Qaecologist Posts http://feed.informer.com/digests/T57DVXB9YH/feeder Qaecologist Posts Respective post owners and feed distributors Mon, 15 Feb 2016 08:40:04 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ Three days of plant ecology in Germany https://janecatford.wordpress.com/2017/06/14/three-days-of-plant-ecology-in-germany/ Jane Catford's Research urn:uuid:3c7535ef-5b59-c767-e26c-a097f9b92e36 Tue, 13 Jun 2017 16:05:45 +0000 Originally posted on <a href="https://jecologyblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/13/three-days-of-plant-ecology/">Journal of Ecology Blog</a>: <br />Journal of Ecology Associate Editors Jane Catford and Rob Salguero-Gómez were both keynote speakers at this year&#8217;s PopBio conference. Here is their report&#8230; A few weeks ago, we had the privilege of attending PopBio2017&#8230;<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=janecatford.wordpress.com&#038;blog=25633722&#038;post=1053&#038;subd=janecatford&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" /> <div class="wpcom-reblog-snapshot"> <div class="reblog-post"><p class="reblog-from"><img alt='' src='https://0.gravatar.com/avatar/ca8bb453ef66397ab9266be27b88d84d?s=32&#038;d=identicon&#038;r=G' class='avatar avatar-32' height='32' width='32' /><a href="https://jecologyblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/13/three-days-of-plant-ecology/">Journal of Ecology Blog</a></p><div class="reblogged-content"> <p><em>Journal of Ecology Associate Editors Jane Catford and Rob Salguero-Gómez were both keynote speakers at this year’s PopBio conference. Here is their report…</em></p> <hr> <p>A few weeks ago, we had the privilege of attending <a href="http://www.popbio2017.de/index.html">PopBio2017</a> in Halle, Germany.</p> <p>This was the 30<sup>th</sup> annual conference of the Plant Population Biology Section of the Ecological Society of Germany, Austria and Switzerland (<a href="https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Gf%C3%96&#038;rlz=1C1CHFX_en-GBGB696GB696&#038;oq=Gf%C3%96&#038;aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.773j0j4&#038;sourceid=chrome&#038;ie=UTF-8">GfÖ</a>). Though hosted by GfÖ, the conference was very international in flavor, with all presentations in English. There were 130 researchers from over 20 countries, including the UK, Germany, Czech Republic, Brazil and South Africa, in what turned out to be a 1:1 gender ratio.</p> <p><img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-5927" src="https://janecatford.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/popbio11.jpg?w=640" alt="popbio1"> Attendees at a presentation at PopBio 2017 (Credit: RSG) </p> <p>It was an incredibly stimulating, fun and well-organized three days, with a lovely balance between unstructured (social) time and scientific talks and posters. Massive thanks and congratulations to the <a href="http://www.popbio2017.de/">organizers</a>, who put together an excellent…</p> </div><p class="reblog-source"><a href="https://jecologyblog.wordpress.com/2017/06/13/three-days-of-plant-ecology/">View original post</a> <span class="more-words">670 more words</span></p></div></div><br /> <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/janecatford.wordpress.com/1053/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/janecatford.wordpress.com/1053/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=janecatford.wordpress.com&#038;blog=25633722&#038;post=1053&#038;subd=janecatford&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" /> New paper: Can habitat management mitigate disease impacts on threatened amphibians? https://gwheardresearch.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/new-paper-can-habitat-management-mitigate-disease-impacts-on-threatened-amphibians/ Geoff Heard's Research urn:uuid:9f2f2306-9d21-222a-8fb2-2da56647f29e Tue, 30 May 2017 02:48:38 +0000 How does one tackle a rapacious pathogen? If it were an infectious agent of humans, we would have much in our armoury. We could isolate the stricken, and slow the pathogens spread. We could search for the vector and extinguish it. We could take antibodies from the immune and treat the susceptible with their serum. [&#8230;]<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=gwheardresearch.wordpress.com&#038;blog=25841594&#038;post=1582&#038;subd=gwheardresearch&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" /> <p><img data-attachment-id="632" data-permalink="https://gwheardresearch.wordpress.com/?attachment_id=632#main" data-orig-file="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/swabbing.jpg?w=216&#038;h=147" data-orig-size="2173,1473" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;QSS&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;}" data-image-title="swabbing" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/swabbing.jpg?w=216&#038;h=147?w=300" data-large-file="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/swabbing.jpg?w=216&#038;h=147?w=869" class=" wp-image-632 alignleft" src="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/swabbing.jpg?w=216&#038;h=147" alt="swabbing" width="216" height="147" srcset="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/swabbing.jpg?w=216&amp;h=147 216w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/swabbing.jpg?w=432&amp;h=294 432w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/swabbing.jpg?w=150&amp;h=102 150w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2013/11/swabbing.jpg?w=300&amp;h=203 300w" sizes="(max-width: 216px) 100vw, 216px" />How does one tackle a rapacious pathogen? If it were an infectious agent of humans, we would have much in our armoury. We could <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/quarantine/">isolate the stricken</a>, and slow the pathogens spread. We could search for the vector and <a href="http://www.who.int/malaria/areas/vector_control/core_methods/en/">extinguish it</a>. We could take antibodies from the immune and treat the susceptible with <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26104697">their serum</a>. Or we could disseminate doses of powerful antibiotics or vaccines, and lead the pathogen down the <a href="http://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.79.12.1648">path to functional extinction</a>.</p> <p>But what if the pathogen targets wildlife? In that case, our armoury is much diminished. So much so that the outcome of wildlife-pathogen interactions in nature are almost always determined by natural mechanisms; by the death of the susceptible and, failing complete extinction, either the survival and <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0042682299901046">proliferation of the immune</a>, or persistence of relic populations in <a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320706001583">disease refugia</a>, away from reservoir hosts or in regions outside the pathogens environmental hitting zone.</p> <p>In <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/conl.12375/abstract">our latest paper</a>, just out in <em>Conservation Letters</em>, we assess the degree to which knowledge of environmental refugia can be used to mitigate the impacts of perhaps the worst wildlife pathogen of modern times – the<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batrachochytrium_dendrobatidis"> amphibian chytrid fungus</a>. Chytrid emerged as a major pathogen of amphibians <a href="http://www.pnas.org/content/95/15/9031.full">late last century</a>, for reasons unknown. It spread across the globe, facilitated by us, and decimated frogs and toads as it went. The toll is difficult to quantify (and continues to mount), but at least 200 species are now thought to have either succumbed completely to chytridiomycosis, or suffered significant population declines.</p> <div data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1354" style="width: 259px" class="wp-caption alignright"><img data-attachment-id="1354" data-permalink="https://gwheardresearch.wordpress.com/2017/01/10/new-paper-after-the-epidemic-ongoing-declines-stabilisations-and-recoveries-in-chytridiomycosis-impacted-amphibians/csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus/#main" data-orig-file="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus.jpg?w=249&#038;h=200" data-orig-size="2657,2132" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}" data-image-title="csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus.jpg?w=249&#038;h=200?w=300" data-large-file="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus.jpg?w=249&#038;h=200?w=869" class="alignnone wp-image-1354" src="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus.jpg?w=249&#038;h=200" alt="csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus" width="249" height="200" srcset="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus.jpg?w=249&amp;h=200 249w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus.jpg?w=498&amp;h=400 498w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus.jpg?w=150&amp;h=120 150w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/csiro_scienceimage_1392_scanning_electron_micrograph_of_chytrid_fungus.jpg?w=300&amp;h=241 300w" sizes="(max-width: 249px) 100vw, 249px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Chytrid sporangia, CSIRO</p></div> <p>Despite this, chytrid is not invincible. In fact, it has some key environmental frailties – its pathogenicity <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/srep01515">falls sharply at warmer temperatures</a>, and it cannot tolerate <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/3761981?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents">acidic or alkaline environments</a>, nor those which are <a href="http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0036942">somewhat saline</a>. In short, it has several environmental Achilles heels.</p> <p>We set out to assess the degree to which these weaknesses could be harnessed to bolster amphibian population viability. For small metapopulations of our focal species, the threatened <a href="https://frogs.org.au/frogs/species/Litoria/raniformis/">Growling Grass Frog</a>, we used simulations to understand how slight increases to wetland water temperatures and salinity (achieved by reducing wetland shading, increasing wetland size and depth, and tapping groundwater) could reduce pathogen prevalence and increase rates of frog population persistence. In addition, we assessed the degree to which strategic creation of warm and slighty saline wetlands (&lt;10,000 µS/cm) could enhance metapopulation viability. The work builds on <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ele.12463/abstract">our 2015 paper</a> which demonstrated that environmental refugia, metapopulation size and connectivity are important determinants of the persistence of Growling Grass Frog populations afflicted by chytrid.</p> <p>So, what did we find? Three things in particular. First, our simulations suggest that habitat management to mitigate chytrid impacts will be most effective in climates where hosts are already less susceptible to the disease; that is, within <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ddi.12091/pdf">climatic refugia</a> where disease impacts are already curtailed. Second, our work suggests that creating new wetlands with refugial properties may be substantially more effective than manipulating existing habitat, in part because altering existing habitat will be constrained by other environmental considerations. Third, increasing metapopulation size and connectivity through strategic habitat creation can greatly reduce extinction risk, because dense-clusters of wetlands are much more likely to enable a balance between the opposing forces of population extinction and (re)colonisation.</p> <p>Our work is one of very few to assess the effectiveness of habitat-based management levers for controlling wildlife disease. The results are encouraging. The next step is to test the effectiveness of habitat-based management of chytrid in the field. We need well-designed, statistically rigorous experiments replicated across multiple taxa to understand the scale and breadth of its effectiveness, its practicality under varying contexts, and the cost-benefit ratio relative to other potential control options.</p> <div data-shortcode="caption" id="attachment_1589" style="width: 433px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img data-attachment-id="1589" data-permalink="https://gwheardresearch.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/new-paper-can-habitat-management-mitigate-disease-impacts-on-threatened-amphibians/20170131_122003/#main" data-orig-file="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/20170131_122003.jpg?w=423&#038;h=318" data-orig-size="4032,3024" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;1.7&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;SM-G930F&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1485865202&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;4.2&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;40&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.00040453074433657&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;1&quot;}" data-image-title="20170131_122003" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/20170131_122003.jpg?w=423&#038;h=318?w=300" data-large-file="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/20170131_122003.jpg?w=423&#038;h=318?w=869" class="alignnone wp-image-1589" src="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/20170131_122003.jpg?w=423&#038;h=318" alt="20170131_122003" width="423" height="318" srcset="https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/20170131_122003.jpg?w=423&amp;h=318 423w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/20170131_122003.jpg?w=846&amp;h=636 846w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/20170131_122003.jpg?w=150&amp;h=113 150w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/20170131_122003.jpg?w=300&amp;h=225 300w, https://gwheardresearch.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/20170131_122003.jpg?w=768&amp;h=576 768w" sizes="(max-width: 423px) 100vw, 423px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">A pool on the Merri Creek recently choked by invasive Phragmites, Willows and Hawthorn. Once an important breeding site for Growling Grass Frogs, the species is no longer found here</p></div> <p>But in the interim, our work provides clear guidance to managers of Growling Grass Frogs in southern Australia, and its sister-taxa the <a href="https://frogs.org.au/frogs/species/Litoria/aurea/">Green and Golden Bell Frog</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pFSFgPWnjE">Yellow-spotted Bell Frog</a>. The niche of these frogs has narrowed in the wake of chytrid. Today, they require dense networks of large, deep wetlands that receive copious sun, and they can benefit from slightly saline environments. If shading from riparian trees and invasive emergent vegetation is prevalent in the systems you manage, thin it out or remove it all together. If wetlands are sparse, small and shallow, seek to build adjacent wetlands that not only provide disease refugia, but bolster metapopulation size and connectivity. And if you have access to slightly saline ground water (&lt;10,000 µS/cm), consider sinking bores and feeding some wetlands with this water source. Do let us know how you get on.</p><br />Filed under: <a href='https://gwheardresearch.wordpress.com/category/uncategorized/'>Uncategorized</a> <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/gwheardresearch.wordpress.com/1582/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/gwheardresearch.wordpress.com/1582/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=gwheardresearch.wordpress.com&#038;blog=25841594&#038;post=1582&#038;subd=gwheardresearch&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" /> Wet wetlands restore better https://janecatford.wordpress.com/2017/05/30/wet-wetlands-restore-better/ Jane Catford's Research urn:uuid:e66941e0-e292-5988-165d-f7e4f6ce64bf Mon, 29 May 2017 23:58:21 +0000 Originally posted on <a href="https://jappliedecologyblog.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/wet-wetlands-restore-better/">The Applied Ecologist&#039;s blog</a>: <br />With Plant Conservation Day in mind, Samantha Dawson&#8217;s post discusses characteristics of wetland plants and her new paper, Plant traits of propagule banks and standing vegetation reveal flooding alleviates impacts of agriculture on&#8230;<img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=janecatford.wordpress.com&#038;blog=25633722&#038;post=1049&#038;subd=janecatford&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" /> <div class="wpcom-reblog-snapshot"><div class="reblogger-note"><div class='reblogger-note-content'><blockquote><p>What the Great British Bake Off can teach us about wetland restoration &#8211; some notes from Samantha Dawson</p> </blockquote></div></div><div class="reblog-post"><p class="reblog-from"><img alt='' src='https://0.gravatar.com/avatar/c4370168975a3242695b1849b9c63374?s=32&#038;d=identicon&#038;r=G' class='avatar avatar-32' height='32' width='32' /><a href="https://jappliedecologyblog.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/wet-wetlands-restore-better/">The Applied Ecologist&#039;s blog</a></p><div class="reblogged-content"> <p><strong>With Plant Conservation Day in mind, Samantha Dawson’s post discusses characteristics of wetland plants and her new paper, <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1365-2664.12922/full">Plant traits of propagule banks and standing vegetation reveal flooding alleviates impacts of agriculture on wetland restoration.</a></strong></p> <p>Many of the world’s wetlands are highly degraded and they are one of the most threatened types of ecosystems. To attempt to halt or reverse this trend, there are lots of small and large restoration projects underway in many places. One of the most widely-used restoration methods is to re-introduce flooding to degraded wetlands, with the idea that if you provide water, the plants that were there before will return. Unfortunately, we haven’t had much success predicting the outcome of these restoration efforts and we do not always understand why restoration succeeds or fails.</p> <p><img class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-3959" src="https://janecatford.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/dawson_wetlands2_may17.jpg?w=300&#038;h=225" height="225" width="300" alt="Dawson_wetlands2_May17"> Dawson explains that understanding how different filters affect plant traits means we may be able to predict and manage restoration more…</p> </div><p class="reblog-source"><a href="https://jappliedecologyblog.wordpress.com/2017/05/18/wet-wetlands-restore-better/">View original post</a> <span class="more-words">854 more words</span></p></div></div><br /> <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/janecatford.wordpress.com/1049/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/janecatford.wordpress.com/1049/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=janecatford.wordpress.com&#038;blog=25633722&#038;post=1049&#038;subd=janecatford&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" /> Sun Foundation Peer Prize for Women in Science https://hsfraser.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/sun-foundation-peer-prize-for-women-in-science/ Hannah Fraser Research urn:uuid:b6169813-d34d-d2ec-b274-6e4e126c5423 Mon, 29 May 2017 01:09:32 +0000 An email went around our lab group a few weeks ago about the Sun Foundation Peer Prize for Women in Science and I was instantly intrigued by it. The prize is two $20,000 research grants, one for health sciences and &#8230; <a href="https://hsfraser.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/sun-foundation-peer-prize-for-women-in-science/">Continue reading <span class="meta-nav">&#8594;</span></a><img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=hsfraser.wordpress.com&#038;blog=94796466&#038;post=280&#038;subd=hsfraser&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" /> <p>An email went around our lab group a few weeks ago about the <a href="https://the-peer-prize-for-women-in-science-2017.thinkable.org/">Sun Foundation Peer Prize for Women in Science</a> and I was instantly intrigued by it. The prize is two $20,000 research grants, one for health sciences and one for environmental and earth sciences, awarded to the person who has the most peer votes. The thing that really drew me to the competition was that you can look through all of the applications and find out a bit about the brilliant work being done by women researchers throughout Australia. It ties in with my ideas about the necessity of finding <a href="https://hsfraser.wordpress.com/2017/03/24/publication-the-value-of-virtual-conferencing-for-ecology-and-conservation/">low carbon ways of discussing and disseminating research</a> and I am full of ideas that I could use $20,000 dollars to research so I thought I would apply. Voting opens on the 5th of June and close on the 16th of June 2017 and I&#8217;m very excited to see which other women applied and what research they are working on.</p> <p>Please note that, in order to vote, the people at Thinkable who are running the competition need to verify that you are a scientist who has published in the past 5 years. This takes 24-48 hours&#8230; so you cant just go and try to vote on the last day</p> <p>For a sneak preview you could have a look at my attempt to create a video about my research. Please be kind, this is way outside my skill set</p> <p><iframe class='youtube-player' type='text/html' width='640' height='390' src='https://www.youtube.com/embed/PcWvFEgQzME?version=3&#038;rel=1&#038;fs=1&#038;autohide=2&#038;showsearch=0&#038;showinfo=1&#038;iv_load_policy=1&#038;start=6&#038;wmode=transparent' allowfullscreen='true' style='border:0;'></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p><br /> <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/hsfraser.wordpress.com/280/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/hsfraser.wordpress.com/280/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=hsfraser.wordpress.com&#038;blog=94796466&#038;post=280&#038;subd=hsfraser&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" /> Kate Cranney’s Beautiful Art https://hsfraser.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/kate-cranneys-beautiful-art/ Hannah Fraser Research urn:uuid:3325bbc6-dd4c-ad25-8929-8359a6764d19 Mon, 29 May 2017 00:14:31 +0000 A couple of years ago, Kate Cranney did this fantastic artwork and article inspired by me and my research and I want to share it with you all. If you want to see more of her brilliant work you can &#8230; <a href="https://hsfraser.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/kate-cranneys-beautiful-art/">Continue reading <span class="meta-nav">&#8594;</span></a><img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=hsfraser.wordpress.com&#038;blog=94796466&#038;post=272&#038;subd=hsfraser&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" /> <p>A couple of years ago, Kate Cranney did this fantastic artwork and article inspired by me and my research and I want to share it with you all. If you want to see more of her brilliant work you can find her at http://www.katecranney.com/</p> <p><img data-attachment-id="278" data-permalink="https://hsfraser.wordpress.com/2017/05/29/kate-cranneys-beautiful-art/drawn-to-science/" data-orig-file="https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg?w=640" data-orig-size="1241,1754" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;0&quot;}" data-image-title="Drawn to science" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg?w=640?w=212" data-large-file="https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg?w=640?w=640" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-278" src="https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg?w=640" alt="Drawn to science" srcset="https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg?w=640 640w, https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg?w=106 106w, https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg?w=212 212w, https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg?w=768 768w, https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg?w=725 725w, https://hsfraser.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/drawn-to-science.jpg 1241w" sizes="(max-width: 640px) 100vw, 640px" /></p><br /> <a rel="nofollow" href="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/gocomments/hsfraser.wordpress.com/272/"><img alt="" border="0" src="http://feeds.wordpress.com/1.0/comments/hsfraser.wordpress.com/272/" /></a> <img alt="" border="0" src="https://pixel.wp.com/b.gif?host=hsfraser.wordpress.com&#038;blog=94796466&#038;post=272&#038;subd=hsfraser&#038;ref=&#038;feed=1" width="1" height="1" />