Scottish Government Library Information Literacy newsfeeds http://feed.informer.com/digests/PSEGPV0SVQ/feeder Scottish Government Library Information Literacy newsfeeds Respective post owners and feed distributors Mon, 21 Sep 2015 12:51:24 +0100 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ How to turn video into deep learning http://donaldclarkplanb.blogspot.com/2019/05/how-to-turn-video-into-deep-learning.html Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:cca832bf-6e00-f552-e817-529e8c067522 Sun, 19 May 2019 13:51:36 +0100 <div dir="ltr" style="text-align: left;" trbidi="on"><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">With video in learning one can feel as though one is learning, as the medium holds your attention but as you are hurtled forward, that knowledge disappears off the back. It’s like a shooting star; looks and feels great but the reality is that it burns up as it enters the atmosphere and rarely ever lands.</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><b>Video and learning<o:p></o:p></b></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">We have evolved to learn our first language, walk, recognise faces and so on. This primary knowledge was not learnt in the sense of being schooled or deliberately studied. It is embodied in our evolutionary past and evolved brains. Note that some of this learning is patently wrong. Our intuitive view of inertia, forces, astronomy, biology and many other things is intuitively wrong, which is why we, as a species, developed intellectual development, science, maths, literature and… education. This secondary knowledge is not easily learnt – it has to be deliberately learned and takes effort. This includes maths, medicine, the sciences and most forms of intellectual and even practical endeavour. That brings us to the issue of how we learn this stuff.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><b>Working and LT memory<o:p></o:p></b></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">Let’s start with the basics. What you are conscious of, is what’s in working memory, limited in capacity to 2-4 elements of information at any time. We can literally only hold these conscious thoughts in memory for 20 or so seconds. So our minds move through a leaning experience with limited capacity and duration. This is true of all experience and with video it has some interesting consequences.&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">We also have a long-term memory, which has no known limits in capacity or duration, although lifespan is its obvious limit. We can transfer thoughts from long-term meory back into working memory quickly and effortlessly. This is why ‘knowing’ matters. In maths, it is useful to automatically know your times table, to allow working memory to then manipulate recalled results more efficiently. We also use existing information to cope with and integrate novel information. The more you know the easier it is to learn new information. Old, stored, processed information renders working memory enormous through effortless recall from long-term memory.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">All of this raises the question of how we can get video-based learning into long-term memory.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><b>Episodic and semantic memory<o:p></o:p></b></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">There is also the distinction, in long-term memory, between episodic and semantic memory. Episodic memories are those experiences such as what you did last night, what you ate for dinner, recalling your experience at a concert. They are, in a sense, like recalling short video sequences (albeit reconstructed). Semantic memory is the recall of facts, numbers, rules and language. They are different types of memory processed in different ways and places by the brain.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">When dealing with video in learning, it is important to know what you are targeting. Video appeals far more to episodic than semantic memory – the recall of scenes, events, procedures, places and people doing things.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><b>Element interactivity<o:p></o:p></b></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">When learning meaningful information that is processed, for example in multiplication, you have 2-4 registers for the numbers being multiplied. The elements have to be manipulated within working memory and that adds extra load. Element interactivity is always extra load. Learning simply additions or subtractions have low element interactivity but multiplication is more difficult. Learning vocabulary has low element interactivity. Learning how to put the words together into meaningful sentences is more difficult.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">In video, element interactivity, is very difficult, as the brain is coping with newly presented material and the pace is not under your control. This makes video a difficult medium for learning semantic information, as well as consolidation g learning through cognitive effort and deeper processing.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><b>Video not sufficient</b><o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">Quite simple, we engage in teaching, whether offline or online, to get things into long-term memory via working memory. You must take this learning theory into account when designing video content. When using video we tend to forget about working memory as a limitation and the absence of opportunity to move working memory experiences into long-term memory.&nbsp;&nbsp;We also tend to shove in material that is more suited to other media, semantic content such as facts, figures and conceptual manipulations. So video is often too long, shows points too quickly and is packed with inappropriate content.&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">We can recognise that video has some great learning affordances in that it can capture experiences that one may not be able to experience easily, for real – human interactions, processes, procedures, places and so on. Video can also enhance learning experiences, reveal the internal thoughts of people with voiceover and use techniques that compress, focus in and highlight points that need to be learnt. When done well, it can also have an emotional or affective impact making it good for attitudinal change. The good news is that video has had a century or so to develop a rich grammar of techniques designed to telescope, highlight and get points across. The range of techniques from talking heads to drama, with sophisticated editing techniques and the ability to play with time, people and place, makes it a potent and engaging medium.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">The mistake is to see video as a learning medium&nbsp;<i>in itself</i>. Video is a great learning medium if it things are paced, reinforced but made greater if the learner has the opportunity to supplement the video experience with some effortful learning.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><b>Illusion of learning<o:p></o:p></b></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">However, the danger is that, on its own, video can encourage the illusion of learning. This phenomenon was uncovered by Bjork and others, showing that learners are easily fooled into thinking that learning experiences have stuck, when they have actually decayed from memory, often within the first 20 minutes.&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><b>Video plus…<o:p></o:p></b></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">How do we make sure that video learning experience is not lost and forgotten? The evidence is clear, the learner needs some effortful learning – they need to supplement their video learning experience with deeper learning that allows them to move that experience from short to long-term memory.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">The first is repeated access to the video, so that second and third bites of the cherry are possible. Everything in the psychology of learning tells us that repeated access to content allows us to understand, process and embed learning for retention and later recall. While repeated watching helps consolidate the learning it is not enough and an inefficient, long-winded, learning strategy.</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">The second is to take notes. This increase retention significantly by up to 20-30% of done well as deeper processing comes into play as you write, generate your own words, draw diagrams and so on.</div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;"><b>WildFire<o:p></o:p></b></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">The third, is far more effective and that is to engage in a form of deeper, effortful learning that involves retrieval and recall. We have built a tool, <a href="http://www.wildfirelearning.co.uk/">WildFire</a>,that does exactly this.<o:p></o:p></div><div class="MsoNormal" style="font-family: Cambria; margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt;">How do you ensure that your learning is not lost and forgotten? Strangely enough it is by engaging in a learning experience that makes you recall what you think you’ve learnt. We grab the transcript of the video, put it into an AI engine that creates a supplementary learning experience, where you have to type in what you ‘think’ you know. This is both simple concepts, numbers but also open input sentences, where the AI also semantically interprets your answers. This powerful form of retrieval learning, not only gives you reinforcement through a a second bite of the cherry bit also consolidates the learning. Research has shown that recalling back into memory – literally looking away and thinking about what you know, is even more powerful than the original teaching experience or exposure. In addition, the AI creates links out to supplementary material (curates if you wish) to further consolidate memory through deeper thought and processing.<o:p></o:p></div></div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/dcplanb/~4/BtWlTBM7y40" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> "More plants than a Garden Centre" - Twitter reacts to alleged bias on BBC Question Time https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/17646761.more-plants-than-a-garden-centre-twitter-reacts-to-alleged-bias-on-bbc-question-time/?ref=rss Information Literacy - BBC news and Scottish newspapers urn:uuid:086ab0c1-d077-69ad-6630-d1698b778b9b Sun, 19 May 2019 10:40:00 +0100 Viewers took to social media to query the audience selection process on BBC Question Time last night after identifying a number of Conservative councillors in the audience, while former MSP Mary Scanlon was selected to speak at length without identification. The Joanna Cherry imbroglio and how we got to here https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/17649775.the-joanna-cherry-imbroglio-and-how-we-got-to-here/?ref=rss Information Literacy - BBC news and Scottish newspapers urn:uuid:5ec8b4cd-d5fe-9eeb-9948-423f121eb223 Sun, 19 May 2019 05:15:48 +0100 Like most earthquakes it began with barely a rumble along a fault line, before the very public explosions and outpourings. At the start of this month the impressive SNP MP Joanna Cherry had been given police protection over death threats and online abuse on social media. Last Sunday this newspaper revealed that she was at the centre of a bullying inquiry into alleged staff mistreatment inside her own office. Featured Teaching Librarian: Marisa Méndez-Brady https://information-literacy.blogspot.com/2019/05/featured-teaching-librarian-marisa.html Information Literacy Weblog urn:uuid:38dc2a37-32a9-7da8-6d37-345b55989f36 Sat, 18 May 2019 17:00:51 +0100 The latest<b> Featured Teaching Librarian</b> on the ACRL blog is <b>Marisa Méndez-Brady</b>, who is Reference and Instruction Librarian at California Institute of the Arts (CalArts), USA. The interview is here: <a href="https://acrl.ala.org/IS/featured-teaching-librarian-marisa-l-mendez-brady/" target="_blank">https://acrl.ala.org/IS/featured-teaching-librarian-marisa-l-mendez-brady/</a> Concerns over Aberdeen blue badge online applications https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/news/aberdeen/1751252/concerns-over-aberdeen-blue-badge-online-applications/ Information Literacy - BBC news and Scottish newspapers urn:uuid:9709195e-fb5e-3831-bec0-207fe3c3ba42 Sat, 18 May 2019 09:00:41 +0100 An Aberdeen MSP has written to city council bosses over disabled blue badge applications now being entirely online. <p>An Aberdeen MSP has written to city council bosses over disabled blue badge applications now being entirely online.</p> <p>Aberdeen Donside independent Mark McDonald said he had fears older people would struggle without physical paper forms and has asked the local authority to reconsider their decision.</p> <p>The badges applied to cars allow disabled people to park closer to their destination.</p> <p>He said: “Whilst Aberdeenshire Council have retained a facility for obtaining and using paper copies, Aberdeen City Council have showed no such cognisance of the difficulties facing those applying for blue badges.</p> <p>“Bearing in mind that those applying include people who are registered blind, who have mobility difficulties, and those with terminal illnesses, it seems unfitting that Aberdeen City Council’s advice for those without internet access at home is to visit their local library to use one of the self-service computers, with no concern for the inappropriateness of asking vulnerable people with disabilities to divulge personal information in a public place.</p> <p>“Even for those who would be able to complete the form online it is also necessary to attach various documents requiring appropriate equipment and the ability to scan or photograph the supporting evidence, and upload it.</p> <p>“There is a clear risk that many individuals who qualify for a blue badge will find themselves unable to access the online form, thus creating a discriminatory situation.</p> <p>“I hope that Aberdeen City Council will reconsider their approach and will reinstate the paper copies of the blue badge application form.”</p> <p>Isobel Hunter, of Aberdeen Action on Disability, added: “We would like an explanation as to how the decision to move to online applications has been taken without consultation.</p> <p>“Everyone seems to think that this is just the way things are going and have neither knowledge of, nor concern for those who are being systematically excluded”.</p> North-east woman, who ‘woke up blind’, to take part in Aberdeen Kiltwalk https://www.pressandjournal.co.uk/fp/news/aberdeen/1751034/north-east-woman-who-woke-up-blind-to-take-part-in-aberdeen-kiltwalk/ Information Literacy - BBC news and Scottish newspapers urn:uuid:e4b66c99-558d-ef64-3608-535466ba73e8 Sat, 18 May 2019 08:21:46 +0100 A north-east woman who “woke up blind one morning” is calling on others to join her on the Aberdeen Kiltwalk next month. <p>A north-east woman who “woke up blind one morning” is calling on others to join her on the Aberdeen Kiltwalk next month.</p> <p>Elizabeth O’Hara, who lost her sight to diabetic retinopathy, is walking to raise funds for the Royal National Institute for the Blind&#8217;s (RNIB) Talking Books library, which provides audio books for the blind.</p> <p>As well as taking on the Granite City event on June 2, the 50-year-old has already completed the Glasgow walk and will also be taking part in the Edinburgh and Dundee events.</p> <p>She said: &#8220;I literally woke up blind one morning, right now, I can&#8217;t see anything with my left eye and have a little residual vision in my right.</p> <p>&#8220;I love reading, and I couldn&#8217;t imagine not being able to read the same books that everyone else does.</p> <p>&#8220;That&#8217;s why I&#8217;ve decided to do all four Kiltwalks to raise funds for RNIB this year. RNIB helped me a great deal when I lost my sight.</p> <p>“It would be great if other people could join my team. The more the merrier.&#8221;</p> <p>The Kiltwalks offer a chance for anyone to raise funds for a charity they care about, with the Sir Tom Hunter’s Foundation giving every penny raised a 40% top up.</p> <p>The organisation brings thousands of walkers together from all over Scotland each year for their four events.</p> <p>Those taking part can choose to walk six, 15 or 23 miles.</p> <p>Meanwhile, Aberlour Child Care Trust is offering free places to Aberdeen Kiltwalkers.</p> <p>The Moray-based charity, which provides lifeline care for vulnerable children, young people and their families, are offering free entry to anyone who pledges to raise £150 for their organisation.</p> <p>To sign up for the Aberdeen Kiltwalk on June 2, visit <a href="https://registration.everydayhero.com/ps/event/TheAberdeenKiltwalk2019">https://registration.everydayhero.com/ps/event/TheAberdeenKiltwalk2019</a></p> CBS made informal offer to buy Starz: The Information https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-lions-gate-ent-m-a-cbs/lions-gate-offered-to-sell-starz-to-cbs-for-5-5-billion-sources-idUKKCN1SN2CC Talkwalker Alert: 50 results for ["information literacy" OR "social media" OR librar* OR "information skills" OR "digital literacy" OR "digital skills" OR "online learning" OR elearning OR "blended learning" OR "lifelong learning"] urn:uuid:e201652f-3cdb-106b-a7fd-7db4e97f2f13 Fri, 17 May 2019 20:05:32 +0100 ...extensive film and TV <b>libraries</b> to launch streaming rivals to Netflix... 1022 - ATD and Asia Meetups, Storytelling for Global Reach, Innovation as Strategy http://trends.masie.com/archives/2019/5/17/1022-atd-and-asia-meetups-storytelling-for-global-reach-inno.html Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:9795c5c0-0701-abb7-85c5-2d7497a26b0a Fri, 17 May 2019 19:08:44 +0100 <p>Elliott Masie&rsquo;s Learning TRENDS - May 17, 2019.<br />#1,022&nbsp; Updates on Learning, Business &amp; Technology Since 1997.<br />58,1187 Readers - <a href="http://www.masie.com">www.masie.com</a> - The MASIE Center.<br />Host: Learning Innovations LAB - June 2019 - Saratoga Springs, NY USA&nbsp;</p> <p>1. ATD &amp; Asia Colleague Meetups!<br />2. Storytelling for Global Reach.<br />3. Innovation - Solve a Business Challenge.&nbsp;</p> <p>1. ATD &amp; Asia Colleague Meetups: I would love to connect with Learning Colleagues during my travels in the next three weeks:&nbsp;</p> <p>* ATD Conference in Washington, DC (May 18 to 22):&nbsp; I will be presenting a session on Monday afternoon:&nbsp;</p> <p>Learning Changes: Trends, Challenges, and Hype (Mon, May 20 | 1:00 PM - 2:15 PM | Room: Ballroom A, Convention Center)&nbsp;</p> <p>Change in learning is constant! Learners, technology, formats, business realities, and expectations are changing rapidly in 2019. In this session, you&#8217;ll explore the key innovations, opportunities, and overstatements for workplace learning in the months and years ahead. Learn what to watch for in automation, AI/machine learning, immersive/VR tech, chat bots, predictive assessment, gamification 2.0, voice-based coaching, and global learning.&nbsp;</p> <p>And, I will be at the MASIE Booth in the ATD Expo - Booth #2546.&nbsp; Come stop by and say hello.&nbsp; Or, send a note to <a href="mailto:emasie@masie.com">emasie@masie.com</a> and we will try to connect during the event.&nbsp; We are also doing a State of the Industry report for our Learning CONSORTIUM based on scans and conversations at ATD.&nbsp;</p> <p>* Visit to Japan (May 24 to May 28):&nbsp; I will be in Tokyo meeting with colleagues about Learning trends and also Broadway theater coming to Asia. <br />* Visit to China (May 28 to June 3rd):&nbsp; I will be in Shanghai and in Suzhou for a national conference on Training, Learning and Internet of Things.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Please be in touch via email or wechat (etbroadway) if we could connect during the Asia Trip.&nbsp;</p> <p>2. Storytelling for Global Reach: As you may know, we are focusing on Storytelling as a major and evolving skill and technique for learning and communication at the workplace.&nbsp; I was deeply moved by a video that was done by Disney to look at how one of the stories in the Lion King was performed in dozens of languages and cultures around the world.&nbsp; Look at this clip to see how stories can be global and local at the same time:&nbsp;</p> <p>Circle of Life Around the World!<br /><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jC27RaaxJ0">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0jC27RaaxJ0</a>&nbsp;</p> <p>3. Innovation - Solve a Business Challenge: I am increasingly tired of folks talking about innovation in learning being focused on a new technology - from AI to AR to xAPI.&nbsp;</p> <p>Yes, technologies may be part of the &#8220;solution&#8221;, but innovation must focus on the &#8220;business challenge&#8221;!&nbsp;</p> <p>Innovate on how your organization and workforce will shift their approach to meet a business challenge, crisis, opportunity or change.&nbsp; Innovate on how we can make a problem go away or rise up to meet an opportunity or threat to the business.&nbsp;</p> <p>Our workers don&#8217;t want to hear about more online courses being made available.&nbsp; They want to hear about pathways to sustained or continued employment and career growth.&nbsp; Managers are not deeply interested in our LMS technology - but they are widely intrigued about changing the speed to readiness and the culture of talent retention.&nbsp;</p> <p>Start the conversation about innovation by approaching business challenges - and you will get better attention, support, financing and authenticity.&nbsp; Learning will follow the shifts in the changing world of the business and marketplace.&nbsp;</p> <p>Yours in learning,</p> <p>Elliott Masie<br />Email: <a href="mailto:emasie@masie.com">emasie@masie.com</a>&nbsp;<br />Twitter: @emasie&nbsp; &nbsp;</p> <p>MASIE Center Seminars, Events and Services:&nbsp; <a href="http://www.masie.com">www.masie.com</a> for Details:&nbsp;</p> <p>- Learning Innovations LAB - June 18 to 20 - Saratoga Springs, NY<br />- Storytelling &amp; Broadway - June 26 - New York City<br />- Membership in The Learning CONSORTIUM&nbsp;</p> <p>Elliott Masie will be a Featured Keynote Speaker at Learning 2019, now produced by CloserStill&nbsp; (October 27 to 30, Orlando, Florida).&nbsp; The Learning CONSORTIUM will have its annual meeting at Learning 2019.&nbsp; Information and Registration at <a href="http://www.learning2019.com">http://www.learning2019.com</a>&nbsp;</p> <p>Learning TRENDS is produced by The MASIE Center.&nbsp; 95 Washington Street, Saratoga Springs, NY 12866</p> Deadline extended for proposals to the Global media and Information Literacy (MIL) conference #globalMILweek https://information-literacy.blogspot.com/2019/05/deadline-extended-for-proposals-to.html Information Literacy Weblog urn:uuid:0d871ec0-2834-761e-e45d-08b7fd3231e5 Fri, 17 May 2019 18:49:26 +0100 <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-2cWibTFimDc/XNMUg39OfPI/AAAAAAAAPhY/2Nyczd9eIE0Lyxq5PoMo5qSyV99LaGO8wCLcBGAs/s1600/globalmil2019.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="779" data-original-width="1600" height="156" src="https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-2cWibTFimDc/XNMUg39OfPI/AAAAAAAAPhY/2Nyczd9eIE0Lyxq5PoMo5qSyV99LaGO8wCLcBGAs/s320/globalmil2019.jpg" width="320" /></a></div>The <span style="color: blue;">deadline </span>for the call for proposals for the feature conference of <b>Global Media and Information Literacy (MIL) week</b> has <b><span style="color: blue;">been extended to the 24 May 2019.</span></b> The conference will be held in Gothenburg, Sweden, 24-25 September, with the Youth Forum on 26 September 2019. The key theme is <b>MIL Citizens and how MIL can contribute to improving the levels of information, engagement, and empowerment for all. </b><br />The registration form is here: <a href="https://en.unesco.org/feedback/call-papers-global-mil-week-2019-feature-conference" target="_blank">https://en.unesco.org/feedback/call-papers-global-mil-week-2019-feature-conference</a><br />The full call is here: <a href="https://en.unesco.org/news/global-media-and-information-literacy-week-2019-feature-conference-call-presentations" target="_blank">https://en.unesco.org/news/global-media-and-information-literacy-week-2019-feature-conference-call-presentations</a><br />The conference is organised by UNESCO, UNAOC, the Media and Information Literacy and Intercultural Dialogue (MILID) University Network, the UNESCO-led Global Alliance for Partnerships on MIL (GAPMIL), in partnership with the local hosts County Council Region Västra Götaland and University of Gothenburg (Sweden). Primary Research Group Inc. has published: Profiles of Academic Library Use of Data Visualization Applications, ISBN 978-1-57440-587-3 https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A2=LIS-INFOLITERACY;51223d5.1905 LIS-INFOLITERACY List urn:uuid:43a0602a-2e41-9809-f3c4-14609fe1e041 Fri, 17 May 2019 15:19:40 +0100 Primary Research Group Inc. has published: Profiles of Academic Library Use of Data Visualization Applications, ISBN 978-1-57440-587-3<br><br>This study profiles the efforts of six university libraries in choosing and deploying data visualization applications in a broad range of efforts including but not limited to: in information literacy efforts, in the library’s own presentation and strategic planning efforts, in cooperation with data labs, repositories, academic departments and other university centers and departments. The six universities or colleges profiled are: New York University, the University of Washington, the University of California at Santa Barbara, St. John Fisher College, the University of Michigan [...] Book Review: Other, Please Specify: Queer Methods in Sociology edited by D’Lane Compton, Tey Meadow and Kristen Schilt https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2019/05/17/book-review-other-please-specify-queer-methods-in-sociology-edited-by-dlane-compton-tey-meadow-and-kristen-schilt/ Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:1c35e843-30b4-9b88-f2c6-4e5b0017d4c3 Fri, 17 May 2019 11:00:33 +0100 In Other, Please Specify: Queer Methods in Sociology, editors D’Lane Compton, Tey Meadow and Kristen Schilt bring together contributors to reflect on the challenges and rewards of developing and conducting queer research while also questioning the traditional epistemological, methodological and political commitments of sociology. This is an engaging and vital book that provides methodological advice and practical strategies for undertaking queer research, writes Catalina Martin.  This post [&#8230;]<div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/feedburner/LSEImpactBlog?a=qR2er_LdMP0:-1UV3o_ALHk:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/feedburner/LSEImpactBlog?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/feedburner/LSEImpactBlog/~4/qR2er_LdMP0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Webinar: Incorporating Social Justice and the Framework in Information Literacy Instruction https://information-literacy.blogspot.com/2019/05/webinar-incorporating-social-justice.html Information Literacy Weblog urn:uuid:7c3b1008-fb39-5b6a-5484-4538fc8ed95f Thu, 16 May 2019 22:02:47 +0100 <div class="separator" style="clear: both; text-align: center;"><a href="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Sa9GB7XtSSo/XN3PyNCAcJI/AAAAAAAAPi4/i0rn48JuHUY2s3zL2eU4oI4PMhpdeT0xwCLcBGAs/s1600/dandelion.jpg" imageanchor="1" style="clear: right; float: right; margin-bottom: 1em; margin-left: 1em;"><img border="0" data-original-height="1578" data-original-width="1600" height="197" src="https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-Sa9GB7XtSSo/XN3PyNCAcJI/AAAAAAAAPi4/i0rn48JuHUY2s3zL2eU4oI4PMhpdeT0xwCLcBGAs/s200/dandelion.jpg" width="200" /></a></div>On May 20 2019 at 1pm-2.30 pm US Central time (which is, for example, 7pm-8.30pm UK time) there is a webinar: <b>Incorporating Social Justice and the Framework in Information Literacy Instruction</b>, part of ACRL Instruction Section's Virtual Program. You can add questions for the speakers at: <a href="https://tinyurl.com/y2llxmgv" target="_blank">https://tinyurl.com/y2llxmgv</a> The webinar "will explore the ways that librarians have incorporated social justice into the classroom, including as a pedagogy, as an advocacy topic, and in conjunction with the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Speakers will discuss social justice and the Framework from the practical perspective of how attendees can utilize their approaches to lesson plans, classroom activities, and course syllabi. Attendees will gain ideas, as well as strategies, resources, and instructional artifacts to apply in and modify for their own teaching. The program will offer four presentations by librarians who work directly with these topics, including a 20-minute keynote and three 15-minute presentations on instructional approaches to social justice and the Framework." Speakers are:<br />- Keynote: Ray Pun and Nicole Cooke: <i>Applying Social Justice Frame in Teaching and in Practice</i><br />- Martha Allen: <i>Silent Sam and the Academy: Confederate Symbols in Higher Education</i><br />- Sergio Chaparro: <i>Educating for Social Justice and Information Advocacy using Open Access Platforms from the Southern Region of the World</i><br />- Jason Ezell and Lucy Rosenbloom:<i> Homing in on Coming Out: Digital Mapping &amp; the Process of Placing Gay Liberation Where You Are </i><br />Registration is required at <a href="https://ala-events.zoom.us/webinar/register/42c90712552e33b07c24e00bf0acd2b8" target="_blank">https://ala-events.zoom.us/webinar/register/42c90712552e33b07c24e00bf0acd2b8</a> and after registering you will get the link to join the session when it goes live. This webinar will be recorded.<br /><i>Photo by Sheila Webber: dandelions, May 2019</i> Collaborative filmmaking and affective traces of belonging https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjet.12808?af=R Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:dab72659-9373-0add-d8ab-ef563277c41d Thu, 16 May 2019 20:59:52 +0100 British Journal of Educational Technology, EarlyView. <h2>Abstract</h2> <p>In order to explore how experiences with youth media production resonate with people throughout their lives, we conducted video interviews with alumni from the Educational Video Center's youth documentary programs across the organization's history of more than 30 years. We talked with alumni and watched their films together to see what memories and feelings they would share through revisiting their filmmaking. We devised a multimodal analysis method that places the films alongside the interview footage in order to observe how affect was embodied by the alumni, as well as their use of affect to reflect on their filmmaking experiences. Affective moments gave us clues about how to understand and situate the memories as lingering traces of alumni's past experiences, that centered on descriptions of belonging.</p> Lifelong learning: Formal, non‐formal and informal learning in the context of the use of problem‐solving skills in technology rich environments https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjet.12807?af=R Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:2f272b38-3d14-ee48-c6c3-5941584bc471 Thu, 16 May 2019 18:50:50 +0100 British Journal of Educational Technology, EarlyView. <h2>Abstract</h2> <p>The evolving technological landscape in the digital era has a crucial influence on lifelong learning and the demand for problem‐solving skills. In this paper, we identify associations between formal, non‐formal and informal learning with sufficient problem‐solving skills in technology‐rich environments (TRE). We focus on adults' problem‐solving skills in TRE as a novel approach to investigate formal, non‐formal and informal learning based on data from the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies. This programme measured 16–64‐year‐old adults' proficiency in problem‐solving skills in TRE. The total sample size was 61 654 individuals from 13 European countries. Our results clearly indicate that the skill levels of more than 50% of adults aged 16–64 years old seem to be insufficient to cope effectively in TRE. The findings suggest that the learning ecologies of adults are a combination of formal, non‐formal and informal learning activities. The overall level of problem‐solving skills in TRE was higher among individuals who indicated that they have participated either formal or non‐formal learning activities, compared to those who have not. However, interestingly, the association between formal learning and problem‐solving skills in TRE was not major. Instead, our results clearly indicate that informal learning seems to be highly associated with sufficient problem‐solving skills in TRE. In practice, we outline those formal, non‐formal and informal learning activities that adults perform when applying the skills in TRE. By recognising these activities undertaken by sufficient problem solvers, we can promote lifelong learning skills. Our findings can also be used as a starting point for future studies on lifelong learning.</p> From tweeting to meeting: Expansive professional learning and the academic conference backchannel https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjet.12817?af=R Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:d3537e28-8765-696c-4af1-374407a4ca03 Thu, 16 May 2019 17:46:08 +0100 British Journal of Educational Technology, EarlyView. <h2>Abstract</h2> <p>As new technologies shape and are shaped by human practices, educators and researchers must consider the impact that participating in social media—to access, reflect upon, question, evaluate and disseminate scholarship—is having on their professional development and practices. This paper investigates how members of the educational research community use social media to advance professional learning and scholarship dissemination in online–offline networks. Specifically, we examine whether and how participating in the microblogging service, Twitter, as a conference backchannel, facilitated professional learning and participation in the annual meetings of American educational researchers in 2012 and 2016, respectively, and the nature of that participation. Insights from this paper will benefit educators of varying disciplines and experience levels interested in the changing nature of social media in education, scholarship, and professional learning ecologies.</p> Connecting knowledge spaces: Enabling cross‐community knowledge building through boundary objects https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjet.12804?af=R Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:d4e939bf-c200-2974-6341-147fd48f4443 Thu, 16 May 2019 17:45:01 +0100 British Journal of Educational Technology, EarlyView. <h2>Abstract</h2> <p>A learning community works with a collective knowledge space where members contribute and interact with one another’s ideas to advance their community’s knowledge. This study aims to explore designs of collective knowledge space to support cross‐community interaction. A design experiment was conducted in four grade 5 classrooms with the support of Knowledge Forum over a school year. As students conducted focused inquiry and discourse within their own community, they reviewed productive threads of ideas and created “super notes” (idea thread syntheses) for cross‐community sharing and interaction. A set of “super notes” from previous classrooms studying human body systems was also posted in the cross‐community space. Qualitative analyses results showed that the students wrote and posted “super notes” to capture substantive idea progress and deepening questions that had emerged from their inquiry. Social network analysis of who had read whose “super notes” revealed extensive social interactions between the four classrooms as well as among the students within each classroom. Analysis of the classroom conversations that followed the “super notes” reading elaborated how students built on the insights gained from the cross‐classroom interactions to develop deeper understandings in their home classroom. Analyses of teacher interviews and observation data documented the teachers’ roles to contextualize the purpose of the cross‐classroom space, support “super notes” reading and writing, and scaffold cross‐classroom connection and conversation.</p> Guest post: The principal lesson that school teaches is the need to be taught (Illich, 2000). Discuss. https://infolit.org.uk/guest-post-the-principal-lesson-that-school-teaches-is-the-need-to-be-taught-illich-2000-discuss/ Information Literacy urn:uuid:67da58d7-0027-4985-7776-3a99203b298e Thu, 16 May 2019 16:09:08 +0100 Darryl Toerien is Head of Library at Oakham School in Rutland. He serves on the National Committee of CILIP&#8217;s School Libraries Group (SLG) and the Board of the School Library Association (SLA), and has recently also been elected to the Section Standing Committee for School Libraries of IFLA. He was shortlisted for the Information Literacy Award in 2019 and was [&#8230;] focus group - responses https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A2=LIS-INFOLITERACY;4cef3c15.1905 LIS-INFOLITERACY List urn:uuid:f5d4e5f3-b784-a459-505f-f5278d60628b Thu, 16 May 2019 16:03:46 +0100 Hi all,<br><br>I recently asked members of the List if they had advice about running focus groups (FGs). I received a number of responses, and also some requests for sharing, so here is my update.<br><br>We had planned to run our focus groups before the summer, but time has slipped away so realistically we will not get around to it until November. We have, however, received some training from HR on how to run a focus group. It was really helpful, so if anyone in your HR team can help, I would highly recommend getting in touch. [...] Learning Lessons https://blog.learnlets.com/2019/05/learning-lessons/ Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:1a79e2e3-fbc4-1a77-ba4c-e3c48abbe4d7 Thu, 16 May 2019 16:02:40 +0100 <p>So, I just finished teaching a mobile learning course online for a university. My goal was not to &#8216;teach&#8217; mobile so much as develop a mobile mindset. You have to think differently than what the phrase &#8216;mobile learning&#8217; might lead you to think. And, not surprisingly, some things went well, and some thing didn&#8217;t. I [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2019/05/learning-lessons/">Learning Lessons</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.learnlets.com">Learnlets</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://blog.learnlets.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/DMBookCoverMedium.jpg"><img class="alignright wp-image-1824" src="http://blog.learnlets.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/DMBookCoverMedium-200x300.jpg" alt="Designing mLearning book" width="148" height="222" srcset="https://blog.learnlets.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/DMBookCoverMedium-200x300.jpg 200w, https://blog.learnlets.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/DMBookCoverMedium.jpg 300w" sizes="(max-width: 148px) 100vw, 148px" /></a>So, I just finished teaching a mobile learning course online for a university. My goal was not to &#8216;teach&#8217; mobile so much as develop a mobile mindset. You have to think differently than what the phrase &#8216;mobile learning&#8217; might lead you to think. And, not surprisingly, some things went well, and some thing didn&#8217;t. I thought I&#8217;d share the learning lessons, both for my own reflection, and for others.</p> <p>As a fan of Nilson&#8217;s <a href="https://elearnmag.acm.org/archive.cfm?aid=3240149" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><em>Specifications Grading</em></a>, I created a plan for how the assessment would go. I want lots of practice, less content. And I do believe in checking knowledge up front, then having social learning, and a work product. Thus, each week had a repeated structure of each element. It was competency based, so you either did it or not. No aggregation of points, but instead: you get this grade if you do: <em>this many assignments</em> correct, <em>and </em>write a substantive comment in a discussion board <em>and</em> comment on someone else&#8217;s <em>this many times</em>, <em>and</em> complete <em>this level on this many knowledge checks</em>. And I staggered the deadlines through the week, so there&#8217;d be reactivation. I&#8217;ve recommended this scheme on principle, and think it worked out good in practice, and I&#8217;d do it again.</p> <p>In many ways it &#8216;teacher proofs&#8217; the class. For one, the students are giving each other feedback in the discussion question. The choice of discussion question and assignment both were designed to elicit the necessary thinking, which makes the marking of the assignment relatively easy. And the knowledge checks set a baseline background. Designing them all as scenario challenges was critical as well.</p> <p>And I was really glad I mixed things up. In early weeks, I had them look at apps or evaluated ones that they liked. For the social week, I had them collaborate in pairs. In the contextual week, they submitted a video of themselves. They had to submit an information architecture for the design week. And for the development week, they tested it.  Thus, each assignment was tied to mobile.</p> <p>It was undermined by a couple of things. First, the LMS interfered. I wrote careful feedback for each wrong answer for each question on the knowledge checks. And, it turns out, the students weren&#8217;t seeing it!  (And they didn&#8217;t let me know &#8217;til the 2nd half of the abbreviated semester!) There&#8217;s a flag I wasn&#8217;t setting, but it wasn&#8217;t the default!  (Which was a point I then emphasized in the design week: start with good defaults!)</p> <p>And, I missed making the discussions &#8216;gradeable&#8217; until late because of another flag. That&#8217;s at least partly on me. Which meant again they weren&#8217;t getting feedback, and that&#8217;s not good. And, of course, it wasn&#8217;t obvious &#8217;til I remedied it. Also, my grading scheme doesn&#8217;t fit into the default grading schema of the LMS anyways, so it wasn&#8217;t automatically doable anyways. Next time, I would investigate that and see if I could make it more obvious. And learn about the LMS earlier. (Ok, so I had some LMS anxiety and put it off&#8230;)</p> <p>With 8 weeks, I broke it up like this:</p> <ol> <li>Overview: mobile is <em>not</em> courses on a phone. The <a href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2010/02/writing-and-the-4cs-of-mobile/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Four C&#8217;s</a>.</li> <li>Formal Learning: <em>augmenting</em> learning.</li> <li>Performance Support: mobile&#8217;s natural niche</li> <li>Social: connecting to people &#8216;on the go&#8217;</li> <li>Contextual: the unique mobile opportunity</li> <li>Design: if you get the <a href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2011/02/quip-design/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">design</a> right&#8230;</li> <li>Development: practicalities and testing.</li> <li>Strategy: platform and policy.</li> </ol> <p>And I think this was the right structure. It naturally reactivated prior concepts, and developed the thinking before elaborating.</p> <p>For the content, I had a small set of readings. Because of a late start, I only found out that I couldn&#8217;t use my own mLearning <a href="http://designingmlearning.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">book</a> when the bookstore told me it was out of print (!). That required scrambling and getting approval to use some other writings I&#8217;d done. And the late start precluded me from organizing other writings. No worries, minimal was good.  And I wrote a script that covered the material, and filmed myself giving a lecture for each week. Then I also provided the transcript.</p> <p>The university itself was pretty good. They capped the attendance at 20. This worked really well. (Anything else would&#8217;ve been a deal breaker after a disaster many years ago when an institution promised to keep it under 32 and then gave me 64 students.)  And there was good support, at least during the week, and some support was available even over the weekend.</p> <p>Overall, despite some hiccups and some stress, I think it worked out (particularly under the <a href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2019/04/violating-expectations/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">constraints</a>). Of course, I&#8217;ll have to see what the students say. One other thing I&#8217;d do that I didn&#8217;t do a good job of generally (I did with a few students) was <em>explain </em>the pedagogy. I&#8217;ve learned this in the past, and I should&#8217;ve done so, but in the rush to wrestle with the systems, it slipped through the cracks.</p> <p>Those are my learning lessons. I welcome <em>your</em> feedback and lessons!</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2019/05/learning-lessons/">Learning Lessons</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.learnlets.com">Learnlets</a>.</p> Assessing Impact Assessment – What can be learnt from Australia’s Engagement and Impact Assessment? https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2019/05/16/assessing-impact-assessment-what-can-be-learnt-from-australias-engagement-and-impact-assessment/ Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:dda4ffc1-e19d-c4d3-d61c-4b33f189597e Thu, 16 May 2019 16:00:02 +0100 The impact agenda is an international and evolutionary phenomenon that has undergone numerous iterations. Discussing the development and recent release of the results of the Australian Engagement and Impact Assessment (EIA), Ksenia Sawczak considers the effectiveness of this latest exercise in impact assessment, finding it to provide an inadequate account of the impact of Australian research and ultimately a shaky evidence [&#8230;]<div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/feedburner/LSEImpactBlog?a=w91Jnt2nss4:CaFN48Zej2w:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/feedburner/LSEImpactBlog?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/feedburner/LSEImpactBlog/~4/w91Jnt2nss4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> World of Learning Conference & Exhibition 2019 Announced https://towardsmaturity.org/2019/05/16/world-of-learning-conference-exhibition-2019-announced/ Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:4a3436b0-b007-6bf8-58d4-78a4d5e38865 Thu, 16 May 2019 11:04:38 +0100 <p>Learning and Development (L&#038;D) best practice, thought leadership and the latest learning technology to be shared at Birmingham’s NEC on 15 &#038; 16 October.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://towardsmaturity.org/2019/05/16/world-of-learning-conference-exhibition-2019-announced/">World of Learning Conference &#038; Exhibition 2019 Announced</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://towardsmaturity.org">Towards Maturity</a>.</p> 10th International Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Conference – Competition winner and details of virtual atttendance https://www.cilips.org.uk/10th-international-evidence-based-library-and-information-practice-conference-competition-winner-and-details-of-virtual-atttendance/ CILIPS urn:uuid:361a9e70-1a6a-d303-3963-12abc57255af Thu, 16 May 2019 07:57:10 +0100 <p>We are pleased to announce that the winner of our competition to win a place at the 10th International Evidence Based Library and Information Practice [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.cilips.org.uk/10th-international-evidence-based-library-and-information-practice-conference-competition-winner-and-details-of-virtual-atttendance/">10th International Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Conference &#8211; Competition winner and details of virtual atttendance</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.cilips.org.uk">CILIPS</a>.</p> <p>We are pleased to announce that the winner of our competition to win a place at the 10th International Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Conference was Charlotte Dunn. Enjoy the event Charlotte!</p> <p><strong>Would you like to also attend the event but can&#8217;t get the time off? Here&#8217;s a message from the organisers telling you how you can:</strong></p> <p>The 10th International Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Conference is in Glasgow, UK from 17-19 June (<a href="https://eblip10.org/">https://eblip10.org</a>). However, we know many people can’t take the time off work or make the journey to Scotland. However, we have other ways for people to attend.</p> <p><strong>If you’re too far away to join us in person</strong>, you can join us virtually. We are making the conference available virtually for the nominal fee of £65. Virtual conference attendance includes all of the <a href="https://eblip10.org/Keynotes/tabid/8291/Default.aspx">keynote speakers</a> (David Stewart, President of CILIP; Dr Frankie Wilson, Head of Assessment at the Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford; and Donna Scheeder, Past President of IFLA and SLA) and one track of the presentations, including topics such as Meeting User Needs; Value, Impact, and Outcomes; National Initiatives for Health Libraries; and Emerging Roles for Librarians (more information about the sessions are available <a href="https://eblip10.org/Schedule/tabid/7771/Default.aspx">here</a>, in Room GH514).</p> <p><strong>If you’re in the UK</strong> and want to participate in some evidence-based practice continuing professional development, you can join us for the pre-conference workshops at Sunday 16 June. We have two morning and two afternoon workshops on advocacy and impact, using systematic reviews to support evidence-based practice, incorporating evidence-based practice, and outcome measurement in academic libraries. These half-day workshops are £50 each (including lunch). More information can be found <a href="https://eblip10.org/Schedule/tabid/7771/Default.aspx">here</a>. To get the information needed for workshop registration, please email <a href="mailto:eblip10conference@gmail.com">eblip10conference@gmail.com</a>.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.cilips.org.uk/10th-international-evidence-based-library-and-information-practice-conference-competition-winner-and-details-of-virtual-atttendance/">10th International Evidence Based Library and Information Practice Conference &#8211; Competition winner and details of virtual atttendance</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.cilips.org.uk">CILIPS</a>.</p> Supporting collaborative learning using a diagram‐based visible thinking tool based on cognitive load theory https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjet.12818?af=R Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:3ecb2b27-3316-006c-1bce-89f09ca62c95 Wed, 15 May 2019 16:34:55 +0100 British Journal of Educational Technology, EarlyView. <h2>Abstract</h2> <p>A natural concern in the field of computer‐supported collaborative learning is how participants in collaborative learning project attain individual deep understanding through pedagogical or technological support. This study explores such individual outcomes as influenced by designing a collaborative learning project supported with a diagram‐based thinking tool based on cognitive load theory (CLT). A comparative experiment was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the diagram‐based thinking tool. A total of 49 first‐year graduate students were recruited and assigned to two conditions. In the experiment condition, the group students completed the collaborative learning project through a diagram‐based thinking tool, while the group students in the control condition completed the same project through an alternative text‐based thinking tool. Pre‐and posttesting of the domain knowledge was employed to evaluate each individual's learning outcome. Group discourse was employed to evaluate how group students actively engage during collaboration. Results show that the support of diagram‐based thinking tool integrated in collaborative learning can facilitate individual understanding intensively. Moreover, diagram‐based thinking tool can engage group students into cognitively demanding learning activities actively. Findings demonstrate that the semantic diagram tool provides promising technological support when designing collaborative learning project based on CLT. This study serves as a foundation to the design of technological support for future classroom‐based collaborative learning project.</p> Key components of learning ecologies: A Delphi assessment https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/bjet.12805?af=R Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:bcdac551-7e5f-74b2-a081-840843256ec7 Wed, 15 May 2019 16:07:50 +0100 British Journal of Educational Technology, EarlyView. <h2>Abstract</h2> <p>The educational landscape has changed in recent years, requiring reflection about new pedagogical methods and theories. There are three important perspectives as drivers of pedagogical reflection: lifelong and life‐wide learning, the idea of learning as a social construct in which internal elements and changing external factors converge, and the recognition of technology as a resource that can promote ubiquitous and expanded learning. Learning ecology has been proposed as a conceptual and empirical framework, but its still emergent nature along with its multidimensionality and complexity require further exploration. The Delphi study we present as part of a broader research project aims to identify the components of learning ecologies. Three panel rounds with international experts were carried out, after which two important dimensions emerged in the structure of learning ecologies. The first is related to intrinsic “learning dispositions,” which is made up of three categories: the subject's ideas about learning, their motivations and expectations. The second dimension, called “learning processes,” comprises four components: relationships, resources, actions and context. The identification of the components of learning ecologies and their influence on formal, non‐formal and informal training processes will provide guidance for educational policies and help to better organize training programmes.</p> Guest post: recent articles on information literacy research and practice https://infolit.org.uk/guest-post-recent-articles-on-information-literacy-research-and-practice/ Information Literacy urn:uuid:4b5a01c6-a4ce-390a-971d-f76df7ec59fc Wed, 15 May 2019 11:58:36 +0100 Dr Alison Hicks, Lecturer in Library and Information Science at UCL, has written a guest post highlighting some recent articles in the field of information literacy research and practice. One of the greatest privileges of moving into a university lecturer position, alongside working with fabulous students, has been the opportunity (and requirement!) to keep up to date with newly-published information literacy [&#8230;] Your chance to have a say on LIRG events! https://www.jiscmail.ac.uk/cgi-bin/webadmin?A2=LIS-INFOLITERACY;3247f15.1905 LIS-INFOLITERACY List urn:uuid:a284d9e0-1f51-d6af-cb74-2654d164c21b Wed, 15 May 2019 11:09:41 +0100 **Cross-posted**<br>CILIP LIRG events survey 2019<br><br>LIRG is a CILIP special interest group focused on promoting the value of information research and linking research with practice.<br><br>Please help us develop engaging and relevant professional development events by completing this survey&lt;https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/LIRGEventsSurvey2019&gt;. Completion of the survey will enter you into a prize draw offering free places on the EBLIP10conference virtual programme. [...] Measuring Inequality – Creating an indicator to assess gender bias in universities https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/impactofsocialsciences/2019/05/15/measuring-inequality-creating-an-indicator-to-assess-gender-bias-in-universities/ Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:51b92fe7-eebf-21f8-fd71-71ac06b2c22c Wed, 15 May 2019 11:00:12 +0100 Higher education and research institutions are increasingly coming to terms with the issue of gender inequality. However, efforts to move in this direction are often isolated and difficult to compare and benchmark against each other. In this post, Caroline Wagner presents a new initiative from the Centre for Science and Technology Studies at Leiden (CWTS), to assess gender inequality in [&#8230;]<div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/feedburner/LSEImpactBlog?a=1CPuzUeVRwQ:48eJ713_-hQ:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/feedburner/LSEImpactBlog?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/feedburner/LSEImpactBlog/~4/1CPuzUeVRwQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> England’s best beaches revealed with Blue Flag awards https://uk.news.yahoo.com/england-best-beaches-revealed-blue-082043435.html Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:2ec62ec8-8268-0248-f8f4-92d62b654b43 Wed, 15 May 2019 09:48:36 +0100 The international Blue Flag and the <b>UK</b> Seaside Awards are quality... “From environmental <b>education</b> for the local community and ensuring... Shaming, safety, & misconceptions https://blog.learnlets.com/2019/05/shaming-safety-misconceptions/ Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:ef1c2c41-320d-5b94-9f0a-5cfdd5c7a168 Tue, 14 May 2019 17:19:29 +0100 <p>Another twitter debate, another blog post. As an outgrowth of a #lrnchat debate, a discussion arose around whether making errors in learning could be a source of shaming. This wasn&#8217;t about the learners, however, being afraid of being shamed. Instead it was about whether the designers would feel proscribed from  making real errors because of [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2019/05/shaming-safety-misconceptions/">Shaming, safety, &#038; misconceptions</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.learnlets.com">Learnlets</a>.</p> <p>Another twitter <a href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2019/04/reflection-on-reflection/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">debate</a>, another blog post. As an outgrowth of a #lrnchat debate, a discussion arose around whether making errors in learning could be a source of shaming. This wasn&#8217;t about the learners, however, being afraid of being shamed. Instead it was about whether the designers would feel proscribed from  making real errors because of their <em>expectation</em> of learner&#8217;s emotions. And, I have strong beliefs about why this is an important issue. Learners should be making errors, for important reasons. So, we need to make it safe!</p> <p>The importance of errors is in the fact that we&#8217;d rather make them in practice than when it counts. Some have argued that we literally <em>have</em> to fail to be ready to learn. (Perhaps almost certainly if the learners are overconfident.) The importance to me is in <a href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2017/01/errors-and-misconceptions/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">misconceptions</a>. Our errors don&#8217;t tend to be random (there is <em>some</em> randomness), but instead are patterned. They come from systematic ways of perceiving the situation that are wrong. They come from bringing in the wrong models in ways that seem to make sense. And it&#8217;s best to address them by being able to make that choice, and getting feedback about why that&#8217;s wrong.</p> <p>Which means learners <em>will</em> have to fail. And they should be able to make mistakes. (Guided) Exploration is good. Learners should be able to try things out, see what the consequences are, and then try other approaches. It shouldn&#8217;t be a free-for-all, since learners can not explore systematically. Instead, as I&#8217;ve <a href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2018/05/quip-learning-instruction/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">said</a>, learning <em>should</em> be designed action and guided reflection. And that means we should be designing in these alternatives to the right action as options, and provide specific feedback.</p> <p>So, if they&#8217;re failing, is that shaming? Not if we do it right. It&#8217;s about making failing <em>okay</em>.  It&#8217;s about making the learning experience &#8216;<a href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2019/04/surprise-and-safety/" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">safe</a>&#8216;. Our feedback should be about the decision, and why it&#8217;s wrong (referring to the <a href="https://www.litmos.com/blog/articles/mental-models-learning-design" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">model</a>). We might not give them the right answer, if we want them to try again. But we don&#8217;t make it personal, just like good coaching. It&#8217;s about what they did, not who they are. So our design should prevent shaming, but by making it safe to fail, not preventing failure.</p> <p>The one issue that emerged was that there was fear that the designers (or other stakeholders) might have fear that this could be emotionally damaging, perhaps from fears of their own. Er, nope! It&#8217;s about the learning, and we know what research tells us works. We have to be responsible to be willing to do what&#8217;s right, as challenging as that may be for any reason. Time, money, emotions, what have you. Because, if we want to be responsible stewards of the resources entrusted to us, we should be doing what&#8217;s known to be right. Not chasing <a href="http://www.learningsolutionsmag.com/articles/cargo-cults-shiny-object-syndrome-and-elearning" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">shiny objects</a>. (At least, until we get the core right. ;)</p> <p>So, let&#8217;s not shame ourselves by letting irrelevant details cloud our judgment. Do the right thing. For the right reasons. We know how to be <a href="http://elearningmanifesto.org" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">serious</a> about our learning. Make it so.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.learnlets.com/2019/05/shaming-safety-misconceptions/">Shaming, safety, &#038; misconceptions</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.learnlets.com">Learnlets</a>.</p> Olympic weightlifter Zoe Smith on depression, confidence and still... https://uk.news.yahoo.com/olympic-weightlifter-zoe-smith-depression-161154754.html Scottish Government Library Learning and Development newsfeeds urn:uuid:0258d40d-67f2-b283-c3be-c51b034194d3 Tue, 14 May 2019 17:11:54 +0100 ...nor elite funding from <b>UK</b> Sport aside from the £192,500 Aspiration ... Smith has returned to <b>education</b> to better her post-weightlifting...