Value chains http://feed.informer.com/digests/SUCGM4EZI5/feeder Value chains Respective post owners and feed distributors Tue, 27 Nov 2018 14:34:38 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ Agricultural development addresses food loss and waste while reducing greenhouse gas emissions https://hdl.handle.net/10568/105693 CGSpace urn:uuid:1b817626-2fdc-8219-2dd3-e4bf4a385d76 Fri, 10 Jan 2020 00:00:00 +0000 Agricultural development addresses food loss and waste while reducing greenhouse gas emissions Galford, Gillian L; Peña, Olivia; Sullivan, Amanda K; Nash, Julie; Gurwick, Noel; Pirolli, Gillian; Richards, Meryl; White, Julianna; Wollenberg, Eva Food loss and waste (FLW) reduce food available for consumption and increase the environmental burden of production. Reducing FLW increases agricultural and value-chain productivity and may reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with feeding the global population. Although studies of interventions that reduce FLW exist, almost no research systematically investigates FLW interventions across multiple value chains or countries, most likely due to challenges in collecting and synthesizing data and estimates, let alone estimating greenhouse gas emissions. Our research team investigated changes in FLW in projects supported by the United States Agency for International Development's (USAID) global hunger and food security initiative, Feed the Future. This was a unique opportunity to conduct ex-ante estimates of the impacts of FLW interventions across 20 value chains in 12 countries, based on project documents and interviews with USAID and project staff. This paper describes specific interventions in each value chain and country context, providing insight to interventions that decrease FLW at multiple points along food value chains, from upstream producer-dominated stages to downstream consumer-dominated stages. Amongst the sub-sectors studied, FLW interventions directed at extensive dairy systems could decrease FLW by 4–10%, providing meaningful greenhouse gas mitigation, since these systems are both emission-intensive and experience high FLW. More modest emissions reductions were found for other key agricultural products, including maize, rice, vegetables, fruits and market goods.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/CCAFSoutputscgspace/~4/Tz_foOBdLuw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Young innovator Carlos Barragan García is implementing sustainable maize systems for smallholder farmers https://maize.org/young-innovator-carlos-barragan-garcia-is-implementing-sustainable-maize-systems-for-smallholder-farmers/ CGIAR Research Program on MAIZE urn:uuid:50f056e8-765f-ccd5-06d6-a7d40c7e64a7 Mon, 04 Nov 2019 17:04:33 +0000 Carlos Barragan García works on soil fertility as well as inclusive business models for smallholder farmers working in maize agri-food value chains. New project launched to strengthen veterinary service delivery in Ethiopia https://livestock.cgiar.org/2019/04/26/heard-ethiopia/ CGIAR Research Program on Livestock urn:uuid:c5ea3f47-4715-ec33-bc9e-bd2d15d21c7e Fri, 26 Apr 2019 12:26:58 +0000 A new four-year (2019-2022) European Union-funded project known as Health of Ethiopian Animals for Rural Development (HEARD) has been launched in Ethiopia. The EUR15 million project builds upon the experience and lessons learned from other animal health projects in Ethiopia. <span class="more-link"><a href="https://livestock.cgiar.org/2019/04/26/heard-ethiopia/">Continue reading <span class="meta-nav">&#8594;</span></a></span> <p><img src="https://live.staticflickr.com/7896/33614382198_4a3176bcd1_z.jpg" alt="Participants of the workshop" width="640" height="343" /></p> <p><em>Participants of the HEARD project inception workshop on 29 March 2019 at ILRI Ethiopia (photo credit: ILRI/Apollo Habtamu).</em></p> <p>A new four-year (2019-2022) European Union-funded project known as Health of Ethiopian Animals for Rural Development (HEARD) has been launched in Ethiopia. The EUR15 million project builds upon the experience and lessons learned from other animal health projects in Ethiopia. It has three main objectives:</p> <ul> <li>Strengthening the quality and delivery of public and private veterinary services through the creation of an enabling and rationalizing environment. This component of the program will be implemented through three grants in Somali, Amhara, and Oromia regional states. It will be led by regional livestock bureaus/agencies with the support of the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA).</li> <li>Improving technical competencies (knowledge, skills, and attitude) and incentives for veterinary service providers to enable them to deliver better and rationalized services. This component will be jointly implemented by the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and the Ethiopian Veterinary Association.</li> <li>Improving the food safety of primary animal origin products and achieving better control of zoonotic diseases. This component will be led by the MoA and focuses on meat inspection and improved food safety along livestock value chains.</li> </ul> <p>On 29 March 2019, a HEARD project inception workshop was held at ILRI Addis campus to bring together all stakeholders in the Ethiopian veterinary service system to introduce the objectives and planned activities of HEARD, and to elicit stakeholders expectations in a one-day consultations process.</p> <p>More than 50 representatives of various institutions attended the event. These included officials from the EU, the Agriculture Transformation Agency, MoA, regional bureaus of agriculture, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the National Veterinary Institute , universities, non-governmental organizations involved in veterinary service delivery, professional associations, and the private sector.</p> <p>Azage Tegegne, deputy to the director general representative in Ethiopia, welcomed dignitaries and workshop participants. HE Gebregziabher Gebreyohannes, Ethiopia State Minister for Livestock in the Ministry of Agriculture, and Dominique Davoux of the European Union Delegation in Ethiopia also spoke at the meeting.</p> <p>The HEARD project will be implemented by ILRI and a wide range of implementing partners including the MoA, the Ethiopian Veterinarian Association, the Oromia National Regional State Bureau of Livestock and Fisheries Development, the Amhara National Regional State Livestock Resource Development and Promotion Agency and the Somali National Regional State Livestock and Pastoralists Development Bureau. The overall implementation of the project will be coordinated by the Livestock State Ministry of the MoA.</p> <p>Read more: <u><a href="https://reliefweb.int/report/ethiopia/livestock-stakeholders-discuss-15-million-euro-heard-project" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Livestock Stakeholders Discuss 15-Million Euro HEARD Project</a></u></p> Isabelle Baltenweck: an agricultural economist passionate about making the world a better place for women and men in livestock https://livestock.cgiar.org/2019/02/11/isabelle-baltenweck-an-agricultural-economist-passionate-about-making-the-world-a-better-place-for-women-and-men-in-livestock/ CGIAR Research Program on Livestock urn:uuid:dac25279-36b7-aca5-46b4-9279665a367f Mon, 11 Feb 2019 06:46:23 +0000 The CGIAR Research Program on Livestock recently announced with pleasure the appointment of Dr. Isabelle Baltenweck as its new flagship leader for Livestock, Livelihoods and Agro-food Systems (LLAFS). Originally from France, Isabelle brings to the role close to 20 years of post-doctoral experience in smallholder value chains in Africa, South and South-East Asia, with a &#8230; <span class="more-link"><a href="https://livestock.cgiar.org/2019/02/11/isabelle-baltenweck-an-agricultural-economist-passionate-about-making-the-world-a-better-place-for-women-and-men-in-livestock/">Continue reading <span class="meta-nav">&#8594;</span></a></span> <p><img data-attachment-id="1102" data-permalink="https://livestock.cgiar.org/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit/" data-orig-file="https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=610" data-orig-size="5605,3741" data-comments-opened="1" data-image-meta="{&quot;aperture&quot;:&quot;11&quot;,&quot;credit&quot;:&quot;ILRI&quot;,&quot;camera&quot;:&quot;NIKON D810&quot;,&quot;caption&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;created_timestamp&quot;:&quot;1549531727&quot;,&quot;copyright&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;focal_length&quot;:&quot;110&quot;,&quot;iso&quot;:&quot;1600&quot;,&quot;shutter_speed&quot;:&quot;0.002&quot;,&quot;title&quot;:&quot;&quot;,&quot;orientation&quot;:&quot;1&quot;}" data-image-title="Livestock_CRP_IsabelleBaltenweck_ageconomist_edit" data-image-description="" data-medium-file="https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=610?w=300" data-large-file="https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=610?w=610" class="alignnone size-full wp-image-1102" src="https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=610" alt="Livestock_CRP_IsabelleBaltenweck_ageconomist_edit" srcset="https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=610 610w, https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=1220 1220w, https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=150 150w, https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=300 300w, https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=768 768w, https://crplivestock.files.wordpress.com/2019/02/livestock_crp_isabellebaltenweck_ageconomist_edit.jpg?w=1024 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 610px) 100vw, 610px" /></p> <p><em>The CGIAR Research Program on Livestock recently announced with pleasure the appointment of Dr. Isabelle Baltenweck as its new flagship leader for Livestock, Livelihoods and Agro-food Systems (LLAFS). Originally from France, Isabelle brings to the role close to 20 years of post-doctoral experience in </em><em>smallholder value chains in Africa, South and South-East Asia, with a focus on livestock farming. She has played a central role in the flagship </em><em>through its different iterations, first as the Livestock &amp; Fish CRP and in its current form, as the Livestock CRP. </em></p> <p><em> </em><em>On International Women and Girl’s in Science day, we celebrate Isabelle’s contributions as an agricultural economist with ILRI for 19 years, while looking ahead to her new role that she is inheriting from Dr. Steve Staal, where she will draw upon her varied areas of expertise in farm level economics, value chains, gender, livelihoods and systems approach.</em></p> <p><em>Here Isabelle shares with us her vision for the LLAFS flagship and talks about what motivates her most.</em></p> <h3><span style="color:#c24d2e;"><strong>WITH 3 YEARS LEFT ON THE CLOCK, WHAT OPPORTUNITIES DO YOU SEE FOR THE FLAGSHIP AND THE LIVESTOCK CRP AS A WHOLE?</strong></span></h3> <p>Quite a lot of work has been accomplished in the first phase of the CRP as Livestock and Fish, and now two years into the current phase, we have a real chance now to consolidate research outputs in order to generate some solid international public goods, through applying lessons learned from our cross country and cross commodity experiences.</p> <p>We are able now to formulate fewer and more focused research questions – including whether livestock can really help move farming communities onto the path towards gender equity. We are also in a position to concretely inform the debate on how and why it is important to invest in livestock value chains, for which types of benefits, and at various levels – i.e. farm, value chain and country.</p> <h3><span style="color:#c24d2e;"><strong>WHAT DO YOU BRING TO THE FLAGSHIP LEADERSHIP POSITION? </strong></span></h3> <p>I believe in inter-disciplinary work, and for me this is what the Livestock CRP is all about – harnessing the expertise of different people. I enjoy working with people from different disciplines and being challenged. I also know livestock systems well, especially dairy.</p> <p>Mostly, I want to ensure is that our research answers important questions, not just the ones from donors, but especially those from the livestock communities and stakeholders that we serve.</p> <p>We need to be looking at how the research conducted in different countries are answering the CRP’s research questions, helping us to identify innovations that can have the most impact. For example, what are better ways for farmers to access the needed inputs and services – those that enable value chain actors to be more profitable and improve their livelihoods. We need to provide evidence on various options so that people–from an animal health provider, a woman livestock trader, to an extension or ministry person–can make an informed choice, taking into account trade-offs.</p> <h3><span style="color:#c24d2e;"><strong>WHAT DREW YOU TOWARDS WORKING AS AN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIST IN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH FOR DEVELOPMENT?</strong></span></h3> <p>I believe scientists, including economists, have a responsibility to make the world a better place.</p> <p>I could have been a farmer (though I’m way too risk averse) or a development practitioner (but I spend too much time considering different options), so I ended up in research. Economics is about looking at options and trade-offs, and this approach allows us to better understand decision making and processes.</p> <h3><strong><span style="color:#c24d2e;">COULD YOU DESCRIBE SOME OF YOUR PROFESSIONAL HIGHLIGHTS?</span></strong></h3> <p>I would say the contribution I made to the Heifer-led <a href="https://www.heifer.org/ending-hunger/our-work/programs/eadd/index.html">East Africa Dairy Development</a> project. ILRI was the research partner and I contributed to the design and implementation of this multi-country, multi-partner project. Being able to influence the design of the 2<sup>nd</sup> phase was a great achievement, moving it away from a “one-size-fits-all” hub model to a flexible hub approach.</p> <p>I also take great pride in seeing my various staff and students increase their capacity – capacity strengthening is a big part of what I do (not only formal training).</p> <h3><span style="color:#c24d2e;"><strong>WHAT GETS YOU UP IN THE MORNING?</strong> </span></h3> <p>It would have to be working with great colleagues, and knowing that I will learn something new (almost) every day.</p>