SEO Biz Updated RSS Feed http://feed.informer.com/digests/MLEFXEUEU1/feeder SEO Biz Updated RSS Feed Respective post owners and feed distributors Thu, 21 Sep 2017 18:07:00 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ 7 Expert Tips to Protect Your Online Reputation by @pierrezarokian http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11279066 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:7dbe30c5-f75c-c5a0-a564-f09a0b6cb76a Sun, 21 Apr 2019 12:00:51 +0000 <p>Here is some detailed advice that will help you protect your reputation online.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/protect-your-online-reputation-expert-tips/300811/">7 Expert Tips to Protect Your Online Reputation by @pierrezarokian</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11279066.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Android Update Impact on European Search Marketing by @martinibuster http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11278799 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:f4d70a47-6d85-0e0c-691d-d4fac7376db5 Sun, 21 Apr 2019 08:32:20 +0000 <p>Google announced changes to Android that may affect it’s search and browser dominance in Europe. Every Android user in Europe will soon be asked to make a choice of what browser and search service the users wishes to use. Impact to Search Marketing The update will be rolling out over the coming weeks. It will impact current and new Android device users. It may be useful to follow European user trends. Significant changes may impact how search marketing from PPC to organic search is conducted. That said, there is reason to believe that Google’s implementation of the choice prompt is […]</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/android-update-browser-search-services/304383/">Android Update Impact on European Search Marketing by @martinibuster</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11278799.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Facebook Updates Advertising Tools https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/facebook-updates-advertising-tools/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:1b1c898f-91c0-a9b2-dfe9-5195e772444e Sat, 20 Apr 2019 10:00:49 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SMMT-Show-2019-04-20-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SMMT-Show-2019-04-20-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SMMT-Show-2019-04-20-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SMMT-Show-2019-04-20-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SMMT-Show-2019-04-20-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/SMMT-Show-2019-04-20-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Welcome to this week&#8217;s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week&#8217;s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore Facebook Ads Manager updates, new ad bidding strategies, and inventory filters with special guests Charlie Lawrance and Amanda [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/facebook-updates-advertising-tools/">Facebook Updates Advertising Tools</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> Google’s John Mueller Discusses TF-IDF Algo by @martinibuster http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11277197 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:7fd55f96-be01-835a-3128-7208c0483507 Sat, 20 Apr 2019 08:43:03 +0000 <p>Google's John Mueller explains the role of TF-IDF in how web pages are ranked.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-tf-idf/304361/">Google&#8217;s John Mueller Discusses TF-IDF Algo by @martinibuster</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11277197.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Official AMP Plugin for WordPress Now Supports AMP Stories by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11276242 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:7da9b5d6-cacc-6bc0-7932-7811f542ea8f Fri, 19 Apr 2019 20:33:13 +0000 <p>A new version of the official AMP plugin for WordPress supports the creation of AMP Stories.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/official-amp-plugin-for-wordpress-now-supports-amp-stories/304351/">Official AMP Plugin for WordPress Now Supports AMP Stories by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11276242.gif" height="1" width="1"/> 3 steps to signing more clients https://marketingland.com/3-steps-to-signing-more-clients-259769 Marketing Land urn:uuid:0142191d-2d3c-1339-9370-6bb8eee40f41 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 16:56:37 +0000 <p>How agencies can use marketing automation to build their brand and acquire new clients.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/3-steps-to-signing-more-clients-259769">3 steps to signing more clients</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <a href="https://downloads.digitalmarketingdepot.com/SHA_1903_3StepToGrw_landingpage_post.html?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=newspost"><img class="aligncenter wp-image-259770 size-full" src="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/agency-brainstorming-ss-1920.jpg" alt="" width="1920" height="1080" srcset="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/agency-brainstorming-ss-1920.jpg 1920w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/agency-brainstorming-ss-1920-600x338.jpg 600w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/agency-brainstorming-ss-1920-768x432.jpg 768w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/agency-brainstorming-ss-1920-800x450.jpg 800w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/agency-brainstorming-ss-1920-550x310.jpg 550w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a> <p>If you’re reading this, chances are that your agency is already using or considering a marketing automation platform to help your clients grow their funnels of customers or prospects and win more business.</p> <p>Despite using it for clients, however, many agencies are still not using marketing automation internally to support their own business development strategies. Marketing automation is hands down the best tool for achieving the three “gets” that any agency needs in order to grow: Getting found, getting the meeting, and getting the business.</p> <p>In this issue of Agency Perspectives from Sharp Spring, you will:</p> <ul> <li>Learn why you should use marketing automation internally for your agency in addition to using it for clients.</li> <li>Discover new strategies for generating awareness, leads and conversions.</li> <li>Get actionable tips for optimizing your lists, workflows, content library and more.</li> </ul> <p>Visit Digital Marketing Depot to download <a href="https://downloads.digitalmarketingdepot.com/SHA_1903_3StepToGrw_landingpage_post.html?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=newspost" rel="nofollow">&#8220;3 Steps to Signing More Clients.&#8221;</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/3-steps-to-signing-more-clients-259769">3 steps to signing more clients</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> New customer acquisition vs. retention: 7 best practices for search https://marketingland.com/new-customer-acquisition-vs-retention-7-best-practices-for-search-259765 Marketing Land urn:uuid:65af51db-20d2-4b18-0c12-305c67da9542 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 16:09:03 +0000 <p>Here’s how retailers should map their audience strategy for new-versus-returning customers to search.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/new-customer-acquisition-vs-retention-7-best-practices-for-search-259765">New customer acquisition vs. retention: 7 best practices for search</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p>Like nearly all retailers, a large health and beauty organization is facing escalating competition and CPCs on search. The performance marketing team realizes it can’t keep paying heightening costs to acquire the same levels of revenue from repeat customers.</p> <p>At the same time, the team recognizes it can better coordinate its strategy on other channels. Retargeting, email and direct can work together more cohesively to push customers to purchase once they’re in the door, or <i>back </i>in the door, from search.</p> <p>They developed a new strategy for tackling Google Ads, one focused on identifying and treating new customers differently than returning customers. The ultimate goal is to achieve more granular return targets for new versus repeat customers, with repeat customers generating a much more efficient return than in the past.</p> <p>This scenario is not an isolated case. Many performance marketing teams in retail are keen to understand how a new-versus-repeat customer model works for search. Some of the most common questions are: What should we know about this approach? What’s the process to implement it? How would we measure success?</p> <p>Here are some best practices.</p> <h2>1. Realize the war for the wallet will be won at the top of the funnel</h2> <p>A new-versus-returning customer strategy can make a lot of sense in today’s competitive climate. Here’s why:</p> <ul> <li><b>Retailers can’t fight for the bottom of the funnel anymore.</b> CPCs continue to rise in direct response channels like search. <a href="https://discover.getsidecar.com/cost-of-competing-google-ads-e-commerce-retailers/">Retailers’ average CPC in Google paid search</a> (text ads) grew by 14% in 2018, reaching $0.71, according to Sidecar’s 2019 Benchmarks Report: Google Ads in Retail. Google Shopping CPC averaged $0.57 in 2018, up by 4%. Competition in search is at a fever pitch. Retailers are moving the battle to the top of the funnel because they’ve realized the downstream benefits it provides to get in front of customers in the research stage.</li> <li><b>Most retailers own their customers less and less. </b>Consumers have more options than ever in terms of where and when they shop. As a result, most retailers own their customers less and need to work harder and smarter to secure loyalty. With that in mind, consider this: If someone who just purchased from you is now searching for products you sell using generic terms in a competitive space like Google, is that person really your customer? Or is she a prospect you need to re-acquire at the top of the funnel?</li> </ul> <p>Both these realizations speak to the growing importance of the upper funnel. Similarly, acquiring new customers requires you to strengthen the top of your marketing funnel. And strengthening the top, in turn, requires you to shore up the middle and bottom of your funnel, so prospects move forward to conversion.</p> <h2>2. Define what &#8216;customer&#8217; means to your business</h2> <p>Here’s one of the biggest pitfalls marketers face when developing an audience strategy: They overlook the step of defining what comprises a customer, and how that definition translates to their search campaigns.</p> <p>That definition can vary greatly among marketing departments. Some define a customer as any visitor who has purchased in the last six months. Others define a customer as a visitor who has purchased at <i>any</i> point in time. Still, others consider a customer to be a returning visitor who is searching only using branded keywords.</p> <p>Your definition of a customer should align with how you want to treat past purchasers. This thought goes back to the idea that “most retailers own their customers less and less.” If someone bought from you four years ago and hasn’t purchased since, would you still consider him a customer, and treat him the same as someone who bought from you a month ago?</p> <p>Say two people bought from you yesterday. Theoretically, your brand is still fresh in their heads. But today, one shopper searches for the types of products you offer using a generic term. The other shopper uses a branded term. Would you consider both of them active customers? Or would you say you need to re-acquire the shopper who used the generic term?</p> <p>Those are some philosophical considerations to help arrive at your definition of a customer. The other factor is data. Analyze your transaction data to identify trends in repurchase cadence. At what point in time does it become highly unlikely that the shopper will return? One month? Three months? A year? More? Those findings can help inform whether it makes sense to define a customer based on time, and what that timing threshold should be.</p> <h2>3. Understand your customers’ purchase path</h2> <p>Search is typically a new customer acquisition channel, and you can find new customers at varying levels of cost. As you move up the funnel within search marketing, it tends to cost more to acquire new customers.</p> <p>However, if you have a strong understanding of your customers’ purchase path, you ideally know that a heightened cost is justified, because you can see your other channels—like email, affiliates, direct, etc.—are coming into play to nurture customers to purchase.</p> <p>Gaining this understanding has a lot to do with your attribution model. Having a <a href="https://marketingland.com/time-to-leave-last-touch-attribution-in-the-dust-answer-these-4-questions-first-258670" target="_blank" rel="noopener">multi-channel attribution model is essential</a> to viewing performance across your channels—and that also makes it a key best practice with a new-versus-returning customer strategy.</p> <p>Most retailers’ audiences interact with the brand using multiple channels. A multi-channel attribution model lets you more accurately value the role of those channels. That knowledge can translate into critical information for determining the size of your investment and your ROI goal, channel by channel.</p> <h2>4. Create campaigns supporting each audience segment</h2> <p>Once you’ve defined what a customer means to your business, segment your ad campaigns based on new versus returning customers. This is where features like Remarketing Lists for Search Ads (RLSAs) and Customer Match can come into play.</p> <p>Here’s an example setup involving these features and several similar ones. Keep in mind, this is just one way to slice it. You might find a version of this approach is better for your business and goals.</p> <ul> <li><b>New and uncookied customers (prospects) &#8211; </b>This audience is comprised of shoppers who are uncookied and have never purchased. You can build this campaign without remarketing lists, but you can enhance your prospecting efforts by using tools like similar audiences, in-market audiences, affinity audiences, and demographic targeting.</li> <li><b>New and cookied customers &#8211;</b> This bucket could be comprised of shoppers who visited your site but did not purchase within a certain time frame, such as the past 180 days. Create sets of remarketing lists and adjust bids using audience modifiers in Google Ads. Create lists and set modifiers based on the user’s likelihood of converting (e.g., cart abandoners vs. bounced users). The new and cookied bucket also could include customers who have purchased further back than your specified window (in this example, 180 days), because you might consider this audience to fall back into the “new, yet cookied” category.</li> <li><b>Returning customers &#8211;</b> This encompasses shoppers who’ve purchased within the past 180 days (to continue with the example). You can create this segment with a combination of Customer Match (email lists) and cookied purchasers (users who landed on your order confirmation page). For even more granularity, break these users into segments, such as high lifetime value, dormant, or first-time buyers.</li> </ul> <h2>5. Set a unique return goal for each audience segment</h2> <p>Once you’ve developed your audience buckets, determine a unique return goal for each audience. A good return goal should align with the goals of your business and the campaign.</p> <p>Also, it&#8217;s important to note the inherent relationship between return and revenue. Generally, a stricter return goal will limit revenue opportunities, and a more liberal return goal will open revenue opportunities.</p> <p>For instance, you might be willing to target a less efficient goal for prospects (perhaps 30-45% cost/sale), a similar or slightly more efficient goal for the new and cookied audience (25-40% cost/sale), and a much more efficient goal for returning customers (about 5-10% cost/sale).</p> <p>Generally, with a new-versus-returning customer model, you should be willing to spend more budget and operate to a less efficient return goal to attract new customers. By contrast, you should target a more efficient goal for returning customers because you’ve already invested in this audience and you’ve determined it is more likely to convert after having purchased in the past.</p> <h2>6. Segment each campaign further to align with your customers’ journey</h2> <p>Once you establish baseline campaigns for new and returning customers, analyze your data to determine if there’s enough volume to segment even further. For instance, do you still have enough data to split each campaign by device? If you know that more users are beginning their purchase journeys on smartphones compared to desktop or tablet, is there further value to be gained by targeting these mobile users differently?</p> <p>Also consider whether you can segment by branded and non-branded terms, or trademarked and non-trademarked terms. That’s because search terms, naturally, reveal tremendous insight into purchase intent.</p> <p>A new customer searching “laser printers” is probably at the top of the funnel, while a new customer searching “Brother HL-L2370DW printer” is further along in the funnel. If you have enough traffic hitting each of those two types of terms, consider segmenting by them in your new customer campaign.</p> <p>The same concept applies to your returning customer campaign. For instance, If you see enough traffic going to generic terms versus branded or trademarked terms, consider creating campaigns for each type of query.</p> <h2>7. Watch for KPIs of success</h2> <p>Some of the most important questions to ask yourself as you evaluate performance are: Are you hitting your return goals? Are new customers aligning with your ideal customer profile? Are you increasing net new customers, while maintaining the same level of profit? Is cost per conversion down for returning customers?</p> <p>Get in the habit of making incremental tweaks about every three months, depending on the trends arising in your data.</p> <p>Your growth in search will naturally level off if you don’t innovate. Refresh your view of performance, and rethink the role of search in your performance marketing strategy. Consider whether your business and marketing goals are a fit for a model centered on targeting new versus returning customers.</p> <p><i>This story first appeared on Search Engine Land. For more on search marketing and SEO, <a href="https://searchengineland.com?utm_src=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=mlxpost">click here.</a></i></p> <p>https://searchengineland.com/new-customer-acquisition-vs-retention-7-best-practices-for-search-315674</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/new-customer-acquisition-vs-retention-7-best-practices-for-search-259765">New customer acquisition vs. retention: 7 best practices for search</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Google My Business Suggests Positive Reviews to Share as Posts by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11275713 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:e39b6f87-eb23-de1b-4ccd-e68f0ce70eac Fri, 19 Apr 2019 16:06:58 +0000 <p>Google My Business is launching a new feature which will help business owners showcase positive reviews.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-my-business-suggests-positive-reviews-to-share-as-posts/304339/">Google My Business Suggests Positive Reviews to Share as Posts by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11275713.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Digital marketers on Pinterest IPO: Get in early while costs are low, learning opportunities are high https://marketingland.com/digital-marketers-on-pinterest-ipo-get-in-early-while-costs-are-low-learning-opportunities-are-high-259743 Marketing Land urn:uuid:9a4a4aa4-2be7-7fee-a3ee-a0fd966305ca Fri, 19 Apr 2019 15:55:29 +0000 <p>January Digital CEO optimistic the company will grow exponentially if it continues to develop the right tech stack. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/digital-marketers-on-pinterest-ipo-get-in-early-while-costs-are-low-learning-opportunities-are-high-259743">Digital marketers on Pinterest IPO: Get in early while costs are low, learning opportunities are high</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <div id="attachment_259750" style="width: 810px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><img class="size-large wp-image-259750" src="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Pinterest-CEO-Ben-Silbermann-and-CPO-Evan-Sharp-800x500.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="500" srcset="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Pinterest-CEO-Ben-Silbermann-and-CPO-Evan-Sharp-800x500.jpg 800w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Pinterest-CEO-Ben-Silbermann-and-CPO-Evan-Sharp-600x375.jpg 600w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Pinterest-CEO-Ben-Silbermann-and-CPO-Evan-Sharp-768x480.jpg 768w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Pinterest-CEO-Ben-Silbermann-and-CPO-Evan-Sharp.jpg 1184w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Pinterest&#8217;s Chief Product Officer Evan Sharp and CEO Ben Silbermann</p></div> <p>Pinterest debuted on the New York Stock Exchange on Thursday under the ticker symbol PINS. The stock climbed 28.4% over the course of the day, with a market cap of nearly $13 billion.</p> <p>Following the company&#8217;s IPO, CEO Ben Silbermann <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/18/pinterest-ipo-stock-starts-trading-on-the-public-market.html">told CNBC</a> that Pinterest is less focused on making itself a platform where users talk to friends every day or follow celebrities, and instead, thinks of itself as more of a utility.</p> <p>&#8220;I think that&#8217;s something we&#8217;re enabled to do by the fact that we&#8217;re an inspiration platform. We don&#8217;t claim to be a free speech platform or a place that everyone can publish anything,&#8221; said Silbermann, &#8220;The really cool thing about advertising on Pinterest is that people are there to get inspiration and do things, and that often means buying.&#8221;</p> <p><strong>Advertisers should get in early.</strong> January Digital&#8217;s CEO Vic Drabicky believes Pinterest has an immense opportunity from a revenue perspective with advertisers hungry for new channels and new ways to diversify their ad spend.</p> <p>&#8220;The platform is in the infancy of building out its advertising model. If they continue to develop the right tech stack, they will grow exponentially,&#8221; said Drabicky, &#8220;We are already seeing our clients make this shift and the IPO will only generate more opportunity for Pinterest as a brand.&#8221;</p> <p>Drabicky recommends CMOs get in early while the costs are still low and the learning opportunities are high.</p> <p>&#8220;It&#8217;s a great environment for testing. As an agency, we always advise clients to reserve 30 percent for a testing budget,&#8221; said Drabicky, &#8220;This is especially the case with Pinterest, as testing with Pinterest has two benefits: 1. Testing allows a brand to push the envelope, and 2. Testing gets brands in the door with Pinterest before costs rise in the big three environment (Amazon, Google, Facebook).&#8221;</p> <p><strong>4C CMO reports high-growth in Pinterest ad spend.</strong>  &#8220;We&#8217;ve seen triple-digit increases in year-over-year spend for Pinterest advertisers using the Scope by 4C platform,&#8221; said 4C CMO Aaron Goldman, &#8220;Going forward, we expect to see continued investment in ad offerings and geographical expansion.&#8221;</p> <p>Goldman believes Pinterest plays an important role in the media mix by helping brands reach audiences at key moments of inspiration.</p> <p>&#8220;While other channels specialize in facilitating high-level brand awareness or direct-response purchase activity, Pinterest generates results across the entire marketing funnel.&#8221;</p> <p><strong>Why we should care.</strong> Now that it&#8217;s a public company, Pinterest will be committed to driving revenue &#8212; putting even more of its efforts and resources into building out its ad platform and delivering more e-commerce options for advertisers.</p> <p>Silbermann told CNBC that he is focused on expanding the company&#8217;s global presence and making it a place where businesses can reach their target audiences.</p> <p>&#8220;Over the last couple years and for the foreseeable future, we&#8217;re going to work on bridging that gap between seeing something inspirational and finding a product from a retailer that you trust at a price point that makes sense for you,&#8221; said the CEO.</p> <p>To underscore its e-commerce goals, <a href="https://marketingland.com/pinterests-new-head-of-engineering-brings-deep-e-commerce-experience-258741">Pinterest recently hired</a> Walmart&#8217;s former CTO Jeremy King as its new head of engineering. After leading the technology teams for the likes of Walmart and eBay, King brings a wealth of e-commerce technology experience to Pinterest.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/digital-marketers-on-pinterest-ipo-get-in-early-while-costs-are-low-learning-opportunities-are-high-259743">Digital marketers on Pinterest IPO: Get in early while costs are low, learning opportunities are high</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Here’s how to get the most out of your marketing analytics investment https://marketingland.com/heres-how-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-marketing-analytics-investment-259733 Marketing Land urn:uuid:796aca31-6d65-82d1-8e7d-7ef40d7404b9 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 14:30:55 +0000 <p>Build organizational structure and develop analytics leaders who bridge data science with marketing strategy to improve your return on investment.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/heres-how-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-marketing-analytics-investment-259733">Here&#8217;s how to get the most out of your marketing analytics investment</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p>Gartner recently published their <a href="https://www.gartner.com/en/newsroom/press-releases/2019-01-14-gartner-says-marketing-strategies-are-at-risk-due-to-" rel="noopener">Predicts 2019 research report</a>, outlining several converging trends that pose a threat to CMOs and marketing organizations. The report also makes several bold predictions including that “by 2023, 60 percent of CMOs will slash the size of their marketing analytics departments by 50 percent because of a failure to realize promised improvements.”</p> <p>The number one success factor for CMOs today is the ability to effectively leverage customer data and analytics. And yet, according to Gartner’s report, companies today are clearly not demonstrating consistent return on that investment, a problem which often stems from a lack of marketing analytics leaders and the organizational structure necessary to effectively translate data and insights into action.</p> <p>To discuss in more detail, we chatted with one of the authors of the Gartner report, <a href="https://www.gartner.com/marketing/expert/charles-golvin.html" rel="noopener">Charles Golvin</a>, to explore what CMOs and marketing leaders can do to buck the prediction and drive stronger results for their marketing analytics investment.</p> <p>Our conversation, coupled with my own experience, solidified five ways CMOs can improve return on their marketing analytics investment, while also reinforcing why it matters:</p> <h2>1. Build organizational structure to apply better data</h2> <p>Knowing how to effectively leverage customer data and analytics is the <a href="https://www2.deloitte.com/insights/us/en/deloitte-review/issue-22/redefining-the-role-of-the-cmo-chief-marketing-officer.html" rel="noopener">number one success factor</a> for CMOs today. And yet, to fully leverage the power of analytics, companies need to develop organizational structure and processes to be able to identify, combine and manage multiple sources of data.</p> <p>As Golvin puts it, “companies need to build a better pipeline of carrying data from its raw state to decision and action systems for data science leaders to apply insights and powerful analysis to determine the right action and right strategy.”</p> <p>To build these pathways, companies need a strong methodology coupled with an approach for how data gets aggregated, digested and applied to their various marketing systems.</p> <h2>2. Develop analytics leaders who bridge both data science with marketing strategy</h2> <p>Another key success factor for companies is developing and hiring the right leaders who can bridge both data science and business strategy. Simply put, analytics leaders need to know enough about business to ask the right questions of data. Only then, can they apply data and models to yield better decisions and drive sustainable growth.</p> <p>This is our philosophy at Wharton – preparing well rounded, analytically-adept business leaders who don’t ask what data can do for them, but what data is needed to increase customer lifetime value (CLV) and how to apply data and customer insights to shape brand strategy.</p> <p><b>“</b>Gartner regularly conducts surveys about different challenges that CMOs and marketers face, and every year, the one that rises to the top is finding skilled data and analytics leaders to hire,” shares Golvin. “Companies also struggle to find those ‘unicorns,’ or people able to command both data science and business strategy.”</p> <p>Golvin also pointed out that once a company does hire an analytics leader, companies need the right foundation in place to foster their success. “There’s no value to hiring a data scientist whose output leadership doesn’t understand or know how to implement.”</p> <p>Too often, we see traditional marketing organizations that aren’t able to effectively apply analytics or don&#8217;t understand how to frame the questions for data scientists on their team. The reverse is also a common challenge: analytics leaders don’t grasp how to use data to shape the broader business and brand strategy.</p> <h2>3. Hire a Chief Analytics Officer, or up-level the importance of analytics</h2> <p>So how do companies up-level the importance of analytics and develop the data-driven culture, capabilities and leaders needed to successfully transform their organization? One trend we are seeing is the emergence of the Chief Analytics Officer or Chief Data Scientist across more organizations.</p> <p>As Golvin notes, “we’re already starting to see the emergence of Chief Marketing Technology Officers, who are focused on deployment of the right technology, architecture and capabilities. The next trend may be marketing analytics leaders at the c-level, who are purely about analytics and understanding the data.”</p> <p>When companies empower analytics leaders to lead strategy, it can transform the culture, providing a clear vision for what customer data will be used and how to reach the desired business impact. When companies fail to make this investment, it leaves high-caliber professionals in a quandary.</p> <p>“Too often data science leaders end up doing grunt work such as basic data processing and preparation, rather than using their analytics mindset and abilities to drive actionable marketing strategy, separate the signal from the noise and improve marketing outcomes,” notes Golvin.</p> <h2>4. Focus on better data, not big data</h2> <p>An ongoing challenge organizations face today is what we call “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1-F0kyx-XWs" rel="noopener">better data, not big data</a>.” Too often we see companies that are collecting data for data’s sake, rather than taking a lean approach where they only collect data when it helps to optimize the experience for their target customers or better prediction of future behaviors.</p> <p>“As data becomes more integral to marketers, a ‘more is better’ attitude develops, without necessary consideration given to the downside risks,” notes Golvin. “Companies need to do a better job of being transparent about what data they use and how, as well as considering the pros/cons, and risks of incorporating that data into a profile of their customers. More data does not necessarily lead to greater business intelligence – and in many cases can expose the brand to issues that impact customer trust.”</p> <p>Data collection is in no one’s interest when it’s not meaningfully tied to strategy.</p> <h2>5. Separate the signal from the noise to predict and optimize business outcomes</h2> <p>Improving ROI for marketing analytics requires constant learning and experimentation to separate the signal from noise. There’s no better way to learn about your customer than to see what works and what doesn&#8217;t.</p> <p>While big data and machine learning are great to business intelligence, a well-controlled experiment can deliver far more value. Finding the most impactful experiments to run starts with asking the right questions and maintaining a test and learn mindset where you’re constantly evolving to improve the experience for customers. The iterative adaptation based on these experiments builds momentum.</p> <p>Many marketers know the “Holy Grail” phrase “deliver the right product to the right person at the right time.” In the past, this was more difficult because we didn’t know where consumers were. Now when marketers use better data, they know where the customer was and is more likely to be – providing the foundation for the ultimate in contextual 1:1 marketing.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/heres-how-to-get-the-most-out-of-your-marketing-analytics-investment-259733">Here&#8217;s how to get the most out of your marketing analytics investment</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> How to Take Search Console to the Next Level with Google Data Studio by @sam_marsden http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11275425 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:5faec4c9-c744-beed-ab4e-1d76662a08a6 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 13:45:09 +0000 <p>Learn how to get more out of Search Console data by using it in combination with Google Data Studio.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/how-to-take-search-console-to-the-next-level-with-google-data-studio/303859/">How to Take Search Console to the Next Level with Google Data Studio by @sam_marsden</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11275425.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Why Content ‘Tactics’ Fail You & How to Become Relevant by @jamarketer http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11275275 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:eca2ec97-ad0b-74e2-95da-8e7796a18a70 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 12:45:26 +0000 <p>Content tactics promise game-changing results. But most die hard and fast. Here's how to become relevant without them.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/why-content-tactics-fail/303937/">Why Content &#8216;Tactics&#8217; Fail You &#038; How to Become Relevant by @jamarketer</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11275275.gif" height="1" width="1"/> How National Public Radio reinvented itself for an on-demand audience https://marketingland.com/how-national-public-radio-reinvented-itself-for-an-on-demand-audience-259729 Marketing Land urn:uuid:c52e1846-21df-da40-1eef-b5221729e641 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 12:22:53 +0000 <p>At MarTech West, NPR's Meg Goldthwaite highlighted how agile the news organization has become in developing different listening formats for their popular content as voice-enabled devices have grown.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/how-national-public-radio-reinvented-itself-for-an-on-demand-audience-259729">How National Public Radio reinvented itself for an on-demand audience</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-232921" src="https://martechtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Meg-Goldthwaite-NPR-speaker-MarTech-West-staff-800x450.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="450" /> <p>Meg Goldthwaite, Chief Marketing Officer at National Public Radio, took the stage at MarTech in San Jose on April 4 and offered a lively exposition of NPR’s approach to content programming in an era where sound-oriented media are increasingly consumed through voice-enabled devices such as Alexa, Google Home and smartphones equipped with voice assistants like Android’s Google Assistant and Apple’s Siri.</p> <p>“We’re in somewhat of an audio renaissance right now,” said Goldthwaite, noting that NPR has been the top producer of podcast content for the last three years running. She mentioned NPR’s long-standing reputation for using audio to tell compelling stories but explained that the role of such content providers in the lives of consumers has shifted radically in recent years, as content consumption has become a part of today’s on-demand culture.</p> <p>In the previous era, all listening was “appointment listening,” and the family gathered around the radio at a set time to experience their favorite programming. “Now,” said Goldthwaite, “we control what we want to hear and when we want to hear it. You can watch or listen whenever you care to.”</p> <p>This seemingly benign change has dramatic implications. After all, 21% of adults own smart speakers today, with 8% having received a smart speaker during the holidays in 2018. Ownership has grown by 78% just in the past year, and owners of smart speakers are highly active, with more than half using their devices once a day or multiple times per day.</p> <p>Rapid growth in adoption has led to a rapidly maturing user base, many members of which have moved beyond simple voice commands like “Alexa, play NPR,” and into customized experiences such as personalized listening for each member of a household.</p> <p>Voice assistants, Goldthwaite noted, combine the very old technology of audio communication with the very new technologies of voice recognition, machine learning and artificial intelligence. As such, they carry the potential to meet several basic human needs in a new way. Sound, she explained, is the fastest acting sense we have, as well as the sense with the most powerful link to our emotions. Sound also carries the power to change the way we think.</p> <p>NPR works to create programming that fits varying needs and thus works well in an on-demand context. Goldthwaite’s central mission is to create a more informed public and to challenge people and invigorate them with new ideas, and her goal as a marketer is, simply stated, “to make people need NPR.”</p> <p>“There once was a time when no one went to bed at night without listening to the news with Walter Cronkite,” she noted. She sees NPR programming filling a need as well in the minds of listeners, and points to the recent development of short interactive programs such as the Wait Wait Quiz. The capsule version of the popular NPR quiz show allows listeners to play the game at home and interact virtually with hosts Peter Sagal and Bill Kurtis. Such reimaginings of popular shows give fans the ability to experience a brand in a new context.</p> <p>Indeed, NPR has worked in recent months to package much of its popular news and entertainment content in long, medium and shorter formats, the better to accommodate the busy schedules and selective listening preferences of today’s audiences.</p> <p>Goldthwaite sees NPR and smart technology standing at a median between the past and an imagined future where Yoda-like smart assistants anticipate our needs and help us manage all of our daily activities. Ideally, such assistants will free us up to do more of what we like to do, by relieving us of our more burdensome responsibilities.</p> <p>NPR’s role in this imagined future is to continue to tell compelling stories and create engaging content, while expanding the variety and versatility of news and other programming.</p> <p>For a traditional media company, NPR’s transition to newer forms of media has been surprisingly smooth and unforced, perhaps because smart speakers themselves hearken back to the era of the family radio. What is new, of course, is that content is divorced from any set programming schedule, and can be increasingly delivered in the exact time, place and duration the user requires.</p> <p>Goldthwaite mentioned NPR’s famous “driveway moments” concept, where listeners are so captivated by a story that, after arriving home, they keep the car running in the driveway so they can listen all the way to the end. Today, the commitment to tell engaging stories remains, but the on-demand nature of content delivery means that so-called “driveway moments” can take place anywhere and at any time.</p> <div class="well"> <h2><small>More insights from the MarTech Conference</small></h2> <ul><li><small><a href="https://martechconf.com/east">Join us for MarTech East 2019</a></small></li> <li><small><a href="https://martechtoday.com/martech-west-overtime-how-b2b-marketers-can-reach-buying-committees-at-their-target-accounts-232870">MarTech Overtime: How B2B marketers can reach buying committees at their target accounts</a></small></li><li><small><a href="https://martechtoday.com/stackie-award-winner-esris-martech-slide-spread-like-wildfire-across-the-company-232801">Stackie Award winner ESRI's martech slide 'spread like wildfire' across the company</a></small></li><li><small><a href="https://martechtoday.com/what-stackie-winner-airstream-learned-from-communing-with-its-stack-232768">What Stackie winner Airstream learned from communing with its stack</a></small></li></ul></div> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/how-national-public-radio-reinvented-itself-for-an-on-demand-audience-259729">How National Public Radio reinvented itself for an on-demand audience</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Maintaining Work-Life Balance Is Essential to Self-Care by @LEHoneycutt http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11275168 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:c3d3ae24-d25f-a76b-a950-77d8aed89cdc Fri, 19 Apr 2019 11:45:55 +0000 <p>In 2016, life forced me to redefine and achieve work-life balance. Here's how personal struggles made me change everything.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/maintaining-work-life-balance/302325/">Maintaining Work-Life Balance Is Essential to Self-Care by @LEHoneycutt</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11275168.gif" height="1" width="1"/> How to Develop a Thriving Community https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-develop-thriving-community-cate-stillman/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:7d10353c-5683-9b9f-2c3c-675060f7bdbc Fri, 19 Apr 2019 10:00:33 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/develop-thriving-community-cate-stillman-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/develop-thriving-community-cate-stillman-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/develop-thriving-community-cate-stillman-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/develop-thriving-community-cate-stillman-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/develop-thriving-community-cate-stillman-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/develop-thriving-community-cate-stillman-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Is community important to your business? Wondering where you should build your community? To explore how to develop a thriving community beyond Facebook Groups, I interview Cate Stillman. Cate is podcaster, blogger, and author of the book Body Thrive. She&#8217;s also an expert in developing communities. Cate shares tips for developing a brand that incorporates [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-develop-thriving-community-cate-stillman/">How to Develop a Thriving Community</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> Google Releases Free Image Analysis Tool by @martinibuster http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11274752 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:b4920b3d-8469-d89e-4d5b-14ec54115014 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 08:07:09 +0000 <p>Google's AI/Machine Learning tool demonstrates how an algorithm can understand an image.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-cloud-vision-tool/304237/">Google Releases Free Image Analysis Tool by @martinibuster</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11274752.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Free Google AI Image Analysis Tool by @martinibuster http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11274752 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:a61f1c01-639f-4122-2ce0-ab4713f2ca50 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 08:07:09 +0000 <p>Google's AI/Machine Learning tool demonstrates how an algorithm can understand an image.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-cloud-vision-tool/304237/">Free Google AI Image Analysis Tool by @martinibuster</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11274752.gif" height="1" width="1"/> The One-Hour Guide to SEO: Link Building - Whiteboard Friday http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11274565 Moz Blog urn:uuid:a032121a-3435-a76a-1885-8292f2bec3f5 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 00:02:00 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/63\">randfish</a></p><p>The final episode in our six-part One-Hour Guide to SEO series deals with a topic that's a perennial favorite among SEOs: link building. Today, learn why links are important to both&nbsp;SEO and to Google, how Google likely measures the value of links, and a few key ways to begin earning your own.</p> <div class="wistia_responsive_padding" style="padding:56.25% 0 28px 0;position:relative;"><div class="wistia_responsive_wrapper" style="height:100%;left:0;position:absolute;top:0;width:100%;"><figure><iframe src="https://fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/zsz2nx4w3t?seo=false&videoFoam=true" title="The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 6: Link Building - Whiteboard Friday Video" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" class="wistia_embed" name="wistia_embed" allowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="" oallowfullscreen="" msallowfullscreen="" width="100%" height="100%"></iframe></figure></div></div> <script src="https://fast.wistia.net/assets/external/E-v1.js" async=""></script> <p></p> <figure><a href="https://i.imgur.com/6s8rtqA.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/4r4a9906-668017.jpg" data-image="6pji3w9hr88m" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></a></figure> <p style="text-align: center;"><br> </p> <p style="text-align: center;" class="caption">Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!<br> </p> <h2>Video Transcription</h2> <p>Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. We are back with our final part in the One-Hour Guide to SEO, and this week talking about why links matter to search engines, how you can earn links, and things to consider when doing link building. </p> <h2>Why are links important to SEO?</h2> <p>So we've discussed sort of how search engines rank pages based on the value they provide to users. We've talked about how they consider keyword use and relevant topics and content on the page. But search engines also have this tool of being able to look at all of the links across the web and how they link to other pages, how they point between pages.<br></p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-10-531162.jpg" data-image="mgvow0vmy8kx" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"><span id="selection-marker-start" class="redactor-selection-marker"></span><span id="selection-marker-end" class="redactor-selection-marker"></span></figure> <p>So it turns out that Google had this insight early on that what other people say about you is more important, at least to them, than what you say about yourself. So you may say, "I am the best resource on the web for learning about web marketing." But it turns out Google is not going to believe you unless many other sources, that they also trust, say the same thing. Google's big innovation, back in 1997 and 1998, when Sergey Brin and Larry Page came out with their search engine, Google, was PageRank, this idea that by looking at all the links that point to all the pages on the internet and then sort of doing this recursive process of seeing which are the most important and most linked to pages, they could give each page on the web a weight, an amount of PageRank. </p> <p>Then those pages that had a lot of PageRank, because many people linked to them or many powerful people linked to them, would then pass more weight on when they linked. That understanding of the web is still in place today. It's still a way that Google thinks about links. They've almost certainly moved on from the very simplistic PageRank formula that came out in the late '90s, but that thinking underlies everything they're doing. </p> <h2>How does Google measure the value of links?</h2> <p>Today, Google measures the value of links in many very sophisticated ways, which I'm not going to try and get into, and they're not public about most of these anyway. But there is a lot of intelligence that we have about how they think about links, including things like more important, more authoritative, more well-linked-to pages are going to pass more weight when they link. </p> <h3>A.) More important, authoritative, well-linked-to pages pass more weight when they link</h3> <p>That's true of both individual URLs, an individual page, and websites, a whole website. So for example, if a page on The New York Times links to yoursite.com, that is almost certainly going to be vastly more powerful and influential in moving your rankings or moving your ability to rank in the future than if randstinysite.info — which I haven't yet registered, but I'll get on that — links to yoursite.com. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-10-344702.jpg" data-image="xzbz4fugv0oe" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>This weighting, this understanding of there are powerful and important and authoritative websites, and then there are less powerful and important and authoritative websites, and it tends to be the case that more powerful ones tend to provide more ranking value is why so many SEOs and marketers use metrics like Moz's domain authority or some of the metrics from Moz's competitors out in the software space to try and intuit how powerful, how influential will this link be if this domain points to me. </p> <h3>B.) Diversity of domains, rate of link growth, and editorial nature of links ALL matter</h3> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-10-192201.jpg" data-image="ufuckdzpbxlh" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p></p> <p>So the different kinds of domains and the rate of link growth and the editorial nature of those links all matter. So, for example, if I get many new links from many new websites that have never linked to me before and they are editorially given, meaning I haven't spammed to place them, I haven't paid to place them, they were granted to me because of interesting things that I did or because those sites wanted to editorially endorse my work or my resources, and I do that over time in greater quantities and at a greater rate of acceleration than my competitors, I am likely to outrank them for the words and phrases related to those topics, assuming that all the other smart SEO things that we've talked about in this One-Hour Guide have also been done. </p> <h3>C.) HTML-readable links that don't have rel="nofollow" and contain relevant anchor text on indexable pages pass link benefit</h3> <p>HTML readable links, meaning as a simple text browser browses the web or a simple bot, like Googlebot, which can be much more complex as we talked about in the technical SEO thing, but not necessarily all the time, those HTML readable links that don't have the rel="nofollow" parameter, which is something that you can append to links to say I don't editorially endorse this, and many, many websites do. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-210971.jpg" data-image="h3bcpomtrplc" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>If you post a link to Twitter or to Facebook or to LinkedIn or to YouTube, they're going to carry this rel="nofollow,"saying I, YouTube, don't editorially endorse this website that this random user has uploaded a video about. Okay. Well, it's hard to get a link from YouTube. And it contains relevant anchor text on an indexable page, one that Google can actually browse and see, that is going to provide the maximum link benefit. </p> <p>So <em>a href="https://yoursite.com"</em> great tool for audience intelligence, that would be the ideal link for my new startup, for example, which is SparkToro, because we do audience intelligence and someone saying we're a tool is perfect. This is a link that Google can read, and it provides this information about what we do. </p> <p>It says great tool for audience intelligence. Awesome. That is powerful anchor text that will help us rank for those words and phrases. There are loads more. There are things like which pages linked to and which pages linked from. There are spam characteristics and trustworthiness of the sources. Alt attributes, when they're used in image tags, serve as the anchor text for the link, if the image is a link. </p> <p>There's the relationship, the topical relationship of the linking page and linking site. There's text surrounding the link, which I think some tools out there offer you information about. There's location on the page. All of this stuff is used by Google and hundreds more factors to weight links. The important part for us, when we think about links, is generally speaking if you cover your bases here, it's indexable, carries good anchor text, it's from diverse domains, it's at a good pace, it is editorially given in nature, and it's from important, authoritative, and well linked to sites, you're going to be golden 99% of the time. </p> <h2>Are links still important to Google?</h2> <p>Many folks I think ask wisely, "Are links still that important to Google? It seems like the search engine has grown in its understanding of the web and its capacities." Well, there is some pretty solid evidence that links are still very powerful. I think the two most compelling to me are, one, the correlation of link metrics over time.&nbsp;</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-390335.jpg" data-image="2iliifv72dmq" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p></p> <p>So like Google, Moz itself produces an index of the web. It is billions and billions of pages. I think it's actually trillions of pages, trillions of links across hundreds of billions of pages. Moz produces metrics like number of linking root domains to any given domain on the web or any given page on the web. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-255048.jpg" data-image="o2vvx8ls55yk" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>Moz has a metric called <a href="https://moz.com/learn/seo/domain-authority">Domain Authority or DA</a>, which sort of tries to best replicate or best correlate to Google's own rankings. So metrics like these, over time, have been shockingly stable. If it were the case someday that Google demoted the value of links in their ranking systems, basically said links are not worth that much, you would expect to see a rapid drop. </p> <p>But from 2007 to 2019, we've never really seen that. It's fluctuated. Mostly it fluctuates based on the size of the link index. So for many years Ahrefs and Majestic were bigger link indices than Moz. They had better link data, and their metrics were better correlated. </p> <p>Now Moz, since 2018, is much bigger and has higher correlation than they do. So the various tools are sort of warring with each other, trying to get better and better for their customers. You can see those correlations with Google pretty high, pretty standard, especially for a system that supposedly contains hundreds, if not thousands of elements. </p> <p>When you see a correlation of 0.25 or 0.3 with one number, linking root domains or page authority or something like that, that's pretty surprising. The second one is that many SEOs will observe this, and I think this is why so many SEO firms and companies pitch their clients this way, which is the number of new, high quality, editorially given linking root domains, linking domains, so The New York Times linked to me, and now The Washington Post linked to me and now wired.com linked to me, these high-quality, different domains, that correlates very nicely with ranking positions. </p> <p>So if you are ranking number 12 for a keyword phrase and suddenly that page generates many new links from high-quality sources, you can expect to see rapid movement up toward page one, position one, two, or three, and this is very frequent. </p> <h2>How do I get links?</h2> <p>Obviously, this is not alone, but very common. So I think the next reasonable question to ask is, "Okay, Rand, you've convinced me. Links are important. How do I get some?" Glad you asked. There are an infinite number of ways to earn new links, and I will not be able to represent them here. But professional SEOs and professional web marketers often use tactics that fall under a few buckets, and this is certainly not an exhaustive list, but can give you some starting points. </p> <h3>1. Content & outreach</h3> <p>The first one is content and outreach. Essentially, the marketer finds a resource that they could produce, that is relevant to their business, what they provide for customers, data that they have, interesting insights that they have, and they produce that resource knowing that there are people and publications out there that are likely to want to link to it once it exists. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-244028.jpg" data-image="wouzqtwojrwi" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>Then they let those people and publications know. This is essentially how press and PR work. This is how a lot of content building and link outreach work. You produce the content itself, the resource, whatever it is, the tool, the dataset, the report, and then you message the people and publications who are likely to want to cover it or link to it or talk about it. That process is tried-and-true. It has worked very well for many, many marketers.&nbsp;</p> <h3>2. Link reclamation</h3> <p>Second is link reclamation. So this is essentially the process of saying, "Gosh, there are websites out there that used to link to me, that stopped linking." The link broke. The link points to a 404, a page that no longer loads on my website. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-117898.jpg" data-image="cbknl9iobq1x" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>The link was supposed to be a link, but they didn't include the link. They said SparkToro, but they forgot to actually point to the SparkToro website. I should drop them a line. Maybe I'll tweet at them, at the reporter who wrote about it and be like, "Hey, you forgot the link." Those types of link reclamation processes can be very effective as well. </p> <p>They're often some of the easiest, lowest hanging fruit in the link building world.&nbsp;</p> <h3>3. Directories, resource pages, groups, events, etc.</h3> <p>Directories, resource pages, groups, events, things that you can join and participate in, both online or online and offline, so long as they have a website, often link to your site. The process is simply joining or submitting or sponsoring or what have you. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-175142.jpg" data-image="s32104r04nry" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>Most of the time, for example, when I get invited to speak at an event, they will take my biography, a short, three-sentence blurb, that includes a link to my website and what I do, and they will put it on their site. So pitching to speak at events is a way to get included in these groups. I started Moz with my mom, Gillian Muessig, and Moz has forever been a woman-owned business, and so there are women-owned business directories. </p> <p>I don't think we actually did this, but we could easily go, "Hey, you should include Moz as a woman-owned business.We should be part of your directory here in Seattle." Great, that's a group we could absolutely join and get links from.&nbsp;</p> <h3>4. Competitors' links</h3> <p>So this is basically the practice you almost certainly will need to use tools to do this. There are some free ways to do it. </p> <p>The simple, free way to do it is to say, "I have competitor 1 brand name and competitor 2 brand name.I'm going to search for the combination of those two in Google, and I'm going to look for places that have written about and linked to both of them and see if I can also replicate the tactics that got them coverage." The slightly more sophisticated way is to go use a tool. Moz's Link Explorer does this. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-294912.jpg" data-image="bqzgrb1dsk83" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>So do tools from people like Majestic and Ahrefs. I'm not sure if SEMrush does. But basically you can plug in, "Here's me. Here's my competitors. Tell me who links to them and does not link to me." Moz's tool calls this the <a href="https://moz.com/blog/competitor-backlink-intersect-link-building-tool">Link Intersect function</a>. But you don't even need the link intersect function. </p> <p>You just plug in a competitor's domain and look at here are all the links that point to them, and then you start to replicate their tactics. There are hundreds more and many, many resources on Moz's website and other great websites about SEO out there that talk about many of these tactics, and you can certainly invest in those. Or you could conceivably hire someone who knows what they're doing to go do this for you. Links are still powerful.&nbsp;</p> <p>Okay. Thank you so much. I want to say a huge amount of appreciation to Moz and to <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/tyler-foster-4b9a12ab/">Tyler</a>, who's behind the camera — he's waving right now, you can't see it, but he looks adorable waving — and to everyone who has helped make this possible, including <a href="https://twitter.com/CyrusShepard">Cyrus Shepard</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/BritneyMuller">Britney Muller</a> and many others. </p> <p>Hopefully, this one-hour segment on SEO can help you upgrade your skills dramatically. Hopefully, you'll send it to some other folks who might need to upgrade their understanding and their skills around the practice. And I'll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.<br></p> <p><a href="http://www.speechpad.com/page/video-transcription/">Video transcription</a> by <a href="http://www.speechpad.com/">Speechpad.com</a> </p> <h2>In case you missed them:</h2> <p>Check out the other episodes in the series so far:</p> <ul><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-seo-guide-part-1-seo-strategy">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 1: SEO Strategy</a></li><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-seo-guide-part-2-keyword-research">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 2: Keyword Research</a></li><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-guide-to-seo-searcher-satisfaction">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 3: Searcher Satisfaction</a></li><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-guide-to-seo-keyword-targeting-on-page-optimization">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 4: Keyword Targeting & On-Page Optimization</a></li><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-guide-to-seo-technical-seo">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 5: Technical SEO</a></li></ul><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/63\">randfish</a></p><p>The final episode in our six-part One-Hour Guide to SEO series deals with a topic that's a perennial favorite among SEOs: link building. Today, learn why links are important to both&nbsp;SEO and to Google, how Google likely measures the value of links, and a few key ways to begin earning your own.</p> <div class="wistia_responsive_padding" style="padding:56.25% 0 28px 0;position:relative;"><div class="wistia_responsive_wrapper" style="height:100%;left:0;position:absolute;top:0;width:100%;"><figure><iframe src="https://fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/zsz2nx4w3t?seo=false&videoFoam=true" title="The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 6: Link Building - Whiteboard Friday Video" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" class="wistia_embed" name="wistia_embed" allowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="" oallowfullscreen="" msallowfullscreen="" width="100%" height="100%"></iframe></figure></div></div> <script src="https://fast.wistia.net/assets/external/E-v1.js" async=""></script> <p></p> <figure><a href="https://i.imgur.com/6s8rtqA.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/4r4a9906-668017.jpg" data-image="6pji3w9hr88m" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></a></figure> <p style="text-align: center;"><br> </p> <p style="text-align: center;" class="caption">Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!<br> </p> <h2>Video Transcription</h2> <p>Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to another edition of Whiteboard Friday. We are back with our final part in the One-Hour Guide to SEO, and this week talking about why links matter to search engines, how you can earn links, and things to consider when doing link building. </p> <h2>Why are links important to SEO?</h2> <p>So we've discussed sort of how search engines rank pages based on the value they provide to users. We've talked about how they consider keyword use and relevant topics and content on the page. But search engines also have this tool of being able to look at all of the links across the web and how they link to other pages, how they point between pages.<br></p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-10-531162.jpg" data-image="mgvow0vmy8kx" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"><span id="selection-marker-start" class="redactor-selection-marker"></span><span id="selection-marker-end" class="redactor-selection-marker"></span></figure> <p>So it turns out that Google had this insight early on that what other people say about you is more important, at least to them, than what you say about yourself. So you may say, "I am the best resource on the web for learning about web marketing." But it turns out Google is not going to believe you unless many other sources, that they also trust, say the same thing. Google's big innovation, back in 1997 and 1998, when Sergey Brin and Larry Page came out with their search engine, Google, was PageRank, this idea that by looking at all the links that point to all the pages on the internet and then sort of doing this recursive process of seeing which are the most important and most linked to pages, they could give each page on the web a weight, an amount of PageRank. </p> <p>Then those pages that had a lot of PageRank, because many people linked to them or many powerful people linked to them, would then pass more weight on when they linked. That understanding of the web is still in place today. It's still a way that Google thinks about links. They've almost certainly moved on from the very simplistic PageRank formula that came out in the late '90s, but that thinking underlies everything they're doing. </p> <h2>How does Google measure the value of links?</h2> <p>Today, Google measures the value of links in many very sophisticated ways, which I'm not going to try and get into, and they're not public about most of these anyway. But there is a lot of intelligence that we have about how they think about links, including things like more important, more authoritative, more well-linked-to pages are going to pass more weight when they link. </p> <h3>A.) More important, authoritative, well-linked-to pages pass more weight when they link</h3> <p>That's true of both individual URLs, an individual page, and websites, a whole website. So for example, if a page on The New York Times links to yoursite.com, that is almost certainly going to be vastly more powerful and influential in moving your rankings or moving your ability to rank in the future than if randstinysite.info — which I haven't yet registered, but I'll get on that — links to yoursite.com. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-10-344702.jpg" data-image="xzbz4fugv0oe" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>This weighting, this understanding of there are powerful and important and authoritative websites, and then there are less powerful and important and authoritative websites, and it tends to be the case that more powerful ones tend to provide more ranking value is why so many SEOs and marketers use metrics like Moz's domain authority or some of the metrics from Moz's competitors out in the software space to try and intuit how powerful, how influential will this link be if this domain points to me. </p> <h3>B.) Diversity of domains, rate of link growth, and editorial nature of links ALL matter</h3> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-10-192201.jpg" data-image="ufuckdzpbxlh" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p></p> <p>So the different kinds of domains and the rate of link growth and the editorial nature of those links all matter. So, for example, if I get many new links from many new websites that have never linked to me before and they are editorially given, meaning I haven't spammed to place them, I haven't paid to place them, they were granted to me because of interesting things that I did or because those sites wanted to editorially endorse my work or my resources, and I do that over time in greater quantities and at a greater rate of acceleration than my competitors, I am likely to outrank them for the words and phrases related to those topics, assuming that all the other smart SEO things that we've talked about in this One-Hour Guide have also been done. </p> <h3>C.) HTML-readable links that don't have rel="nofollow" and contain relevant anchor text on indexable pages pass link benefit</h3> <p>HTML readable links, meaning as a simple text browser browses the web or a simple bot, like Googlebot, which can be much more complex as we talked about in the technical SEO thing, but not necessarily all the time, those HTML readable links that don't have the rel="nofollow" parameter, which is something that you can append to links to say I don't editorially endorse this, and many, many websites do. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-210971.jpg" data-image="h3bcpomtrplc" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>If you post a link to Twitter or to Facebook or to LinkedIn or to YouTube, they're going to carry this rel="nofollow,"saying I, YouTube, don't editorially endorse this website that this random user has uploaded a video about. Okay. Well, it's hard to get a link from YouTube. And it contains relevant anchor text on an indexable page, one that Google can actually browse and see, that is going to provide the maximum link benefit. </p> <p>So <em>a href="https://yoursite.com"</em> great tool for audience intelligence, that would be the ideal link for my new startup, for example, which is SparkToro, because we do audience intelligence and someone saying we're a tool is perfect. This is a link that Google can read, and it provides this information about what we do. </p> <p>It says great tool for audience intelligence. Awesome. That is powerful anchor text that will help us rank for those words and phrases. There are loads more. There are things like which pages linked to and which pages linked from. There are spam characteristics and trustworthiness of the sources. Alt attributes, when they're used in image tags, serve as the anchor text for the link, if the image is a link. </p> <p>There's the relationship, the topical relationship of the linking page and linking site. There's text surrounding the link, which I think some tools out there offer you information about. There's location on the page. All of this stuff is used by Google and hundreds more factors to weight links. The important part for us, when we think about links, is generally speaking if you cover your bases here, it's indexable, carries good anchor text, it's from diverse domains, it's at a good pace, it is editorially given in nature, and it's from important, authoritative, and well linked to sites, you're going to be golden 99% of the time. </p> <h2>Are links still important to Google?</h2> <p>Many folks I think ask wisely, "Are links still that important to Google? It seems like the search engine has grown in its understanding of the web and its capacities." Well, there is some pretty solid evidence that links are still very powerful. I think the two most compelling to me are, one, the correlation of link metrics over time.&nbsp;</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-390335.jpg" data-image="2iliifv72dmq" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p></p> <p>So like Google, Moz itself produces an index of the web. It is billions and billions of pages. I think it's actually trillions of pages, trillions of links across hundreds of billions of pages. Moz produces metrics like number of linking root domains to any given domain on the web or any given page on the web. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-255048.jpg" data-image="o2vvx8ls55yk" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>Moz has a metric called <a href="https://moz.com/learn/seo/domain-authority">Domain Authority or DA</a>, which sort of tries to best replicate or best correlate to Google's own rankings. So metrics like these, over time, have been shockingly stable. If it were the case someday that Google demoted the value of links in their ranking systems, basically said links are not worth that much, you would expect to see a rapid drop. </p> <p>But from 2007 to 2019, we've never really seen that. It's fluctuated. Mostly it fluctuates based on the size of the link index. So for many years Ahrefs and Majestic were bigger link indices than Moz. They had better link data, and their metrics were better correlated. </p> <p>Now Moz, since 2018, is much bigger and has higher correlation than they do. So the various tools are sort of warring with each other, trying to get better and better for their customers. You can see those correlations with Google pretty high, pretty standard, especially for a system that supposedly contains hundreds, if not thousands of elements. </p> <p>When you see a correlation of 0.25 or 0.3 with one number, linking root domains or page authority or something like that, that's pretty surprising. The second one is that many SEOs will observe this, and I think this is why so many SEO firms and companies pitch their clients this way, which is the number of new, high quality, editorially given linking root domains, linking domains, so The New York Times linked to me, and now The Washington Post linked to me and now wired.com linked to me, these high-quality, different domains, that correlates very nicely with ranking positions. </p> <p>So if you are ranking number 12 for a keyword phrase and suddenly that page generates many new links from high-quality sources, you can expect to see rapid movement up toward page one, position one, two, or three, and this is very frequent. </p> <h2>How do I get links?</h2> <p>Obviously, this is not alone, but very common. So I think the next reasonable question to ask is, "Okay, Rand, you've convinced me. Links are important. How do I get some?" Glad you asked. There are an infinite number of ways to earn new links, and I will not be able to represent them here. But professional SEOs and professional web marketers often use tactics that fall under a few buckets, and this is certainly not an exhaustive list, but can give you some starting points. </p> <h3>1. Content & outreach</h3> <p>The first one is content and outreach. Essentially, the marketer finds a resource that they could produce, that is relevant to their business, what they provide for customers, data that they have, interesting insights that they have, and they produce that resource knowing that there are people and publications out there that are likely to want to link to it once it exists. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-244028.jpg" data-image="wouzqtwojrwi" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>Then they let those people and publications know. This is essentially how press and PR work. This is how a lot of content building and link outreach work. You produce the content itself, the resource, whatever it is, the tool, the dataset, the report, and then you message the people and publications who are likely to want to cover it or link to it or talk about it. That process is tried-and-true. It has worked very well for many, many marketers.&nbsp;</p> <h3>2. Link reclamation</h3> <p>Second is link reclamation. So this is essentially the process of saying, "Gosh, there are websites out there that used to link to me, that stopped linking." The link broke. The link points to a 404, a page that no longer loads on my website. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-117898.jpg" data-image="cbknl9iobq1x" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>The link was supposed to be a link, but they didn't include the link. They said SparkToro, but they forgot to actually point to the SparkToro website. I should drop them a line. Maybe I'll tweet at them, at the reporter who wrote about it and be like, "Hey, you forgot the link." Those types of link reclamation processes can be very effective as well. </p> <p>They're often some of the easiest, lowest hanging fruit in the link building world.&nbsp;</p> <h3>3. Directories, resource pages, groups, events, etc.</h3> <p>Directories, resource pages, groups, events, things that you can join and participate in, both online or online and offline, so long as they have a website, often link to your site. The process is simply joining or submitting or sponsoring or what have you. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-175142.jpg" data-image="s32104r04nry" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>Most of the time, for example, when I get invited to speak at an event, they will take my biography, a short, three-sentence blurb, that includes a link to my website and what I do, and they will put it on their site. So pitching to speak at events is a way to get included in these groups. I started Moz with my mom, Gillian Muessig, and Moz has forever been a woman-owned business, and so there are women-owned business directories. </p> <p>I don't think we actually did this, but we could easily go, "Hey, you should include Moz as a woman-owned business.We should be part of your directory here in Seattle." Great, that's a group we could absolutely join and get links from.&nbsp;</p> <h3>4. Competitors' links</h3> <p>So this is basically the practice you almost certainly will need to use tools to do this. There are some free ways to do it. </p> <p>The simple, free way to do it is to say, "I have competitor 1 brand name and competitor 2 brand name.I'm going to search for the combination of those two in Google, and I'm going to look for places that have written about and linked to both of them and see if I can also replicate the tactics that got them coverage." The slightly more sophisticated way is to go use a tool. Moz's Link Explorer does this. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-18-at-3-294912.jpg" data-image="bqzgrb1dsk83" style="box-shadow: 0 0 10px 0 #999; border-radius: 20px;"></figure> <p>So do tools from people like Majestic and Ahrefs. I'm not sure if SEMrush does. But basically you can plug in, "Here's me. Here's my competitors. Tell me who links to them and does not link to me." Moz's tool calls this the <a href="https://moz.com/blog/competitor-backlink-intersect-link-building-tool">Link Intersect function</a>. But you don't even need the link intersect function. </p> <p>You just plug in a competitor's domain and look at here are all the links that point to them, and then you start to replicate their tactics. There are hundreds more and many, many resources on Moz's website and other great websites about SEO out there that talk about many of these tactics, and you can certainly invest in those. Or you could conceivably hire someone who knows what they're doing to go do this for you. Links are still powerful.&nbsp;</p> <p>Okay. Thank you so much. I want to say a huge amount of appreciation to Moz and to <a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/tyler-foster-4b9a12ab/">Tyler</a>, who's behind the camera — he's waving right now, you can't see it, but he looks adorable waving — and to everyone who has helped make this possible, including <a href="https://twitter.com/CyrusShepard">Cyrus Shepard</a> and <a href="https://twitter.com/BritneyMuller">Britney Muller</a> and many others. </p> <p>Hopefully, this one-hour segment on SEO can help you upgrade your skills dramatically. Hopefully, you'll send it to some other folks who might need to upgrade their understanding and their skills around the practice. And I'll see you again next week for another edition of Whiteboard Friday. Take care.<br></p> <p><a href="http://www.speechpad.com/page/video-transcription/">Video transcription</a> by <a href="http://www.speechpad.com/">Speechpad.com</a> </p> <h2>In case you missed them:</h2> <p>Check out the other episodes in the series so far:</p> <ul><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-seo-guide-part-1-seo-strategy">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 1: SEO Strategy</a></li><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-seo-guide-part-2-keyword-research">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 2: Keyword Research</a></li><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-guide-to-seo-searcher-satisfaction">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 3: Searcher Satisfaction</a></li><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-guide-to-seo-keyword-targeting-on-page-optimization">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 4: Keyword Targeting & On-Page Optimization</a></li><li><a href="https://moz.com/blog/one-hour-guide-to-seo-technical-seo">The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 5: Technical SEO</a></li></ul><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11274565.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Facebook is Testing Upvotes and Downvotes for Comments by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11273532 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:0fa364f2-77a6-88f2-b966-e7463ea94eca Thu, 18 Apr 2019 21:42:36 +0000 <p>Facebook has been spotted testing the ability for users to upvote and downvote comments.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/facebook-is-testing-upvotes-and-downvotes-for-comments/304171/">Facebook is Testing Upvotes and Downvotes for Comments by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11273532.gif" height="1" width="1"/> MarTech West Overtime: How B2B marketers can reach buying committees at their target accounts https://marketingland.com/martech-west-overtime-how-b2b-marketers-can-reach-buying-committees-at-their-target-accounts-259721 Marketing Land urn:uuid:5f6d4809-4cf2-94ac-05a6-35e2adc44c35 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 19:38:00 +0000 <p>ABM expert and MarTech West speaker, Peter Isaacson, offers advice about target account intent as well as advertising in the anonymous buyer journey.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/martech-west-overtime-how-b2b-marketers-can-reach-buying-committees-at-their-target-accounts-259721">MarTech West Overtime: How B2B marketers can reach buying committees at their target accounts</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-232893" src="https://martechtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/martech-overtime-peter-isaacson-800x450.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="450" /> <p>Peter Isaacson, CMO and account-based marketing leader at Demandbase, presented at MarTech West about how to reach buying committees at target accounts. Questions were submitted by attendees around intent, KPIs and the journey of the buying committee and Isaacson took the time to share some insights with us.</p> <h2>How do you use AI – along with intent – to reach the buying committee early?</h2> <p>The goal of all B2B marketing and sales is to reach the buying committee at your target accounts, i.e., the people who will sign off on a purchase and all of the influencers who are going to contribute to the decision. The challenge has been how to identify that buying committee because they are by nature ad hoc, ephemeral and different at every organization. And quite frankly, different for every purchase.</p> <p>It’s very difficult to identify the buying committee, but technology now allows these people to self-identify themselves. The people who are researching the topics and keywords that are connected to your company are very likely the buyers and influencers you’re trying to reach at your target account. These people are self-identifying themselves as the buying committee- showing interest and intent because of the content they are consuming online.</p> <h2>How do you actually get intent for the account and for the buying committee?</h2> <p>Intent at the account level and intent at the buying committee are very much linked because we are identifying all of the content areas, topics and keywords that individuals are researching across the internet as a whole. The magic (I mean AI and machine learning) is synthesizing all of this data, and connecting the topic areas to the value proposition of your company. Each of the individuals is connected to an account, giving us both individual-level intent and account level intent.</p> <p>For instance, at Demandbase, we are very interested in any keywords or topic areas around Account-Based Marketing, website personalization, digital personalization and marketing customization. We take individuals that are researching those types of keywords and we combine all of those individuals at a particular company into a full account identification. If there are three or four &#8211; or 15 &#8211; people at a specific company who are researching topics or keywords associated with a specific company, we’ll combine those into a holistic look at the full company and identify that as an account that is showing strong intent. This gives us intent for both the buying committee because they’re self-identifying by actually doing the research on these topic areas and at the account level because an aggregate of these people from the same company shows they are all researching common topic areas.</p> <h2>How do you advertise in the anonymous buyer journey?</h2> <p>B2B marketers understand that waiting until the hand raise or someone fills out a form is too late in the buyer’s journey to start marketing to someone, as most of the research and investigation has already occurred by then. Likewise, it’s even too late in the process to wait until they show up the first time at your website to evaluate or consume different content. By then, they have likely already researched on the outside web and, very likely, have been to at least one &#8211; if not a few &#8211; of your competitors’ websites.</p> <p>You need to reach buyers at the very earliest stages of their research. The first sign of intent that you can measure is when they’re starting to do some research on the broader web on areas that are connected to your company’s value proposition. At that point, they’re still anonymous. They haven&#8217;t identified themselves and they’re probably going to be anonymous for the next several weeks &#8211; if not few months &#8211; before they finally click on a button and say “show me a demo” or “I’d like to talk to a sales rep” or “sign me up for a webinar.” But just identifying these individuals demonstrating intent is not enough – you need actually to trigger a marketing activity, like advertising. So your intent identification needs to be integrated into an account-based DSP that can execute ads against these individuals and accounts.</p> <h2>You define the KPIs for modern advertising as 90% of target accounts reached, 30% of target accounts engaging on site, and $15-$300 per account engaged on site. How did you determine these metrics, how often are companies achieving them and what can they do to ensure they’re hitting these KPIs?</h2> <p>When it comes to advertising, B2B marketers have been sold metrics that have nothing to do with business impact for a B2B marketer. They are told they should focus on CPMs, and purchase inventory as cheaply as they possibly can. Focus on click-through-rates, even if those clicks have absolutely zero chance of buying your products. This is often why marketers lose credibility with their C-level peers. Chief Revenue Officers and CEOs don’t care about CPM’s or click-through-rates but publishers and adtech vendors push this because they are the only metrics they can sell.</p> <p>As B2B marketers, and Account-Based Marketers specifically, we should care about what percentage of our target accounts are actually engaging with our content, which of our target accounts are making it onto our website and what percentage of those target accounts that saw the advertising are making it a pipelined business.</p> <p>When it comes to the benchmarks mentioned in the question, if you’re below those benchmarks, you should reevaluate, but in most cases marketers should be striving to reach those KPIs. More and more marketers are focused on business impact, but I still talk to a lot of folks who are obsessed with CPMs and click-through-rates. For CPM’s, getting the cheapest advertising that you can is somewhat akin to buying all you can eat sushi. It’s a great deal in terms of getting a ton of fish for a low price, but is it something you want to eat? Absolutely not. It’s the same with CTR’s. Why are marketers obsessed with a .02 vs. a .03 CTR? It really doesn’t matter if people who are never going to buy your products are clicking on your ads. We shouldn’t be obsessed with that. Rather, we should be focused on whether the right company – and the right people at the right company – see our ads, and whether they taking action on those ads.</p> <p><i>This story first appeared on MarTech Today. For more on marketing technology, <a href="https://martechtoday.com?utm_src=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=mlxpost">click here.</a></i></p> <p>https://martechtoday.com/martech-west-overtime-how-b2b-marketers-can-reach-buying-committees-at-their-target-accounts-232870</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/martech-west-overtime-how-b2b-marketers-can-reach-buying-committees-at-their-target-accounts-259721">MarTech West Overtime: How B2B marketers can reach buying committees at their target accounts</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Here’s how digital word of mouth and search have converged https://marketingland.com/heres-how-digital-word-of-mouth-and-search-have-converged-259716 Marketing Land urn:uuid:260086f2-0192-9065-0daf-106c0eda6750 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 19:13:05 +0000 <p>Smart companies can shape their reputations and visibility with online word of mouth and careful attention to customer feedback.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/heres-how-digital-word-of-mouth-and-search-have-converged-259716">Here&#8217;s how digital word of mouth and search have converged</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p>For many industry practitioners, including me, the <a href="https://moz.com/local-search-ranking-factors" rel="noopener">Moz Local Search Ranking Factors</a> report serves as a useful and reference throughout the year to stay abreast of local search ranking signals (disclaimer, I’ve been a participant since 2014). One takeaway from the most recent Moz report that continues to resonate is this:</p> <blockquote><p><i>A business’s customer reviews as a ranking signal have increased in importance by 17 percent year over year and by 43 percent over the past three years.</i></p></blockquote> <p>As the survey founder <a href="https://www.davidmihm.com/blog/" rel="noopener">David Mihm</a> told Moz, “In mid-to-large metro areas, even industries where ranking in the 3-pack used to be possible with a handful of reviews or no reviews, now feature businesses with dozens of reviews at a minimum — and many within the last few months, which speaks to the importance of a steady stream of feedback.”</p> <p>The influence of reviews on the Moz rankings underscores how word of mouth has evolved in the digital age to have even more impact a business – to affect not only reputation but also visibility.</p> <h2>Word of mouth goes digital</h2> <p>In a business context, word of mouth dates back centuries to the dawn of commerce. Who can say exactly when consumers began sharing opinions of the businesses they frequent? By the dawn of the 21st Century, businesses had figured out how to shape word of mouth in a variety of ways, such as encouraging consumers to review them or convincing people with influence to talk about their brands (as memorably discussed in Malcolm Gladwell’s <i>The Tipping Point</i>).</p> <p>In the digital age, word of mouth exploded. The emergence of online platforms such as Amazon, Facebook and Google gave consumers a way to share their opinions of businesses in more transparent and permanent ways. A conversation between two neighbors over coffee about the quality of a plumber or a doctor no longer became a fleeting impression. Digital made those conversations scale and multiply beyond two people. If someone raved about the quality of a restaurant’s beef tenderloin entrée or torched an auto dealership for having bad service, now the whole world knew.</p> <p>Something else happened as well: search engines began tracking customer ratings and reviews as a ranking signal. Google started to award businesses with a heavy volume of positive reviews by ranking them favorably over businesses that attracted only a trickle of reviews. That’s because consumers began to use search engines the same way they would consult their friends for advice about a business: as a source of word-of-mouth. Someone looking for a bike retailer nearby would want to know not only where to go (triggering a need for accurate location data published on Google) but also whether the retailer had a solid reputation (which is where customer ratings/reviews began to come into play). Google, wanting to deliver the most useful information in search results, responded. And as Moz has reported, rankings/reviews are more important than ever.</p> <h2>Businesses seize an opportunity</h2> <p>At a time when digital is often viewed as disruptive, though, the emergence of online word of mouth has created an opportunity for businesses. Smart companies have realized that they can shape their reputations and visibility simultaneously. Instead of viewing Amazon, Facebook and Google as a threat, they’ve employed these platforms to amplify their presence. For many businesses, doing so has meant asking customers to post reviews on the platforms that will give them the most visibility. Also, businesses with hundreds and thousands of locations have invested in automated tools that make it possible for them to secure, publish, and learn from reviews on a larger scale. In essence, they have automated word of mouth.</p> <p>Today, automated word of mouth creates a virtuous cycle that affects a company’s reputation, visibility, and quality of service. The virtuous cycle looks something like this:</p> <ul> <li><b>Optimize search</b>. A business becomes more findable by publishing accurate location data, descriptive content and customer ratings/reviews. Doing so boosts the ranking signal in remarkable ways as discussed in the Local Search Ranking Factors survey and also builds a business’s reputation. Also, accurate and reliable content beyond ratings/reviews also boosts a brand’s reputation by creating a positive first impression.</li> <li><b>Acquire customers</b>. Consumers look for ratings and reviews across a wide range of sites beyond a company’s website. By encouraging customers to review them, businesses not only boost their search signal but also spread positive social sentiment. Let’s face it: people are more likely to proactively talk about a bad experience at a business than a good one. Companies need to take steps to ensure that people share the positives. Asking a customer face to face is one way. Doing so via online tools such as email or text is a more efficient way. This positive social sentiment encourages a more accurate representation of customer conversions.</li> <li><b>Improve the experience</b>. The real power of the virtuous cycle happens when a business relies on solicited information plus unstructured, organic text that people leave on social media to look for ways to improve themselves. Businesses that take to heart reviews and use them as a source of feedback to positively change their businesses will create happy customers who are more likely to give you a positive review when you ask them – thus improving your reputation and boosting your visibility.</li> </ul> <p>The good news about digital word of mouth is that businesses will continue to have a say in this process. Brands should:</p> <ul> <li>Manage your customer ratings/reviews on an ongoing basis. Monitor them, respond to them, learn from them and encourage them – everywhere people are talking about your business online and offline.</li> <li>Be proactive. Accept the fact that your business is going to get some negative reviews from unhappy customers. Respond to those customers to let them know you care. And balance those experiences by following up with customers and asking them to review you online.</li> <li>Mind your location information. I say this a lot because it’s essential: treat your location data and content as a precious asset. Follow best practices for making your business findable with accurate data and descriptive content that is optimized for search.</li> </ul> <p>Digital word of mouth and search have become intertwined. There is no going back. And this evolution is good. Google can give users (and your customers) a better experience when people search for a business. And you can give them a better experience when they find you.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/heres-how-digital-word-of-mouth-and-search-have-converged-259716">Here&#8217;s how digital word of mouth and search have converged</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Window shopping 2.0: How visual search is revolutionizing digital fashion retail https://marketingland.com/window-shopping-2-0-how-visual-search-is-revolutionizing-digital-fashion-retail-259701 Marketing Land urn:uuid:236f9176-c1c1-d165-5cf2-0a12f32974d1 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 18:05:08 +0000 <p>Brands who stand out are paying careful attention to image size and file type along with detailed product descriptions and descriptive alt-text.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/window-shopping-2-0-how-visual-search-is-revolutionizing-digital-fashion-retail-259701">Window shopping 2.0: How visual search is revolutionizing digital fashion retail</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p>The future of fashion retail is e-commerce, but the future of e-commerce is unclear. On the one hand, e-commerce <a href="https://www.digitalcommerce360.com/article/us-ecommerce-sales/" rel="noopener">grew 15 percent</a> in 2018, but on the other, <a href="https://www.emarketer.com/content/amazon-will-drive-80-of-ecommerce-growth-this-year" rel="noopener">80 percent</a> of those gains went to Amazon alone. And while traditional fashion retailers are set to <a href="https://moneywise.com/a/retailers-closing-stores-in-2019" rel="noopener">shutter record numbers</a> of physical stores this year, many <a href="https://www.vogue.com/article/the-lead-summit-foremost-50-digital-native-brands" rel="noopener">notable digital-native brands</a> made a concerted push into brick-and-mortar with great success.</p> <p>Retailers understand they must innovate to survive, but rapidly changing technologies and tastes make it hard to decide which innovations are worth pursuing, and for marketers seeking to navigate this ever-evolving space, always staying one step ahead can prove a challenge.</p> <p>Amidst the chaos of the past decade or so, one unassuming technology has quietly been proving its potential for retailers and marketers alike. Visual search began as a novel computer science demo, but as mobile cameras improve, and AI gets smarter, tech giants are increasingly throwing their weight behind this unique approach to search – and fashion is already seeing <a href="https://finance.yahoo.com/news/target-bring-pinterest-lens-app-143100235.html" rel="noopener">the biggest impact</a>.</p> <p>Social media has conditioned an entire generation of shoppers to think visually and seek inspiration from what they see online. Visual search empowers shoppers to act on that inspiration and cuts down on the friction between intent and action. Far from being a thing of the past, the window shopping experience is now being digitized and amplified thanks to visual search – and with the right visual optimization techniques, marketers can ensure that their brands stand out in this landscape.</p> <h2>A new vision for e-commerce</h2> <p>Visual search lets users look for images using other images instead of text. This might sound simple but translating image data into information useful for finding similar images requires deep learning technology and tons of training. Nevertheless, where visual search stands today, it is already showing potential to transform e-commerce. The underlying technology poised to drive this revolution has been quietly developing and maturing in the R&amp;D labs of top tech giants for years.</p> <p>Microsoft Bing was an early pioneer of the technology, but recent iterations by Google and Pinterest (both coincidentally named &#8220;Lens&#8221;) have carried the tech to term and proven visual search as a viable greenfield opportunity for digital commerce. In just the past few months <a href="https://searchengineland.com/google-debuts-shoppable-image-ads-video-in-shopping-showcase-ads-305360" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Google unveiled shoppable ads</a> for its image search and Instagram announced <a href="https://www.recode.net/2019/3/20/18271386/instagram-shopping-discovery-amazon-weakness-checkout" target="_blank" rel="noopener">integrated e-commerce tagging</a> within individual posts.</p> <p>Although still in its infancy, visual search is already resonating with users. Pinterest CEO Ben Silbermann recently shared that the company processes more than one billion visual searches each month, a number equal to the global total just one year before. Pinterest has leaned into visual search’s potential to transform e-commerce, rolling out an <a href="https://www.retaildive.com/news/pinterest-automates-shop-the-look-curation/547997/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">AI-driven “Shop the Look” feature</a> and pushing partnerships with <a href="https://newsroom.pinterest.com/en/post/catalogs-shopping" target="_blank" rel="noopener">retail giants like Levi’s</a>. When Pinterest made its IPO registration public this March, the company categorized itself not as a social platform but as a search engine. Even more interesting, Pinterest named Amazon its number one competitor.</p> <p>This speaks volumes about where Pinterest sees <a href="https://www.fool.com/investing/2019/03/26/pinterests-biggest-competitor-might-surprise-you.aspx" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the biggest potential</a> for visual search. After decades of technology changing the way we shop, Pinterest believes the way we shop can influence new technologies. While Amazon is optimized for people who know exactly what they want, Pinterest’s visual search allows shoppers to seek out inspiration in a more organic, non-linear way.</p> <h2>Window shopping 2.0</h2> <p>Forward-thinking retailers are already implementing visual search to invigorate their online presence and deepen their connection with tech-savvy shoppers.</p> <p>In May of 2018, fashion retailer <a href="https://www.retailtouchpoints.com/topics/mobile/forever-21-increases-aov-20-with-ai-powered-visual-search-and-navigation" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Forever 21 rolled out a visual search feature</a>, and in the month following launch the company saw increased sales conversions and a 20 percent jump in average order value. The ability to digitally replicate the age-old pastime of window shopping has similarly inspired other fashion retailers. Soon after Forever 21’s announcement, ASOS and Farfetch quickly followed suit, deploying visual search functionality of their own.</p> <p>Especially amongst digital-natives currently coming of age, shopping based on photos they post or see in their newsfeed is no longer just a novelty – it’s second nature. One study found that <a href="https://www.emarketer.com/content/visual-search-2018" target="_blank" rel="noopener">62 percent</a> of GenZ and Millennial shoppers wanted visual search to be part of their shopping experience – underscoring that for marketers hoping to reach this coveted demographic, a visual search strategy is vital. The same study found that nearly 80 percent discovered products on mobile while on the go. The rise of visual search amongst digital-native shoppers makes sense because it represents an improvement in the ways they are already shopping.</p> <h2>Spotting social trends</h2> <p>In March 2019, an unlikely item became Instagram’s must-have accessory. The trend began when people <a href="https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/amazon-fashion-pearl-barrette" target="_blank" rel="noopener">started noticing</a> the same, mysterious faux-pearl hairclips showing up on multiple influencers and celebrities. Commenters clamored to find out where to buy them, and eventually, they did – it turns out the clips came from a no-name seller on Amazon charging just $2.65 for a set of three. But they weren’t easy to find.</p> <p>Holly Bullion, editor of popular fashion blog, Refinery 29, shared her experience: “I had been seeing the pearl barrettes all over Instagram and couldn’t figure out where to find them (quickly) and affordably.” She did track them down eventually, but it took some digging.</p> <p>Now think about how perfectly visual search would have fit this situation. Instead of a few fashion-forward Instagrammers taking inspiration from New York Fashion Week then hunting down a stylish, affordable alternative hidden deep within Amazon, they could have simply snapped a photo and searched for “hairclips like these.”</p> <h2>Optimizing visual search marketing</h2> <p>So much of the way people naturally want to shop is far better served by visual search than it is by text search or site-navigation. It goes without saying e-commerce has made shopping incredibly convenient. But it’s also removed some of the magic and delight of just browsing between shops, scouring windows and aisles looking for nothing in particular…but holding out hope because you’ll “know it when you see it.”</p> <p>How can marketers help their brands thrive in an e-commerce ecosystem where high-tech window shopping is becoming more integral?</p> <p>First, it’s essential to verify that a brand’s images can be easily displayed, which means paying careful attention to image size, file type and enabling compression per device. Image file names and URLs should also be keyword rich. No less importantly, brands should include image sitemaps to help Google identify images. Other essentials for boosting a brand’s search rankings: Detailed product descriptions, structured data markups and descriptive alt-text, which helps search engines decipher images. Lastly, to help understand the context of the images, it’s recommended to have text above or below an image.</p> <p>The promise of visual search for fashion e-commerce is to translate the window shopping experience into the digital age: simultaneously preserving and enhancing the benefits of e-commerce, while also recapturing and modernizing a more holistic approach to product discovery and customer experience. Visual search technology is already available and getting better each day. Now it’s up to pioneering brands to realize this bold new vision for fashion e-commerce and embrace visual search.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/window-shopping-2-0-how-visual-search-is-revolutionizing-digital-fashion-retail-259701">Window shopping 2.0: How visual search is revolutionizing digital fashion retail</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> A Facebook voice assistant may have buy-in from marketers – but will users want it? https://marketingland.com/a-facebook-voice-assistant-may-have-buy-in-from-marketers-but-will-users-want-it-259692 Marketing Land urn:uuid:4690304f-d3be-18fe-7435-939045844e2b Thu, 18 Apr 2019 16:23:27 +0000 <p>Facebook may be working on a voice assistant, coinciding with the company's decision to drop the price of its Portal voice chat device by 50 percent.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/a-facebook-voice-assistant-may-have-buy-in-from-marketers-but-will-users-want-it-259692">A Facebook voice assistant may have buy-in from marketers – but will users want it?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p>Facebook is rumored to be working on a voice assistant similar to Amazon&#8217;s Alexa and Google&#8217;s Siri, <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/17/facebook-building-voice-assistant-to-rival-amazon-alexa-and-apple-siri.html">reports CNBC</a>. Two former Facebook employees confirmed to CNBC that efforts to build a new AI assistant has been led by a team in Redmond, Washington and managed by Facebook&#8217;s director of AR/VR and Facebook Assistant Ira Snyder.</p> <p>While it is unknown exactly how Facebook would implement voice assistant technology, the CNBC report said Facebook has been contacting smart speaker supply chain vendors.</p> <h2>Why marketers should care</h2> <p>Facebook&#8217;s foray into voice assistant technology &#8212; and by extension, smart speaker devices &#8212; comes at a questionably precipitous time. The company has spent months upon months doing crisis control over its mismanagement of user data and the fact it failed to safeguard its platform from bad actors. This week, Facebook <a href="https://portal.facebook.com/">dropped the price of its video chat device Portal</a> from $199 to $99 for the next month &#8212; not a good sign the company is moving units.</p> <p>Yet, Facebook still had a banner year in 2018. The company reported <a href="https://martechtoday.com/despite-ongoing-criticism-facebook-generates-16-6-billion-in-ad-revenue-during-q4-up-30-yoy-230261">$16.6 billion in ad revenue</a>, revealing the price of ads decreased by two percent while ad impressions were up 34 percent &#8212; proving advertisers were still on board. The idea that Facebook could marry its precision ad targeting capabilities with the benefits of a voice assistant powered device could have some marketers chomping at the bits, but would it matter if no one trusts letting Facebook take up residence in their homes via smart speaker hardware?</p> <p>The case is still out on how marketers will best leverage the smart speaker market, but a report from Adobe in October showed real potential with <a href="https://marketingland.com/adobe-47-percent-of-smart-speaker-owners-using-device-in-shopping-process-247837">47 percent of smart speaker owners using their device</a> within the shopping process. There is promise for marketers when it comes to voice assistant smart speakers, but Amazon and Google have that market cornered. If Facebook is already having difficulty getting people to purchase their video chat device, an Amazon Alexa or Google Home rival doesn&#8217;t seem like a logical next step.</p> <p>We&#8217;ve asked Facebook for a comment confirming it is building voice assistant technology, but have not received a response.</p> <h2>More on the news</h2> <ul> <li>This isn&#8217;t Facebook&#8217;s first go at voice assistant technology. In 2015, the <a href="https://marketingland.com/facebook-is-testing-m-a-siri-like-personal-assistant-within-messenger-140328">company rolled out &#8220;M&#8221;</a> &#8212; a voice assistant feature within Messenger &#8212; but shuttered it last year.</li> <li>A <a href="https://marketingland.com/survey-reports-118-million-smart-speakers-in-u-s-but-the-expectation-of-future-demand-is-way-down-254937">January report from NPR and Edison Research</a> estimated there are nearly 120 million smart speakers in U.S. homes (a 78% year-over-year increase in adoption), but that 70 percent of the people surveyed for the report said they were &#8220;not at all likely&#8221; to buy another smart speaker device.</li> <li>On Tuesday, NBC News reported leaked documents showed Facebook sought a variety of ways to <a href="https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/social-media/mark-zuckerberg-leveraged-facebook-user-data-fight-rivals-help-friends-n994706">take advantage of user data</a> in its relationships with the companies it partnered with.</li> </ul> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/a-facebook-voice-assistant-may-have-buy-in-from-marketers-but-will-users-want-it-259692">A Facebook voice assistant may have buy-in from marketers – but will users want it?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> 20 Awesome Sources of Free Data by @JulieJoyce http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11271697 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:733ebb28-c0e8-7b96-f879-cb5318dad74d Thu, 18 Apr 2019 13:45:32 +0000 <p>Looking for credible data sources for your next marketing campaign? Here are 20 top sources of free information.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/free-data-sources/302601/">20 Awesome Sources of Free Data by @JulieJoyce</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11271697.gif" height="1" width="1"/> AdStage launches Google Sheets add-on for cross-channel campaign data https://marketingland.com/adstage-launches-google-sheets-add-on-for-cross-channel-campaign-data-259682 Marketing Land urn:uuid:14162dfc-904c-8669-2684-77ecae8f2850 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 13:24:05 +0000 <p>Advertisers can import data from multiple search and social adverting channels with one query.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/adstage-launches-google-sheets-add-on-for-cross-channel-campaign-data-259682">AdStage launches Google Sheets add-on for cross-channel campaign data</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-232833" src="https://martechtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/AdStage-for-GSheets-e1555505484737-800x450.png" alt="" width="800" height="450" /> <p>Now AdStage, a cross-channel campaign analytics and optimization platform, is getting in the add-on game with a new data connector for Google Sheets.</p> <p><strong>What is it? </strong>AdStage for Google Sheets, which <a href="https://www.adstage.io/products/google-sheets/">launched</a> Thursday, is an add-on that lets users import their paid search campaigns, social campaigns and analytics data from AdStage into Google Sheets with one query. AdStage supports paid search and social networks, including Google, Bing, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter and Google Analytics.</p> <p>AdStage for Google Sheets has been in beta for about six months. The product pricing is based on media spend and starts at $29 per month, undercutting Supermetrics – the dominant leader in this space. The license includes unlimited users and unlimited accounts, which again challenges Supermetrics&#8217; comparable offering.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong> AdStage for Google Sheets is available from the Add-ons menu in Google Sheets. Once installed, you&#8217;ll see a sidebar in your Google Sheet. The low price means the sidebar interface isn&#8217;t fancy, and is designed for somewhat technical marketers who already know how, or are willing to learn, to build queries. The query structure is straightforward, with several query templates already available to get you started. There&#8217;s also a video training series and support portal built out for it.</p> <p><strong>Why we should care. </strong>The key is getting blended data calls to pull in data from across multiple channels with just one query. You can then build reporting dashboards in Google Sheets, like the example shown above. Or, you could bring it in to Google Data Studio. AdStage for Google Sheets uses the same API as the rest of the platform, so any data you can access in AdStage should be accessible in Google Sheets with a query.</p> <p>&#8220;We are using AdStage for Google Sheets to combine cost and campaign performance data for the entire company to consume and work with. Without any integration work, we were able to aggregate all of our publisher accounts and blend complex cross-channel data into a single sheet,&#8221; said beta user Arndt Voges, head of growth at space rental company Peerspace, in a statement.</p> <p>Digital agency 3Q Digital, another beta user, has already created a workbook in Google Sheets to help track and visualize cross-channel budget pacing, demographics performance and more.</p> <p><i>This story first appeared on MarTech Today. For more on marketing technology, <a href="https://martechtoday.com?utm_src=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=mlxpost">click here.</a></i></p> <p>https://martechtoday.com/adstage-launches-google-sheets-add-on-for-cross-channel-campaign-data-232728</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/adstage-launches-google-sheets-add-on-for-cross-channel-campaign-data-259682">AdStage launches Google Sheets add-on for cross-channel campaign data</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> How Search Engines Display Search Results by @beanstalkim http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11271498 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:fcc03f0f-a81d-7b0c-97bb-096b3ceec0a4 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 12:45:42 +0000 <p>Let's look at how Google displays search results and the main components of a generic search engine results page (SERP).</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/how-search-engines-display-search-results/301719/">How Search Engines Display Search Results by @beanstalkim</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11271498.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Why Netflix may have to introduce ads and how TV is becoming a programmatic medium https://marketingland.com/why-netflix-may-have-to-introduce-ads-and-how-tv-is-becoming-a-programmatic-medium-259660 Marketing Land urn:uuid:d142e855-5e82-51f7-36a1-a6f68d52bf9f Thu, 18 Apr 2019 12:30:30 +0000 <p>Audience segmentation, targeting and (offline) attribution are increasingly available for 'TV inventory.'</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/why-netflix-may-have-to-introduce-ads-and-how-tv-is-becoming-a-programmatic-medium-259660">Why Netflix may have to introduce ads and how TV is becoming a programmatic medium</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p>On Wednesday, Netflix exceeded expectations with its Q1 earnings <a href="https://www.netflixinvestor.com/investor-news-and-events/investor-events/event-details/2019/Netflix-First-Quarter-2019-Earnings-Interview/default.aspx">report</a>. However, investors were met with disappointment following the company&#8217;s weak guidance for next quarter.</p> <p>Netflix revenues were $4.52 billion compared with consensus expectations of $4.50 billion – a 22 percent increase year over year. The company also attracted a record 9.6 million new subscribers worldwide, bringing total Netflix subscribers to roughly 156 million globally.</p> <p><strong>Streaming passes cable for the first time.</strong> In 2018, streaming usage in the U.S. surpassed cable and satellite for the first time. There were a total of roughly 115 streaming subscribers for the major services combined. Cable and satellite had just under 90 million subscribers at the end of 2018.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>Streaming subscriptions overtake cable (U.S.)</strong></p> <img class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-259662" src="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Screen-Shot-2019-04-17-at-5.42.41-PM-800x346.png" alt="" width="800" height="346" srcset="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Screen-Shot-2019-04-17-at-5.42.41-PM-800x346.png 800w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Screen-Shot-2019-04-17-at-5.42.41-PM-600x259.png 600w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Screen-Shot-2019-04-17-at-5.42.41-PM-768x332.png 768w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /> <p style="text-align: center;">Source: Company data, Reuters estimates (2018)</p> <p><strong>Market more complex than it appears.</strong> Netflix and streaming have partly disrupted cable and various analyst forecasts see the trend continuing: streaming growth and cable subscriber losses for the next five years. However as the cost of streaming rises (e.g., YouTube TV <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/10/youtube-tv-price-increases-to-50-a-month.html">increased prices to $50 per month</a>) and more services appear (i.e., Disney, Apple) growth may slow and reach a kind of market equilibrium.</p> <p>A 2018 CNBC survey found there were a mix of subscriber categories in the market: people who buy cable or satellite only, subscribers who invest in streaming only and a mix of both (the largest single group). The latter category (cable and streaming) will probably continue to lead for the foreseeable future.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong>Cord cutters and streaming subscribers in U.S. (2018)</strong></p> <img class="aligncenter wp-image-259663" src="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Screen-Shot-2019-04-17-at-5.50.52-PM-800x425.png" alt="" width="689" height="366" srcset="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Screen-Shot-2019-04-17-at-5.50.52-PM-800x425.png 800w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Screen-Shot-2019-04-17-at-5.50.52-PM-600x319.png 600w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Screen-Shot-2019-04-17-at-5.50.52-PM-768x408.png 768w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Screen-Shot-2019-04-17-at-5.50.52-PM.png 1352w" sizes="(max-width: 689px) 100vw, 689px" /> <p style="text-align: center;">Source: CNBC consumer survey (2018)</p> <p><strong>The &#8216;last mass medium.&#8217;</strong> TV was regarded by many large agencies and brands as the &#8220;last mass medium.&#8221; But the rise of OTT and CTV, as well as &#8220;advanced&#8221; or data-driven linear TV, means that markets increasingly can target &#8220;TV audiences&#8221; as they would desktop or mobile users. (This obviously doesn&#8217;t happen on Netflix, which has no ads &#8212; yet.)</p> <p>However, it&#8217;s probable that Netflix will introduce some limited form of targeted advertising in the next couple of years for several reasons:</p> <ul> <li>The inventory could command a TV-like premium</li> <li>The audience would likely accept limited pre- or post-roll ads; in-program ads would be different</li> <li>Wall Street would likely cheer such a decision</li> <li>Production costs and investor revenue expectations support the move</li> </ul> <p><strong>Why we should care.</strong> Increasing volumes of TV/video inventory will be “addressable” and accessible through programmatic exchanges. Some targeted inventory on the big platforms is and will be outside the exchanges. However nearly all of it will be capable of the same kinds of audience targeting — and accountability. Already, companies such as Simpli.fi, PlaceIQ, Placed, NinthDecimal and others can match ads that appear during TV programming (CTV/OTT) with offline store visits. OTT and CTV inventory will also be available for retargeting, based on intent or behavioral signals and data from other screens and channels.</p> <p>Marketers seeking to reach &#8220;TV audiences&#8221; will increasingly buy audience segments, intent signals and behaviors rather than Nielsen-style audience demographics for specific shows.</p> <p>So even as the cable TV audience is further disrupted and fragmented, increasing volumes of &#8220;programmatic video&#8221; inventory will make new kinds of audience segmentation, targeting, analytics and attribution possible.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/why-netflix-may-have-to-introduce-ads-and-how-tv-is-becoming-a-programmatic-medium-259660">Why Netflix may have to introduce ads and how TV is becoming a programmatic medium</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> How to Make Google Search Partners Work for You by @hoffman8 http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11271290 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:a33e9422-5cca-289c-a935-8dcb4f153e45 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 11:45:33 +0000 <p>Here are some best practices that will help improve your performance in the Google Search Partners network.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-search-partners/299681/">How to Make Google Search Partners Work for You by @hoffman8</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11271290.gif" height="1" width="1"/> 4 Unconventional Ways to Become a Better SEO http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11272637 Moz Blog urn:uuid:6058e644-5475-f4cb-bbf6-d38863a55e84 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 09:00:00 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/273774\">meagar8</a></p><p>Let’s get real for a moment: As much as we hear about positive team cultures and healthy work environments in the digital marketing space, many of us encounter workplace scenarios that are far from the ideal. Some of us might even be part of a team where we feel discouraged to share new ideas or alternative solutions because we know it will be shot down without discussion. Even worse, there are some who feel afraid to ask questions or seek help because their workplace culture doesn’t provide a safe place for learning.<br></p> <p>These types of situations, and many others like it, are present in far too many work environments. But what if I told you it doesn’t have to be this way?&nbsp;</p> <p>Over the last ten years as a team manager at various agencies, I’ve been working hard to foster a work environment where my employees feel empowered to share their thoughts and can safely learn from their mistakes. Through my experiences, I have found a few strategies to combat negative culture and replace it with a culture of vulnerability and creativity.</p> <p>Below, I offer four simple steps you can follow that will transform your work environment into one that encourages new ideas, allows for feedback and positive change, and ultimately makes you and your team better digital marketers.</p> <h2>Vulnerability leads to creativity</h2> <p>I first learned about the impact of vulnerability after watching a viral TED talk by Dr. Brene Brown. She defined vulnerability as “uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure.” She also described vulnerability as “the birthplace of love, belonging, joy, courage, empathy, and creativity.” From this, I learned that to create a culture of vulnerability is to create a culture of creativity. And isn’t creativity at the heart of what we SEOs do?</p> <p>A culture of vulnerability encourages us to take risks, learn from mistakes, share insights, and deliver top results to our clients. In the fast-paced world of digital marketing, we simply cannot achieve top results with the tactics of yesterday. We also can’t sit around and wait for the next Moz Blog or marketing conference, either. Our best course of action is to take risks, make mistakes, learn from those mistakes, and share insights with others. We have to learn from those with more experience than us and share what we know to those with less experience. In other words, we have to be vulnerable.</p> <p>Below is a list of four ways you can help create a culture of vulnerability. Whether you are a manager or not, you can impact your team’s culture.</p> <h2>1. Get a second pair of eyes on your next project</h2> <p>Are you finishing up an exciting project for your client? Did you just spend hours of research and implementation to optimize the perfect page? Perfect! Now go ask someone to critique it!</p> <p>As simple as it sounds, this can make a huge difference in fostering a culture of creativity. It’s also extremely difficult to do.</p> <p>Large or small, every project or task we complete should be the best your team can provide. All too often, however, team members work in silos and complete these projects without asking for or receiving constructive feedback from their teammates before sending it to the client. This leaves our clients and projects only receiving the best one person can provide rather than the best of an entire team.</p> <p>We all work with diverse team members that carry varying levels of experience and responsibilities. I bet someone on your team will have something to add to your project that you didn’t already think of. Receiving their feedback means every project that you finish or task that you complete is the best your team has to offer your clients.</p> <p>Keep in mind, though, that asking for constructive feedback is more than just having someone conduct a “standard QA.” In my experience, a “standard QA” means someone barely looked over what you sent and gave you the thumbs up. Having someone look over your work and provide feedback is only helpful when done correctly.</p> <p>Say you’ve just completed writing and editing content to a page and you’ve mustered up the courage to have someone QA your work. Rather than sending it over, saying “hey can you review this and make sure I did everything right,” instead try to send detailed instructions like this:</p> <p>"Here is a &lt;LINK&gt; to a page I just edited. Can you take 15 minutes to review it? Specifically, can you review the Title Tag and Description? This is something the client said is important to them and I want to make sure I get it right."</p> <p>In many cases, you don’t need your manager to organize this for you. You can set this up yourself and it doesn’t have to be a big thing. Before you finish a project or task this week, work with a team member and ask them for help by simply asking them to QA your work. Worried about taking up too much of their time? Offer to swap tasks. Say you’ll QA some of their work if they QA yours.</p> <h3>Insider tip</h3> <p>You will have greater success and consistency if you make QA a mandatory part of your process for larger projects. Any large project like migrating a site to https or conducting a full SEO audit should have a QA process baked into it.</p> <p>Six months ago I was tasked to present one of our 200+ point site audits to a high profile client. The presentation was already created with over 100 slides of technical fixes and recommendations. I’m normally pretty comfortable presenting to clients, but I was nervous about presenting such technical details to THIS particular client.</p> <p>Lucky for me, my team already had a process in place for an in-depth QA for projects like this. My six team members got in a room and I presented to them as if they were the client. Yes, that’s right, I ROLE PLAYED! It was unbearably uncomfortable at first. Knowing that each of my team members (who I respect a whole lot) are sitting right in front of me and making notes on every little mistake I make.</p> <p>After an agonizing 60 minutes of me presenting to my team, I finished and was now ready for the feedback. I just knew the first thing out of their mouths would be something like “do you even know what SEO stands for?” But it wasn’t. Because my team had plenty of practice providing feedback like this in the past, they were respectful and even more so, helpful. They gave me tips on how to better explain canonicalization, helped me alter some visualization, and gave me positive feedback that ultimately left me confident in presenting to the client later that week.</p> <p>When teams consistently ask and receive feedback, they not only improve their quality of work, but they also create a culture where team members aren’t afraid to ask for help. A culture where someone is afraid to ask for help is a toxic one and can erode team spirit. This will ultimately decrease the overall quality of your team’s work. On the other hand, a culture where team members feel safe to ask for help will only increase the quality of service and make for a safe and fun team working experience.</p> <h2>2. Hold a half-day all hands brainstorm meeting</h2> <p>Building strategies for websites or solving issues can often be the most engaging work that an&nbsp;SEO&nbsp;can do. Yes that’s right, solving issues is fun and I am not ashamed to admit it. As fun as it is to do this by yourself, it can be even more rewarding and infinitely more useful when a team does it together.</p> <p>Twice a year my team holds a half-day strategy brainstorm meeting. Each analyst brings a client or issues they are struggling to resolve its website performance, client communication, strategy development, etc. During the meeting, each team member has one hour or more to talk about their client/issue and solicit help from the team. Together, the team dives deep into client specifics to help answer questions and solve issues.</p> <p>Getting the most out of this meeting requires a bit of prep both from the manager and the team.</p> <p>Here is a high-level&nbsp;overview of what I do.</p> <h3>Before the Meeting</h3> <p>Each Analyst is given a Client/Issue Brief to fill out describing the issue in detail. We have Analysts answer the following 5 questions:</p> <ol><li>What is the core issue you are trying to solve?</li><li>What have you already looked into or tried?</li><li>What haven’t you tried that you think might help?</li><li>What other context can you provide that will help in solving this issue?</li></ol> <p>After all client briefs are filled out and about 1-2 days prior to the half day strategy meeting I will share all the completed briefs to the team so they can familiarize themselves with the issues and come prepared to the meeting with ideas.</p> <h3>Day of the Meeting</h3> <p>Each Analyst will have up to an hour to discuss their issue with the team. Afterwards, the team will deep dive into solving it. During the 60 minute span, ideas will be discussed, Analysts will put on their nerd hats and dive deep into Analytics or code to solve issues. All members of the team are working toward a single goal and that is to solve the issue.</p> <p>Once the issues is solved the Analyst who first outlined the issue will readback the solutions or ideas to solving the issue. It may not take the full 60 minutes to get to a solution. Whether it takes the entire time or not after one issue is solved another team member announces their issue and the team goes at it again.</p> <h3>Helpful tips</h3> <ul><li>Depending on the size of your team, you may need to split up into smaller groups. I recommend 3-5.</li><li>You may be tempted to take longer than an hour but in my experience, this doesn’t work. The pressure of solving an issue in a limited amount of time can help spark creativity.</li></ul> <p>This meeting is one of the most effective ways my team practices vulnerability allowing the creativity flow freely. The structure is such that each team member has a way to provide and receive feedback. My experience has been that each analyst is open to new ideas and earnestly listens to understand the ways they can improve and grow as an analyst. And with this team effort, our clients are benefitting from the collective knowledge of the team rather than a single individual.</p> <h2>3. Solicit characteristic feedback from your team</h2> <p>This step is not for the faint of heart. If you had a hard time asking for someone to QA your work or presenting a site audit in front of your team, then you may find this one to be the toughest to carry out.</p> <p>Once a year I hold a special meeting with my team. The purpose of the meeting is to provide a safe place where my employees can provide feedback about me with their fellow teammates. In this meeting, the team meets without me and anonymously fills out a worksheet telling me what I should start doing, stop doing, and keep doing.</p> <p>Why would I subject myself to this, you ask?</p> <p>How could I not! Being a great SEO is more than just being great at SEO. Wait, what?!? Yes, you read that right. None of us work in silos. We are part of a team, interact with clients, have expectations from bosses, etc. In other words, the work we do isn’t only technical audits or site edits. It also involves how we communicate and interact with those around us.</p> <p>This special meeting is meant to focus more on our characteristics and behaviors, over our tactics and SEO chops, ensuring that we are well rounded in our skills and open to all types of feedback to improve ourselves.</p> <h3>How to run a keep/stop/start meeting in 4 steps:</h3> <p>Step 1: Have the team meet together for an hour. After giving initial instructions you will leave the room so that it is just your directs together for 45 minutes.</p> <p>Step 2: The team writes the behaviors they want you to start doing, stop doing, and keep doing. They do this together on a whiteboard or digitally with one person as a scribe.</p> <p>Step 3: When identifying the behaviors, the team doesn’t need to be unanimous but they do need to mostly agree. Conversely, the team should not just list them all independently and then paste them together to make a long list.</p> <p>Step 4: After 45 minutes, you re-enter the room and over the next 15 minutes the team tells you about what they have discussed</p> <h3>Here are some helpful tips to keep in mind:</h3> <ul><li>When receiving the feedback from the team you only have two responses you can give, “thank you” or ask a clarifying question.</li><li>The feedback needs to be about you and not the business.</li><li>Do this more than once. The team will get better at giving feedback over time.</li></ul> <p>Here is an example of what my team wrote during my first time running this exercise.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-16-at-6-112268.jpg" data-image="ly10dmzltoyo"></figure> <p>Let’s break down why this meeting is so important.</p> <ol><li>With me not in the room, the team can discuss openly without holding back.</li><li>Having team members work together and come to a consensus before writing down a piece of feedback ensures feedback isn’t from a single team member but rather the whole team.</li><li>By leaving the team to do it without me, I show as a manager I trust them and value their feedback.</li><li>When I come back to the room, I listen and ask for clarification but don’t argue which helps set an example of receiving feedback from others</li><li>The best part? I now have feedback that helps me be a better manager. By implementing some of the feedback, I reinforce the idea that I value my team’s feedback and I am willing to change and grow.</li></ol> <p>This isn’t just for managers. Team members can do this themselves. You can ask your manager to go through this exercise with you, and if you are brave enough, you can have you teammates do this for you as well.</p> <h2>4. Hold a team meeting to discuss what you have learned recently</h2> <p>Up to this point, we have primarily focused on how you can ask for feedback to help grow a culture of creativity. In this final section, we’ll focus more on how you can share what you have learned to help maintain a culture of creativity.</p> <p>Tell me if this sounds familiar: I show up at work, catch up on industry news, review my client performance, plug away at my to-do list, check on tests I am running and make adjustments, and so on and so forth.</p> <p>What are we missing in our normal routines? Collaboration. A theme you may have noticed in this post is that we need to work together to produce our best work. What you read in industry news or what you see in client performance should all be shared with team members.</p> <p>To do this, my team put together a meeting where we can share our findings. Every 2 weeks, my team meets together for an hour and a half to discuss prepared answers to the following four questions.</p> <h3>Question 1: What is something interesting you have read or discovered in the industry?</h3> <p>This could be as simple as sharing a blog post or going more in depth on some research or a test you have done for a client. The purpose is to show that everyone on the team contributes to how we do SEO and helps contribute knowledge to the team.</p> <h3>Question 2: What are you excited about that you are working on right now?</h3> <p>Who doesn’t love geeking out over a fun site audit, or that content analysis that you have been spending weeks to build? This is that moment to share what you love about your job.</p> <h3>Question 3: What are you working to resolve?</h3> <p>Okay, okay, I know. This is the only section in this meeting that talks about issues you might be struggling to solve. But it is so critical!</p> <h3>Question 4: What have you solved?</h3> <p>Brag, brag, brag! Every analyst has an opportunity to share what they have solve. Issues they overcame. How they out-thought Google and beat down the competition.</p> <h2>In conclusion</h2> <p>Creativity is at the heart of what SEOs do. In order to grow in our roles, we need to continue to expand our minds so we can provide stellar performance for our clients. To do this requires us to receive and give out help with others. Only then will we thrive in a culture that allows us to be safely vulnerable and actively creative.</p> <p>I would love to hear how your team creates a culture of creativity. Comment below your ideas!<br><br><br></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/273774\">meagar8</a></p><p>Let’s get real for a moment: As much as we hear about positive team cultures and healthy work environments in the digital marketing space, many of us encounter workplace scenarios that are far from the ideal. Some of us might even be part of a team where we feel discouraged to share new ideas or alternative solutions because we know it will be shot down without discussion. Even worse, there are some who feel afraid to ask questions or seek help because their workplace culture doesn’t provide a safe place for learning.<br></p> <p>These types of situations, and many others like it, are present in far too many work environments. But what if I told you it doesn’t have to be this way?&nbsp;</p> <p>Over the last ten years as a team manager at various agencies, I’ve been working hard to foster a work environment where my employees feel empowered to share their thoughts and can safely learn from their mistakes. Through my experiences, I have found a few strategies to combat negative culture and replace it with a culture of vulnerability and creativity.</p> <p>Below, I offer four simple steps you can follow that will transform your work environment into one that encourages new ideas, allows for feedback and positive change, and ultimately makes you and your team better digital marketers.</p> <h2>Vulnerability leads to creativity</h2> <p>I first learned about the impact of vulnerability after watching a viral TED talk by Dr. Brene Brown. She defined vulnerability as “uncertainty, risk, and emotional exposure.” She also described vulnerability as “the birthplace of love, belonging, joy, courage, empathy, and creativity.” From this, I learned that to create a culture of vulnerability is to create a culture of creativity. And isn’t creativity at the heart of what we SEOs do?</p> <p>A culture of vulnerability encourages us to take risks, learn from mistakes, share insights, and deliver top results to our clients. In the fast-paced world of digital marketing, we simply cannot achieve top results with the tactics of yesterday. We also can’t sit around and wait for the next Moz Blog or marketing conference, either. Our best course of action is to take risks, make mistakes, learn from those mistakes, and share insights with others. We have to learn from those with more experience than us and share what we know to those with less experience. In other words, we have to be vulnerable.</p> <p>Below is a list of four ways you can help create a culture of vulnerability. Whether you are a manager or not, you can impact your team’s culture.</p> <h2>1. Get a second pair of eyes on your next project</h2> <p>Are you finishing up an exciting project for your client? Did you just spend hours of research and implementation to optimize the perfect page? Perfect! Now go ask someone to critique it!</p> <p>As simple as it sounds, this can make a huge difference in fostering a culture of creativity. It’s also extremely difficult to do.</p> <p>Large or small, every project or task we complete should be the best your team can provide. All too often, however, team members work in silos and complete these projects without asking for or receiving constructive feedback from their teammates before sending it to the client. This leaves our clients and projects only receiving the best one person can provide rather than the best of an entire team.</p> <p>We all work with diverse team members that carry varying levels of experience and responsibilities. I bet someone on your team will have something to add to your project that you didn’t already think of. Receiving their feedback means every project that you finish or task that you complete is the best your team has to offer your clients.</p> <p>Keep in mind, though, that asking for constructive feedback is more than just having someone conduct a “standard QA.” In my experience, a “standard QA” means someone barely looked over what you sent and gave you the thumbs up. Having someone look over your work and provide feedback is only helpful when done correctly.</p> <p>Say you’ve just completed writing and editing content to a page and you’ve mustered up the courage to have someone QA your work. Rather than sending it over, saying “hey can you review this and make sure I did everything right,” instead try to send detailed instructions like this:</p> <p>"Here is a &lt;LINK&gt; to a page I just edited. Can you take 15 minutes to review it? Specifically, can you review the Title Tag and Description? This is something the client said is important to them and I want to make sure I get it right."</p> <p>In many cases, you don’t need your manager to organize this for you. You can set this up yourself and it doesn’t have to be a big thing. Before you finish a project or task this week, work with a team member and ask them for help by simply asking them to QA your work. Worried about taking up too much of their time? Offer to swap tasks. Say you’ll QA some of their work if they QA yours.</p> <h3>Insider tip</h3> <p>You will have greater success and consistency if you make QA a mandatory part of your process for larger projects. Any large project like migrating a site to https or conducting a full SEO audit should have a QA process baked into it.</p> <p>Six months ago I was tasked to present one of our 200+ point site audits to a high profile client. The presentation was already created with over 100 slides of technical fixes and recommendations. I’m normally pretty comfortable presenting to clients, but I was nervous about presenting such technical details to THIS particular client.</p> <p>Lucky for me, my team already had a process in place for an in-depth QA for projects like this. My six team members got in a room and I presented to them as if they were the client. Yes, that’s right, I ROLE PLAYED! It was unbearably uncomfortable at first. Knowing that each of my team members (who I respect a whole lot) are sitting right in front of me and making notes on every little mistake I make.</p> <p>After an agonizing 60 minutes of me presenting to my team, I finished and was now ready for the feedback. I just knew the first thing out of their mouths would be something like “do you even know what SEO stands for?” But it wasn’t. Because my team had plenty of practice providing feedback like this in the past, they were respectful and even more so, helpful. They gave me tips on how to better explain canonicalization, helped me alter some visualization, and gave me positive feedback that ultimately left me confident in presenting to the client later that week.</p> <p>When teams consistently ask and receive feedback, they not only improve their quality of work, but they also create a culture where team members aren’t afraid to ask for help. A culture where someone is afraid to ask for help is a toxic one and can erode team spirit. This will ultimately decrease the overall quality of your team’s work. On the other hand, a culture where team members feel safe to ask for help will only increase the quality of service and make for a safe and fun team working experience.</p> <h2>2. Hold a half-day all hands brainstorm meeting</h2> <p>Building strategies for websites or solving issues can often be the most engaging work that an&nbsp;SEO&nbsp;can do. Yes that’s right, solving issues is fun and I am not ashamed to admit it. As fun as it is to do this by yourself, it can be even more rewarding and infinitely more useful when a team does it together.</p> <p>Twice a year my team holds a half-day strategy brainstorm meeting. Each analyst brings a client or issues they are struggling to resolve its website performance, client communication, strategy development, etc. During the meeting, each team member has one hour or more to talk about their client/issue and solicit help from the team. Together, the team dives deep into client specifics to help answer questions and solve issues.</p> <p>Getting the most out of this meeting requires a bit of prep both from the manager and the team.</p> <p>Here is a high-level&nbsp;overview of what I do.</p> <h3>Before the Meeting</h3> <p>Each Analyst is given a Client/Issue Brief to fill out describing the issue in detail. We have Analysts answer the following 5 questions:</p> <ol><li>What is the core issue you are trying to solve?</li><li>What have you already looked into or tried?</li><li>What haven’t you tried that you think might help?</li><li>What other context can you provide that will help in solving this issue?</li></ol> <p>After all client briefs are filled out and about 1-2 days prior to the half day strategy meeting I will share all the completed briefs to the team so they can familiarize themselves with the issues and come prepared to the meeting with ideas.</p> <h3>Day of the Meeting</h3> <p>Each Analyst will have up to an hour to discuss their issue with the team. Afterwards, the team will deep dive into solving it. During the 60 minute span, ideas will be discussed, Analysts will put on their nerd hats and dive deep into Analytics or code to solve issues. All members of the team are working toward a single goal and that is to solve the issue.</p> <p>Once the issues is solved the Analyst who first outlined the issue will readback the solutions or ideas to solving the issue. It may not take the full 60 minutes to get to a solution. Whether it takes the entire time or not after one issue is solved another team member announces their issue and the team goes at it again.</p> <h3>Helpful tips</h3> <ul><li>Depending on the size of your team, you may need to split up into smaller groups. I recommend 3-5.</li><li>You may be tempted to take longer than an hour but in my experience, this doesn’t work. The pressure of solving an issue in a limited amount of time can help spark creativity.</li></ul> <p>This meeting is one of the most effective ways my team practices vulnerability allowing the creativity flow freely. The structure is such that each team member has a way to provide and receive feedback. My experience has been that each analyst is open to new ideas and earnestly listens to understand the ways they can improve and grow as an analyst. And with this team effort, our clients are benefitting from the collective knowledge of the team rather than a single individual.</p> <h2>3. Solicit characteristic feedback from your team</h2> <p>This step is not for the faint of heart. If you had a hard time asking for someone to QA your work or presenting a site audit in front of your team, then you may find this one to be the toughest to carry out.</p> <p>Once a year I hold a special meeting with my team. The purpose of the meeting is to provide a safe place where my employees can provide feedback about me with their fellow teammates. In this meeting, the team meets without me and anonymously fills out a worksheet telling me what I should start doing, stop doing, and keep doing.</p> <p>Why would I subject myself to this, you ask?</p> <p>How could I not! Being a great SEO is more than just being great at SEO. Wait, what?!? Yes, you read that right. None of us work in silos. We are part of a team, interact with clients, have expectations from bosses, etc. In other words, the work we do isn’t only technical audits or site edits. It also involves how we communicate and interact with those around us.</p> <p>This special meeting is meant to focus more on our characteristics and behaviors, over our tactics and SEO chops, ensuring that we are well rounded in our skills and open to all types of feedback to improve ourselves.</p> <h3>How to run a keep/stop/start meeting in 4 steps:</h3> <p>Step 1: Have the team meet together for an hour. After giving initial instructions you will leave the room so that it is just your directs together for 45 minutes.</p> <p>Step 2: The team writes the behaviors they want you to start doing, stop doing, and keep doing. They do this together on a whiteboard or digitally with one person as a scribe.</p> <p>Step 3: When identifying the behaviors, the team doesn’t need to be unanimous but they do need to mostly agree. Conversely, the team should not just list them all independently and then paste them together to make a long list.</p> <p>Step 4: After 45 minutes, you re-enter the room and over the next 15 minutes the team tells you about what they have discussed</p> <h3>Here are some helpful tips to keep in mind:</h3> <ul><li>When receiving the feedback from the team you only have two responses you can give, “thank you” or ask a clarifying question.</li><li>The feedback needs to be about you and not the business.</li><li>Do this more than once. The team will get better at giving feedback over time.</li></ul> <p>Here is an example of what my team wrote during my first time running this exercise.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-04-16-at-6-112268.jpg" data-image="ly10dmzltoyo"></figure> <p>Let’s break down why this meeting is so important.</p> <ol><li>With me not in the room, the team can discuss openly without holding back.</li><li>Having team members work together and come to a consensus before writing down a piece of feedback ensures feedback isn’t from a single team member but rather the whole team.</li><li>By leaving the team to do it without me, I show as a manager I trust them and value their feedback.</li><li>When I come back to the room, I listen and ask for clarification but don’t argue which helps set an example of receiving feedback from others</li><li>The best part? I now have feedback that helps me be a better manager. By implementing some of the feedback, I reinforce the idea that I value my team’s feedback and I am willing to change and grow.</li></ol> <p>This isn’t just for managers. Team members can do this themselves. You can ask your manager to go through this exercise with you, and if you are brave enough, you can have you teammates do this for you as well.</p> <h2>4. Hold a team meeting to discuss what you have learned recently</h2> <p>Up to this point, we have primarily focused on how you can ask for feedback to help grow a culture of creativity. In this final section, we’ll focus more on how you can share what you have learned to help maintain a culture of creativity.</p> <p>Tell me if this sounds familiar: I show up at work, catch up on industry news, review my client performance, plug away at my to-do list, check on tests I am running and make adjustments, and so on and so forth.</p> <p>What are we missing in our normal routines? Collaboration. A theme you may have noticed in this post is that we need to work together to produce our best work. What you read in industry news or what you see in client performance should all be shared with team members.</p> <p>To do this, my team put together a meeting where we can share our findings. Every 2 weeks, my team meets together for an hour and a half to discuss prepared answers to the following four questions.</p> <h3>Question 1: What is something interesting you have read or discovered in the industry?</h3> <p>This could be as simple as sharing a blog post or going more in depth on some research or a test you have done for a client. The purpose is to show that everyone on the team contributes to how we do SEO and helps contribute knowledge to the team.</p> <h3>Question 2: What are you excited about that you are working on right now?</h3> <p>Who doesn’t love geeking out over a fun site audit, or that content analysis that you have been spending weeks to build? This is that moment to share what you love about your job.</p> <h3>Question 3: What are you working to resolve?</h3> <p>Okay, okay, I know. This is the only section in this meeting that talks about issues you might be struggling to solve. But it is so critical!</p> <h3>Question 4: What have you solved?</h3> <p>Brag, brag, brag! Every analyst has an opportunity to share what they have solve. Issues they overcame. How they out-thought Google and beat down the competition.</p> <h2>In conclusion</h2> <p>Creativity is at the heart of what SEOs do. In order to grow in our roles, we need to continue to expand our minds so we can provide stellar performance for our clients. To do this requires us to receive and give out help with others. Only then will we thrive in a culture that allows us to be safely vulnerable and actively creative.</p> <p>I would love to hear how your team creates a culture of creativity. Comment below your ideas!<br><br><br></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11272637.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Twitter’s ‘Hide Replies’ Feature is Set to Roll Out in June by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11269789 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:03c59f66-3ce8-00a4-612f-cdce9fc6fc7d Thu, 18 Apr 2019 01:11:49 +0000 <p>A new Twitter feature which allows users to hide replies to their tweets is set to launch this June.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/twitters-hide-replies-feature-is-set-to-roll-out-in-june/303999/">Twitter&#8217;s &#8216;Hide Replies&#8217; Feature is Set to Roll Out in June by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11269789.gif" height="1" width="1"/> AMP Stories Now Have a Dedicated Section in Google Search Results by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11268957 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:6e450c1b-aedc-ed85-2f20-56d3a58daabd Wed, 17 Apr 2019 18:23:43 +0000 <p>Google is adding a new section to search results which is dedicated to AMP Stories.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/amp-stories-now-have-a-dedicated-section-in-google-search-results/303925/">AMP Stories Now Have a Dedicated Section in Google Search Results by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11268957.gif" height="1" width="1"/> How Do I Improve My Domain Authority (DA)? http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11269786 Moz Blog urn:uuid:831d35fe-39d7-8683-01e8-12f3e9ba5c67 Wed, 17 Apr 2019 18:09:00 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/22897\">Dr-Pete</a></p><p class="alert-page info"><strong>The Short Version:</strong>&nbsp;Don't obsess over Domain Authority (DA) for its own sake. Domain Authority shines at comparing your overall authority (your aggregate&nbsp;link equity, for the most part) to other sites and determining where you can compete. Attract real links that drive traffic, and you'll improve both your Domain Authority and your rankings.</p> <p>Unless you've been living under a rock, over a rock, or really anywhere rock-adjacent, you may know that Moz has recently invested a lot of time, research,&nbsp;and money in a <a href="https://moz.com/blog/new-domain-authority">new-and-improved Domain Authority</a>. People who use Domain Authority (DA) naturally want to improve their score, and this is a question that I admit we've avoided at times, because like any metric, DA can be abused if taken out of context or viewed in isolation.</p> <p>I set out to write a how-to post, but what follows can only be described as a belligerent FAQ ...</p> <h2>Why do you want to increase DA?</h2> <p>This may sound like a strange question coming from an employee of the company that created Domain Authority, but it's the most important question I can ask you. What's your end-goal? Domain Authority is designed to be an indicator of success&nbsp;(more on that in a moment), but it doesn't <em>drive</em> success. DA is not used by Google and will have no direct impact on your rankings.&nbsp;Increasing your DA solely to increase your DA is pointless vanity.</p> <h2>So, I don't want a high DA?</h2> <p>I understand your confusion. If I had to over-simplify Domain Authority, I would say that DA is an indicator of your aggregate link equity. Yes, all else being equal, a high DA is better than a low DA, and it's ok to strive for a higher DA, <em>but</em>&nbsp;high DA itself should not be your end-goal. </p> <h2>So, DA is&nbsp;useless, then?</h2> <p>No, but like any metric, you can't use it recklessly or out of context. Our <a href="https://moz.com/learn/seo/domain-authority">Domain Authority resource page</a> dives into more detail, but the short answer is that DA is very good at helping you understand your relative competitiveness. Smart SEO isn't about throwing resources at vanity keywords, but about understanding where you realistically have a chance at competing. Knowing that your DA is 48 is useless in a vacuum. Knowing that your DA is 48 and the sites competing on a query you're targeting have DAs from 30-45 can be extremely useful.&nbsp;Likewise, knowing that your would-be competitors&nbsp;have DAs of 80+ could save you a lot of wasted time and money.</p> <h2>But Google says DA isn't real!</h2> <p>This topic is a blog post (or eleven) in and of itself, but I'm going to reduce it to a couple points. First, Google's official statements tend to define terms very narrowly. What Google has said is that they don't use a domain-level authority metric for rankings. Ok, let's take that at face value. Do you believe that a new page on a low-authority domain (let's say DA = 25)&nbsp;has an equal chance of ranking as a high-authority domain (DA = 75)? Of course not, because every domain benefits from its aggregate internal link equity, which is driven by the links to individual pages. Whether you measure that aggregate effect in a single metric or not, it still exists.</p> <p>Let me ask another question. How do you measure the competitiveness of a new page, that has no Page&nbsp;Authority (or PageRank or whatever metrics Google uses)? This question is a big part of why Domain Authority exists — to help you understand your ability to compete on terms you haven't targeted and for content you haven't even written yet.<br></p> <hr> <h2>Seriously, give me some tips!</h2> <p>I'll assume you've read all of my warnings and taken them seriously. You want to improve your Domain Authority because it's the best authority metric you have, and authority is generally a good thing. There are no magical secrets to improving the factors that drive DA, but here are the main points:</p> <h3>1. Get more high-authority links</h3> <p>Shocking, I know, but that's the long and short of it. Links from high-authority sites and pages still carry significant ranking power, and they drive both Domain Authority and Page Authority. Even if you choose to ignore DA, you know high-authority links are a good thing to have. Getting them is the topic of thousands of posts and more than a couple of full-length novels (well, ok, books&nbsp;— but there's probably a novel and feature film&nbsp;in the works).</p> <h3>2. Get fewer&nbsp;spammy links</h3> <p>Our new DA score does a much better job of discounting bad links, as Google clearly tries to do. Note that "bad" doesn't mean low-authority links. It's perfectly natural to have some links from low-authority domains and pages, and in many cases it's both relevant and useful to searchers. <a href="https://moz.com/help/link-explorer/link-building/spam-score">Moz's Spam Score</a> is pretty complex, but as humans we intuitively know when we're chasing low-quality, low-relevance links. Stop doing that.</p> <h3>3. Get more traffic-driving links</h3> <p>Our new DA score also factors in whether links come from legitimate&nbsp;sites with&nbsp;real traffic, because that's a strong signal of usefulness. Whether or not you use DA regularly, you know that&nbsp;attracting links that drive traffic is a good thing that indicates relevance to searches and drives bottom-line results. It's also a good reason to stop chasing every link you can at all costs. What's the point of a link that no one will see, that drives no traffic, and that is likely discounted by both our authority metrics and Google.<br></p> <hr> <h2>You can't fake real authority</h2> <p>Like any metric based on signals outside of our control, it's theoretically possible to manipulate Domain Authority. The question is: why? If you're using DA to sell DA 10 links for $1, DA 20 links for $2, and DA 30 links for $3, please, for the love of all that is holy, stop (and yes, I've seen that almost verbatim in multiple email pitches). If you're buying those links, please spend that money on something more useful, like sandwiches.</p> <p>Do the work and build the kind of real authority that moves the needle both for Moz metrics <strong>and</strong> Google. It's harder in the short-term, but the dividends will pay off for years. Use Domain Authority to understand where you can compete today, cost-effectively, and maximize your investments. Don't let it become just another vanity metric.</p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/22897\">Dr-Pete</a></p><p class="alert-page info"><strong>The Short Version:</strong>&nbsp;Don't obsess over Domain Authority (DA) for its own sake. Domain Authority shines at comparing your overall authority (your aggregate&nbsp;link equity, for the most part) to other sites and determining where you can compete. Attract real links that drive traffic, and you'll improve both your Domain Authority and your rankings.</p> <p>Unless you've been living under a rock, over a rock, or really anywhere rock-adjacent, you may know that Moz has recently invested a lot of time, research,&nbsp;and money in a <a href="https://moz.com/blog/new-domain-authority">new-and-improved Domain Authority</a>. People who use Domain Authority (DA) naturally want to improve their score, and this is a question that I admit we've avoided at times, because like any metric, DA can be abused if taken out of context or viewed in isolation.</p> <p>I set out to write a how-to post, but what follows can only be described as a belligerent FAQ ...</p> <h2>Why do you want to increase DA?</h2> <p>This may sound like a strange question coming from an employee of the company that created Domain Authority, but it's the most important question I can ask you. What's your end-goal? Domain Authority is designed to be an indicator of success&nbsp;(more on that in a moment), but it doesn't <em>drive</em> success. DA is not used by Google and will have no direct impact on your rankings.&nbsp;Increasing your DA solely to increase your DA is pointless vanity.</p> <h2>So, I don't want a high DA?</h2> <p>I understand your confusion. If I had to over-simplify Domain Authority, I would say that DA is an indicator of your aggregate link equity. Yes, all else being equal, a high DA is better than a low DA, and it's ok to strive for a higher DA, <em>but</em>&nbsp;high DA itself should not be your end-goal. </p> <h2>So, DA is&nbsp;useless, then?</h2> <p>No, but like any metric, you can't use it recklessly or out of context. Our <a href="https://moz.com/learn/seo/domain-authority">Domain Authority resource page</a> dives into more detail, but the short answer is that DA is very good at helping you understand your relative competitiveness. Smart SEO isn't about throwing resources at vanity keywords, but about understanding where you realistically have a chance at competing. Knowing that your DA is 48 is useless in a vacuum. Knowing that your DA is 48 and the sites competing on a query you're targeting have DAs from 30-45 can be extremely useful.&nbsp;Likewise, knowing that your would-be competitors&nbsp;have DAs of 80+ could save you a lot of wasted time and money.</p> <h2>But Google says DA isn't real!</h2> <p>This topic is a blog post (or eleven) in and of itself, but I'm going to reduce it to a couple points. First, Google's official statements tend to define terms very narrowly. What Google has said is that they don't use a domain-level authority metric for rankings. Ok, let's take that at face value. Do you believe that a new page on a low-authority domain (let's say DA = 25)&nbsp;has an equal chance of ranking as a high-authority domain (DA = 75)? Of course not, because every domain benefits from its aggregate internal link equity, which is driven by the links to individual pages. Whether you measure that aggregate effect in a single metric or not, it still exists.</p> <p>Let me ask another question. How do you measure the competitiveness of a new page, that has no Page&nbsp;Authority (or PageRank or whatever metrics Google uses)? This question is a big part of why Domain Authority exists — to help you understand your ability to compete on terms you haven't targeted and for content you haven't even written yet.<br></p> <hr> <h2>Seriously, give me some tips!</h2> <p>I'll assume you've read all of my warnings and taken them seriously. You want to improve your Domain Authority because it's the best authority metric you have, and authority is generally a good thing. There are no magical secrets to improving the factors that drive DA, but here are the main points:</p> <h3>1. Get more high-authority links</h3> <p>Shocking, I know, but that's the long and short of it. Links from high-authority sites and pages still carry significant ranking power, and they drive both Domain Authority and Page Authority. Even if you choose to ignore DA, you know high-authority links are a good thing to have. Getting them is the topic of thousands of posts and more than a couple of full-length novels (well, ok, books&nbsp;— but there's probably a novel and feature film&nbsp;in the works).</p> <h3>2. Get fewer&nbsp;spammy links</h3> <p>Our new DA score does a much better job of discounting bad links, as Google clearly tries to do. Note that "bad" doesn't mean low-authority links. It's perfectly natural to have some links from low-authority domains and pages, and in many cases it's both relevant and useful to searchers. <a href="https://moz.com/help/link-explorer/link-building/spam-score">Moz's Spam Score</a> is pretty complex, but as humans we intuitively know when we're chasing low-quality, low-relevance links. Stop doing that.</p> <h3>3. Get more traffic-driving links</h3> <p>Our new DA score also factors in whether links come from legitimate&nbsp;sites with&nbsp;real traffic, because that's a strong signal of usefulness. Whether or not you use DA regularly, you know that&nbsp;attracting links that drive traffic is a good thing that indicates relevance to searches and drives bottom-line results. It's also a good reason to stop chasing every link you can at all costs. What's the point of a link that no one will see, that drives no traffic, and that is likely discounted by both our authority metrics and Google.<br></p> <hr> <h2>You can't fake real authority</h2> <p>Like any metric based on signals outside of our control, it's theoretically possible to manipulate Domain Authority. The question is: why? If you're using DA to sell DA 10 links for $1, DA 20 links for $2, and DA 30 links for $3, please, for the love of all that is holy, stop (and yes, I've seen that almost verbatim in multiple email pitches). If you're buying those links, please spend that money on something more useful, like sandwiches.</p> <p>Do the work and build the kind of real authority that moves the needle both for Moz metrics <strong>and</strong> Google. It's harder in the short-term, but the dividends will pay off for years. Use Domain Authority to understand where you can compete today, cost-effectively, and maximize your investments. Don't let it become just another vanity metric.</p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11269786.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Collection of tech companies support changes to CA privacy act that bring it closer to GDPR https://marketingland.com/collection-of-tech-companies-support-changes-to-ca-privacy-act-that-bring-it-closer-to-gdpr-259638 Marketing Land urn:uuid:a4beae20-14c4-5089-de89-0841b798421f Wed, 17 Apr 2019 17:42:55 +0000 <p>Proposed changes include moving from an opt-out to an opt-in consent framework for personal data use.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/collection-of-tech-companies-support-changes-to-ca-privacy-act-that-bring-it-closer-to-gdpr-259638">Collection of tech companies support changes to CA privacy act that bring it closer to GDPR</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p>The California Consumer Privacy Act (<a href="https://martechtoday.com/california-lawmakers-approve-highly-contested-new-data-privacy-rules-staving-off-a-november-ballot-initaitve-217799">CCPA</a>) is set to take effect next year and is likely to become the de facto national privacy standard for online publishers and marketers. Ahead of this deadline, however, competing groups <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/02/08/theres-going-be-fight-here-weaken-it-inside-lobbying-war-over-californias-landmark-privacy-law/?utm_term=.8f8fd8087ab9">are lobbying for changes in its terms</a>.</p> <p><strong>AB 1760 looks more like GDPR.</strong> A recently proposed amendment in the California legislature (AB 1760) would make <a href="https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=201920200AB1760">major changes to CCPA</a>, effectively repealing and replacing it with something that imposes stricter obligations on companies and has more teeth &#8212; much more consistent with Europe&#8217;s GDPR. It would allow an additional year for implementation and not go into effect until January 2021 (proposed amendment embedded below).</p> <p>A group of 23 technology companies, lead by DuckDuckGo, has <a href="https://spreadprivacy.com/ccpa-privacy-for-all-act/">submitted a letter in support</a> of the changes. The bulk of the signatories are not household names. Major internet companies, many of whom oppose CCPA in its existing form, did not sign the letter.</p> <p><strong>Proposed changes make the law tougher.</strong> Below are some of the major proposed changes to CCPA at a high level:</p> <ul> <li> <p align="left">The name would change from CCPA to &#8220;Privacy for All Act of 2019&#8221; (PAA) and delay the effective date of the law until January 1, 2021, to allow more time for preparation and compliance.</p> </li> <li> <p align="left">CCPA has an opt-out consent framework; that would change to opt-in for personal data sharing. The new rules would prevent companies from sharing or selling a consumer’s personal data without prior authorization.</p> </li> <li> <p align="left">It carries tougher disclosure obligations for companies. For example, businesses would need to disclose specific pieces of personal data (as opposed to categories) as well as the specific third parties that are receiving the data.</p> </li> <li> <p align="left">Consumers that exercise their rights cannot be refused access to services or charged different prices. Conversely, this raises a question about whether companies could offer incentives for data sharing (e.g., discounts).</p> </li> <li> <p align="left">Companies could not refuse a consumer request to delete personal information from their databases. There could only be delays for permissible reasons under the statute. Significantly, business would be required to delete all data related to that consumer in their possession regardless of how it was acquired (first party vs. third party).</p> </li> <li> <p align="left">Data retention rules would look much more like GDPR: only what&#8217;s reasonably necessary for the stated use case.</p> </li> <li>There are a range of stronger enforcement provisions and consumer legal remedies, increasing potential liability for violations.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Why you should care.</strong> It&#8217;s not yet clear whether the amendment will pass. However, if it does a tough law will get even tougher and effectively create a GDPR-like framework for personal data in the U.S. Congressional action that could pre-empt the California law is unlikely before the 2020 election. (As more people find out about AB 1760, pressure will mount for Congress to act.)</p> <p>GDPR is a year old this May. It has not proven to be the data cataclysm that many feared. Accordingly, companies shouldn&#8217;t panic about CCPA or AB 1760 but educate themselves about the existing California privacy rules and the proposed amendment. If the latter comes to pass there will be an additional year to get ready, which almost nobody is doing right now anyway.</p> <p>Companies that went through the GDPR compliance process will be in a much stronger position than those that did not. And unless Congress enacts new privacy legislation (unlikely), the California law(s) will be unavoidable.</p> <div class="fit-embeded"><iframe src="https://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/58LN346CPDBxoI" width="479" height="511" frameborder="0" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" scrolling="no" style="border:1px solid #CCC; border-width:1px; margin-bottom:5px; max-width: 100%;" allowfullscreen> </iframe> </p> <div style="margin-bottom:5px"> <strong> <a href="https://www.slideshare.net/gesterling/ab-1760-amendments" title="Ab 1760 -_amendments" target="_blank">Ab 1760 -_amendments</a> </strong> from <strong><a href="https://www.slideshare.net/gesterling" target="_blank">Greg Sterling</a></strong> </div> </div> <p><i>This story first appeared on MarTech Today. For more on marketing technology, <a href="https://martechtoday.com?utm_src=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=mlxpost">click here.</a></i></p> <p>https://martechtoday.com/collection-of-tech-companies-support-changes-to-ca-privacy-act-that-bring-it-closer-to-gdpr-232815</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/collection-of-tech-companies-support-changes-to-ca-privacy-act-that-bring-it-closer-to-gdpr-259638">Collection of tech companies support changes to CA privacy act that bring it closer to GDPR</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Salesforce will acquire Salesforce.org for $300 million https://marketingland.com/salesforce-will-acquire-salesforce-org-for-300-million-259645 Marketing Land urn:uuid:b24a0aa3-b654-f0be-21f7-fabaf13a4f08 Wed, 17 Apr 2019 16:23:21 +0000 <p>Salesforce announces $300 million acquisition of Salesforce.org. The deal could drastically redefine the relationship between Salesforce and its nonprofit customers.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/salesforce-will-acquire-salesforce-org-for-300-million-259645">Salesforce will acquire Salesforce.org for $300 million</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <img class="size-medium wp-image-190742 aligncenter" src="https://martechtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/salesforce-logo-1920_jlqwcm-600x338.jpg" alt="" width="600" height="338" /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.salesforce.com/company/news-press/press-releases/2019/04/190415-d/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Salesforce.com Inc. and Salesforce.org announced Monday</a> that the San Francisco tech giant will acquire the independent nonprofit organization for $300 million. Salesforce will absorb Salesforce.org into the Salesforce entity as a new business vertical. Rob Acker, the current CEO of Salesforce.org, will lead the new nonprofit vertical.</p> <p>In Monday&#8217;s statement, Salesforce said it would continue to &#8220;scale its philanthropic efforts and create strategic synergies and operational simplicity that will enable the company to drive even greater success for its nonprofit, education and philanthropy customers.&#8221;</p> <p>There have been no announcements of any immediate changes impacting customers.</p> <h2><strong>Why we should care.</strong></h2> <p>The announcement has left customers — along with investors — confused as to what this means for existing customers. Many are questioning how the changes will affect nonprofit organizations currently using the software at deeply discounted rates. Nearly 40,000 nonprofit organizations, including the American Red Cross, Change.org, Girls Scouts of the USA and countless educational institutions use discounted or free software through Salesforce.org.</p> <p>By integrating Salesforce.org into Salesforce, the company will also acquire nonprofit customers as part of the new vertical. This move may help Salesforce create the efficiencies their business needs, such as increasing revenue margins, which in turn could increase costs for nonprofits. Nonprofit organizations should consider the implications of price increases and prepare their teams for the potential changes to come.</p> <p>The cash from the deal will be distributed to the Salesforce Foundation, the company&#8217;s nonprofit entity, for future philanthropic endeavors.</p> <p><i>This story first appeared on MarTech Today. For more on marketing technology, <a href="https://martechtoday.com?utm_src=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=mlxpost">click here.</a></i></p> <p>https://martechtoday.com/salesforce-will-acquire-salesforce-org-for-300-million-232841</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/salesforce-will-acquire-salesforce-org-for-300-million-259645">Salesforce will acquire Salesforce.org for $300 million</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Explore the SMX Advanced agenda https://marketingland.com/explore-the-smx-advanced-agenda-259640 Marketing Land urn:uuid:971191ce-f08d-f079-26c0-96292815adce Wed, 17 Apr 2019 14:28:19 +0000 <p>Seasoned search marketers like you are attending SMX® Advanced for elite, actionable SEO and SEM tactics that drive real results. We’d love for you to join us June 3-5 in Seattle! This is your guide to everything you can expect at the event. But before diving in, I’ll remind you to register now, before Early [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/explore-the-smx-advanced-agenda-259640">Explore the SMX Advanced agenda</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img class="alignnone wp-image-302538 size-large" src="https://searchengineland.com/figz/wp-content/seloads/2018/07/smxadvanced-442-1-800x450.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="450" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Seasoned search marketers like you are attending SMX® Advanced for elite, actionable <a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/agenda-at-a-glance?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long">SEO and SEM tactics</a> that drive real results. We’d love for you to join us June 3-5 in Seattle! </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is your guide to everything you can expect at the event. But before diving in, I’ll remind you to <a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/rates?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long">register now</a>, </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">before</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Early Bird rates expire next Saturday, April 27. SMX Advanced sells out </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">every</span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"> year… don’t pass up your chance to secure a seat AND lock in the lowest available rates!</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now, onto the preview… here’s how it’s gonna work: We’ll look at all of the </span><b>SEO</b> <b>and</b> <b>SEM</b> <b>keynotes and sessions</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, explain the brand new </span><b>Insights</b> <b>Track</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, check out the pre-conference </span><b>workshops</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, run through the </span><b>Solutions</b> <b>Track</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, explore the</span><b> Expo</b> <b>Hall</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, and finish up with a run-down of our exclusive </span><b>networking events</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, including the 5th annual Search Engine Land Awards. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here we go! </span></p> <h3><b>SEO Sessions: The Evolution of Ranking Factors, Penalties, Local Search, &amp; More</b></h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The SEO track kicks off with a keynote that sets the tone for the conference: Surveying the SEO Horizon. SEO has never been one-size fits all, and if there’s one constant in organic search, it’s change. Search Engine Land&#8217;s in-house SEO expert, Jessica Bowman, and technical SEO pro, Detlev Johnson, will join with agency rockstar Alexis Sanders for a one-of-a-kind, panoramic view of SEO &#8212; exploring merging advanced tactics, changes in the ecosystem, and what makes an SEO successful.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You’ll also enjoy SMX hallmarks, like… </span></p> <p><b>The Periodic Table Of SEO Success Factors: 2019 Edition.</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> We&#8217;ll unveil the newly-updated Periodic Table of SEO Success Factors and examine all of the search ranking factors that influence your results. What&#8217;s on the rise? What&#8217;s on the decline? And what still works? You&#8217;ll leave this session knowing the exact elements that deliver maximum SEO success.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Then, it’s time for in-depth analysis of crucial SEO topics, including… </span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mobile-First &amp; AMP For The Advanced SEO</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">What&#8217;s New With Schema &amp; Structured Data</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The New Renaissance Of JavaScript</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Optimizing For Voice Search &amp; Virtual Assistants</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Google &amp; Bing Talk Spam &amp; Penalties</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Smart Way To Create &amp; Repurpose Content</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Evolving Landscape Of Local Search</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ask The SEOs</span></li> </ul> <p><a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/seo-sessions/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Check out the complete SEO track.</span></a></p> <h3><b>SEM Sessions: Mad Scientists, Automation Generation, Cracking Attribution, &amp; More</b></h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of the best parts about SMX Advanced is you get your insights straight from the source &#8211; and that’s definitely the case for our opening SEM keynote. Ginny Marvin, Search Engine Land editor-in-chief, will share advice on the </span><b>biggest issues facing search marketers</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and how smart marketers are keeping pace. Google&#8217;s Chief Search Evangelist Nic Darveau-Garneau will discuss </span><b>how the role of the search marketer has changed</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and steps to succeed in this new world. Microsoft execs Lynne Kjolso and Vaishali De will cover the </span><b>latest product developments</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> in Bing Ads, including LinkedIn and the Microsoft Audience Network. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The rest of the SEM track features signature SMX Advanced sessions, including…</span></p> <p><b>The Mad Scientists Of Paid Search! </b><span style="font-weight: 400;">Our expert panelists will present original research and highly-insightful observations including the impact of match type changes, how search and e-commerce auctions really work, new developments in attribution modeling, linear regression, and much more. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">]Then, it’s time to load up on SEM goodness at tactic-rich sessions like&#8230;</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">What&#8217;s New &amp; Crucial In SEM</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Automation: The Next Generation</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Perfect Your SEM Testing: How &amp; Why To Evaluate Everything</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cracking Attribution In A Cross-Channel, Cross-Device World</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Making Your Analytics Work Harder &amp; Smarter</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Aligning Your Marketing With Your Customer&#8217;s Journey</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Selling Smarter With Search, Social, Marketplace Ads</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ask The SEMs</span></li> </ul> <p><a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/sem-sessions/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Check out the complete SEM track.</span></a></p> <h3><b><i>New! </i></b><b>Overtime: Extended Discussion Time With Speakers </b></h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You told us you want more opportunities to connect directly with speakers. We heard you. Say hello to “Overtime” &#8212; extended discussion time following each editorial session. Join attendees and speakers to continue the conversation, dive deeper, and get your questions answered. </span></p> <h3><b><i>New!</i></b><b> The Insights Track: Must-Try Tactics &amp; Q&amp;A Clinics</b></h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Insights Track features two types of sessions: Insights and Clinics.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">During each Insights session, you’ll get one must-try tactic, one nugget of sage advice, or one takeaway that makes you more productive in this fast-paced, value-packed format. Here’s a taste of what’s in store: </span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Things Google Tries To Correct For You, with Patrick Stox of IBM</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Outsmart YouTube&#8217;s Automated Bidding To Drive More Conversions, Ashley Mo of 3Q Digital</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Evolution Of Branding: Brand To Demand, with Helen Provost of Google</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Have an insight you want to share from the stage? <a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/speaker-form/">Pitch your idea here</a>! </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Need specific pointers? Eager for an account audit? Bring your questions to our audience-engagement-fueled Advanced Clinics. No PowerPoints, no presentations, just honest advice from a panel of experts. Advanced Clinic topics include social ads, Amazon ads, technical SEO, SEM, and Google Analytics.</span></p> <h3><b>Pre-Conference Workshops &amp; Training</b></h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">\Hungry for more? Come a day early and add an <a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/workshops?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long">immersive, hands-on workshop</a> to your agenda. These unique training opportunities are led by recognized industry experts and offer invaluable networking in small-group environments. Choose from the following topics:</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/seotoolset-training/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Advanced SEO Training with Bruce Clay</span></a></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/advanced-adwords-training/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Advanced AdWords Training with Brad Geddes</span></a></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/advanced-technical-seo/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hardcore Technical SEO Tactics &amp; Techniques with Eric Enge</span></a></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/in-house-seo-exchange/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long"><span style="font-weight: 400;">In-House SEO Exchange with Jessica Bowman</span></a></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/leveraging-search-social-for-maximum-roi/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Leveraging Search &amp; Social For Maximum ROI with Marty Weintraub and Susan Wenograd</span></a></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These workshops carry an additional fee. </span><i><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pro-tip! </span></i><span style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/rates/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long">Score deep discounts</a> when you bundle your workshop with an All Access pass!</span></p> <h3><b>The Solutions Track: Key Insights from Top Vendors</b></h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sessions in the Solutions track are created and produced by the company sponsoring them. Because these sessions compete with high-quality editorial sessions, the companies producing Solutions track sessions make sure that plenty of great information is offered. Here’s what you can expect in Seattle: </span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">It&#8217;s All About the Flywheel: How Marketers Are Leveraging Quora for Big Results, with Quora Inc.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Link Building Secrets SEOs Won&#8217;t Share: How To Build A Link Profile That Rank, with PureLinq</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mastering SEO Silos, with Bruce Clay, Inc.</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You’ll also hear from BrightEdge, Adobe, Bing, and Invoca. Stay tuned for more session details! </span></p> <h3><b>The Expo Hall: Your One-Stop Shop For Marketing Technology Solutions</b></h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Our Expo Hall is an inexhaustible center for knowledge and networking. You’ll connect with <a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/exhibitors?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long">market-defining vendors</a> and obtain invaluable solution demos in a relaxed, welcoming environment. The products and services you discover can help save you time and boost productivity. Swing by during session breaks or spend some focused hours combing through all the Expo Hall has to offer. </span></p> <h3><b>Career-Defining Networking</b></h3> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">SMX Advanced brings together the most accomplished search marketers in the world and we provide plenty of thoughtfully-sequenced <a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/in-person?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long">networking events</a> for you to engage with your peers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once you’re registered, request an invitation to our private SMX Facebook Group. This will allow you to connect with other attendees and speakers before, during, and after the show.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We’ll be kicking off the show </span><b>Monday, June 3</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> with </span><b>two dynamic community meetups</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, one for SEOs and one for SEMs:</span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><b>SEOs</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> will join Search Engine Land&#8217;s Barry Schwartz for a discussion about Google&#8217;s March 2019 core search algorithm update and other hot issues at this exclusive gathering.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><b>SEMs</b><span style="font-weight: 400;"> will team up with Search Engine Land editor-in-chief Ginny Marvin for a tour through the latest announcements and changes in paid search.</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Then, it’s time for </span><b>the Opening Reception</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, sponsored by Bruce Clay, Inc. You’ll enjoy drinks, appetizers, and a spectacular view of Seattle from the roof of the Bell Harbor while connecting with fellow attendees and speakers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Join us after the Opening Reception for </span><b>Janes of Digital</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, a Microsoft-created event devoted to important conversations about diversity and inclusion. Stay tuned for more details! </span></p> <p><b>Tuesday evening, June 4</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">, we’ll toast our exhibitors during the </span><b>Expo Hall Reception. </b><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mingle with peers and check out the best-of-breed marketing solutions over drinks and hors d&#8217;oeuvres.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lastly, you won&#8217;t want to miss the most prestigious awards program in search &#8212; the 5th annual</span><b> Search Engine Land Awards</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">! Join us for a fabulous evening at Seattle’s Museum of Pop Culture. We’ll honor the finalists and winners and celebrate the community with an epic afterparty! </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Want more time for shop talk? Sign up for one of our Birds of a Feather lunch tables on </span><b>Tuesday, June 4 </b><span style="font-weight: 400;">and</span><b> Wednesday, June 5</b><span style="font-weight: 400;">. These topic-driven tables elevate your mealtime small talk to truly valuable conversations with others who share your professional interests. We’ll email you with a list of table topics in the coming weeks, so stay tuned!</span></p> <p><b>You’ve Read, Now Register!</b></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">I hope you&#8217;ve found this preview useful, and that you&#8217;ll be joining us in Seattle this June! Now is the time to take advantage of Early Bird rates &#8211; <a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/rates/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long">pick your ideal pass</a> and book now: </span></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><b>All Access: </b><span style="font-weight: 400;">All sessions, keynotes, networking, and amenities. Book by April 27 and save $300 off on-site rates!</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><b>All Access + Workshop Combo </b><b>(best value!)</b><b>: </b><span style="font-weight: 400;">The complete SMX experience + your choice of immersive, full-day workshop. Book by April 27 to save $600 off on-site rates!</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><b>Networking: </b><span style="font-weight: 400;"><a href="https://marketinglandevents.com/smx/advanced/network-pass/?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long">Full access</a> to the Expo Hall and networking events, plus downloadable speaker presentations and more. Book by April 27 and save $200 off on-site rates!</span></li> </ul> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Remember: Whichever pass you choose, <a href="https://attend.marketinglandevents.com/smxadvanced2019?utm_source=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=smx+adv+2019&amp;utm_content=eb+preview+long">book NOW</a> to lock in these special rates!</span></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/explore-the-smx-advanced-agenda-259640">Explore the SMX Advanced agenda</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> 8 Ways You’re Wasting Money on SEO Without Knowing It by @coreydmorris http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11268023 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:2652ba26-0d06-99b9-6b1e-0519dace9a9d Wed, 17 Apr 2019 13:45:18 +0000 <p>Not getting the ROI you expect from SEO? Here are eight ways you might be wasting time and money.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/wasting-money-on-seo/302975/">8 Ways You’re Wasting Money on SEO Without Knowing It by @coreydmorris</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11268023.gif" height="1" width="1"/> AI-powered surveys: Hyped or helpful? https://marketingland.com/ai-powered-surveys-hyped-or-helpful-259642 Marketing Land urn:uuid:22b60d27-a423-502f-f1c8-c3a374a28e72 Wed, 17 Apr 2019 13:30:02 +0000 <p>Some wonder if AI-powered surveys are over-hyped vaporware that legitimizes bad science. Here's how they really work.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/ai-powered-surveys-hyped-or-helpful-259642">AI-powered surveys: Hyped or helpful?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p>For marketers with an interest in research, it’s a good time to start talking about AI-facilitated online surveys. What are those, exactly? They’re surveys that use machine learning to engage with respondents (think of a chatbot) which then manage a lot of the back-end data involved with implementing and reporting (think of pure drudgery). We have had a great experience with GroupSolver, and other examples include Acebot, Wizer, Attuned (specific to HR) and Worthix. There are others out there, and probably even more by the time you read this.</p> <p>The good news is that a conversation about AI-facilitated online surveys is well underway. The bad news is that it’s rife with exaggerated claims. By distinguishing between hype and genuine promise, it’s possible to set some realistic expectations and tap into the technology’s benefits without overinvesting your time and research dollars in false promises (which seems to happen a lot with AI).</p> <p>As Dr. Melanie Mitchell puts it in &#8220;<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/05/opinion/artificial-intelligence-machine-learning.html" rel="nofollow">Artificial Intelligence Hits the Barrier of Meaning</a>,&#8221; AI is outstanding at doing what it is told, but not at uncovering human meaning. If that’s true, what possible use can AI have for online surveys? There are five themes that need to be addressed.</p> <h2>Reduced customer fatigue</h2> <p>One misconception is that AI surveys reduce fatigue because traditional surveys are too long. Not quite. Surveys are only too long if they are poorly crafted, but that has nothing to do with how the instrument is administered. Where AI does help is in creating an experience that is very comfortable for the respondent because it looks and feels like a chat session. The informality helps respondents feel more at ease and is well-suited to a mobile screen. The possible downside is that responses are less likely to be detailed because people may be typing with their thumbs.</p> <h2>Open-ended questions</h2> <p>There are three advantages to how AI treats open-ended questions. First, the platform we used takes that all-important first pass at codifying a thematic analysis of the data. When you go through the findings, the machine will have already grouped them according to the thematic analysis the AI has parsed. If you are using grounded theory (i.e., looking for insights as you go), this can be very helpful in getting momentum towards developing your insights.</p> <p>Secondly, the AI also facilitates the thematic analysis by getting each respondent to help with the coding process themselves, <i>as part of the actual survey</i>. After the respondent answers “XYZ,&#8221; the AI tells the respondent that other people had answered “ABC,” and then asks if that is also similar to what the respondent meant. This process continues until the respondents have not only given their answers but have weighed in on the answers of the other respondents (or with pre-seeded responses you want to test). The net result for the researcher is a pre-coded sentiment analysis that you can work with immediately, without having to take hours to code them from scratch.</p> <p>The downside of this approach is that you will be combining both aided and unaided responses. This is useful if you need to get group consensus to generate insights, but it’s not going to work if you need completely independent feedback. Something like GroupSolver works best in cases where you otherwise might consider open-ended responses, interviews, focus groups, moderated message boards or similar instruments that lead to thematic or grounded theory analyses.</p> <p>The third advantage of this approach over moderated qualitative methodologies is that the output can give you not only coded themes but also gauge their relative importance. This gives you a dimensional, psychographic view of the data, complete with levels of confidence, that can be helpful when you look for hidden insights and opportunities to drive communication or design interventions.</p> <h2>Surveys at the speed of change</h2> <p>There are claims out there that AI helps drive speed-to-insight and integration with other data sources in real-time. This is the ultimate goal, but it’s still a long way off. It’s not a matter of connecting more data pipelines; it’s because they do very different things. Data science tells us what is happening but not necessarily why it’s happening, and that’s because it’s not meant to uncover behavioral drivers. Unless we’re dealing with highly structured data (e.g., Net Promoter Score), we still need human intervention to make sure the two types of data are speaking the same language. That said, AI can create incredibly fast access to the types of quantitative and qualitative data that surveys often take time to uncover, which does indeed bode very well for increased speed to insight.</p> <h2>Cross-platform and self-learning ability</h2> <p>There is an idea out there that AI surveys can access ever-greater sources of data for an ever-broader richness of insight. Yes, and no. Yes, we can get the AI to learn from large pools of respondent input. But, once again, without two-factor human input (from respondents themselves and the researcher), the results are not to be trusted because they run the likely danger of missing underlying meaning.</p> <h2>Creates real-time, instant surveys automatically</h2> <p>The final claim we need to address is that AI surveys can be created nearly-instantaneously or even automatically. There are some tools that generate survey questions on the fly, based on how the AI interprets responses. It’s a risky proposition. It’s one thing to let respondents engage with each other’s input, but it’s quite another to let them drive the actual questions you ask. An inexperienced researcher may substitute respondent-driven input for researcher insight. That said, if AI can take away some drudgery from the development of the instrument, as well as the back-end coding, so much the better. “Trust but verify” is the way to go.</p> <p>So, this quote from Picasso may still hold true: “Computers are useless. They can only give you answers,” but now they can make finding the questions easier too.</p> <h2>Summary</h2> <p>The good news is that AI can do what it’s meant to do – reduce drudgery. And here’s some more good news (for researchers): There will always be a need for human intervention when it comes to surveys because AI can neither parse meaning from interactions nor substitute research strategy. AI approaches that succeed will be the ones that can most effectively facilitate that human intervention in the right way, at the right time.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/ai-powered-surveys-hyped-or-helpful-259642">AI-powered surveys: Hyped or helpful?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Is Conversion Lift the Future of Attribution? by @Wrodarczyk http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11267817 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:1a78cec9-b10f-a808-33b5-b679d96f0575 Wed, 17 Apr 2019 12:45:40 +0000 <p>Stop building complicated attribution models. Learn how conversion lift tests can help you measure your digital advertising performance.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/conversion-lift-attribution/298073/">Is Conversion Lift the Future of Attribution? by @Wrodarczyk</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11267817.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Building and scaling global SEO Centers of Excellence https://marketingland.com/building-and-scaling-global-seo-centers-of-excellence-259617 Marketing Land urn:uuid:67311cc3-d156-c4a2-732a-684aa58614dc Wed, 17 Apr 2019 12:05:08 +0000 <p>Before you can involve your company’s executives in SEO advocacy, you need a set of best practices and clear goals to share. Here's how you do it.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/building-and-scaling-global-seo-centers-of-excellence-259617">Building and scaling global SEO Centers of Excellence</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <p>Wider spread internet adoption and mobile use worldwide are opening up lucrative new markets in Latin America, China and the rest of Asia-Pacific and more. Global opportunities bring with them a whole new realm of user behaviors, language and intent considerations, and search engine expectations for SEOs to navigate. Google is practically nonexistent in China, for example, where more than <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-08-21/chinese-internet-users-cross-800-million-mark">800 million</a> Internet users choose Baidu – which handles an average of 6 billion queries daily in China alone – Haosou, or a handful of others instead.</p> <p>How can you ensure that your SEO is built to scale as you expand into new global markets?</p> <p>Being one of a handful of SEOs constantly attempting to explain and justify your needs, budget and activities is a constant uphill battle. Instead, I’ve long been an advocate for the development of Centers of Excellence inside enterprise brands as a proven way to decentralize critical knowledge and best practices. In doing so, SEOs can win buy-in and cooperation across the brand.</p> <p>In developing Global SEO Centers of Excellence, you can win support and share in SEO successes across the brand. Here’s how.</p> <h2>Promoting SEO maturity in your organization</h2> <p>You have to walk before you can run. Before you can involve your company’s executives and other teams in SEO advocacy and process, you need a set of best practices and clear goals to share.</p> <p>In organizations with high SEO maturity, we see several common positive traits across the people, process and platforms involved, including:</p> <p>People</p> <ul> <li>The SEO team is supported by strong, cross-organizational executive support for search</li> <li>A central SEO team owns the Center of Excellence and drives network-wide activities that support its goals</li> <li>The organization boasts a digitally native community that supports skills development and certifications</li> </ul> <p>Process</p> <ul> <li>There are formal, documented engagement and SEO models deployed throughout the process of content development</li> <li>Customer-driven insights drive data-backed content decisions</li> <li>Social, paid search, and SEO are tightly integrated</li> </ul> <p>Platform</p> <ul> <li>Standardized dashboards and reporting capabilities integrate on-page and off-page data, automating where possible and enabling the activation of data in as near to real-time as possible</li> <li>Audits, insights, publishing and other core SEO activities are integrated at the platform level</li> </ul> <p>Only once your people, processes and platform in place are you ready to scale your global SEO efforts. These are the backbone of your Center of Excellence – it’s the foundation on which your organization-wide understanding of and advocacy for SEO can be built.</p> <p>Below is an example of a framework for broader <a href="https://martechtoday.com/cmo-coe-3-steps-build-digital-center-excellence-185394">Digital Centers of Excellence</a> that you can also map to.</p> <img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-315476" src="https://searchengineland.com/figz/wp-content/seloads/2019/04/image1.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="446" /> <h2>3 Key Traits of Successful Global SEO Centers of Excellence</h2> <p>With that baseline in place, what do these centers actually look like? As you set out to build yours, pay particular attention to these three critical areas.</p> <p><b>1. An inherent understanding of demand in each region</b></p> <p>Does your team understand searcher behavior as well as the powerful search engines in each region?</p> <p>Even here in the United States, where Google takes the lion’s share of queries, the way search results come back varies wildly across regions. The content will be different, but the entire structure of the SERP may change, as well. A query that brings back a Map Pack result in one region may generate plain blue links in a different (perhaps underserviced or rural) area.</p> <p>In this &#8220;where to stay&#8221; example, you can see that Google and Yandex are offering different types of enriched Local Pack results, while Baidu opted for text links (with the top result geared to tourists, a clear reflection of my querying in English from the other side of the world).</p> <img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-315477" src="https://searchengineland.com/figz/wp-content/seloads/2019/04/image3.jpg" alt="" width="512" height="1200" /> <p>Results are going to vary widely across industries and verticals as well as search engines, geographic regions and languages. They may also be influenced by the search engine’s perception of the searcher’s intent, how well prospective sites are marked up and potentially hundreds of other factors.</p> <p>Inside your SEO Center of Excellence, you need to have a documented process for investigating and optimizing for different kinds of search results in the areas in which you do business. Make sure that you account for the following:</p> <ul> <li>Who owns the responsibility of investigating the opportunity in each region;</li> <li>Wow the opportunity and requirements to achieve various search results are communicated internally;</li> <li>Who is responsible for staying on top of new features, updates, and other search engine changes;</li> <li>How the results of these optimizations will be tracked and measured across regions</li> <li>How wins will be communicated to executives;</li> <li>How progress and success will be measured, tracked, and reported to inform operations throughout the organization.</li> </ul> <p><b> 2. Content is localized for each market</b></p> <p>Localizing content goes far deeper than translation, and it begins with the definition of each market. In some cases, a market may be a neighborhood, ZIP/postal code or city. In others, an entire country might constitute a single market.</p> <p>Your content needs to help audience members in each market in their decision-making. It needs to appeal to them; to answer a question or need and resonate on a level that moves them to the next stage in their purchasing journey. Truly localized content reflects:</p> <ul> <li>Local language, dialect, and slang</li> <li>Search trends in the region (mobile vs desktop, keywords, etc.)</li> <li>Local knowledge, via photos, videos, references to local landmarks, and more</li> </ul> <p>A Global SEO Center of Excellence has a defined and documented process for ensuring that content is properly localized and updated as needed. For factors such as on-page SEO ranking factors can vary from engine to engine.</p> <img class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-315478" src="https://searchengineland.com/figz/wp-content/seloads/2019/04/image2-4.png" alt="" width="687" height="299" /> <p><em>Source: BrightEdge International Search Success</em></p> <p><b> 3. Global, mobile, and local SEO are all part of the framework</b></p> <p>Even as SEO teams strive for unity and recognition among departments, there can be division inside the team. Yes, your SEO strategies for mobile, local and global look different. No, they should not be siloed and operate independently of one another.</p> <p>Your comprehensive global SEO strategy will include technical best practices that support all efforts, such as the proper use of hreflang tags. This code will help Google understand the intended country and language for each piece of content, helping it appear for the right audiences and reducing the likelihood of Google perceiving content intended for different groups as duplicate.</p> <p>That foundation supports your global, local and mobile optimizations. Because some mobile optimizations can impact local rankings, and local can impact organic and so on, careful coordination is needed between the specialists in each area.</p> <p>Aligning these specialists within the broader context of your Global SEO Center of Excellence ensures:</p> <ul> <li>that decisions and optimizations consistently factor in the corporate framework and strategic goals of the organization;</li> <li>that cross-functional SEO knowledge can be shared throughout the organization to support all search-related initiatives;</li> <li>that efficiencies are realized wherever possible in the sharing of resources, data analysis, keyword research, etc.</li> </ul> <h2>Ensure the stability and longevity of your global SEO efforts</h2> <p>SEO is not an island. To ensure the success of your SEO efforts in a global enterprise, you need to get everyone from IT and web development to operations, communications and marketing, and product on board. The Center of Excellence model gives you a centralized hub of SEO efforts, but also a framework by which to decentralize that knowledge and support your best practices for search across the organization.</p> <p>This definition and structure help you deliver the best content and most engaging, relevant experiences to the right audience members at the right time – wherever in the world they happen to be.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/building-and-scaling-global-seo-centers-of-excellence-259617">Building and scaling global SEO Centers of Excellence</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Seznam SEO: An Interview with Seznam’s Search Division Director by @TaylorDanRW http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11267652 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:161b22f2-971f-3f65-5377-d68fc8f9e1d4 Wed, 17 Apr 2019 11:45:36 +0000 <p>Learn how Seznam approaches modern-day search and how the Czech search engine processes JavaScript-powered websites.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/seznam-interview/302851/">Seznam SEO: An Interview with Seznam&#8217;s Search Division Director by @TaylorDanRW</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11267652.gif" height="1" width="1"/> How to Cross-Post to Instagram From Your Facebook Page https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-cross-post-to-instagram-from-facebook-page/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:a9be2482-fc3e-a9e4-5384-fc832930b574 Wed, 17 Apr 2019 10:00:17 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/instagram-crosspost-from-facebook-desktop-how-to-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/instagram-crosspost-from-facebook-desktop-how-to-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/instagram-crosspost-from-facebook-desktop-how-to-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/instagram-crosspost-from-facebook-desktop-how-to-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/instagram-crosspost-from-facebook-desktop-how-to-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/instagram-crosspost-from-facebook-desktop-how-to-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Do you use Instagram and Facebook for your business? Are you looking for a way to post to Instagram from your desktop? In this article, you&#8217;ll learn how to cross-post from Facebook to Instagram via your desktop. Why Consider Cross-Posting to Instagram via Facebook on Desktop? Instagram accounts have had the ability to cross-post to [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-cross-post-to-instagram-from-facebook-page/">How to Cross-Post to Instagram From Your Facebook Page</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> Google Says You Are Not Entitled to Links by @martinibuster http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11267127 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:c27a115d-2c4b-bd0c-1f9e-9a29870c9caf Wed, 17 Apr 2019 08:45:34 +0000 <p>A recent post on Twitter by Google's Danny Sullivan highlighted that websites are not entitled to links.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-and-links/303737/">Google Says You Are Not Entitled to Links by @martinibuster</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11267127.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Google Shopping Ads Benchmarks for YOUR Industry by @wordstream http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11266577 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:dd8f10a2-2848-2dc8-7ca8-f88427b35dcb Wed, 17 Apr 2019 05:00:05 +0000 <p>Find out how ecommerce advertisers are performing with their Google Shopping and Bing Shopping campaigns.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-shopping-ads-industry-benchmarks-wordstream/302375/">Google Shopping Ads Benchmarks for YOUR Industry by @wordstream</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11266577.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Google My Business Lets Users Create Custom Short URLs by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11266067 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:b0cb9d1e-ffc0-63c1-be9a-4ee0765211a5 Wed, 17 Apr 2019 00:52:48 +0000 <p>Google is now letting users create customized short URLs for Google My Business listings. Google is calling these custom URLs “short names” and it appears only some businesses have access to them at the moment. However, it’s definitely more than just a test feature because a help center article already exists for it. Ben Fisher shared an example on Twitter. You can see at the bottom right corner of his screenshot where he set his short name to ‘SteadyDemand.’ New: Shortnames for GMB Profiles – Think of this as more than vanity URL&#39;s, this is an easy way to share […]</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-my-business-lets-users-create-custom-short-urls/303725/">Google My Business Lets Users Create Custom Short URLs by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11266067.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Facebook is Improving Ads Manager and Business Manager by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11265737 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:33a9bdd5-c5c5-c97a-4267-e5ed184e89cd Tue, 16 Apr 2019 22:14:02 +0000 <p>Facebook shared plans to update both Ads Manager and Business Manager making them easier to use.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/facebook-is-improving-ads-manager-and-business-manager/303713/">Facebook is Improving Ads Manager and Business Manager by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11265737.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Google is Experiencing Indexing Issues With Content in Google News by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11265417 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:4845c3dd-388a-26b1-fb05-913fcf68fe07 Tue, 16 Apr 2019 20:36:30 +0000 <p>Google has confirmed it's aware of indexing issues affecting content in Google News.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/google-is-experiencing-indexing-issues-with-content-in-google-news/303691/">Google is Experiencing Indexing Issues With Content in Google News by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11265417.gif" height="1" width="1"/> What Stackie winner Airstream learned from communing with its stack https://marketingland.com/what-stackie-winner-airstream-learned-from-communing-with-its-stack-259615 Marketing Land urn:uuid:70302c61-9957-5590-28ea-257da0df89e5 Tue, 16 Apr 2019 20:32:35 +0000 <p>The iconic camper company said analysis of the technology helped them see common goals and key opportunities across marketing operations teams.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/what-stackie-winner-airstream-learned-from-communing-with-its-stack-259615">What Stackie winner Airstream learned from communing with its stack</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <img class="aligncenter wp-image-232258 size-full" src="https://martechtoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Airstream.jpg" alt="Airstream martech stack" width="1280" height="720" /> <p>Airstream might just have the most iconic and recognizable campers around. So when it came to visualizing their marketing technology stacks, the company didn&#8217;t stray far from the campgrounds.</p> <p class="p2">The company partnered with marketing agency Element Three to develop a slide that ultimately earned them <a href="https://martechtoday.com/2019-stackie-award-winners-5-leaders-recognized-for-first-class-marketing-technology-stacks-232291" target="_blank" rel="noopener">one of five Stackie Awards</a> at MarTech earlier this month through a visualization that demonstrated the many technologies at work in their martech stack, while playing on the theme of nature and escaping to the great outdoors.</p> <p class="p2">But it wasn&#8217;t all for the prize. Digital marketing director Dustin Clark said that during the teams&#8217; creative processes and analysis of the stacks, they recognized common goals — and opportunities — across marketing operations teams.</p> <p>Here are the takeaways they gleaned.</p> <h2 class="p2">Better data</h2> <p class="p2">The persistent need to pull together disparate data remains a pain point for many organizations. &#8220;I&#8217;m happy to see clients, and others, adopt connectors — systems to move data from one system or another to consolidate sources to get better data,&#8221; said Clark. &#8220;It&#8217;s also nice to see a series of project management software included since the operations side of marketing doesn&#8217;t get much love.&#8221;</p> <h2 class="p2">&#8216;Single source of truth&#8217;</h2> <p class="p2">According to Clark, integrating technologies and creating a reliable source of data continues to challenge marketers. As organizations continue to add technology, it becomes increasingly difficult to create a method for sharing data in a scalable, digestible way. &#8220;The biggest opportunity we continue to see is connecting technologies. As communications continue to evolve — ad platforms, chatbots, automation, etc. — the need to work towards one &#8216;single source of truth&#8217; continues to get trickier, but it&#8217;s a fun challenge to solve.&#8221;</p> <h2 class="p2">Analytics are key</h2> <p class="p2">&#8220;Investing in and setting up analytics is so often overlooked, and yet always pays for itself in the long run, especially in marketing operations. Being able to track and report on the results of marketing efforts quickly is crucial to getting buy-in on projects and budget approvals. You&#8217;re not going to get those numbers easily if the state of your web analytics is a mess,&#8221; Clark added.</p> <h2 class="p2">Bring it all together</h2> <p class="p2">For digital marketers striving to provide the &#8216;single source of truth,&#8217; Clark said that integrating data sources properly is crucial to success. &#8220;Start with cleaning up your analytics and implementing those technology connectors,&#8221; said Clark. &#8220;This will help stakeholders see the value of their efforts.&#8221;</p> <p>The Stackie Awards were announced at the MarTech West in San Jose on April 3, 2019. The event also raised $4,800 for Girls Who Code, a nonprofit organization supporting women in the field of computer science. This year&#8217;s other winners include ESRI, Juniper Networks, Paychex and Sargento.</p> <div class="well"> <h2><small>More insights from the MarTech Conference</small></h2> <ul><li><small><a href="https://martechconf.com/west/rates/?utm_source=mtt&amp;utm_medium=newspost&amp;utm_campaign=mt+west+2019">Register now for the MarTech Conference - April 3-5, San Jose, Calif.</a></small></li> <li><small><a href="https://martechtoday.com/the-martech-stack-fallacy-its-not-about-technology-232669">The martech stack fallacy: It’s not about technology</a></small></li><li><small><a href="https://martechtoday.com/martech-overtime-have-we-achieved-peak-martech-in-2019-232546">MarTech Overtime: Have we achieved peak martech in 2019?</a></small></li><li><small><a href="https://martechtoday.com/building-a-marketing-operations-team-from-scratch-one-year-in-232431">Building a marketing operations team from scratch, one year in</a></small></li></ul></div> <p><i>This story first appeared on MarTech Today. For more on marketing technology, <a href="https://martechtoday.com?utm_src=ml&amp;utm_medium=textlink&amp;utm_campaign=mlxpost">click here.</a></i></p> <p>https://martechtoday.com/what-stackie-winner-airstream-learned-from-communing-with-its-stack-232768</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/what-stackie-winner-airstream-learned-from-communing-with-its-stack-259615">What Stackie winner Airstream learned from communing with its stack</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> Yoast SEO Becomes First WordPress Plugin to Offer Proper Schema Implementation by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11264691 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:d1275c5a-97a4-6152-30b8-cdcb971260b9 Tue, 16 Apr 2019 18:02:22 +0000 <p>Popular WordPress plugin Yoast is releasing an update which offers complete implementation of Schema.org markup.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/yoast-seo-becomes-first-wordpress-plugin-to-offer-proper-schema-implementation/303671/">Yoast SEO Becomes First WordPress Plugin to Offer Proper Schema Implementation by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11264691.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Yoast SEO Becomes First WordPress Plugin to Offer Defragmented Schema Markup by @MattGSouthern http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/13962/11264691 Search Engine Journal urn:uuid:2309616b-7090-d87c-a078-cbe517b15853 Tue, 16 Apr 2019 18:02:22 +0000 <p>Popular WordPress plugin Yoast is releasing an update which offers defragmented implementation of Schema.org markup.</p><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com/yoast-seo-becomes-first-wordpress-plugin-to-offer-proper-schema-implementation/303671/">Yoast SEO Becomes First WordPress Plugin to Offer Defragmented Schema Markup by @MattGSouthern</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.searchenginejournal.com">Search Engine Journal</a>.</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/13962/11264691.gif" height="1" width="1"/> How 2019 Stackie Award winner Sargento cooked up their stack https://marketingland.com/how-2019-stackie-award-winner-sargento-cooked-up-their-stack-259605 Marketing Land urn:uuid:5acebe12-7923-5ef7-0a3e-eb050510ed7f Tue, 16 Apr 2019 17:32:44 +0000 <p>The exercise showed the cheesemaker that its martech stack was more robust than the marketing team first realized.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/how-2019-stackie-award-winner-sargento-cooked-up-their-stack-259605">How 2019 Stackie Award winner Sargento cooked up their stack</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p> <img src="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Sargento-800x450.jpg" alt="" width="800" height="450" class="aligncenter size-large wp-image-259197" srcset="https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Sargento-800x450.jpg 800w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Sargento-600x338.jpg 600w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Sargento-768x432.jpg 768w, https://marketingland.com/wp-content/ml-loads/2019/04/Sargento-550x310.jpg 550w" sizes="(max-width: 800px) 100vw, 800px" /> <p>What&#8217;s the secret to putting together a useful visualization of your marketing technology stack? Well, in the case of 2019 Stackie winner and food company Sargento, it required more than a few chefs.</p> <p>&#8220;The concept development took two weeks,&#8221; said Sargento senior marketing manager Cami Schenck about the company&#8217;s winning martech slide, &#8220;It was a collaborative effort across our core digital team, including our media manager Celeste Eby, graphic designer Gina Pethan and myself.&#8221;</p> <p>Schenck said the first step to building out Sargento&#8217;s winning slide involved isolating the different elements of their stack.</p> <p>&#8220;The core data strategy team understood the connection points of the technologies and how they were being leveraged. Our digital creative had a high-level understanding of the goal, which led her to the first &#8216;Aha!&#8217; moment &#8212; which was the brand metaphor.&#8221;</p> <p>From there, the creative design took shape with the visual organization of the columns &#8212; &#8220;Plan your meal,&#8221; &#8220;Create your dish,&#8221; &#8220;Activate your tastebuds&#8221; and &#8220;Measure your skills&#8221; &#8212;  representing different layers of the stack.</p> <h2>What they learned</h2> <p>Schenck said the group effort between the data and creative leads resulted in more team members seeing the company&#8217;s martech stack for what it is.</p> <p>&#8220;This concept was critical in gaining understanding and alignment from the broader team because it placed the technology in a visually familiar setting, which was easy for them to understand and digest.&#8221;</p> <p>The second &#8216;Aha!&#8217; moment for the team? Sargento&#8217;s martech stack itself was more robust than Schenck&#8217;s marketing team first realized.</p> <p>&#8220;We have found this to be a valuable tool,&#8221; said Schenck, &#8220;Within internal conversations, we had been referring to the marketing technology stack &#8212; which was a vague concept for the marketing team. We discovered the Stackie contest and it inspired us to develop our own illustration.&#8221;</p> <p>The slide now serves as a reference point her team uses to talk about the company&#8217;s ongoing data strategy evolution.</p> <p>&#8220;It was also integral in the discovery phase of our data strategy development,&#8221; said Schenck, &#8220;We hope to submit again next year. As we look to the future, we anticipate adding predictive analytics, visualization software and deeper personalization technologies.&#8221;</p> <p>The 2019 Stackie Awards event that kicked off the 2019 MarTech conference raised $4,800 for Girls Who Code, a nonprofit organization supporting women in the field of computer science. In addition to Sargento, this year&#8217;s Stackie Award winners included Airstream, ESRI, Juniper Networks and Paychex.</p> <div class="well"> <h2><small>More insights from the MarTech Conference</small></h2> <ul><li><small><a href="https://martechconf.com/west/rates/?utm_source=mtt&amp;utm_medium=newspost&amp;utm_campaign=mt+west+2019">Register now for the MarTech Conference - April 3-5, San Jose, Calif.</a></small></li> <li><small><a href="https://martechtoday.com/the-martech-stack-fallacy-its-not-about-technology-232669">The martech stack fallacy: It’s not about technology</a></small></li><li><small><a href="https://martechtoday.com/martech-overtime-have-we-achieved-peak-martech-in-2019-232546">MarTech Overtime: Have we achieved peak martech in 2019?</a></small></li><li><small><a href="https://martechtoday.com/building-a-marketing-operations-team-from-scratch-one-year-in-232431">Building a marketing operations team from scratch, one year in</a></small></li></ul></div> <p><i>This story first appeared on MarTech Today. For more on marketing technology, <a href="https://martechtoday.com?utm_src=ml&#038;utm_medium=textlink&#038;utm_campaign=mlxpost">click here.</a></i></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com/how-2019-stackie-award-winner-sargento-cooked-up-their-stack-259605">How 2019 Stackie Award winner Sargento cooked up their stack</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://marketingland.com">Marketing Land</a>.</p>