back into the 5% range in 2025. But it&#39;s hard to say with certainty whether rates will drop any further than this.</p><p><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/how-are-mortgage-rates-determined">Mortgage rates are determined by a variety of factors</a>, including economic trends, Fed policy, investor demand, and more. Right now, the economy is relatively strong, though it&#39;s cooling off after running too hot for several years. This cooling should allow mortgage rates to decrease. But unless the economy weakens significantly, we probably won&#39;t see rates plunge like they did after the start of the pandemic.&nbsp;</p><h3>Today&#39;s mortgage rates</h3><h3>Today&#39;s refinance rates</h3><h3>Mortgage Calculator</h3><p>Use our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/mortgage-calculator" rel="noopener" data-analytics-module="body_link" data-analytics-post-depth="40">free mortgage calculator</a>&nbsp;to see how today&#39;s interest rates will affect your monthly payments:</p><p>By clicking on &#34;More details,&#34; you&#39;ll also see how much you&#39;ll pay over the entire length of your mortgage, including how much goes toward the principal vs. interest.</p><h2>Mortgage Rate Projection for 2024</h2><p>Mortgage rates started ticking up from historic lows in the second half of 2021 and increased dramatically in 2022 and throughout most of 2023.</p><p>Many forecasts expect rates to fall this year now that inflation has been coming down. In the last 12 months, the <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/inflation-cpi-june-prices-food-energy-fed-interest-rate-cuts-2024-7">Consumer Price Index</a> rose by 3.0%. This is a significant slowdown compared when it peaked at 9.1% in 2022, which means mortgage rates should start trending down soon.&nbsp;</p><p>For homeowners looking to&nbsp;leverage their home&#39;s value&nbsp;to cover a big purchase &mdash; such as a home renovation &mdash; a&nbsp;home equity line of credit (HELOC) may be a good option while we wait for mortgage rates to ease. Check out some of our <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-heloc-lenders">best HELOC lenders</a> to start your search for the right loan for you.</p><p>A HELOC is a line of credit that lets you borrow against the equity in your home. It works similarly to a credit card in that you borrow what you need rather than getting the full amount you&#39;re borrowing in a lump sum. It also lets you tap into the money you have in your home without replacing your entire mortgage, like you&#39;d do with a cash-out refinance.</p><p><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/current-heloc-rates" rel="" data-analytics-product-module="body_link" data-analytics-post-depth="100" data-uri="e3f3577dfe678e19f8dce895f3061b13"></a><a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/current-heloc-rates" rel="" data-analytics-product-module="body_link" data-analytics-post-depth="100" data-uri="e3f3577dfe678e19f8dce895f3061b13">Current HELOC rates</a>&nbsp;are relatively low compared to other loan options, including credit cards and personal loans.&nbsp;</p><h2>When Will House Prices Come Down?</h2><p>We aren&#39;t likely to see <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/home-prices-drop">home prices drop</a> this year. In fact, they&#39;ll probably rise.</p><p><a href="https://www.fanniemae.com/media/51616/display" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Fannie Mae researchers</a> expect prices to increase 4.8% in 2024 and 1.5% in 2025, while the <a href="https://www.mba.org/news-and-research/forecasts-and-commentary" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Mortgage Bankers Association</a> expects a 4.5% increase in 2024 and a 3.3% increase in 2024.</p><p>Sky high mortgage rates have pushed many hopeful buyers out of the market, slowing homebuying demand and putting downward pressure on home prices. But rates have since eased, removing some of that pressure. The current supply of homes is also <a href="https://www.freddiemac.com/research/insight/20210507-housing-supply" target="_blank" rel="noopener">historically low</a>, which will likely push prices up.</p><h2>What Happens to House Prices in a Recession?</h2><p>House prices usually drop during a recession, but not always. When it does happen, it&#39;s generally because fewer people can afford to purchase homes, and the low demand forces sellers to lower their prices.</p><h2>How Much Mortgage Can I Afford?</h2><p>A mortgage calculator like the one above can help you determine <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/how-much-house-can-i-afford">how much house you can afford</a>. Play around with different home prices and down payment amounts to see how much your monthly payment could be, and think about how that fits in with your overall budget.</p><p>Typically, experts recommend spending no more than 28% of your gross monthly income on housing expenses. This means your entire monthly mortgage payment, including taxes and insurance, shouldn&#39;t exceed 28% of your pre-tax monthly income.</p><p>The lower your rate, the more you&#39;ll be able to borrow, so shop around and <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/mortgage-preapproval">get preapproved</a> with multiple <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/best-mortgage-lenders">mortgage lenders</a> to see who can offer you the best rate. But remember not to borrow more than what your budget can comfortably handle.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/best-mortgage-refinance-rates-today-monday-22-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Jeeps Could Crash the Party at GM and Ford https://www.wsj.com/articles/jeeps-could-crash-the-party-at-gm-and-ford-a0498c90?mod=rss_markets_main WSJ.com: Markets urn:uuid:8c244444-fffe-d554-d6e9-e08cfa592348 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 09:56:00 +0000 Six months ago, the manufacturers were penciling price declines into their forecasts for the year, but sales prices have turned out better than expected. All the Democrats who have endorsed Kamala Harris to replace Joe Biden after he dropped out https://www.businessinsider.com/democrats-endorsing-kamala-harris-to-replace-joe-biden-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:d60af432-9eee-dd98-1dd9-cc1244b6816e Mon, 22 Jul 2024 09:48:46 +0000 After Joe Biden dropped out of the race and endorsed Kamala Harris, a host of Democrats also threw their support behind the VP to replace him. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669d5a0880d4d5da13d5a977?format=jpeg" height="683" width="1024" charset="" alt="Vice President Kamala Harris speaks at a moderated conversation"/><figcaption>President Joe Biden has endorsed Vice President Kamala Harris to replace him as the Democratic nominee.<p class="copyright">Chris duMond/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>President Joe Biden dropped out of the presidential race after weeks of mounting pressure.</li><li>Biden endorsed Vice President Kamala Harris to replace him and become the Democratic nominee.</li><li> Democratic lawmakers quickly showed their support for Harris.</li></ul><p>After weeks of mounting pressure, President Joe Biden announced Sunday <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-presidential-race-2024-7">he would drop out</a> of the presidential race.</p><p>The Democrats now only have <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-what-happens-next-2024-7">a few weeks to rally behind a new nominee,</a> who will go on to face former President Donald Trump in November.</p><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-endorses-kamala-harris-after-dropping-out-2024-7">Biden&#39;s endorsement of Vice President Kamala Harris</a> places her as a frontrunner, though it&#39;s uncertain if any other potential candidates will choose to challenge her. Harris accepted Biden&#39;s endorsement on Sunday evening.</p><p>As of Monday morning, many former and current Democratic lawmakers have already pledged their support for the vice president.</p><h2 id="140d8582-fa7c-4780-aa3c-dc7cca5c04f5" data-toc-id="140d8582-fa7c-4780-aa3c-dc7cca5c04f5">Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii</h2><div id="1721612928737" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">I strongly endorse <a href="https://twitter.com/KamalaHarris?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@KamalaHarris</a>’ candidacy for president. Her historic service as VP helped us achieve many of our biggest legislative wins, casting tie-breaking votes on bills to help the country recover from the pandemic &amp; take the biggest climate action in human history.</p>&mdash; Brian Schatz (@brianschatz) <a href="https://twitter.com/brianschatz/status/1815171416666386933?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2024</a></blockquote><script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><h2 id="8b89469f-dfdf-41fd-9921-64a90020be3e" data-toc-id="8b89469f-dfdf-41fd-9921-64a90020be3e">Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut</h2><div id="1721612928737" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Just because I know people are rightly cynical, there was no coordination of all these endorsements. We all learned about the President’s decision when everyone else did. <br/><br/>The outpouring of support for Kamala is organic. Because she can beat Trump and be a great president.</p>&mdash; Chris Murphy I burned out trying to be an overachieving parent. I learned it's OK to ask for help. https://www.businessinsider.com/overachieving-parent-burnout-learned-ask-help-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:3e886bae-d6b8-5f05-0b41-01aac0fb096a Mon, 22 Jul 2024 09:48:02 +0000 I was an overachieving parent with my first two kids. With my daughter, I learned I didn't have to burn myself out to be a good mom. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669967bc49138fa6f6e39a71?format=jpeg" height="1000" width="2000" charset="" alt="Amanda Miller Littlejohn and her daughter on a yellow background with baby toys and a bottle in red collaged in squares behind her."/><figcaption>The author felt like she had to be an overachiever while parenting her first two kids but learned to ask for help the third time around.<p class="copyright">Amanda Miller Littlejohn; Getty Images; Tyler Le/BI</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>I was an overachiever when I had my sons in my 20s.</li><li>Now 40 with a toddler, I&#39;ve learned I don&#39;t have to burn out to be a good mom.</li><li>I realized it&#39;s OK to ask others in my community for help.</li></ul><p>I had my teen sons in my late 20s, and by age 30, I was parenting two toddlers. Now I&#39;m over 40, raising a toddler once again, and I am not the same.</p><p>I grew up as your typical high-achieving, elder millennial. Once I became a mother, I saw parenting as my most high-stakes assignment and was determined to ace it.</p><p>Unimpressed by the handful of mommy-and-me arts and music classes I toured with my firstborn once he was of age, I set out to design my own <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-i-raised-successful-adults-making-education-fun-2023-11">exploratory arts curriculum</a> rooted in African-American culture.</p><p>At home, I introduced the boys to the music of Fela Kuti and John Coltrane and the art of Jacob Lawrence, Romare Bearden, and Jean-Michel Basquiat. We&#39;d attempt our own mixed-media collages and paint with watercolors on the floor while the polyrhythms of Afrobeat music filled our kitchen.</p><p>When they were toddlers, I was their teacher. I&#39;d structure their days tightly with breakfast, a lesson of some sort, and a morning outing to a museum, forest trail walk, or errands with me before going back home for lunch. Then, I&#39;d put them down for their afternoon nap, during which I&#39;d work on projects for my consulting clients.</p><p>I remember touring several day care facilities and even using one for a few months. But ultimately, my husband and I both decided the boys were better off at home with me, where I could more closely oversee their development.</p><p>I was obsessed with the idea of them learning and &#34;getting ahead&#34; even before they officially started school. When my kids were 2 and 3, I&#39;d buy the Lego bricks kit, puzzles, and coloring books designed for the 4- and 5-year-olds. I was always pushing them to <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-parents-set-their-kids-up-for-success-2016-4">reach beyond average</a>; I wanted them to be exceptional.</p><p>If they showed an inkling of interest in anything at all, I&#39;d search for lessons, camps, and classes. I purchased an obscene amount of professional art supplies, often investing hundreds of dollars without them asking.</p><p>To be clear, no one pressured me; I pressured myself. I saw my overachieving as a way to set them up for future success in a hyper-competitive world. I didn&#39;t come from money, but what I <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/personal-finance/biracial-didnt-understand-generational-wealth-growing-up-2024-2">lacked in generational wealth</a> to pass on, I made up for in pure grit.</p><p>When they officially entered school at 3 and 4, I felt confident my sons were on track. My youngest was reading and my eldest was studying in a Chinese immersion school. Official piano lessons would start the following year. I still kept a close eye on their cultivation outside the classroom.</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/66996ca649138fa6f6e39e04?format=jpeg" height="1836" width="2448" charset="" alt="Amanda Miller Littlejohn sitting outside at a picnic table with her two sons when they were younger."/><figcaption>The author created structured days for her two sons when they were young.<p class="copyright">Courtesy Amanda Miller Littlejohn</p></figcaption></figure><h2 id="9c6bbe79-d44a-404a-8728-c50cf74ec45b" data-toc-id="9c6bbe79-d44a-404a-8728-c50cf74ec45b">Things were different when I had my daughter</h2><p>Being a high-achieving mother while striving to grow my career and get a business off the ground meant I often put myself last. My parenting style came at the expense of my own inner child &mdash; the freedom to be joyful and build a stronger relationship with myself.</p><p>I stopped cultivating my interests in the way I had done before I had kids and instead poured all of that tending energy into my children. I stopped writing creatively, reading for pleasure, and <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-catch-up-with-friends-spend-quality-time-things-do-2024-2">hanging out with girlfriends</a>, just to be silly. Instead, I approached my spare time as an opportunity to get ahead. Each moment had to earn its keep.</p><p>So, by the time I gave birth to my daughter at the end of 2020 &mdash; 12 years after I had my last son &mdash; I was fried. Her arrival in the middle of the pandemic kicked off a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/burnout-working-mom-parenting-advice-working-from-home-pandemic-covid-2021-10">profound season of burnout</a> for me as I, knocking on 40, was forced to acknowledge my limits. My daughter helped me rest. She also helped me find community.</p><p>We had kept our sons home in the first years of their lives, and with a deadly virus on the loose and the vaccine in its early stages, we felt it best to keep our daughter home as well. But right after she turned 1, her pediatrician recommended we enroll her in a local home-based day care so she could get out of the house and be with other kids. We tried it out and found it was the perfect fit for her.</p><p>No, it wasn&#39;t a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/montessori-school-cost-mortgage-payment-2024-2">Montessori program</a> employing the latest research on childhood socio-emotional development, but she seemed to enjoy it. She was having fun each day, showed affection to her teachers, and seemed to like being part of a cohort of her peers.</p><p>I shifted my focus from asking, &#39;Is she getting ahead?&#39; to, &#39;Is she becoming a happily adjusted person in the world?&#39; And when I realized that the answer was yes &mdash; and that was its own way to get ahead &mdash; that was good enough for me.</p><p>When my boys were little, I thought motherhood was something I had to push through alone. Hundreds of miles away from family in Tennessee, my husband and I didn&#39;t have much family help with the kids. Back then, most of the mothers at their school were older than I was, as the women my age hadn&#39;t started having children yet.</p><p>But this time around, more of my contemporaries have toddlers, too, which means I have a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/single-moms-mommune-mothers-coliving-together-2024-2">built-in community</a>. So now, instead of trying to get a gold star for thinking of everything myself, I regularly reach out to copy their homework.</p><h2 id="0d08ed66-ce7c-4380-aea6-a84493322a45" data-toc-id="0d08ed66-ce7c-4380-aea6-a84493322a45">I learned it&#39;s OK to ask other parents for help</h2><p>My girl-mom network has shared hand-me-down winter coats, barely-worn Easter dresses, and pediatric specialist recommendations. They&#39;ve passed on enrollment links to Saturday soccer and their copious notes on elementary school options. They&#39;ve done the homework to find the best 3-year-old ballet class; they&#39;ve already found a <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/wearing-braids-self-love-practice-from-my-dad-2023-6">hair braider</a> who makes house calls and is good with squirming toddlers.</p><p>I used to feel guilty asking for recommendations, like I was cutting in line. I&#39;ve always pulled my own weight and done more than expected; I never wanted to be perceived as a slacker. But I&#39;ve learned relying on my network to hook me up doesn&#39;t make me lazy, unserious, or checked out as a parent. Their support keeps me from running myself down.</p><p>In my 30s, I was terrified that if I alone somehow failed to overwork and overachieve as a parent, I would hold my kids back. But my mindset has evolved as I&#39;ve matured, so now I give myself grace.</p><p>When my older kids were small, I was parenting under the gun, as if so much was at stake if I didn&#39;t push them to achieve. I think a big part of my self-worth was tied up in <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/overcoming-parenting-shame-therapy-2024-7">how well I performed in motherhood</a>. Each of their accomplishments was like a gold star &mdash; proof that I was indeed a good mother. If they weren&#39;t ahead, or at least on track, I was failing.</p><p>I think that&#39;s largely because I viewed them as &#34;my greatest achievements&#34; and their own achievements as necessary currency for their future happiness and success.</p><p>I realize that the way the world is set up, a level of achievement is necessary but perhaps not required for the type of happiness or success they will eventually seek. They are not me. We are alike in many ways, but in some ways, we are different. They tell me they appreciate the early push, but did they need that to get where they are? I&#39;m not so sure.</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/66996cf849138fa6f6e39e21?format=jpeg" height="1536" width="2048" charset="" alt="Amanda Miller Littlejohn with her sons and daughter at the beach, they are smiling in the sun and standing on the sand."/><figcaption>The author learned it&#39;s OK to ask for recommendations from friends and other parents while parenting her daughter.<p class="copyright">Courtesy Amanda Miller Littlejohn</p></figcaption></figure><h2 id="4cc66fba-783f-4e18-ba80-b175e9594e8f" data-toc-id="4cc66fba-783f-4e18-ba80-b175e9594e8f">I don&#39;t have to overwork to be considered a good mom</h2><p>Being more laid back this time around means I&#39;m more present. I&#39;m not my daughter&#39;s CEO or performance coach &mdash; I&#39;m just mommy. Now, I play with no agenda; every toy doesn&#39;t have to teach a new skill, and every game doesn&#39;t have to be a stepping stone.</p><p>I think mothers are beginning to renegotiate the idea that we must pour every ounce of free time and effort into our kids to be considered &#34;good,&#34; and for us to be considered good mothers. By all means, we want them to be great, but we are also learning to trust they&#39;ll find their way. Their paths don&#39;t have to be so engineered; we can let them simply unfold.</p><p>My daughter is 3 years old and not reading yet like my older kids were at her age, but she&#39;s one of the most socially intelligent people I know. So, instead of comparing her to her brothers, I&#39;m nurturing her natural gifts and valuing her uniqueness. I&#39;m learning to parent her as a person, not as a project for extra credit.</p><p>It&#39;s not that I strive to do the bare minimum as a mother now, but I realize overworking isn&#39;t practical or required at this stage in my life. I&#39;ve already done the work, and for the most part, the kids are all right. I don&#39;t have to burn myself out for them to be OK.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/overachieving-parent-burnout-learned-ask-help-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Startups that aren't using AI are already obsolete, says the man known as the 'father of modern entrepreneurship' https://www.businessinsider.com/steve-blank-lean-startup-method-advice-for-founders-ai-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:60a68754-f4e4-b368-2336-81f4b2539dd0 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 09:47:48 +0000 Legendary entrepreneur Steve Blank said entrepreneurs are making one big mistake when it comes to using AI. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669532a05439fb59cebd5555?format=jpeg" height="1414" width="2121" charset="" alt="Blue hologram outlines of nine humans in a dark office setting."/><figcaption>Blank spoke to BI about what he&#39;d be doing if trying to grow a business today.<p class="copyright">XH4D/ Getty</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Steve Blank is the creator of the Lean Startup Method &mdash; the go-to blueprint for creating successful startups.&nbsp;</li><li>But has his advice for entrepreneurs changed now that AI is disrupting all aspects of business?</li><li>Blank spoke to Business Insider about the one thing he&#39;d be doing if he was starting a business today.</li></ul><p>Every year, roughly 4.7 million new businesses are created in the US, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.census.gov/econ/currentdata/?programCode=BFS&amp;startYear=2004&amp;endYear=2024&amp;categories[]=TOTAL&amp;dataType=BA_BA&amp;geoLevel=US&amp;adjusted=1&amp;notAdjusted=1&amp;errorData=0">according to data from the United States Census Bureau.</a> Within 10 years, more than 65% of them will fail, the USCB&#39;s data shows.</p><p>Most seasoned entrepreneurs will tell you that failure is part of success. True visionaries pick themselves up and turn to their next innovation, ready to once again confront the question: What&#39;s the secret to a winning startup?</p><p>Steve Blank is the man who has provided that answer for many founders. After more than two decades involved in eight technology startups, half of which reached IPO, Blank turned to academia and developed a method for leading early-stage companies to success &mdash; the lean startup method.</p><p>The lean startup, as Blank explained in a 2013 <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://hbr.org/2013/05/why-the-lean-start-up-changes-everything">Harvard Business Review</a> cover story, favors experimentation, a customer-centric approach, and agility over traditional up front strategies.</p><p>At the core of the method was the recognition that early-stage companies couldn&#39;t and shouldn&#39;t aim to operate like large businesses.</p><p>It&#39;s become the go-to template for startups, is taught in business schools worldwide, informs <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.fedtech.io/resource/how-lean-start-up-methodology-can-benefit-va-innovators">federal commerce initiatives</a>, and has earned Blank unofficial status as the &#34;<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/news/ai-will-reinvent-every-piece-commerce-and-enterprise-next-year-says-father-modern-entrepreneurship-steve-blank">Father of Modern Entrepreneurship</a>.&#34;</p><p>Now, in addition to his work as an adjunct professor at Stanford, Blank is involved in efforts to imbue US national security with the spirit of entrepreneurship he&#39;s renowned for.</p><p>As the world enters what Blank calls the &#34;beginning of massive change,&#34; Business Insider spoke to the legendary entrepreneur about what he&#39;d do if he was trying to grow a business today.</p><p>His biggest piece of advice? Have fun with AI.</p><p>&#34;If you&#39;re not playing with all the tools and trying to build apps on top of them, you&#39;re already obsolete,&#34; Blank told BI. &#34;In twenty years, it will be the companies with AI in their DNA that are thriving.&#34;</p><p>Entrepreneurs should immerse themselves in this rapidly changing environment. If they don&#39;t they&#39;ll be left behind by the new wave, according to the Silicon Valley veteran.</p><p>&#34;And if your experiments are not making you giggle, you&#39;re not experimenting enough.&#34;</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/5f2c4a58a6f0e13d294a5464?format=jpeg" height="2640" width="3960" charset="" alt="Steve Blank sits on a stage with a mic, holding his hand outreached to the audience."/><figcaption>Blank&#39;s methodology can only be enhanced by AI, he told BI. <p class="copyright">Steve Blank</p></figcaption></figure><p>That applies to his own methodology as well.</p><p>&#34;If I was still an entrepreneur, I would immediately be AI-enabling that whole lean startup model and building enterprise software,&#34; said Blank.</p><p>&#34;The pieces of the lean startup are just so obvious to me to be automated and then strung together. That doesn&#39;t replace my process, it augments it.&#34;</p><p>&#34;Doing it manually will look silly in another five or 10 years, if not sooner,&#34; he added.</p><p>Blank acknowledged there are risks and that <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/job-disruption-ai-future-careers-blue-collar-desk-work-2023-11">some industries</a> will be &#34;completely devastated&#34; by AI. But he said the people claiming the technology will end the world are fooling themselves.</p><p>That doesn&#39;t mean there aren&#39;t mistakes to be made. The most common issue for innovators right now is that they&#39;re putting too much trust in AI working consistently.</p><p>&#34;It works until it doesn&#39;t. But then a lot of it won&#39;t tell you when it&#39;s not working,&#34; Blank told BI. An outlandish answer on a chatbot may be a small issue, but if you&#39;re designing an aircraft wing using AI-enabled computation, those calculations are mission-critical.</p><p>&#34;That is the interesting thing about a neural net; you really don&#39;t know how it&#39;s coming up with its answer.&#34;</p><p>Increasing references or ways to check how LLMs have come up with their outcomes will be crucial to solving this problem going forward, he added.</p><p>From Blank&#39;s perspective, one side of entrepreneurship that is safe in the emerging AI world is the role of the visionary founder.</p><p>&#34;I think the idea of a passionate set of founders who see over the horizon and see something that no one else does, that&#39;s going to be with us forever. All that&#39;s going to be different is the tools and the markets that they go after. Founders are closer to artists than any other profession.&#34;</p><p>&#34;They&#39;re resilient, and they&#39;re driven by a passion for creation that is never going to go away as long as human beings are around.&#34;</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/steve-blank-lean-startup-method-advice-for-founders-ai-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Pornhub is awash in lawsuits. Unverified videos still on the site could bring even more, says the author of the new book 'Takedown.' https://www.businessinsider.com/pornhub-is-awash-in-lawsuits-unverified-videos-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:40c1ab90-569c-5456-8c84-a0c693be31a3 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 09:30:02 +0000 Some 300 plaintiffs say Pornhub profited from their assaults. An anti-trafficking advocate says there will be more legal challenges to come. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/66995e1249138fa6f6e39284?format=jpeg" height="1500" width="2000" charset="" alt="Photo illustration of the Pornhub logo and the Supreme court."/><figcaption><p class="copyright">Getty Images; Jenny Chang-Rodriguez</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Hundreds have sued Pornhub, saying videos of their abuse remained online despite their protests.</li><li>Age-verification requirements for Pornhub users in 19 states will be weighed by SCOTUS this fall.</li><li>The site&#39;s many unverified videos will bring more legal woes, warns anti-trafficking activist.</li></ul><p>It took just a few minutes for anti-trafficking activist Laila Mickelwait to log on to <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/pornhub-videos-that-shouldve-been-removed-stayed-up-for-months-2023-3">Pornhub,</a> type the search term &#34;homeless,&#34; and find a disturbing amateur video, the kind she complains about in her new book, &#34;Takedown.&#34;</p><p>&#34;You can hear the woman yelling to stop because it hurts,&#34; she said recently of the video, which includes a tag showing it&#39;s been on the site five years. &#34;She&#39;s angrily telling the man to shut the camera off and stop filming.&#34;</p><p>Mickelwait used the same search term to quickly find another video that shows a woman described in its title as a &#34;crack whore.&#34; The woman is heard complaining bitterly as she submits to sex in return for what the title mockingly claims is five dollars.</p><p>&#34;We have no indication she even knows this is being filmed,&#34; Mickelwait said of this video, which has been on the site for two years. &#34;You cannot see the woman&#39;s face, so it would be impossible to verify.&#34;</p><p>Pornhub, launched in 2007 and based in Montreal, lets users upload amateur and professional porn videos in much the same way users upload to YouTube.</p><p>It&#39;s been four years since a wave of news accounts revealed that the site was infested with non-consensual videos of rape, sexual assault, child porn, and footage from hidden cameras.</p><p>Advertisers, streaming platforms, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/mastercard-visa-pornhub-cut-off-payments2020-12">and credit card companies</a> cut ties en masse, and the site took down 80% of its content.</p><p>Since then, Pornhub has enacted <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://help.pornhub.com/hc/en-us/categories/4419836212499-Our-Commitment-to-Trust-and-Safety">a detailed system of safeguards</a> to keep illegal and abusive content off the site. Users who upload videos must submit government-issued photo IDs. In January, the site began requiring these IDs for &#34;performers&#34; in all new videos.</p><p>&#34;No platform on the internet has taken the significant steps we have to protect the safety and security of our community,&#34; said Sarah Bain, a spokeswoman for <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/pornhubs-new-owner-wont-reveal-mindgeek-bosses-names-due-stigma-2023-3?utm_medium=social&amp;utm_campaign=business-sf&amp;utm_source=twitter">Ethical Capital Partners</a>, a Canadian private equity firm that owns the Pornhub network of adult-content sites.</p><p>&#34;We have taken unprecedented steps to mitigate the ability of bad actors to upload illegal material on our platforms,&#34; including using AI technologies and human monitoring to police content, she said.</p><p>But legal repercussions from those pre-purge days &mdash; including federal monitoring and an ever-growing number of lawsuits &mdash; are still rippling through Pornhub and its network of user-generated porn sites.</p><p>&#34;Performers&#34; remain unverified in many thousands of pre-2024 videos, including those that pop up from search terms involving teens and violence, Mickelwait told Business Insider.</p><p>It&#39;s these kinds of videos &mdash; uploaded without any verification of the age or consent of those depicted &mdash; that now drive Mickelwait&#39;s fight to knock Pornhub out of business.</p><p>Without verification, there&#39;s no way to know if the &#34;performers&#34; consented to the performance &mdash; or to its posting on Pornhub. &#34;You actually don&#39;t know if they&#39;re 18, or if it&#39;s revenge porn, or if it&#39;s rape,&#34; Mickelwait said.</p><h2 id="6eb78c56-8852-4b74-9c18-5fa6405ac746" data-toc-id="6eb78c56-8852-4b74-9c18-5fa6405ac746">Lawsuits and monitoring</h2><p>An ever-growing number of lawsuits by some 300 plaintiffs allege the site knowingly profited from videos of their abuse. More lawsuits are being readied, plaintiff lawyers told BI. Lawyers for Pornhub did not return requests for comment on these suits.</p><p>In yet another ripple, Pornhub&#39;s parent company, Aylo &mdash; formerly MindGeek &mdash; was ordered last year to submit to three years of <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.justice.gov/usao-edny/pr/pornhub-parent-company-admits-receiving-proceeds-sex-trafficking-and-agrees-three-year">federal monitoring </a>of its content and screening. Aylo is the parent company for a network of porn sites, including Pornhub, PornhubPremium, Brazzers, YouPorn, Reality Kings, <a target="_blank" href="http://Men.com">Men.com</a>, TransAngels and Nataku.</p><p>Details of that monitoring &mdash; part of a deferred prosecution agreement from the Pornhub network&#39;s years of hosting hundreds of videos from <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/girls-do-porn-victims-sue-pornhub-mindgeek-40-million-2020-12">the GirlsDoPorn sex-trafficking ring </a>&mdash; have not been made public. A law enforcement source told BI last week that an announcement will be made soon.</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669bcf83fb2b6bedb058f1df?format=jpeg" height="946" width="820" charset="" alt="An image of the book &#34;Takedown: Inside the Fight to Shut Down Pornhub,&#34; by anti-trafficking activist Laila Mickelwait."/><figcaption><p class="copyright">Penguin Random House</p></figcaption></figure><p>Pornhub remains a thriving user-generated adult entertainment site, boasting <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.pornhub.com/press">100 million visits a day</a>.</p><p>But as detailed in her new book &mdash; to be released by Random House on Tuesday and written like a detective thriller &mdash; Mickelwait has landed some round-house punches.</p><h2 id="d11684aa-56af-4a27-bd30-76a0a5cad3ec" data-toc-id="d11684aa-56af-4a27-bd30-76a0a5cad3ec"><strong>A one-woman fight to sink Pornhub</strong></h2><p>Mickelwait is the founder of the nonprofit <a target="_blank" href="https://justicedefensefund.org/">Justice Defense Fund</a>. Her <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://traffickinghubpetition.com/">Traffickinghub</a> petition, which calls for an end to Pornhub, has 2.3 million signatures.</p><p>The mother of two began her fight against the online porn empire in early 2020, as horror stories began to mount.</p><p>Nearly two dozen videos uploaded to Pornhub showed a 12-year-old Alabama boy being repeatedly drugged and raped. The rapist, Rocky Shay Franklin, is now serving <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.justice.gov/usao-mdal/pr/man-sentenced-40-years-sexual-exploitation-child-advertising-child-porn-and">a 40-year prison term</a> for sexual exploitation.</p><p>A 15-year-old Florida girl who went missing for a year <a target="_blank" href="https://www.nbcnews.com/news/crime-courts/florida-man-arrested-after-videos-missing-teen-surface-pornography-website-n1072141">was found </a>when a Pornhub user reached out to the girl&#39;s mother. &#34;The mother found fifty-eight videos of her child being raped on Pornhub,&#34; Mickelwait writes.</p><p>An investigation in the Sunday Times of London revealed illegal videos on the site involving children as young as three.</p><p>Mickelwait&#39;s book &mdash; its full title is &#34;Takedown: Inside the Fight to Shut Down Pornhub for Child Abuse, Rape, and Sex Trafficking&#34; &mdash; details her public and behind-the-scenes efforts to expose the site&#39;s outrages and publicly shame its business partners.</p><p>A spectrum of influential voices, including former progressive <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/mastercard-visa-pornhub-cut-off-payments2020-12">New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof </a>and conservative <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/bill-ackman-endorses-trump-after-assassination-attempt-2024-7">hedge-fund titan Bill Ackman</a>, has amplified Mickelwait&#39;s activism.</p><p>In response to the outcry, advertisers Heinz, Unilever, and even KY Jelly pulled their ads off Pornhub, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/mastercard-visa-pornhub-cut-off-payments2020-12">and credit card companies</a> severed their ties. MindGeek, the name of the parent company for Pornhub at the time &mdash; which then had more traffic than Amazon or Netflix &mdash; purged 10 million unverified videos almost overnight.</p><p>&#34;In less than 24 hours, 80% of the entire site is gone,&#34; Mickelwait writes. &#34;The 10th-largest website in the world has just been cut down to a stump.&#34;</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669b3c65fb2b6bedb058eece?format=jpeg" height="1667" width="2500" charset="" alt="A headshot of anti-trafficking expert Laila Mickelwait, author of the book Takedown: Inside The Fight To Shut Down Pornhub For Child Abuse, Rape, And Sex Trafficking."/><figcaption>Anti-trafficking expert Laila Mickelwait, author of the book &#34;Takedown: Inside The Fight To Shut Down Pornhub For Child Abuse, Rape, And Sex Trafficking.&#34;<p class="copyright">Laila Mickelwait/Business Insider</p></figcaption></figure><p>&#34;Laila is a one-woman wrecking crew, with two babies in her arms and a keyboard,&#34; said Mike Bowe, a Manhattan-based attorney <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/pornhub-mindgeek-sued-by-34-women-alleged-trafficking-videos-2021-6">who represents 34 women </a>accusing Pornhub of sex trafficking and child pornography in an ongoing federal racketeering lawsuit out of California filed in 2021.</p><p>&#34;I&#39;ve never seen someone with so few resources make such a big impact on such an important issue,&#34; Bowe told Business Insider.</p><p>Hedge-funder Ackman&#39;s public outcry after Kristof&#39;s devastating Times investigation &mdash; titled &#34;The Children of Pornhub&#34; &mdash; is credited in the book with pressuring Mastercard and Visa to abandon the site.</p><p>&#34;Laila Mickelwait is a superstar advocate and activist who has single-handedly led the charge against Pornhub and its facilitation and monetization of child sex trafficking,&#34; he tweeted last week.</p><div id="1721488443916" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="custom" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="insider-raw-embed" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Laila Mickelwait is a superstar advocate and activist who has single-handedly led the charge against Pornhub and its facilitation and monetization of child sex trafficking. She has written an important book called Takedown which will help further the cause. I encourage you to… <a href="https://t.co/kG2TK2R8sj">https://t.co/kG2TK2R8sj</a></p>&mdash; Bill Ackman (@BillAckman) <a href="https://twitter.com/BillAckman/status/1812148727001321803?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 13, 2024</a></blockquote> <script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><h2 id="b99be0d2-93b7-4096-9f2d-14c2557cac2b" data-toc-id="b99be0d2-93b7-4096-9f2d-14c2557cac2b">Pornhub&#39;s growing legal problems</h2><p>These days, Mickelwait hopes spiraling legal troubles &mdash; and potential damages in the tens of millions of dollars &mdash; will be Pornhub&#39;s knock-out blow.</p><p>Business Insider has found lawsuits on behalf of nearly 300 plaintiffs who allege that back before the 2020 purge, videos of their abuse were uploaded to Pornhub without their consent and remained on the site for weeks or months after they were flagged.</p><p>Pornhub&#39;s owners, advertisers, credit card partners, and hedge-fund financiers raked in millions, these lawsuits allege.</p><p>More than a dozen of these lawsuits were filed in the past month alone, and many more may be on the way. &#34;We are in the process of filing cases on behalf of approximately 250 victims, with more reaching out weekly,&#34; Bowe told BI.</p><p>In a nod to the scope of this litigation tsunami, a federal judge in California used the phrase &#34;tens of thousands of children&#34; in a November order granting class certification to one of at least two class-action trafficking suits against Pornhub and MindGeek, which rebranded last year as Aylo.</p><p>&#34;There is evidence from the defendants&#39; own records demonstrating the presence of thousands of pieces of CSAM on their sites,&#34; in previous years, US District Judge Cormac J. Carney <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/24888992-mindgeek-class-cert-order">wrote in the order</a>, using the acronym for child sexual abuse material.</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669b4d8849138fa6f6e41158?format=jpeg" height="448" width="1194" charset="" alt="An excerpt from a California federal judge&#39;s November order granting class-action status to one of dozens of Pornhub lawsuits."/><figcaption>An excerpt from a federal judge&#39;s November order granting class-action status to one of dozens of Pornhub lawsuits.<p class="copyright">Business Insider</p></figcaption></figure><h2 id="33ca5276-1756-446f-84d2-6fdea78df9c7" data-toc-id="33ca5276-1756-446f-84d2-6fdea78df9c7">Hundreds of accusers</h2><p>The allegations in the lawsuits are heartbreaking.</p><p>In 2020, 40 women &mdash; <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/girls-do-porn-victims-sue-pornhub-mindgeek-40-million-2020-12">victims of the &#34;Girls Do Porn&#34; sex-trafficking operation</a> &mdash; sued Pornhub in federal court in California, alleging the company knowingly profited from illegal videos of their abuse. In October, the list of plaintiffs in that case grew to 121 women.</p><p>A 2022 lawsuit says Pornhub profited from the videos of the 12-year-old Alabama boy who was drugged and repeatedly raped &mdash; and for five months ignored demands by police that the videos be taken down.</p><p>&#34;I ended up trying to kill myself many times. I ended up in mental hospitals,&#34; Serena Fleites, the lead plaintiff in Bowe&#39;s 34-plaintiff trafficking suit, said 2021, while testifying at a hearing before the Canadian Parliament, according to Mickelwait&#39;s book.</p><p>Fleites was a 14-year-old 8th grader in Bakersfield, California when a boy a year older than her, who she had a crush on, asked her to film naked videos of herself. The boy shared the videos with friends, and someone uploaded them to Pornhub.</p><p>&#34;There were instances where the video would have literally 2.7 million views,&#34; she told lawmakers investigating the parent company. &#34;And it would still be on Pornhub despite hundreds of comments saying: &#39;Oh this is definitely child pornography. That girl can&#39;t be any more than fourteen, thirteen.&#39;</p><p>&#34;And yet Pornhub still wouldn&#39;t take it down, even when I messaged them multiple times,&#34; she testified.</p><h2 id="40d8720e-2e96-4a39-8f1f-4aa6dc03fdb4" data-toc-id="40d8720e-2e96-4a39-8f1f-4aa6dc03fdb4">Legislation in 19 states</h2><p>Pornhub, Aylo, and Ethical Capital Partners are aggressively fighting these lawsuits, some of which are nearly four years old. The companies deny knowingly profiting from illegal and abusive content and insist that <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://help.pornhub.com/hc/en-us/categories/4419836212499-Our-Commitment-to-Trust-and-Safety">reforms</a> now keep such content off the site.</p><p>&#34;Out of respect for the integrity of court proceedings, our policy is not to comment on ongoing litigation,&#34; said Ethical Capital Partner&#39;s spokeswoman, Bain.</p><p>&#34;We look forward to the facts being fully and fairly aired in that forum. We believe in fair and just outcomes, we are committed to working with law enforcement and regulators to respond to ever-changing threats and challenges, and we will continue to expand our practices to be at the forefront of the industry and protect the safety and security of our users,&#34; she said.</p><p>Pornhub and Aylo are also fighting hard against recent <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://exoduscry.com/pcnp/tracker/">legislation in 19 states</a> that requires users to verify they are 18, typically by requiring anyone registering to use the site to upload government-issued proof of age.</p><p>In protest of these restrictions, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.pcmag.com/news/pornhub-blocked-texas-age-verification-vpn">Pornhub has blocked access</a> from IP addresses for at least nine states with such laws, according to pcmag.com. Users who try to log on to Pornhub from IP addresses in those states instead get <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://nebraskaexaminer.com/2024/07/16/pornhub-blocks-access-by-nebraska-users-as-age-verification-law-takes-effect/">a message from adult film actor Cherie DeVille</a>, telling them to complain to their local representatives.</p><p>Pornhub&#39;s lawyers have sued the attorneys general in these states, challenging the constitutionality of their user age-verification laws.</p><p>Their challenge to Texas&#39;s age-verification law is set to be heard by the US Supreme Court during its fall term. It&#39;s a case that would decide the legality of these laws coast to coast.</p><p>&#34;Most consumers in general do not feel comfortable uploading their IDs&#34; when online, noted Mike Stabile, director of public policy for the <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.freespeechcoalition.com/">Free Speech Coalition</a>, an adult entertainment trade association that has joined in fighting the lawsuits.</p><p>&#34;That&#39;s doubly more sensitive when you&#39;re dealing with adult content,&#34; he said.</p><p>Stabile added that if Mickelwait finds something of concern, she should report it.&#34;Historically, what Laila has done is air it through the press,&#34; he said.</p><p>Mickelwait said that she has reported many hundreds of videos to law enforcement and anti-trafficking watchdogs.</p><p>Most recently, she said, she reported to state authorities the Pornhub video showing a woman shouting in pain and asking not to be filmed.</p><p>&#34;It&#39;s critical to bring justice to these victims, but also to be a deterrent to future abusers,&#34; she told BI. &#34;Pornhub, to this day, is still a crime scene that needs to be shut down and its owners held accountable.&#34;</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/pornhub-is-awash-in-lawsuits-unverified-videos-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Big Tech's phony Trumpism https://www.businessinsider.com/marc-andreessens-endorsement-donald-trump-tech-industry-silicon-valley-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:3180cfdf-88ed-9761-4aa5-f79d278f028f Mon, 22 Jul 2024 09:27:02 +0000 Marc Andreessen 2024 is backing Trump. Marc Andreessen 2007 thinks that's stupid. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669810dbfb2b6bedb058093c?format=jpeg" height="1000" width="2000" charset="" alt="Collage featuring a large photo of Donald Trump towering over a smaller photo of Marc Andreessen"/><figcaption><p class="copyright">Paul Chinn; Andrew Caballero Reynolds/Getty Images; Alyssa Powell/BI</p></figcaption></figure><p class="drop-cap">On July 16, the famed technology investor Marc Andreessen announced via podcast that he is supporting Donald Trump in his campaign for a second term as president. That&#39;s a huge about-face: Andreessen backed every Democratic presidential candidate from Bill Clinton to Hillary.</p><p>I listened to<a target="_blank" href="https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-ben-marc-show/id1713388101?i=1000662448093"><u> the podcast</u></a>, all 85 minutes of it, to hear why Andreessen is joining so many other <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-vcs-in-silicon-valley-2024-7"><u>big names in Silicon Valley</u></a> &mdash; from his investing partner Ben Horowitz to Elon Musk to Larry Ellison &mdash; in backing Trump. The main reason, Andreessen explained, is<strong> </strong>what he&#39;s been touting as a &#34;<a target="_blank" href="https://a16z.com/the-little-tech-agenda/"><u>Little Tech&#34; agenda</u></a>, which decries any government regulation of technology and venture capital. Scrappy little startups, the manifesto asserts, are &#34;the vanguard of American technology supremacy.&#34; They fuel hypergrowth, improve everyone&#39;s quality of life, and guarantee American military superiority and global stability. The<strong> </strong>Little Tech agenda also includes a surprising hat tip to the defense industry, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/failure-silicon-valley-bank-myth-american-west-pioneer-frontier-technology-2023-3"><u>one of Silicon Valley&#39;s original funders</u></a> and most <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/top-defense-tech-vcs-to-know-2024-4"><u>reliable customers</u></a>.</p><p>&#34;A startup,&#34; Andreessen has written, &#34;is what happens when a plucky group of outcasts and misfits comes together with a dream, ambition, courage, and a particular set of skills &mdash; to build something new in the world, to build a product that will improve people&#39;s lives, and to build a company that may go on to create many more new things in the future.&#34; And Trump, he believes, is the man who will prevent big government from getting in the way of these daring visionaries.</p><p>After listening to Andreessen explain his political change of heart, I came away convinced of two things: (1) His Trumpiness doesn&#39;t make much sense, and (2) neither does his Little Tech agenda.</p><p>How do I know this? Because for the past 20 years, I&#39;ve been reading a smart, prolific tech blogger named Marc Andreessen.</p><p>Before Andreessen and Horowitz formed their venture-capital firm in 2009, Andreessen was an incisive observer of Silicon Valley. And in those days, before he had so much money in the game, he <a target="_blank" href="https://web.archive.org/web/20080229071047/http:/blog.pmarca.com/2007/06/the_truth_about.html"><u>warned us against falling for the kind of hyperbole</u></a> he&#39;s now spewing.</p><p>Back then, Andreesen&#39;s concept of what constituted a startup was a lot simpler. &#34;There are many fine businesses in the world &mdash; many of them highly profitable, and very satisfying to run &mdash; that do not have leverage in their model that makes them suitable for venture capital investment,&#34; he wrote. Meaning, in plain English, that what constituted a startup worthy of VC backing was the ability to get a 10x return on investments in five years &mdash; to make something once, like a piece of software or a website, and then sell it to 1,000 businesses or millions of consumers.</p><p>That&#39;s it. That&#39;s all a venture-backed startup should be, according to Andreessen. It&#39;s not Captain America&#39;s shield or something.</p><p>Big Andreesen (meaning the current bloated billionaire model) also contradicts Little Andreessen (the earlier, leaner blogger) on the issue of regulation. His partner, Horowitz, recently wrote that the <a target="_blank" href="https://a16z.com/politics-and-the-future/"><u>main risk to American tech</u></a>, and by extension American global hegemony, is &#34;misguided regulatory policy.&#34; Government needs to get out of the way of &#34;decentralized technologies&#34; like AI, biotech, and blockchain and focus its energies on &#34;the centralized, monopoly-enabling technologies of web 2 and the industrial-era financial system.&#34;</p><p>But 15 years ago, Andreessen told us that&#39;s the wrong way to think about the internet. &#34;Web 2.0,&#34; he wrote, &#34;has been picked up as a term by the entrepreneurial community and its corollaries in venture capital, the press, analysts, large media and Internet companies, and Wall Street to describe a theoretical new category of startup companies.&#34; But it was just branding, he explained. There aren&#39;t &#34;spaces&#34; or ecosystems. &#34;If the product is compelling to the market, it will succeed,&#34; he wrote. &#34;If the product is not compelling to the market, it will fail.&#34; The issue isn&#39;t whether tech is good or bad for America. The issue is whether the tech actually works and fills a need.</p><es-blockquote data-styles="pullquote-breakout" data-quote="Andreessen is just deploying the Trumpian trick of falsely idealizing the past" data-quote-updated="true" data-source="Add source (optional)" data-source-updated="false"> <blockquote class="pullquote-wrapper pullquote-breakout"> <q class="pullquote-quotation">Andreessen is just deploying the Trumpian trick of falsely idealizing the past</q> </blockquote> </es-blockquote><p>To be fair, Andreessen didn&#39;t worry much about regulation back in the old days. The reason, he now claims, is that government used to leave Silicon Valley alone. On the podcast he said Democrats used to be &#34;pro-tech, they were pro-startup, they were pro-America winning in tech markets, they were pro-entrepreneurship. You could be successful in business, you could make a lot of money, and then you give the money away in philanthropy and get enormous credit.&#34; VC investors operated in a magical technolibertarian liminal space, a West wild enough to enable them to make tiny iPhones and big bucks. But the Biden administration changed that, Andreessen argues, by trying to regulate the &#34;math&#34; of AI and by going after Big Tech&#39;s anticompetitive and deceptive practices.</p><p>In this case, Andreessen is just deploying the Trumpian trick of falsely idealizing the past. The Biden administration didn&#39;t invent tech regulation. It&#39;s just resuscitating regulatory practices that were well in play back in the 1990s and early 2000s. Like when <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/microsoft-1990s-antitrust-case-looms-over-apple-2024-3"><u>the Justice Department sued Microsoft</u></a> and separated its web browser from its operating system. Or a decade or so before that, when <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/heres-a-look-at-the-long-history-of-atts-battles-with-the-us-government-2018-6"><u>the government broke up AT&amp;T</u></a> and sparked a whole new flourishing of telecommunications companies. Enforcing regulations almost always opens the field to new startups and a diverse set of new technologies. Biden&#39;s position is basically that to Make America Great Again, we need to Make America Innovate Again.</p><p>I suspect some of Andreessen&#39;s support of Trump is really just personal. His explanation for <a target="_blank" href="https://pmarchive.com/an_hour_and_a_half_with_barack_obama.html"><u>why he endorsed Barack Obama</u></a> basically boils down to &#34;I had a very long meeting with him and he charmed me.&#34; This time around, well, Donald Trump met with Andreessen and Horowitz, but Joe Biden did not.</p><es-blockquote data-styles="pullquote-right" data-quote="Beyond his own share prices and dividends, Andreessen&#39;s biggest about-face is his refusal to take into account the larger consequences of supporting Trump" data-quote-updated="true" data-source="Add source (optional)" data-source-updated="false"> <blockquote class="pullquote-wrapper pullquote-right"> <q class="pullquote-quotation">Beyond his own share prices and dividends, Andreessen&#39;s biggest about-face is his refusal to take into account the larger consequences of supporting Trump</q> </blockquote> </es-blockquote><p>At any rate, Andreessen&#39;s support of Trump hardly comes as a surprise. He and his fellow Silicon Valley investor-class billionaires have been <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-david-sacks-dinner-anti-biden-hollywood-hills-2024-4"><u>sliding rightward</u></a> for years. Despite all their highfalutin language about saving America through technological innovation, they&#39;re actually arguing <em>against </em>the kind of anticompetitive rules that would enable innovation to flourish.</p><p>&#34;The &#39;Little Tech Agenda&#39; has nothing to do with innovation or technology,&#34; <a target="_blank" href="https://www.techpolicy.press/the-little-tech-agenda-is-just-selfserving-nonsense/"><u>observes</u></a> the political scientist and tech analyst Dave Karpf. &#34;It&#39;s just a VC wish list. The investor class isn&#39;t clever enough to invest in companies that turn a profit by bringing useful products to market anymore. They need special treatment from the government for their bad investments to pay off.&#34;</p><p>Beyond his own share prices and dividends, Andreessen&#39;s biggest about-face is his refusal to take into account the larger consequences of supporting Trump. In 2016, Andreessen <a target="_blank" href="https://www.vox.com/2016/6/14/11940052/marc-andreessen-donald-trump-hillary-clinton"><u>explained his support of Hillary Clinton</u></a> at the Bloomberg Technology Conference. He said he looked at four criteria for a president: science policy, market policy, trade, and immigration. He was unhappy with the Democrats for regulating GMOs, he said. But the dealbreaker, for him, was Trump&#39;s restrictive and racist immigration policy.</p><p>&#34;The Valley wouldn&#39;t be here, we wouldn&#39;t be doing any of this, if we didn&#39;t have the amazing flow of immigrants that we&#39;ve had in the last 80 years,&#34; Andreessen declared. &#34;And the idea of choking that off just makes me sick to my stomach.&#34;</p><p>Since then, Trump&#39;s immigration policies have <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/stagflation-recession-trump-policy-tariff-immigration-deportation-economy-outlook-jpmorgan-2024-7"><u>only gotten </u><em><u>worse</u></em></a>. But Andreessen&#39;s digestion has somehow improved?</p><p>I&#39;ve been writing about the tech industry, on and off, since before Andreessen&#39;s company Netscape went public. I always thought that the gadgets and connections coming out of Silicon Valley were more than just toys &mdash; that they really could presage a world where people had better stuff and more knowledge. I bought Silicon Valley&#39;s founding rhetoric. Tech would be a great democratic equalizer. Whether people got rich along the way seemed incidental.</p><p>I now understand my mistake. It&#39;s not that Andreessen has changed, or that his support of Donald Trump is hypocritical. It&#39;s that I didn&#39;t see that this is where Silicon Valley was always headed. For the people who got rich off tech, getting rich was always the point. By backing Trump, they&#39;re making clear that nothing else matters to them: not human rights, not the climate emergency, not women&#39;s reproductive health, not the &#34;amazing flow of immigrants&#34; who helped them get rich in the first place. It&#39;s easy to scoff at the way they now claim to care about making America great. But I was a sucker for believing they ever cared about anything beyond their own self-interest.</p><hr/><p><a target="_blank" rel="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/author/adam-rogers"><em><u>Adam Rogers</u></em></a><em> is a senior correspondent at Business Insider.</em></p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/marc-andreessens-endorsement-donald-trump-tech-industry-silicon-valley-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> A top JP Morgan strategist predicted in January that Biden would drop out. Here's what else was in that analyst's list of top 10 'surprises' to look out for in 2024. https://www.businessinsider.com/jpmorgan-strategist-predicted-january-biden-drop-out-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:a91e6ecb-290c-d94d-4b63-86423f0c2f96 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 09:16:21 +0000 JPMorgan's Michael Cembalest also expected consumer backlash against self-driving vehicles and that the Ukraine War will drag on for another year. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669e09e080d4d5da13d5bfd6?format=jpeg" height="768" width="1024" charset="" alt="Elon Musk speaking during the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity; President Joe Biden speaking at the 115th NAACP National Convention; Russian leader Vladimir Putin during a visit to the All-Russian Exhibition Center."/><figcaption>Besides predicting President Joe Biden would drop out, JPMorgan Asset Management strategist Michael Cembalest also expected consumer backlash against self-driving vehicles and that Russia&#39;s war on Ukraine will drag on for another year.<p class="copyright">Marc Piasecki via Getty Images; Mario Tama via Getty Images; Contributor via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Michael Cembalest predicted that President Joe Biden would drop his reelection plans before November.</li><li>The prediction, published on January 1, came true on Sunday when Biden dropped out.</li><li>Cembalest also made other predictions regarding self-driving cars and the Ukraine war.</li></ul><p>JPMorgan Asset Management strategist Michael Cembalest was <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/jpmorgan-strategist-biden-could-drop-out-of-2024-election-2024-1">right on the money</a> when he predicted that President <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/who-is-joe-biden-bio-age-family-key-positions-2019-3">Joe Biden</a> would <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-presidential-race-2024-7">drop out from the 2024 presidential race</a>.</p><p>Cembalest, who chairs the company&#39;s market and investment strategy, made the prediction in his list of &#34;<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://assets.jpmprivatebank.com/content/dam/jpm-pb-aem/global/en/documents/eotm/outlook-2024.pdf#page=41">top 10 possible surprises for 2024.</a>&#34; The list was published in JPMorgan Asset Management&#39;s January 1 &#34;Eye on the Market Outlook.&#34;</p><p>&#34;President Biden withdraws sometime between Super Tuesday and the November election, citing health reasons. Biden passes the torch to a replacement candidate named by the Democratic National Committee,&#34; Cembalest wrote.</p><p>In his prediction, Cembalest didn&#39;t specify the reasons for Biden&#39;s withdrawal. However, he did note that the president &#34;has a low approval rating for a President with ~10% job creation since his inauguration.&#34;</p><p>On Sunday, Biden dropped out of the race and endorsed Vice President <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-should-not-drop-out-election-prediction-allan-lichtman-2024-7">Kamala Harris</a> as his successor.</p><p>It remains unclear how the Democratic Party will pick Biden&#39;s replacement. Some have called for an <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-what-happens-next-2024-7">open convention</a> where potential contenders can fight it out, while others are advocating for Harris to <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/democrats-endorsing-kamala-harris-to-replace-joe-biden-2024-7">take over Biden&#39;s campaign and the nomination immediately</a>.</p><p>That said, Biden&#39;s departure from the race wasn&#39;t the only interesting prediction Cembalest made. His list, which included technical forecasts on foreign currencies and the loan market, also touched on technological and geopolitical developments.</p><p>For one, Cembalest wrote in his list that &#34;the driverless car backlash is coming.&#34;</p><p>&#34;I believe that a possible backlash is coming from citizens who believe, as in the case of the despised urban scooter plague, that convenience for some results in dangers and inconvenience for others,&#34; he wrote, citing the declining stock prices for companies selling <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/guides/tech/what-is-lidar">LiDAR</a>, a type of sensor used by self-driving cars.</p><p>If Cembalest is right on that count, that would be a huge bummer for EV entrepreneurs like <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk">Elon Musk</a>. Musk has bet <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/tesla">Tesla&#39;s</a> future on a flashy <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-says-tesla-robotaxi-event-delay-due-to-redesign-2024-7">robotaxi concept</a> that is set to be unveiled in October.</p><p>On the geopolitical front, Cembalest said that we shouldn&#39;t expect a resolution to the Ukraine war anytime soon.</p><p>&#34;Despite Russia reportedly losing 87% of its prewar active troops (315,000 killed or injured) and two-thirds of its tanks, there is no ceasefire, and the war drags on for another year,&#34; he wrote in January.</p><p>Cembalest&#39;s prediction aligns with what the Biden administration has said about the conflict.</p><p>In May, US national security advisor Jake Sullivan said the Ukrainians will be able to &#34;<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/jake-sullivan-ukraine-can-mount-counteroffensive-on-russia-in-2025-2024-5">hold the line</a>&#34; this year and could look to mount a counteroffensive in 2025.</p><p>US Army Gen. Christopher Cavoli told the Armed Services Committee during an April hearing that <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/russias-army-15-percent-larger-when-attacked-ukraine-us-general-2024-4">Russia&#39;s army is now 15% bigger</a> than when it invaded Ukraine.</p><p>&#34;Over the past year, Russia increased its front-line troop strength from 360,000 to 470,000,&#34; Cavoli said in his April 11 <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.armed-services.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/cavoli_statement.pdf">statement</a> to Congress. &#34;Regardless of the outcome of the war in Ukraine, Russia will be larger, more lethal, and angrier with the West than when it invaded.&#34;</p><p>Representatives for Cembalest at JPMorgan Asset Management did not immediately respond to a request for comment from BI sent outside regular business hours.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/jpmorgan-strategist-predicted-january-biden-drop-out-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> I'm a ghostwriter for big names in business and Hollywood. The interview process is emotional, but I know what makes a great story. https://www.businessinsider.com/ghostwriter-celebrity-business-leader-memoirs-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:29ddbc36-24a2-d26d-8a33-a5031006b520 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 09:05:02 +0000 Loren Stephens charges up to $150,000 to ghostwrite memoirs for celebrities, business leaders, and politicians. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669dd0b0fb2b6bedb05913b3?format=jpeg" height="2000" width="2667" charset="" alt="headshot of a woman on a lilac background"/><figcaption>Loren Stephens ghostwrites memoirs for many CEOs and entrepreneurs.<p class="copyright">Courtesy of Loren Stephens</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Loren Stephens moved on from editing, banking, and documentary production to ghostwriting in 2007.</li><li>Her company, Write Wisdom, employs seven writers and caters to Hollywood and business elites.</li><li>She generates six-figures in revenue annually, with book fees ranging from $65,000 to $150,000.</li></ul><p><em>This as-told-to essay is based on a conversation with </em><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://writewisdom.com/"><em>Loren Stephens</em></a><em>, a ghostwriter based in Los Angeles. The following has been edited for length and clarity.</em></p><p>I studied English literature, government, and international relations. After graduate school, I worked as an economics editor in Boston before pivoting to banking, where I stayed for eight years.</p><p>I moved to Los Angeles in 1980 and took a job in corporate development before moving to theater and documentary production, where my strength was raising money.</p><p>Now, I&#39;m a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/twitter-ghostwriter-silicon-valley-vc-venture-founder-san-francisco-2022-10">ghostwriter</a> for celebrities and leaders in business.</p><h2 id="450f9594-2e50-412e-b065-70c2cc75da14" data-toc-id="450f9594-2e50-412e-b065-70c2cc75da14"><strong>I wrote my mom&#39;s life story first</strong></h2><p>My mom was an opera singer, and I wrote a book about her life for her. She got so much pleasure from it, and I did, too. I didn&#39;t even know what a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-pr-firms-are-making-linkedin-ghostwriting-a-big-business-2024-4">ghostwriter</a> was or if there was a business for it.</p><p>I told some of my biggest donors that I was going to try something completely different. Some of them became my first ghostwriting clients.</p><h2 id="8dfb946b-36eb-4abc-96e5-a2b85f012eac" data-toc-id="8dfb946b-36eb-4abc-96e5-a2b85f012eac"><strong>I started my company, Write Wisdom, in 2007</strong></h2><p>I have seven writers who work for me on a per-book basis. I negotiate the fees, collect payments, and distribute payments to our writers. The writers set the interview and writing schedule with the client.</p><p>I spend around five hours per day writing, and I often manage multiple projects simultaneously.</p><h2 id="9d2e1245-138e-4ab8-83b3-89b428dd4b9f" data-toc-id="9d2e1245-138e-4ab8-83b3-89b428dd4b9f"><strong>The business revenue is in the 6-figures annually</strong></h2><p>The fee I charge for one book depends on the genre and length but ranges between $65,000 and $150,000. It&#39;s typically paid in increments as we sign the agreement, write the first draft, and complete the final draft.</p><p>We&#39;ll also enter a follow-up agreement if the client wants us to help select a publisher and a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-landed-six-figure-book-deal-major-publisher-2023-7">book publicist</a>.</p><h2 id="809340db-fc35-4779-a6e0-9f7f3805b330" data-toc-id="809340db-fc35-4779-a6e0-9f7f3805b330"><strong>I work with a lot of CEOs and entrepreneurs</strong></h2><p>Some of my clients have been businessmen and philanthropist Al Azus, actor and music industry executive Aki Gonzalez Aleong, and Jeff Margolis, a director for major Hollywood awards ceremonies, <a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/oscars-insiders-say-no-host-is-great-idea-2019-2">including the Oscars</a>.</p><p>They hire me because they know that I understand their language. From my time making documentaries, I know how to put together a good story and juice the emotion out of them.</p><p>If the client and I feel it will help the book succeed, we add my name. Most of the time, however, my name isn&#39;t on the cover. The wording is usually &#34;with&#34; rather than &#34;and&#34; since the story is theirs.</p><h2 id="c7ce0b4d-e73c-40fc-b252-05bb99bb1bcd" data-toc-id="c7ce0b4d-e73c-40fc-b252-05bb99bb1bcd"><strong>We do 10 two-hour interviews with our client</strong></h2><p>The interviews are recorded and transcribed and become the basis for the first draft. Part of the writing also includes research and <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-use-chatbots-fact-checking-prompts-made-up-answers-2023-7">fact-checking</a>, which is usually a collaborative effort.</p><p>Once the client looks at the first draft, it often prompts them to think of things they&#39;ve forgotten. We do further interviews and incorporate that material into the book. After that, we do another edit, which is more of a polish.</p><p>The manuscript should typically be completed in about a year. Working with successful people usually means they&#39;re extremely busy, so sometimes we have to wait for them to find time for everything.</p><h2 id="f32dd7a9-7551-44db-bc63-c6054928ec77" data-toc-id="f32dd7a9-7551-44db-bc63-c6054928ec77"><strong>Finding the emotional hook is the most important part of ghostwriting</strong></h2><p>There&#39;s usually a moment when it&#39;s obvious that a question has touched a nerve, and the floodgates open.</p><p>I don&#39;t advocate for becoming <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/barbara-walters-most-controversial-interviews-from-her-60-year-career-2022-12">Barbara Walters</a>, but rather to gently shape questions that will lead to highly charged emotions everyone can relate to.</p><p>I establish what readers can identify with, like how they felt when they almost went bankrupt. People like to read about how others have faced hardships and come out the other end because it&#39;s inspiring.</p><h2 id="702ddfef-33e7-4e1b-85e7-3c0ca2bc3b6b" data-toc-id="702ddfef-33e7-4e1b-85e7-3c0ca2bc3b6b"><strong>Sometimes the interview process can be difficult for clients</strong></h2><p>When we address topics like <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/what-is-intergenerational-trauma-signs-2024-1">trauma</a> and relationships, it can be a lot for the client to process. I&#39;ve had clients struggle with things in the interview, so I&#39;ll suggest that we put something to the side and come back to it later.</p><p>Very often, as they go through the interview process, they become more comfortable talking about difficult things later on.</p><p>Pushing someone into a corner is the worst thing you can do. If they&#39;re adamant they don&#39;t want something in the book, I don&#39;t force them to speak about it.</p><h2 id="7527d8d2-ffd8-4084-aa44-757ed98ac1f7" data-toc-id="7527d8d2-ffd8-4084-aa44-757ed98ac1f7"><strong>I&#39;ve had to delicately try to talk clients into leaving some things out</strong></h2><p>Generally, these tend to be boring items. Often, it&#39;s an A-Z list of family and friends. I usually try to find a photo of the friend and them together to judge whether it&#39;s worth keeping them in the story.</p><p>Sometimes when something is really important to them, I have to make a judgment call. They&#39;re hiring us because we&#39;re the experts. At the same time, they&#39;re the experts on their own life.</p><h2 id="015a591e-41b3-45db-b4df-66e4a28e4d29" data-toc-id="015a591e-41b3-45db-b4df-66e4a28e4d29"><strong>I&#39;ve only had one client who wasn&#39;t happy with the first draft</strong></h2><p>&#34;Talmage Farm,&#34; by former North Carolina State Rep. Leo Daughtry, turned into one of my favorite books I&#39;ve worked on.</p><p>It&#39;s set in the 50s and 60s in a farming area of North Carolina. I&#39;m from LA, and I struggled to understand the politics and economics of the area. I resorted to cliché a little too much.</p><p>I was worried I would lose the assignment, but I took a few steps back and ate some humble pie. I listened to their objections and went deeper into the issues they raised with further interviews and research.</p><h2 id="a912d506-16fa-41b4-a381-75c6daec5d21" data-toc-id="a912d506-16fa-41b4-a381-75c6daec5d21"><strong>My goal is to get the client&#39;s story onto the page, hook the reader, educate, entertain, and enlighten</strong></h2><p>I recently received an email from the son of one of my clients, who said he learned a great deal about his father from reading the manuscript. Even with my mother&#39;s book, my son read it and said he wished he had known some of the things she revealed.</p><p>The greatest compliment we can receive is when our client tells us: &#34;I gave my book to so and so, and they said that they heard my voice on every page.&#34;</p><p>That is the true test of success. Of course, good reviews are the cherry on top.</p><p><em>Want to share your story? Email Lauryn Haas at lhaas@businessinsider.com</em></p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/ghostwriter-celebrity-business-leader-memoirs-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Gen Zers can be weird in interviews. A recruiter explained how it sets them back. https://www.businessinsider.com/recruiter-explains-interview-habits-holding-gen-z-back-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:a2ccce04-ea78-22f3-f8dc-dd6018e79a6d Mon, 22 Jul 2024 08:50:52 +0000 Emily Levine, an executive vice president of Career Group Companies, thinks some habits are giving Zoomers a bad reputation during their job search. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/6698f06a49138fa6f6e359dc?format=jpeg" height="1500" width="2000" charset="" alt="Gen Z woman in an interview, hiring manager looking at CV on a tablet."/><figcaption>Gen Zers may be making some huge mistakes early on in the jobseeking process (stock photo).<p class="copyright">Anchiy/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Gen Zers often struggle with job applications, feeling ignored by hiring managers.</li><li>Employers are cautious due to Gen Z&#39;s perceived entitlement and high demands.</li><li>Jobseekers should do their research and maintain professional appearances, a top recruiter advised.</li></ul><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/gen-z-millennials-job-market-unemployment-rate-economy-career-news-2024-3">Gen Zers are looking for jobs</a>. But a senior recruiter said they may be making mistakes early on that set them back.</p><p>Emily Levine, executive vice president of Career Group Companies, told Business Insider a lot of Zoomers who are filling in applications feel like they&#39;re sending them &#34;into the abyss.&#34;</p><p>&#34;There&#39;s all these job postings, but they can&#39;t get through to a live person,&#34; Levine said. &#34;There&#39;s just a ton of complaining and panic about what&#39;s next for this new generation of workers.&#34;</p><p>Levine said a slowdown in vacancies is half the story. The other half is that Gen Zers have a bad reputation among hiring managers.</p><p>Companies are still hiring, she said, &#34;they&#39;re just being a lot more careful.&#34;</p><h2 id="4b922077-5bac-4bf5-afe7-a9832a701181" data-toc-id="4b922077-5bac-4bf5-afe7-a9832a701181">Red flags</h2><p>When companies started filling roles again as global COVID-19 lockdowns started to lift, employers were &#34;throwing money at candidates,&#34; Levine said. Jobs were plentiful. But no longer.</p><p>&#34;There aren&#39;t as many jobs open as there are people who are graduating,&#34; she said. &#34;And there&#39;s a lot of people who are just more old-school and maybe turned off by the rumors of Gen Z.&#34;</p><p>Levine recruits from industries including fashion, media, tech, entertainment, and real estate, from entry-level to the C-suite. So, she&#39;s got plenty of examples of what not to do during the jobseeking stage.</p><p>She said Zoomers can have particularly high demands of their workplaces, which may be hindering them.</p><p>They are known as the generation less enthused <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/gen-z-might-kill-middle-management-2023-11">about climbing the corporate ladder.</a> They favor <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/gen-z-workers-want-flexibility-fair-pay-survey-2024-5">a work-life balance and flexibility</a>. They are the cohort that coined the term &#34;<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/tiktok-anti-work-girl-boss-lazy-girl-jobs-2023-6">lazy girl jobs</a>&#34; and <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-millennial-bosses-manage-gen-z-workers">work to live</a> rather than the other way around.</p><p>But bringing up these preferences <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/gen-z-work-life-balance-interview-questions-millennial-genx-managers-2023-3">in the very first interview</a> with a company can be a red flag, Levine said.</p><p>&#34;Do they understand that they have to pay their dues?&#34; she said.</p><p>Some are overeager to get promoted instead of focusing on the job they applied for, she said. &#34;Do they understand that just because you hit an anniversary or a milestone, that doesn&#39;t mean your title is getting changed?&#34;</p><p>Levine said raising concerns about career progression is fair, but candidates should first show the company what they can do.</p><p>Otherwise, &#34;it sounds the alarm in the interviewer&#39;s mind,&#34; she said, that they are already thinking about their next steps.</p><h2 id="353c7891-6109-4ff3-93bd-471029fda1d7" data-toc-id="353c7891-6109-4ff3-93bd-471029fda1d7">Job-hopping and bathrobes</h2><p>Gen Zers love to job-hop. Many see a job <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/gen-z-job-satisfaction-unhappy-work-salary-promotion-loyalty-2024-2">as just a job</a> and <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/gen-z-happy-job-hopping-quit-without-backup-oliver-wyman-2023-1">are happy to quit roles</a> that don&#39;t meet their expectations, even without a backup plan.</p><p>That can make firms turn to more experienced candidates &mdash; even for entry-level positions, Levine said.</p><p>&#34;How do we find someone with an entry-level price who isn&#39;t this entitled Gen Z type of candidate?&#34; Levine said. &#34;Maybe we hire someone with a little bit more experience because turnover is expensive.&#34;</p><p>One of the biggest mistakes Levine has encountered from young job seekers is &#34;winging it&#34; &mdash; not doing any research on the company or person they are meeting for an interview.</p><p>&#34;Even if they&#39;re provided with the link of who they&#39;re meeting with, they show up completely blind, and they have no idea of anything about the company or the person that they&#39;re interviewing with,&#34; she said. &#34;Which is just so insulting.&#34;</p><p>She&#39;s heard of some candidates taking video interviews from their cars without pulling over.</p><p>&#34;They&#39;re just driving on video and having a conversation as if it&#39;s totally normal,&#34; Levine said. &#34;Not even making eye contact with the interviewer.&#34;</p><p>Levine has also seen candidates take interviews from bed, or lying down on the sofa with a laptop on their stomach, &#34;and just dirty laundry everywhere in the room.&#34;</p><p>Levine&#39;s colleague had a recent interaction with a potential client who was in bed watching TV during her interview with them.</p><p>&#34;We just thought it was the strangest thing ever,&#34; Levine said, as if &#34;we were inconveniencing her during a nap.&#34;</p><p>&#34;I&#39;ve had people answer FaceTime interviews and they&#39;re wearing a bathrobe,&#34; Levine added. &#34;Wet hair, hair twisted up in a towel.&#34;</p><p>Chewing gum throughout the interview is also a bad look, Levine said, as is having a parent follow up after an interview &mdash; or even <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/gen-zers-bringing-parents-job-interviews-recruiters-not-happy-2024-6">bringing mom or dad to the interview itself</a>.</p><p>&#34;The bottom line is that people are just way too comfortable,&#34; Levine said.</p><p>To bridge this disconnect, Levine said Zoomers who want to work hard and find the right job should start by doing their research. They should tailor their resumes and applications to specific roles rather than sending the same version to multiple job postings.</p><p>Interview attire is also important, Levine said, so candidates should have a selection of job-appropriate outfits. It doesn&#39;t have to be expensive, she said, but should show you take yourself seriously.</p><p>They should also clean up their social media, Levins said, removing anything &#34;controversial&#34; from public profiles.</p><p>&#34;Interviews are auditions, and you always want to put your best foot forward,&#34; Levine said. &#34;But I&#39;m finding that candidates are just more and more clueless today about what it takes.&#34;</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/recruiter-explains-interview-habits-holding-gen-z-back-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Here comes the wave of insurance claims for the CrowdStrike outage https://www.businessinsider.com/businesses-claiming-losses-crowdstrike-outage-insurance-billions-losses-cyber-policies-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:47080c71-2b2d-b4d4-1a2d-4fa80ebe0a95 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 08:49:19 +0000 CrowdStrike's outage might have cost the economy "tens of billions of dollars," a cyber insurance exec told Reuters. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669e16c1fb2b6bedb0591673?format=jpeg" height="3333" width="5000" charset="" alt="Flight information written manually amid CrowdStrike outage"/><figcaption>CrowdStrike&#39;s outage on Friday affected business operations worldwide, including grounding airlines.<p class="copyright">Zakaria Zainal/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li><strong>CrowdStrike&#39;s outage might have cost the economy &#34;tens of billions of dollars,&#34; said a cyber insurance exec.</strong></li><li><strong>Businesses are turning to their cyber insurance providers to regain their losses.</strong></li><li><strong>But not all companies have adequate coverage for such major disruptions.</strong></li></ul><p>Friday&#39;s massive <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/major-disruptions-airline-bank-london-stock-exchange-microsoft-outage-2024-7">CrowdStrike outage</a> grounded businesses and services worldwide to a screeching halt. Now, some of those affected are looking to recoup their losses.</p><p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/mass-it-outage-companies-operations-airlines-affected-microsoft-crowdstrike-2024-7">Damages to businesses</a> included grounded flights, which left thousands of passengers stranded at airports, delivery delays, and closed stores and <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/disney-universal-theme-parks-disrupted-mass-it-outage-microsoft-crowdstrik-2024-7">amusement parks.</a></p><p>&#34;Economic damages could reach tens of billions of dollars,&#34; Nir Perry, CEO of cyber insurance risk platform Cyberwrite, told <a target="_blank" href="https://www.reuters.com/technology/insurers-face-business-interruption-claims-after-global-tech-outage-2024-07-19/">Reuters</a> on Saturday.</p><p>CrowdStrike just owes customers a<a target="_blank" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/crowdstrike-terms-conditions-limits-damages-to-refund-2024-7"> refund of its subscription fees</a> &mdash; it doesn&#39;t have to cover the money businesses lost from the interruption. A representative for CrowdStrike didn&#39;t respond to Business Insider&#39;s request for comment on Friday about how the company will enforce its terms and conditions.</p><p>Some companies affected by the outage are turning to their insurance providers to cover losses. An executive with Marsh, the world&#39;s largest insurance brokerage, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2024-07-19/tech-outage-spurs-insurance-clients-to-ready-cyber-claims">told Bloomberg on Friday</a> that more than 75 clients have prepared to file claims in the wake of the cybersecurity meltdown.</p><p>It&#39;s still too soon to tally the full impact from Friday&#39;s disruption, spokespeople for major cyber insurance providers AXA and Munich Re told Business Insider on Monday.</p><p>For companies that file claims, the money won&#39;t come immediately, and businesses might not get back anywhere close to what they lost from the outages. Certain cyber insurance policies include coverage for non-malicious incidents, and affected businesses have to consider certain variables such as deductibles and waiting periods before making claims, Perry told Reuters.</p><p>CrowdStrike&#39;s unexpected outage hit some businesses that might not have been insured against such disruptions, which can cost more than standard cyber insurance policies, Marcos Alvarez, the head of insurance at ratings agency DBRS Morningstar, told Reuters.</p><p>Larger companies like airlines or hospitals might fare slightly better than smaller businesses recovering damages from CrowdStrike itself. They might have negotiated different terms and conditions to hold CrowdStrike accountable, said Elizabeth Burgin Waller, chair of the Cybersecurity &amp; Data Privacy practice at Woods Rogers, who spoke to Business Insider on Friday.</p><p>A portion of insurance claims will likely cover costs like legal fees, personnel, and the loss of employee productivity.</p><p>The fallout of the CrowdStrike outage is expected to make waves in the cyber insurance industry as, Perry wrote on <a target="_blank" href="https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:7220037642183172096/">LinkedIn</a>, an &#34;event that will be referred to in the years to come when assessing risk.&#34;</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/businesses-claiming-losses-crowdstrike-outage-insurance-billions-losses-cyber-policies-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> MAGA world is really mad that Trump is no longer running against Biden https://www.businessinsider.com/maga-mad-that-trump-no-longer-running-against-biden-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:3cfeba08-7a39-72c3-bbb9-4ec1cccfd085 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 07:56:02 +0000 Trump and his supporters are slamming Biden for quitting the race and endorsing VP Kamala Harris instead, calling it a "coup" and demanding refunds. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669ddafb80d4d5da13d5be6f?format=jpeg" height="683" width="1024" charset="" alt="Former President Donald Trump speaking at the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee."/><figcaption>Former President Donald Trump speaking at the Republican National Convention in Milwaukee.<p class="copyright">Spencer Platt/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Trump and his supporters are slamming Joe Biden for quitting the race and endorsing Kamala Harris.&nbsp;</li><li>Some members of MAGA world are bemoaning the millions of dollars spent running against Joe Biden.</li><li>Biden&#39;s withdrawal also means Trump is now the oldest candidate in the presidential race.</li></ul><p>In the wake of President Joe Biden&#39;s withdrawal from the Democratic Party&#39;s 2024 race, it sure looks like MAGA world will be very sad to see him go. </p><p>Biden decided on Sunday to <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-presidential-race-2024-7">reject</a> his party&#39;s presidential nomination, and <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-endorses-kamala-harris-after-dropping-out-2024-7">endorsed</a> his Vice President Kamala Harris for the top ticket instead.</p><p>His announcement sparked angry outbursts from former President Donald Trump and his supporters, some of whom called the sudden switch in candidates a &#34;coup.&#34;</p><p>&#34;So, we are forced to spend time and money on fighting Crooked Joe Biden, he polls badly after having a terrible debate, and quits the race,&#34; Trump <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://truthsocial.com/@realDonaldTrump/posts/112826696160137948">wrote</a> on his Truth Social. &#34;Now we have to start all over again.&#34;</p><p>Trump added that he thought the GOP should be &#34;reimbursed for fraud.&#34;</p><p>Conservative blogger and Elon Musk friend Ian Miles Cheong reposted a screenshot of Trump&#39;s post, saying: &#34;his campaign was forced to waste money against Biden for as long as it did only for the Democrats to pull the rug out from under him by pulling Joe out of the race.&#34;</p><div id="1721620172699" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Trump raises an excellent point: his campaign was forced to waste money against Biden for as long as it did only for the Democrats to pull the rug out from under him by pulling Joe out of the race. This, if anything, is a form of cheating. <a href="https://t.co/vW1nzxSagW">pic.twitter.com/vW1nzxSagW</a></p>&mdash; Ian Miles Cheong (@stillgray) <a href="https://twitter.com/stillgray/status/1815147654944293107?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2024</a></blockquote><script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><p>Madison Cawthorn, who used to be a North Carolina congressman, echoed Trump&#39;s demand of a refund from the Biden-Harris campaign.</p><p>&#34;Someone sue the Bidden Harris campaign for a refund and request a preliminary injunction,&#34; Cawthorn <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/CawthornforNC/status/1815112552785080793">wrote</a> on X.</p><p>&#34;That campaign should not be allowed to spend a dollar on Kamala&#39;s behalf until this is fully litigated,&#34; he added.</p><p>Trump&#39;s former senior advisor Steven Miller also went on Fox News, and raged about how the Republican party had &#34;spent tens of millions of dollars running against Joe Biden.&#34;</p><p>&#34;Now they just woke up one morning and said &#39;never mind, we&#39;re cancelling the entire primary, we&#39;re getting rid of our candidate,&#39;&#34; he added.</p><div id="1721620172699" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Stephen Miller is melting down on Fox tonight. <a href="https://t.co/o22R1IihJ3">pic.twitter.com/o22R1IihJ3</a></p>&mdash; Ron Filipkowski (@RonFilipkowski) <a href="https://twitter.com/RonFilipkowski/status/1815186790422032871?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 22, 2024</a></blockquote><script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><p>With Biden stepping down, Trump is now<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-age-oldest-candidate-election-2024-7#:~:text=Now%20that%20President%20Joe%20Biden,took%20office%20at%20age%2078."> the oldest person from the two major parties to ever run for president</a>. And to be sure, Trump&#39;s camp may well be incensed because they&#39;ve spent months &mdash; and a considerable amount of airtime at the RNC &mdash; hammering Biden for his advanced age &mdash; an argument they can no longer use with Harris, who&#39;s 59.</p><p>However, Biden stepping down likely wasn&#39;t a complete surprise for the GOP. The Trump camp had anti-Harris attack ads at the ready, which they released <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-kamala-harris-attack-ads-2024-7">within an hour of Biden backing out</a>. </p><p>Signs that the GOP has been prepping for Harris versus Trump showdown have also been there for weeks. </p><p>Following Biden&#39;s disastrous CNN debate performance in June, Trump posted a video on his Truth Social account on July 3, discussing the possibility of running against Harris rather than Biden.</p><p>&#34;I got him out the race, and that means we have Kamala,&#34; Trump said in the clip.</p><p>Trump was also already trialing nasty <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-already-trialing-nicknames-for-potential-kamala-harris-face-off-2024-7">nicknames</a> for Harris long before Biden quit, including &#34;Laffin&#39; Kamala Harris&#34; and &#34;Cackling Copilot Kamala Harris.&#34;</p><p>And on Wednesday, the Trump-Vance campaign said that it would not agree to a vice presidential debate until <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-vance-no-vp-debate-until-harris-picks-running-mate-2024-7">Harris picked &#34;her running mate.&#34;</a></p><p>Representatives for Harris and Trump did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Business Insider sent outside regular business hours.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/maga-mad-that-trump-no-longer-running-against-biden-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Biden's withdrawal from the presidential race spells uncertainty for the 'Trump trade' https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/biden-withdrawal-us-presidential-election-trump-trade-uncertainty-markets-investing-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:c23487ff-d587-a2dd-0af2-96fca382e480 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 06:56:47 +0000 Investors had positioned themselves for the so-called "Trump trade" following the failed assassination attempt on former President Trump on July 13. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669df2c480d4d5da13d5bf49?format=jpeg" height="1806" width="2709" charset="" alt="Harris"/><figcaption>Vice President Kamala Harris and President Joe Biden at the White House.<p class="copyright">Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Joe Biden&#39;s withdrawal from the 2024 presidential race is causing market uncertainty.</li><li>Investors were already trying to position themselves following the failed assassination attempt on former President Trump on July 13.</li><li>Analysts now expect more market volatility after Biden pulled out of the race.</li></ul><p>US President <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-presidential-race-2024-7">Joe Biden&#39;s withdrawal from the presidential election</a> is throwing fresh uncertainty into the markets for a second straight week.</p><p>Investors were already trying to position themselves for the so-called <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://markets.businessinsider.com/news/stocks/trump-trade-dominate-markets-weekend-shooting-bitcoin-dollar-inflation-bonds-2024-7">&#34;Trump trade&#34;</a> following the failed assassination attempt on former President Donald Trump on July 13. Now, they are trying to figure out how Biden dropping out would change the game.</p><p>Analysts are gearing up for volatility.</p><p>&#34;We have seen some rotation toward &#39;red&#39; sectors and away from &#39;blue&#39; ones in recent weeks as recent momentum has favored the Republican party,&#34; Mark Haefele, UBS Global Wealth Management&#39;s chief investment officer, wrote in a note on Sunday. &#34;That could at least partially reverse in the coming days as markets parse the latest developments.&#34;</p><p>The US dollar &mdash; which is expected to gain under a potential Trump presidency &mdash; weakened on Monday. This helped dollar-denominated spot gold rise 0.2% to above $2,400 an ounce.</p><p>Markets at large were relatively calm following Biden&#39;s withdrawal after the Trump trade gripped sentiment last week. S&amp;P 500 stock futures were 0.2% at 1:33 a.m. ET, while Nasdaq-100 futures were up 0.4%.</p><p>Yields for 10-year US Treasury yields were 1.7 basis points lower, &#34;which may reflect a little less risk of even more fiscal spending,&#34; Jim Reid, a multi-asset research strategist at Deutsche Bank, wrote on Monday.</p><p>Both EUROSTOXX 50 and FTSE futures were slightly higher.</p><p>Kyle Rodda, a senior market analyst at trading platform Capital.com, told Business Insider that Biden&#39;s withdrawal from the race also removes a layer of uncertainty in the market.</p><p>&#34;This move probably improves the chances of the Democrats to win the presidency,&#34; said Rodda, referring to Biden&#39;s decision not to seek a second term.</p><p>Gold, as a safe haven asset, is likely to come under pressure should Harris&#39; chances improve, since it reduces the risk of fallout from Trump&#39;s hawkish foreign policy and massive deficit spending, Chris Weston, the head of research at Australian onine broker Pepperstone, wrote in a note.</p><h2 id="b3f48522-54de-4da9-82d3-437e495c1682" data-toc-id="b3f48522-54de-4da9-82d3-437e495c1682">Investors are watching to see if Harris wins the Democrats&#39; nomination</h2><p id="b3f48522-54de-4da9-82d3-437e495c1682">Investors are still focusing on whether the Democratic Party will nominate Kamala Harris as its presidential candidate.</p><p>&#34;There is a small risk that Harris&#39; presumptive nomination is met with resistance within the Democratic Party and causes internal divisions, leading to calls for another candidate,&#34; said Rodda. &#34;That would reignite the volatility we saw at the end of last week.&#34;</p><p>The <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://markets.businessinsider.com/">CBOE Volatility Index</a> rose 33% last week following the assassination attempt on Trump, reflecting market jitters over the political landscape. The index was not yet open for trade on Monday as of the time this article was published.</p><p>Analysts don&#39;t expect the Democrats&#39; fiscal and trade policy agenda to shift much if they nominate Harris.</p><p>&#34;The Dems will want to position her as a continuity candidate,&#34; said Rodda.</p><p>&#34;Biden&#39;s withdrawal resets the contest. However, to the extent that Harris is nominated to succeed Biden as the Democratic standard-bearer, we believe the dynamics of the election will not change as much as one might expect,&#34; said UBS&#39; Haefele.</p><p>&#34;The American electorate is highly polarized and most of Biden&#39;s supporters will be reluctant to abandon the party&#39;s nominee,&#34; he added.</p><h2 id="e61103fa-8cc5-45d1-b7c4-8f13267a9b79" data-toc-id="e61103fa-8cc5-45d1-b7c4-8f13267a9b79">Focus on fundamentals</h2><p id="e61103fa-8cc5-45d1-b7c4-8f13267a9b79">Despite the uncertainty, UBS advises investors to not forget fundamentals matter too &mdash; maybe even more so than politics.</p><p id="e61103fa-8cc5-45d1-b7c4-8f13267a9b79">&#34;Investors should remember that US political outcomes are far from the largest driver of financial market returns, or even sector performance,&#34; wrote Haefele.</p><p id="e61103fa-8cc5-45d1-b7c4-8f13267a9b79">The Swiss bank is advising investors to not alter their strategies too dramatically based on political expectations.</p><p id="e61103fa-8cc5-45d1-b7c4-8f13267a9b79">&#34;Economic data and Fed rate cut expectations remain at least as important,&#34; Haefele added.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/biden-withdrawal-us-presidential-election-trump-trade-uncertainty-markets-investing-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Elon Musk is very publicly trying to recruit his billionaire peers to the Trump-Vance camp https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-going-all-in-recruit-billionaire-peers-trump-vance-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:4565ccbf-a945-b3f2-6afc-94880e9aa22e Mon, 22 Jul 2024 05:51:49 +0000 "Come on, Vinod. Trump/Vance LFG!!" Musk said in an X post to early OpenAI backer Vinod Khosla. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669dcea980d4d5da13d5bd97?format=jpeg" height="768" width="1024" charset="" alt="Former President Donald Trump and his running mate, Ohio Sen. JD Vance at the Republican National Convention; Elon Musk at the Breakthrough Prize ceremony."/><figcaption>&#34;My smartest friends, including those living in the San Francisco Bay Area who have been lifelong Dems, are excited about Trump/Vance,&#34; billionaire Elon Musk said in an X post on Sunday.<p class="copyright">Chip Somodevilla via Getty Images; Steve Granitz/FilmMagic via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Elon Musk has become a huge cheerleader for the Trump-Vance campaign on his social media platform X.</li><li>Besides endorsing the GOP team, Musk has also been selling the pair to his fellow tech billionaires.</li><li>But experts told Business Insider that Musk&#39;s stumping may not sway voters.</li></ul><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk">Elon Musk</a> really wants former President <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-luck-classified-documents-assassination-debate-2024-7">Donald Trump</a> and his vice presidential pick, Sen. <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-vice-president-jd-vance-career-facts-2024-7">JD Vance</a> of Ohio, to prevail this November.</p><p>The mercurial billionaire gave his <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-endorses-trump-after-pennsylvania-rally-incident-2024-7">endorsement</a> to Trump, just minutes after the GOP presidential candidate was nearly assassinated on July 13.</p><p>Since then, Musk has only doubled down on Trump and his newly minted running mate, Vance on his social media platform, X.</p><p>&#34;My smartest friends, including those living in the San Francisco Bay Area who have been lifelong Dems, are excited about Trump/Vance,&#34; Musk wrote in an <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/elonmusk/status/1815091075431678146">X post</a> on Sunday.</p><div id="1721614430075" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">I believe in an America that maximizes individual freedom and merit. <br/><br/>That used to be the Democratic Party, but now the pendulum has swung to the Republican Party.</p>&mdash; Elon Musk (@elonmusk) <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1815092002083471731?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2024</a></blockquote><script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><p>Besides campaigning for Trump on his own X account, Musk has even gone so far as to proposition his fellow tech billionaires after President Joe Biden said that he was <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-presidential-race-2024-7">dropping out of the race</a>.</p><p>The president said in an <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/JoeBiden/status/1815087772216303933">X post</a> on Sunday that he was endorsing Vice President Kamala Harris to be the Democratic nominee instead.</p><p>But Biden stepping aside instead prompted Musk to reach out to Democratic donors like early OpenAI backer <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/elonmusk/status/1815094152868298819">Vinod Khosla</a> and Netflix cofounder, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/elonmusk/status/1815107924257341525">Reed Hastings</a>.</p><p>Both Khosla and Hastings were calling for the Democratic Party to pick a suitable replacement for Biden when Musk jumped in and made a pitch for the Trump-Vance ticket.</p><p>Musk made a similar overture to LinkedIn cofounder <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/elonmusk/status/1815108566011011343">Reid Hoffman</a> after the latter endorsed Harris.</p><div id="1721614430075" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Come on, Vinod. Trump/Vance LFG!!</p>&mdash; Elon Musk (@elonmusk) <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1815094152868298819?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2024</a></blockquote><script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><div id="1721614430075" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Trump/Vance LFG!!</p>&mdash; Elon Musk (@elonmusk) <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1815107924257341525?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2024</a></blockquote><script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><div id="1721625817615" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Trump/Vance LFG!!</p>&mdash; Elon Musk (@elonmusk) <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1815108566011011343?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2024</a></blockquote><script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><p>&#34;I&#39;m not suggesting that Trump is without flaws, however we need an administration that is more likely to be meritocratic and promote individual freedoms over the heavy hand of government,&#34; Musk <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/elonmusk/status/1815100195736092954">told</a> Khosla after the venture capitalist replied and expressed his misgivings about Trump.</p><p>The potential switch in Democratic nominee to Harris hasn&#39;t swayed Musk, who started criticizing her candidacy on Sunday.</p><p>&#34;Imagine 4 years of this …&#34; Musk wrote in an X post about Harris. Musk was mocking Harris&#39; opening remarks at meeting, where she was heard introducing herself as a &#34;<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/speeches-remarks/2022/07/26/remarks-by-vice-president-harris-in-a-roundtable-with-disability-advocates/">woman sitting at the table wearing a blue suit.</a>&#34;</p><p>It&#39;s worth noting that the video Musk referenced was a clip of Harris from July 2022, where she was presiding over a meeting with disability advocates. Her remarks were meant to <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2022/07/kamala-harris-pronouns-description-disabilities/670970/">accommodate visually impaired meeting attendees</a>.</p><div id="1721614430075" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Imagine 4 years of this … <a href="https://t.co/gFwWAv15Qx">https://t.co/gFwWAv15Qx</a></p>&mdash; Elon Musk (@elonmusk) <a href="https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1815193874366640591?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 22, 2024</a></blockquote><script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><h2 id="b680c9fb-fd3c-441d-8503-90e9ca91eb40" data-toc-id="b680c9fb-fd3c-441d-8503-90e9ca91eb40">Musk&#39;s pro-Trump bluster may not have the effect he&#39;s hoping for, experts say</h2><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://communication.ucsd.edu/people/faculty-emeriti/hallin-dan.html">Daniel Hallin</a>, a professor emeritus studying political communication at UC San Diego, says it&#39;s not uncommon for billionaires like Musk to weigh in on politics, giving how vital money is to political races.</p><p>&#34;I think it makes sense that Musk supports Trump; they are similar in many ways, narcissistic, macho, and prone to think of themselves as above any kind of rules of the game. And I think Musk sees Trump as someone who will let billionaires be billionaires, keep their taxes low, not bother them with regulations or legal scrutiny,&#34; Hallin told BI.</p><p>Hallin added that Musk &#34;probably thinks Trump is likely to win and wants to have a friend in power, both because it is fun to be an insider, and because he has lots of business interests that are affected by government.&#34;</p><p>As for Musk&#39;s support, Hallin told BI the &#34;partisan&#34; bluster on X may not be great for Musk&#39;s business in the long run &mdash; but it won&#39;t move the needle for those who already support Trump. </p><p>&#34;You might think it would undermine Trump&#39;s populist image, but I don&#39;t think his supporters care &mdash; I think they are comfortable with the idea of a billionaire populist,&#34; Hallin told Business Insider.</p><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://annenberg.usc.edu/faculty/jonathan-d-aronson">Jonathan Aronson</a>, a communications professor at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, told BI there is a reason why Musk&#39;s being so overt about his support for Trump.</p><p>&#34;Musk hates government regulators telling him what he can and cannot do &mdash; hence his exit to Texas,&#34; Aronson told BI. &#34;Trump won&#39;t pursue him. Trump stokes his ego.&#34;</p><p>Aronson added that youths and minorities could rally to a Harris-led Democratic ticket &mdash; but it likely won&#39;t just be because of Musk and his allies&#39; support for Trump.</p><p>Representatives for Musk did not immediately respond to a request for comment from BI sent outside regular business hours.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-going-all-in-recruit-billionaire-peers-trump-vance-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Sam Altman's giant basic income study is out. Here's what it found. https://www.businessinsider.com/sam-altman-basic-income-study-results-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:919ca410-0470-90b7-1eff-f3c29681168f Mon, 22 Jul 2024 05:00:02 +0000 OpenAI CEO Sam Altman's basic income study lasted three years and included 3,000 people across Texas and Illinois, making it one of the most comprehensive basic income experiments yet. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/66991be349138fa6f6e360cb?format=jpeg" height="1500" width="3000" charset="" alt="Sam Altman photo illustration."/><figcaption><p class="copyright">Getty Images; Jenny Chang-Rodriguez/BI</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>The results of OpenAI CEO Sam Altman&#39;s guaranteed basic income study are in.</li><li>Overall spending increased, but most of the extra cash went to food and rent.</li><li>Recipients noted decreased financial stress, but that faded over time, the study found.</li></ul><p>The results are in for Sam Altman&#39;s much-anticipated basic income study, one of the largest of its kind. The experiment gave low-income participants $1,000 a month for three years, no strings attached.</p><p>Recipients put the bulk of their extra spending toward basic needs like rent, transportation, and food, the study found. They also worked less on average but remained engaged in the workforce and were more deliberate in their job searches compared to a control group.</p><p>&#34;Recipients had greater agency to make decisions that worked best for their lives and to prepare for the future, from moving neighborhoods to expressing interest in new business ventures,&#34; the report&#39;s authors said.</p><p>Altman, the CEO of OpenAI, a leading artificial intelligence company, raised $60 million for the study, including $14 million of his own money. <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.openresearchlab.org/approach"><span>OpenResearch</span></a><span> conducted the study,&nbsp;</span>which<span>&nbsp;was</span> led by researcher Elizabeth Rhodes.</p><p>It officially began in 2019 when 3,000 Texas and Illinois residents across urban, suburban, and rural areas enrolled. All of these residents had incomes below $28,000. A third got $1,000 a month for three years, while the rest &mdash; the control group &mdash; got $50 a month. No enrolled participants lost their existing benefits.</p><p>The study found that those who received the $1,000 payments increased their overall spending by an average of $310 a month, but most of that spending went toward food, rent, and transportation. They also offered more financial support to others in need compared to the control group.</p><p>Researchers, however, said they found no &#34;direct evidence of improved access to healthcare or improvements to physical and mental health&#34; among those who received $1,000 payments.</p><p>&#34;We do see significant reductions in stress, mental distress, and food insecurity during the first year, but those effects fade out by the second and third years of the program,&#34; the report said, noting that $1,000 a month could only do so much. &#34;Cash alone cannot address challenges such as chronic health conditions, lack of childcare, or the high cost of housing.&#34;</p><h2 id="f9fd84cd-91cb-426e-86a2-3a3a6135eb76" data-toc-id="f9fd84cd-91cb-426e-86a2-3a3a6135eb76">The debate over basic income</h2><p>The study was inspired by Altman&#39;s belief in the importance of a basic income in the age of AI, which some fear could render millions of jobs obsolete.</p><p>&#34;It&#39;s impossible to truly have equality of opportunity without some version of guaranteed income,&#34; Altman said when announcing the project.</p><p>The idea of a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-people-spend-universal-basic-income-ubi-food-housing-transportation-2024-4">universal basic income</a> has been around for awhile, but rose to prominence as the center of Andrew Yang&#39;s 2016 presidential campaign. Other significant figures in the tech industry have since voiced support<strong> </strong>for some kind of basic income, including Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey and Tesla CEO Elon Musk. AI godfather <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/ai-godfather-geoffrey-hinton-universal-basic-income-2024-5">Geoffrey Hinton recently advised the British government</a> to adopt a universal basic income to mitigate the number of &#34;mundane jobs&#34; AI is set to replace.</p><p>A universal basic income would provide all people with direct cash payments, no strings attached. That&#39;s a hefty political lift, however. So many cities and states have experimented with guaranteed basic incomes instead. These programs provide cash payments without restrictions to select low-income or vulnerable populations. Altman&#39;s study falls into this camp as well.</p><p>Data from dozens of these smaller programs have found that cash payments can help alleviate homelessness, unemployment, and food insecurity &mdash; though results still stress the need for local and state governments to invest in social services and housing infrastructure.</p><p>Earlier this year, Altman also floated another kind of basic income plan, which he called a &#34;<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/openai-sam-altman-universal-basic-income-idea-compute-gpt-7-2024-5#:~:text=Altman%20has%20long%20supported%20a,as%20AI%20threatens%20their%20jobs.">universal basic compute</a>.&#34; In this scenario, Altman said people would get a &#34;slice&#34; of the computational resources of large language model GPT-7, which they could use however they like.</p><p>&#34;You own part of the productivity,&#34; he explained on a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/all-in-with-chamath-jason-sacks-friedberg/id1502871393?i=1000655220554">podcast</a>.</p><p>Even these smaller experiments, however, have <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/basic-income-opposition-discriminatory-universal-basic-income-argument-2024-4">faced political hurdles</a>. Conservatives in several states have challenged the programs, halting their progress.</p><h2 id="8ac87517-0da8-463d-9395-bf25b14d1489" data-toc-id="8ac87517-0da8-463d-9395-bf25b14d1489">The Altman study&#39;s findings</h2><p>In its results, Altman&#39;s study assessed both quantitative data, such as surveys and bank transactions, and qualitative data, such as interviews with recipients.</p><p>The study found that compared to the control group, recipients&#39; total individual savings in their bank accounts increased by nearly 25%. Recipients also spent $22 more a month on other people, or about 26% more than the control group. There was little impact on car or home ownership, though recipients of the $1,000 were more likely to move neighborhoods or pay for housing than the control group.</p><p>Regarding healthcare, recipients saw slight increases compared to the control group in dental care, emergency room visits, and healthcare spending &mdash; though there was no direct evidence of improved health.</p><p>Recipients were more likely to want to have a budget and advance their education, specifically in the third year, compared to the control group. However, there were no significant effects on educational attainment overall.</p><p>The study, which began during the COVID-19 pandemic when unemployment was high, found that employment rates fell in the second and third years among recipients compared to the control group. On average, incomes rose significantly for all groups, though slightly higher for the control group. Incomes for recipients of the $1,000 rose from just under $30,000 to $45,710, while incomes for the control group started at a similar level but grew higher, to $50,970.</p><p>&#34;Cash offers flexibility and may increase agency to make employment decisions that align with recipients&#39; individual circumstances, goals, and values,&#34; the report&#39;s authors said.</p><h2 id="78870e8c-3763-4a7c-a1d2-a8d6bae99891" data-toc-id="78870e8c-3763-4a7c-a1d2-a8d6bae99891">What the participants in Altman&#39;s basic income study say</h2><p>One recipient in the program, Sarah, is a mother of four from rural Illinois who teaches in a homeschool network and makes just enough from her job to pay for school supplies.</p><p>&#34;I don&#39;t really make anything off of it,&#34; she said in a testimonial shared by OpenResearch. &#34;Even though my husband had a pretty decent job, we didn&#39;t have a lot of money for extras.&#34;</p><p>The payments from the Altman program helped Sarah pay for braces for both of her children, which weren&#39;t covered by their insurance, she said. She also used the money to finance a graduation trip for her daughter.</p><p>However, Sarah said she began &#34;slipping into a mindset&#34; where she was less careful with her finances because it felt like money was coming in &#34;without having to work for it.&#34;</p><p>&#34;Looking back, I regret that I didn&#39;t save more of it,&#34; she said.</p><p>Another recipient, Cara, told the study&#39;s researchers that she suffered from a debilitating nerve disorder that caused pain across much of her body and a loss of mobility.</p><p>While she started to receive some short-term disability payments, she said a break-in to her apartment set her back financially, and she began to sell her personal belongings.</p><p>&#34;Feeling the loss of being able to care for yourself and desperately needing the help of others; it&#39;s rough,&#34; Cara said.</p><p>She said she &#34;probably started crying&#34; when she got the phone call saying she would be receiving $1,000 payments from the Altman program. The money helped her pay off nearly all of her debts.</p><p>&#34;It&#39;s almost like a miracle,&#34; she said. &#34;Knowing that I was able to manage that mountain of medical debt, it felt like my brain would have been in a completely different place.&#34;</p><p>Celene, another participant, told researchers she was forced to move her family in with a friend after losing money in a business venture. She said she was living in squalid conditions.</p><p><span>When she received the call that she had been selected for the group receiving $1,000 a month, she was in utter disbelief.</span></p><p><span>She said the money helped her buy new clothes, shoes, and basic necessities for herself and her children. By the second month, she had landed a job and began saving.</span></p><p><span>The money helped her &#34;not feel like a failure as a parent,&#34; she said, and gave her the confidence to make decisions in her family&#39;s best interests.</span></p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/sam-altman-basic-income-study-results-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Sam Altman's basic income study is out. Here's what it found. https://www.businessinsider.com/sam-altman-basic-income-study-results-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:4bc3b3ec-e16b-e03b-973d-ffb4716ee916 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 05:00:02 +0000 OpenAI CEO Sam Altman's basic income study lasted three years and included 3,000 people across Texas and Illinois, making it one of the most comprehensive basic income experiments yet. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/66991be349138fa6f6e360cb?format=jpeg" height="1500" width="3000" charset="" alt="Sam Altman photo illustration."/><figcaption><p class="copyright">Getty Images; Jenny Chang-Rodriguez/BI</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>The results of OpenAI CEO Sam Altman&#39;s guaranteed basic income study are in.</li><li>Overall spending increased, but most of the extra cash went to food and rent.</li><li>Recipients noted decreased financial stress, but that faded over time, the study found.</li></ul><p>The results are in for Sam Altman&#39;s much-anticipated basic income study, one of the largest of its kind. The experiment gave low-income participants $1,000 a month for three years, no strings attached.</p><p>Recipients put the bulk of their extra spending toward basic needs like rent, transportation, and food, the study found. They also worked less on average but remained engaged in the workforce and were more deliberate in their job searches compared to a control group.</p><p>&#34;Recipients had greater agency to make decisions that worked best for their lives and to prepare for the future, from moving neighborhoods to expressing interest in new business ventures,&#34; the report&#39;s authors said.</p><p>Altman, the CEO of OpenAI, a leading artificial intelligence company, raised $60 million for the study, including $14 million of his own money. <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.openresearchlab.org/approach">OpenResearch</a> conducted the study,&nbsp;which&nbsp;was led by researcher Elizabeth Rhodes.</p><p>It officially began in 2019 when 3,000 Texas and Illinois residents across urban, suburban, and rural areas enrolled. All of these residents had incomes below $28,000. A third got $1,000 a month for three years, while the rest &mdash; the control group &mdash; got $50 a month. No enrolled participants lost their existing benefits.</p><p>The study found that those who received the $1,000 payments increased their overall spending by an average of $310 a month, but most of that spending went toward food, rent, and transportation. They also offered more financial support to others in need compared to the control group.</p><p>Researchers, however, said they found no &#34;direct evidence of improved access to healthcare or improvements to physical and mental health&#34; among those who received $1,000 payments.</p><p>&#34;We do see significant reductions in stress, mental distress, and food insecurity during the first year, but those effects fade out by the second and third years of the program,&#34; the report said, noting that $1,000 a month could only do so much. &#34;Cash alone cannot address challenges such as chronic health conditions, lack of childcare, or the high cost of housing.&#34;</p><h2 id="f9fd84cd-91cb-426e-86a2-3a3a6135eb76" data-toc-id="f9fd84cd-91cb-426e-86a2-3a3a6135eb76">The debate over basic income</h2><p>The study was inspired by Altman&#39;s belief in the importance of a basic income in the age of AI, which some fear could render millions of jobs obsolete.</p><p>&#34;It&#39;s impossible to truly have equality of opportunity without some version of guaranteed income,&#34; Altman said when announcing the project.</p><p>The idea of a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-people-spend-universal-basic-income-ubi-food-housing-transportation-2024-4">universal basic income</a> has been around for awhile, but rose to prominence as the center of Andrew Yang&#39;s 2016 presidential campaign. Other significant figures in the tech industry have since voiced support<strong> </strong>for some kind of basic income, including Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey and Tesla CEO Elon Musk. AI godfather <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/ai-godfather-geoffrey-hinton-universal-basic-income-2024-5">Geoffrey Hinton recently advised the British government</a> to adopt a universal basic income to mitigate the number of &#34;mundane jobs&#34; AI is set to replace.</p><p>A universal basic income would provide all people with direct cash payments, no strings attached. That&#39;s a hefty political lift, however. So many cities and states have experimented with guaranteed basic incomes instead. These programs provide cash payments without restrictions to select low-income or vulnerable populations. Altman&#39;s study falls into this camp as well.</p><p>Data from dozens of these smaller programs have found that cash payments can help alleviate homelessness, unemployment, and food insecurity &mdash; though results still stress the need for local and state governments to invest in social services and housing infrastructure.</p><p>Earlier this year, Altman also floated another kind of basic income plan, which he called a &#34;<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/openai-sam-altman-universal-basic-income-idea-compute-gpt-7-2024-5#:~:text=Altman%20has%20long%20supported%20a,as%20AI%20threatens%20their%20jobs.">universal basic compute</a>.&#34; In this scenario, Altman said people would get a &#34;slice&#34; of the computational resources of large language model GPT-7, which they could use however they like.</p><p>&#34;You own part of the productivity,&#34; he explained on a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/all-in-with-chamath-jason-sacks-friedberg/id1502871393?i=1000655220554">podcast</a>.</p><p>Even these smaller experiments, however, have <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/basic-income-opposition-discriminatory-universal-basic-income-argument-2024-4">faced political hurdles</a>. Conservatives in several states have challenged the programs, halting their progress.</p><h2 id="8ac87517-0da8-463d-9395-bf25b14d1489" data-toc-id="8ac87517-0da8-463d-9395-bf25b14d1489">The Altman study&#39;s findings</h2><p>In its results, Altman&#39;s study assessed both quantitative data, such as surveys and bank transactions, and qualitative data, such as interviews with recipients.</p><p>The study found that compared to the control group, recipients&#39; total individual savings in their bank accounts increased by nearly 25%. Recipients also spent $22 more a month on other people, or about 26% more than the control group. There was little impact on car or home ownership, though recipients of the $1,000 were more likely to move neighborhoods or pay for housing than the control group.</p><p>Regarding healthcare, recipients saw slight increases compared to the control group in dental care, emergency room visits, and healthcare spending &mdash; though there was no direct evidence of improved health.</p><p>Recipients were more likely to want to have a budget and advance their education, specifically in the third year, compared to the control group. However, there were no significant effects on educational attainment overall.</p><p>The study, which began during the COVID-19 pandemic when unemployment was high, found that employment rates fell in the second and third years among recipients compared to the control group. On average, incomes rose significantly for all groups, though slightly higher for the control group. Incomes for recipients of the $1,000 rose from just under $30,000 to $45,710, while incomes for the control group started at a similar level but grew higher, to $50,970.</p><p>&#34;Cash offers flexibility and may increase agency to make employment decisions that align with recipients&#39; individual circumstances, goals, and values,&#34; the report&#39;s authors said.</p><h2 id="78870e8c-3763-4a7c-a1d2-a8d6bae99891" data-toc-id="78870e8c-3763-4a7c-a1d2-a8d6bae99891">What the participants in Altman&#39;s basic income study say</h2><p>One recipient in the program, Sarah, is a mother of four from rural Illinois who teaches in a homeschool network and makes just enough from her job to pay for school supplies.</p><p>&#34;I don&#39;t really make anything off of it,&#34; she said in a testimonial shared by OpenResearch. &#34;Even though my husband had a pretty decent job, we didn&#39;t have a lot of money for extras.&#34;</p><p>The payments from the Altman program helped Sarah pay for braces for both of her children, which weren&#39;t covered by their insurance, she said. She also used the money to finance a graduation trip for her daughter.</p><p>However, Sarah said she began &#34;slipping into a mindset&#34; where she was less careful with her finances because it felt like money was coming in &#34;without having to work for it.&#34;</p><p>&#34;Looking back, I regret that I didn&#39;t save more of it,&#34; she said.</p><p>Another recipient, Cara, told the study&#39;s researchers that she suffered from a debilitating nerve disorder that caused pain across much of her body and a loss of mobility.</p><p>While she started to receive some short-term disability payments, she said a break-in to her apartment set her back financially, and she began to sell her personal belongings.</p><p>&#34;Feeling the loss of being able to care for yourself and desperately needing the help of others; it&#39;s rough,&#34; Cara said.</p><p>She said she &#34;probably started crying&#34; when she got the phone call saying she would be receiving $1,000 payments from the Altman program. The money helped her pay off nearly all of her debts.</p><p>&#34;It&#39;s almost like a miracle,&#34; she said. &#34;Knowing that I was able to manage that mountain of medical debt, it felt like my brain would have been in a completely different place.&#34;</p><p>Celene, another participant, told researchers she was forced to move her family in with a friend after losing money in a business venture. She said she was living in squalid conditions.</p><p>When she received the call that she had been selected for the group receiving $1,000 a month, she was in utter disbelief.</p><p>She said the money helped her buy new clothes, shoes, and basic necessities for herself and her children. By the second month, she had landed a job and began saving.</p><p>The money helped her &#34;not feel like a failure as a parent,&#34; she said, and gave her the confidence to make decisions in her family&#39;s best interests.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/sam-altman-basic-income-study-results-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Sam Altman's basic-income study is out. Here's what it found. https://www.businessinsider.com/sam-altman-basic-income-study-results-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:11dd5006-cbf2-667c-f5a0-b737ba7f870d Mon, 22 Jul 2024 05:00:02 +0000 Sam Altman's basic-income study lasted three years and included 3,000 people, making it one of the most comprehensive basic-income experiments yet. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/66991be349138fa6f6e360cb?format=jpeg" height="1500" width="3000" charset="" alt="A photo illustration of Sam Altman with images of a couple with a pushchair, houses, and dollar bills behind him."/><figcaption><p class="copyright">Getty Images; Jenny Chang-Rodriguez/BI</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>The results of OpenAI CEO Sam Altman&#39;s guaranteed-basic-income study are in.</li><li>Overall spending increased, but most of the extra cash went to food and rent.</li><li>Recipients experienced decreased financial stress, but that faded over time, the study found.</li></ul><p>The results are in for Sam Altman&#39;s much-anticipated basic-income study, one of the largest of its kind. The experiment gave low-income participants $1,000 a month for three years, no strings attached.</p><p>Recipients put the bulk of their extra spending toward basic needs such as rent, transportation, and food, the study found. They also worked less on average but remained engaged in the workforce and were more deliberate in their job searches compared with a control group.</p><p>&#34;Recipients had greater agency to make decisions that worked best for their lives and to prepare for the future, from moving neighborhoods to expressing interest in new business ventures,&#34; the report&#39;s authors said.</p><p>Altman, the CEO of OpenAI, a leading artificial-intelligence company, raised $60 million for the study, including $14 million of his own money. <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.openresearchlab.org/studies/unconditional-cash-study/study">OpenResearch</a> conducted the study,&nbsp;which&nbsp;was led by the researcher Elizabeth Rhodes.</p><p>It officially began in 2019 when 3,000 Texas and Illinois residents across urban, suburban, and rural areas enrolled. All of these residents had incomes below $28,000. A third got $1,000 a month for three years, while the rest &mdash; the control group &mdash; got $50 a month. No enrolled participants lost their existing benefits.</p><p>The study found that those who received the $1,000 payments increased their overall spending by an average of $310 a month, but most of that spending went toward food, rent, and transportation. They also offered more financial support to others in need compared with the control group.</p><p>Researchers, however, said they found no &#34;direct evidence of improved access to healthcare or improvements to physical and mental health&#34; among those who received $1,000 payments.</p><p>&#34;We do see significant reductions in stress, mental distress, and food insecurity during the first year, but those effects fade out by the second and third years of the program,&#34; the report said, noting that $1,000 a month could only do so much. &#34;Cash alone cannot address challenges such as chronic health conditions, lack of childcare, or the high cost of housing.&#34;</p><h2 id="f9fd84cd-91cb-426e-86a2-3a3a6135eb76" data-toc-id="f9fd84cd-91cb-426e-86a2-3a3a6135eb76">The debate over basic income</h2><p>The study was inspired by Altman&#39;s belief in the importance of a basic income in the age of AI, which some fear could render millions of jobs obsolete.</p><p>&#34;It&#39;s impossible to truly have equality of opportunity without some version of guaranteed income,&#34; Altman said when announcing the project.</p><p>The idea of a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/how-people-spend-universal-basic-income-ubi-food-housing-transportation-2024-4">universal basic income</a> has been around for a while but rose to prominence as the center of Andrew Yang&#39;s 2020 presidential campaign. Other significant figures in the tech industry have since voiced support<strong> </strong>for some kind of basic income, including the Twitter cofounder Jack Dorsey and Tesla CEO Elon Musk. The AI godfather <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/ai-godfather-geoffrey-hinton-universal-basic-income-2024-5">Geoffrey Hinton recently advised the British government</a> to adopt a universal basic income to mitigate the number of &#34;mundane jobs&#34; AI could replace.</p><p>A universal basic income would provide all people with direct cash payments, no strings attached. That&#39;s a hefty political lift, however. So many cities and states have experimented with guaranteed basic incomes instead. These programs provide cash payments without restrictions to select low-income or vulnerable populations. Altman&#39;s study falls into this camp as well.</p><p>Data from dozens of these smaller programs have found that cash payments can help alleviate homelessness, unemployment, and food insecurity &mdash; though results still stress the need for local and state governments to invest in social services and housing infrastructure.</p><p>Earlier this year, Altman also floated another kind of basic-income plan, which he called a &#34;<a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/openai-sam-altman-universal-basic-income-idea-compute-gpt-7-2024-5">universal basic compute</a>.&#34; In this scenario, Altman said, people would get a &#34;slice&#34; of the computational resources of the large language model GPT-7, which they could use however they liked.</p><p>&#34;You own part of the productivity,&#34; he explained on a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/all-in-with-chamath-jason-sacks-friedberg/id1502871393?i=1000655220554">podcast</a>.</p><p>Even these smaller experiments, however, have <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/basic-income-opposition-discriminatory-universal-basic-income-argument-2024-4">faced political hurdles</a>. Conservatives in several states have challenged the programs, halting their progress.</p><h2 id="8ac87517-0da8-463d-9395-bf25b14d1489" data-toc-id="8ac87517-0da8-463d-9395-bf25b14d1489">The Altman study&#39;s findings</h2><p>In its results, Altman&#39;s study assessed both quantitative data, such as surveys and bank transactions, and qualitative data, such as interviews with recipients.</p><p>The study found that compared with the control group, recipients&#39; total individual savings in their bank accounts increased by nearly 25%. Recipients also spent $22 more a month on other people, or about 26% more than the control group. There was little impact on car or home ownership, though recipients of the $1,000 were more likely to move neighborhoods or pay for housing than the control group.</p><p>Regarding healthcare, recipients saw slight increases compared with the control group in dental care, emergency-room visits, and healthcare spending &mdash; though there was no direct evidence of improved health.</p><p>Recipients were more likely to want to have a budget and advance their education, specifically in the third year, compared with the control group. But there were no significant effects on educational attainment overall.</p><p>The study, which began during the COVID-19 pandemic when unemployment was high, found that employment rates fell in the second and third years among recipients compared with the control group. On average, incomes rose significantly for all groups, though slightly higher for the control group. Incomes for recipients of the $1,000 rose from just under $30,000 to $45,710, while incomes for the control group started at a similar level but grew higher, to $50,970.</p><p>&#34;Cash offers flexibility and may increase agency to make employment decisions that align with recipients&#39; individual circumstances, goals, and values,&#34; the report&#39;s authors said.</p><h2 id="78870e8c-3763-4a7c-a1d2-a8d6bae99891" data-toc-id="78870e8c-3763-4a7c-a1d2-a8d6bae99891">What the participants in Altman&#39;s basic income study say</h2><p>One recipient in the program, Sarah, is a mother of four from rural Illinois who teaches in a homeschool network and makes just enough from her job to pay for school supplies.</p><p>&#34;I don&#39;t really make anything off of it,&#34; she said in a testimonial shared by OpenResearch. &#34;Even though my husband had a pretty decent job, we didn&#39;t have a lot of money for extras.&#34;</p><p>The payments from the Altman program helped Sarah pay for braces for both of her children, which weren&#39;t covered by their insurance, she said. She also used the money to finance a graduation trip for her daughter.</p><p>But Sarah said she began &#34;slipping into a mindset&#34; in which she was less careful with her finances because it felt as if money was coming in &#34;without having to work for it.&#34;</p><p>&#34;Looking back, I regret that I didn&#39;t save more of it,&#34; she said.</p><p>Another recipient, Cara, told the study&#39;s researchers that she suffered from a debilitating nerve disorder that caused pain across much of her body and a loss of mobility.</p><p>While she started to receive some short-term disability payments, she said a break-in to her apartment set her back financially, and she began to sell her personal belongings.</p><p>&#34;Feeling the loss of being able to care for yourself and desperately needing the help of others; it&#39;s rough,&#34; Cara said.</p><p>She said she &#34;probably started crying&#34; when she got the phone call saying she would be receiving $1,000 payments from the Altman program. The money helped her pay off nearly all of her debts.</p><p>&#34;It&#39;s almost like a miracle,&#34; she said. &#34;Knowing that I was able to manage that mountain of medical debt, it felt like my brain would have been in a completely different place.&#34;</p><p>Celene, another participant, told researchers she was forced to move her family in with a friend after losing money in a business venture. She said she was living in squalid conditions.</p><p>When she received the call that she had been selected for the group receiving $1,000 a month, she was in utter disbelief.</p><p>She said the money helped her buy new clothes, shoes, and necessities for herself and her children. By the second month, she had landed a job and began saving.</p><p>The money helped her &#34;not feel like a failure as a parent,&#34; she said, and gave her the confidence to make decisions in her family&#39;s best interests.</p><p><em>Correction: July 22, 2024 &mdash; An earlier version of this story misstated when Andrew Yang ran for president. It was in 2020, not 2016.</em></p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/sam-altman-basic-income-study-results-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> A Stock Market Rotation of Historic Proportions Is Taking Shape https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-stock-market-rotation-of-historic-proportions-is-taking-shape-da9b6546?mod=rss_markets_main WSJ.com: Markets urn:uuid:ca549bec-6796-a24b-6c2d-11784e28888b Mon, 22 Jul 2024 04:54:00 +0000 The stock market has suddenly turned upside down. Few investors saw the shift coming, and many are puzzled by what is behind it. A Stock-Market Rotation of Historic Proportions Is Taking Shape https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-stock-market-rotation-of-historic-proportions-is-taking-shape-da9b6546?mod=rss_markets_main WSJ.com: Markets urn:uuid:3e88ad64-93fa-eb89-f768-ddea1535b851 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 04:54:00 +0000 The stock market has suddenly turned upside down. Few investors saw the shift coming, and many are puzzled by what is behind it. China finally agrees with Trump on something &mdash; they both think Kamala Harris can't win https://www.businessinsider.com/china-social-media-trump-kamala-harris-cant-win-president-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:1d045ac8-af0c-1eff-9cc0-9385fde22965 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 04:36:08 +0000 Despite polling on par so far with Biden, Harris is relatively unknown in China, where people see Trump winning as a foregone conclusion. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669dd9e42d66759f66fcca25?format=jpeg" height="4016" width="6016" charset="" alt="Vice President Kamala Harris speaks before a podium, condemning the attempted assassination of former President Donald Trump."/><figcaption>Vice President Kamala Harris has been endorsed by President Joe Biden for a 2024 run in the White House.<p class="copyright">Kyle Mazza/Anadolu via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Chinese social media has no faith that Vice President Kamala Harris can beat Donald Trump in November.</li><li>The failed assassination attempt on Trump has convinced Weibo that his victory is a foregone conclusion.</li><li>Harris is relatively unknown in China, with officials like Antony Blinken fielding a stronger presence there.</li></ul><p>President Joe Biden&#39;s <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-dropping-out-what-happens-next-2024-7">ditched election bid</a> has gone viral in China, where online consensus is veering toward former President Donald Trump&#39;s campaign rhetoric.</p><p>Initial reactions from Chinese pundits have dismissed Vice President Kamala Harris &mdash; <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-endorses-kamala-harris-after-dropping-out-2024-7">endorsed by Biden as the heir apparent</a> to the Democratic nomination &mdash; as fielding an even lower chance of winning the White House than her former running mate.</p><p>Trump, now the official Republican nominee, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.reuters.com/world/us/trump-says-kamala-harris-will-be-easier-defeat-than-biden-2024-07-21/">takes the same line</a> and said on Sunday that Harris would be &#34;easier to beat than Joe Biden would have been.&#34;</p><p>China&#39;s heavily moderated social media is no true indicator of its foreign policy, but such discussions provide a glimpse at what rhetoric the authorities allow to survive and thrive.</p><p>&#34;Trump has basically secured the presidency, there&#39;s no need for others to continue the act. It&#39;s awkward and not even entertaining,&#34; <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://weibo.com/7041586017/OoH38CHrx?refer_flag=1001030103_">wrote one blogger based in Gansu.</a></p><p>&#34;The Democratic Party&#39;s chaotic replacement of generals is like the medicine of Wu Dalang,&#34; <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://weibo.com/6479869715/OoH9xBdIz?refer_flag=1001030103_">wrote another blogger</a>, referring to a famous Chinese tale of a man who survived poisoning but was still suffocated to death by his wife. &#34;You will die whether you take it or not.&#34;</p><p>On Weibo, China&#39;s version of X, commenters on state media reports about Biden&#39;s endorsement of Harris kept asking the same question: &#34;Who is she?&#34;</p><p>Harris, despite having met Chinese leader Xi Jinping at an APEC forum in Bangkok, has a far smaller presence on China&#39;s social media than Biden or his state secretary, Antony Blinken.</p><figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669dd935fb2b6bedb0591452?format=jpeg" height="2354" width="3511" charset="" alt="Vice President Kamal Harris meets with Chinese leader Xi Jinping at the APEC 2022 forum."/><figcaption>Vice President Kamala Harris met briefly with Chinese leader Xi Jinping in 2022 at her request during the APEC forum that year.<p class="copyright">Ding Haitao/Xinhua via Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><p>She&#39;s been the main subject of two viral topics on Weibo. One received&nbsp;<a target="_blank" href="https://s.weibo.com/weibo?q=%23%E5%93%88%E9%87%8C%E6%96%AF%E8%AF%B4%E7%BE%8E%E5%9B%BD%E8%BF%87%E5%8E%BB%E5%BE%88%E5%A4%9A%E5%B9%B4%E6%98%AF%E4%B8%BA%E7%9F%B3%E6%B2%B9%E8%80%8C%E6%88%98%23">190 million views in 2021</a>, when she spoke of wars that may soon be &#34;fought over water.&#34; The <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://s.weibo.com/weibo?q=%23%E5%93%88%E9%87%8C%E6%96%AF%E4%B8%88%E5%A4%AB%E5%B0%86%E8%BE%9E%E8%81%8C%E6%94%AF%E6%8C%81%E5%A6%BB%E5%AD%90%E4%BA%8B%E4%B8%9A%23">other received 140 million views in 2020,</a> when her husband, Doug Emhoff, resigned from his law firm to support Harris&#39; vice presidential bid.</p><p>Meanwhile, Blinken &mdash; the Biden administration&#39;s point man on China &mdash; has been the center of over a dozen viral topics since 2021, some ranging up to nearly 800 million views, per data seen by Business Insider.</p><p>As for Trump, the former president is often the subject of memes in China, mocking him as a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/weibo-trump-indictment-chinese-comrade-nation-builder-sabotaged-america-2023-3">secret agent for Beijing</a>.</p><p>But the <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-butler-pennsylvania-rally-secret-service-2024-7">recent failed assassination</a> against him&mdash; and the viral photos of the attempt &mdash; has galvanized Weibo&#39;s masses into believing he presents too strong of a campaign to lose in November.</p><p>Trump has intensified his attacks on Harris since rumors emerged that Biden may step down, using the nickname <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/trump-already-trialing-nicknames-for-potential-kamala-harris-face-off-2024-7">&#34;Laffin&#39; Kamala&#34;</a> in a bid to disparage the way she laughs as a detriment to her leadership.</p><p><a target="_blank" class="" href="https://weibo.com/1671109627/OoEH6A9Bs?refer_flag=1001030103_">Montages of Harris</a> laughing on camera <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://weibo.com/1983489812/OoHu6xull?refer_flag=1001030103_">have also surfaced in China</a>, though most are not derogatory. Some are praising her for having a &#34;contagious laugh and smile.&#34;</p><p>Coincidentally, Harris&#39; name, translated to Chinese, starts with the same character as the word &#34;laugh.&#34;</p><p>The Democratic Party&#39;s deadline to select its nominee is during its national convention on August 19 to 22, and <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/kamala-harris-presidential-campaign-strength-biden-announcement-future-election-2024-7">Harris has quickly been securing the heavyweight support</a> she needs to clinch the position.</p><p>Despite the predictions from Trump and China, a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/polls/president-general/2024/national/">FiveThirtyEight</a> round-up of the latest polls shows that Harris&#39; performance with voters differs from Biden&#39;s by only a small margin &mdash; typically by one or two percentage points at most. At times, she fares better than the president.</p><p>Most July polls put either Democratic leader behind Trump, though typically by a slim disadvantage of one to five percentage points.</p><p>The press team for the Biden-Harris ticket did not immediately respond to a request for comment sent outside regular business hours by Business Insider.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/china-social-media-trump-kamala-harris-cant-win-president-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div> Kamala Harris' opening argument: Vote for me and I'll decimate Project 2025 https://www.businessinsider.com/kamala-harris-opening-argument-vote-for-me-decimate-project-2025-2024-7 Clusterstock urn:uuid:107fe4fb-69f6-22ef-9290-a852a377e248 Mon, 22 Jul 2024 04:15:36 +0000 Harris vowed to defeat Project 2025, but Trump has distanced himself from the project, calling it 'ridiculous' and not tied to him. <figure><img src="https://i.insider.com/669dbf8880d4d5da13d5bd11?format=jpeg" height="683" width="1024" charset="" alt="US Vice President Kamala Harris."/><figcaption>US Vice President Kamala Harris.<p class="copyright">Chris duMond/Getty Images</p></figcaption></figure><ul class="summary-list"><li>Kamala Harris vowed to destroy Project 2025 after Biden endorsed her for the Democratic nomination.</li><li>Project 2025, by The Heritage Foundation, outlines radical conservative policies for the next GOP president.</li><li>Donald Trump has distanced himself from Project 2025, calling it &#34;ridiculous&#34; and not tied to him.</li></ul><p>Shortly after President Joe Biden <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/joe-biden-endorses-kamala-harris-after-dropping-out-2024-7">endorsed Vice President Kamala Harris</a> for the Democratic nomination, Harris made her opening pitch to the country, arguing that voting for her will allow her to decimate the controversial Project 2025.</p><p>&#34;I will do everything in my power to unite the Democratic Party &mdash; and unite our nation&mdash; to defeat Donald Trump and his extreme Project 2025 agenda,&#34; she wrote on <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/kamalaharris/status/1815122384908910919?s=46&amp;t=bkmJfZuvxzKCaiQCsNuiTw">X</a> on Sunday night.</p><div id="1721614157081" data-styles="default-width" data-embed-type="twitter" data-script="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" class="" data-type="embed"><blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">I will do everything in my power to unite the Democratic Party&mdash;and unite our nation&mdash;to defeat Donald Trump and his extreme Project 2025 agenda. If you’re with me, add a donation right now.<a href="https://t.co/xpPDkCRhoZ">https://t.co/xpPDkCRhoZ</a></p>&mdash; Kamala Harris (@KamalaHarris) <a href="https://twitter.com/KamalaHarris/status/1815122384908910919?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 21, 2024</a></blockquote><script async="" src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></div><p>Created by conservative think tank The Heritage Foundation, <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/what-is-project-2025-conservative-political-playbook-heritage-foundation-trump-2024-7">Project 2025</a> is a road map for the next Republican president, presented in the form of a hefty 922-page <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://static.project2025.org/2025_MandateForLeadership_FULL.pdf">playbook</a>.</p><p>It aims to enshrine radical conservative policies into the law and erode US government&#39;s checks and balances.</p><p>Some of its most extreme priorities include: eliminating the Department of Education, prohibiting the FBI from fighting misinformation and disinformation and ending the &#34;war on fossil fuels.&#34;</p><p>Although Harris said that she is determined to defeat former President Donald Trump and &#34;his extreme Project 2025 agenda,&#34; Trump himself has called the project &#34;ridiculous.&#34;</p><p>He attempted to distance himself from it with a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://truthsocial.com/@realDonaldTrump/posts/112734594514167050">post</a> on his Truth Social on July 5, saying: &#34;I know nothing about Project 2025.&#34;</p><p>&#34;I disagree with some of the things they&#39;re saying and some of the things they&#39;re saying are absolutely ridiculous and abysmal,&#34; Trump wrote. &#34;Anything they do, I wish them luck, but I have nothing to do with them.&#34;</p><p>And the project itself is <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/project-2025-heritage-foundation-donald-trump-elected-2024-7">not dependent on Trump</a>. Some of the goals outlined in the project don&#39;t require a president&#39;s involvement at all, and can be carried out by local and state governments.</p><p>While Trump denies knowledge or links to Project 2025, the Heritage Foundation was one of the sponsors for the <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/donald-trump-rnc-speech-assassination-attempt-takeaways-2024-7">Republican National Convention</a>, which saw the GOP nominating Trump for the presidential ticket.</p><p>When asked for comment, Trump&#39;s spokesman Steven Cheung told BI: &#34;Kamala is the one with the radical, out-of-touch agenda,&#34; adding that she is &#34;soft on crime&#34; and &#34;hates American energy production and jobs.&#34;</p><p>Harris&#39; statement comes shortly after President Biden quit the race, following weeks of calls from <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://www.businessinsider.com/top-democrats-convincing-joe-biden-drop-out-campaign-nancy-pelosi-2024-7">top Democrats</a> telling him to step aside or risk losing the election.</p><p>&#34;While it has been my intention to seek reelection, I believe it is in the best interest of my party and the country for me to stand down and to focus solely on fulfilling my duties as President for the remainder of my term,&#34; Biden wrote in a <a target="_blank" class="" href="https://x.com/JoeBiden/status/1815080881981190320">letter</a> posted on social media.</p><p>Representatives for Harris did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Business Insider sent outside regular business hours.</p><div class="read-original">Read the original article on <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/kamala-harris-opening-argument-vote-for-me-decimate-project-2025-2024-7">Business Insider</a></div>