BrevardSeo Social Media Page http://feed.informer.com/digests/KXOPYUBKCD/feeder BrevardSeo Social Media Page Respective post owners and feed distributors Wed, 12 Jul 2017 01:09:19 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ SEO Is a Means to an End: How Do You Prove Your Value to Clients? http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11172187 Moz Blog urn:uuid:cd627acc-8903-53bf-c06c-c593781ad24e Thu, 21 Mar 2019 00:04:00 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/10805655\">KameronJenkins</a></p><p>“Prove it” is pretty much the name of the game at this point. </p> <p>As SEOs, we invest so much effort into finding opportunities for our clients, executing strategies, and on the best days, getting the results we set out to achieve.</p> <p>That’s why it feels so deflating (not to mention mind-boggling) when, after all those increases in rankings, traffic, and conversions our work produced, our clients still aren’t satisfied. </p> <p>Where’s the disconnect? </p> <h2>The value of SEO in today’s search landscape </h2> <p>You don’t have to convince SEOs that their work is valuable. We know full well how our work benefits our clients’ websites.</p> <ol><li>Our attention on crawling and indexing ensures that search engine bots crawl all our clients’ important pages, that they’re not wasting time on any unimportant pages, and that only the important, valuable pages are in the index. </li><li>Because we understand how Googlebot and other crawlers work, we’re cognizant of how to ensure that search engines understand our pages as they’re intended to be understood, as well as able to eliminate any barriers to that understanding (ex: adding appropriate structured data, diagnosing JavaScript issues, etc.)</li><li>We spend our time improving speed, ensuring appropriate language targeting, looking into UX issues, ensuring accessibility, and more because we know the high price that Google places on the searcher experience. </li><li>We research the words and phrases that our clients’ ideal customers use to search for solutions to their problems and help create content that satisfies those needs. In turn, Google rewards our clients with high rankings that capture clicks. Over time, this can lower our clients’ customer acquisition costs. </li><li>Time spent on earning links for our clients earns them the authority needed to earn trust and perform well in search results. </li></ol> <p>There are so many other SEO activities that drive real, measurable impact for our clients, even in a search landscape that is more crowded and getting <a href="https://moz.com/blog/state-of-searcher-behavior-revealed">less clicks</a> than ever before. Despite those results, we’ll still fall short if we fail to connect the dots for our clients. <br></p> <h2>Rankings, traffic, conversions… what’s missing?</h2> <p>What’s a keyword ranking worth without clicks? </p> <p>What’s organic traffic worth without conversions?</p> <p>What are conversions worth without booking/signing the lead?</p> <p>Rankings, traffic, and conversions are all critical SEO metrics to track if you want to prove the success of your efforts, but they are all means to an end. </p> <p>At the end of the day, what your client truly cares about is their return on investment (ROI). In other words, if they can’t mentally make the connection between your SEO results and their revenue, then the client might not keep you around for long. </p> <figure><em><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd6259ff33.43544735.jpg" width="624" height="127" data-image="m4twzvdv0hga"></em><figcaption><em>From searcher to customer: I made this diagram for a past client to help demonstrate how they get revenue from SEO. </em></figcaption></figure> <p><br>But how can you do that? </p> <h2>10 tips for attaching value to organic success</h2> <p>If you want to help your clients get a clearer picture of the real value of your efforts, try some of the following methods.</p> <h3>1. Know what constitutes a conversion</h3> <p>What’s the main action your client wants people to take on their website? This is usually something like a form fill, a phone call, or an on-site purchase (e-commerce). Knowing how your client uses their website to make money is key. </p> <h3>2. Ask your clients what their highest value jobs are</h3> <p>Know what types of jobs/purchases your client is prioritizing so you can prioritize them too. It’s common for clients to want to balance their “cash flow” jobs (usually lower value but higher volume) with their “big time” jobs (higher value but lower volume). You can pay special attention to performance and conversions on these pages.</p> <h3>3. Know your client’s close rate</h3> <p>How many of the leads your campaigns generate end up becoming customers? This will help you assign values to goals (tip #6). </p> <h3>4. Know your client’s average customer value</h3> <p>This can get tricky if your client offers different services that all have different values, but you can combine average customer value with close rate to come up with a monetary value to attach to goals (tip #6). </p> <h3>5. Set up goals in Google Analytics</h3> <p>Once you know what constitutes a conversion on your client’s website (tip #1), you can set up a goal in Google Analytics. If you’re not sure how to do this, read up on <a href="https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1012040?hl=en&utm_id=ad#goal_value">Google’s documentation</a>. </p> <h3>6. Assign goal values</h3> <p>Knowing that the organic channel led to a conversion is great, but knowing the estimated value of that conversion is even better! For example, if you know that your client closes 10% of the leads that come through contact forms, and the average value of their customers is $500, you could assign a value of $50 per goal completion. <br></p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd62ccf995.39361681.png" width="250" height="243" data-image="692bns7n3h5c"></figure> <p></p> <h3>7. Consider having an Organic-only view in Google Analytics</h3> <p>For the purpose of clarity, it could be valuable to set up an additional Google Analytics view just for your client’s organic traffic. That way, when you’re looking at your goal report, you know you’re checking organic conversions and value only.<br> </p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd63639f56.30846372.jpg" width="221" height="259" data-image="svd6twybzqy7"></figure> <p></p> <h3>8. Calculate how much you would have had to pay for that traffic in Google Ads</h3> <p>I like to use the Keywords Everywhere plugin when viewing Google Search Console performance reports because it adds a cost per click (CPC) column next to your clicks column. This screenshot is from a personal blog website that I admittedly don’t do much with, hence the scant metrics, but you can see how easy this makes it to calculate how much you would have had to pay for the clicks you got your client for “free” (organically). </p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd63d8bf76.82229010.png" width="624" height="216" data-image="qlejswe3w0va"></figure> <p></p> <h3>9. Use Multi-Channel Funnels</h3> <p>Organic has value beyond last-click! Even when it’s not the channel your client’s customer came through, organic may have assisted in that conversion. Go to Google Analytics &gt; Conversions &gt; Multi-Channel Funnels. </p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd64503225.81705990.jpg" width="422" height="254" data-image="azgbztmwa8gt"></figure> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd64c458d8.52923762.png" width="464" height="134" data-image="kjfxusk1d5it"></figure> <p></p> <h3>10. Bring all your data together</h3> <p>How you communicate all this data is just as important as the data itself. Use <a href="https://moz.com/blog/impactful-data-storytelling">smart visualizations</a> and helpful explanations to drive home the impact your work had on your client’s bottom line.</p> <hr> <p>As many possibilities as we have for proving our value, doing so can be difficult and time-consuming. Additional factors can even complicate this further, such as: </p> <ul><li>Client is using multiple methods for customer acquisition, each with its own platform, metrics, and reporting</li><li>Client has <a href="https://moz.com/blog/client-seo-maturity">low SEO maturity</a> </li><li>Client is somewhat disorganized and doesn’t have a good grasp of things like average customer value or close rate</li></ul> <p>The challenges can seem endless, but there are ways to make this easier. I’ll be co-hosting a webinar on March 28th that focuses on this very topic. If you’re looking for ways to not only add value as an SEO but also prove it, check it out:</p> <p align="center"><a href="https://hsinfo.moz.com/proving-value-seo-agency-registration" class="button-primary large-cta">Save my spot!</a></p> <p>And let’s not forget, we’re in this together! If you have any tips for showing your value to your SEO clients, share them in the comments below.<br><br><br></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/10805655\">KameronJenkins</a></p><p>“Prove it” is pretty much the name of the game at this point. </p> <p>As SEOs, we invest so much effort into finding opportunities for our clients, executing strategies, and on the best days, getting the results we set out to achieve.</p> <p>That’s why it feels so deflating (not to mention mind-boggling) when, after all those increases in rankings, traffic, and conversions our work produced, our clients still aren’t satisfied. </p> <p>Where’s the disconnect? </p> <h2>The value of SEO in today’s search landscape </h2> <p>You don’t have to convince SEOs that their work is valuable. We know full well how our work benefits our clients’ websites.</p> <ol><li>Our attention on crawling and indexing ensures that search engine bots crawl all our clients’ important pages, that they’re not wasting time on any unimportant pages, and that only the important, valuable pages are in the index. </li><li>Because we understand how Googlebot and other crawlers work, we’re cognizant of how to ensure that search engines understand our pages as they’re intended to be understood, as well as able to eliminate any barriers to that understanding (ex: adding appropriate structured data, diagnosing JavaScript issues, etc.)</li><li>We spend our time improving speed, ensuring appropriate language targeting, looking into UX issues, ensuring accessibility, and more because we know the high price that Google places on the searcher experience. </li><li>We research the words and phrases that our clients’ ideal customers use to search for solutions to their problems and help create content that satisfies those needs. In turn, Google rewards our clients with high rankings that capture clicks. Over time, this can lower our clients’ customer acquisition costs. </li><li>Time spent on earning links for our clients earns them the authority needed to earn trust and perform well in search results. </li></ol> <p>There are so many other SEO activities that drive real, measurable impact for our clients, even in a search landscape that is more crowded and getting <a href="https://moz.com/blog/state-of-searcher-behavior-revealed">less clicks</a> than ever before. Despite those results, we’ll still fall short if we fail to connect the dots for our clients. <br></p> <h2>Rankings, traffic, conversions… what’s missing?</h2> <p>What’s a keyword ranking worth without clicks? </p> <p>What’s organic traffic worth without conversions?</p> <p>What are conversions worth without booking/signing the lead?</p> <p>Rankings, traffic, and conversions are all critical SEO metrics to track if you want to prove the success of your efforts, but they are all means to an end. </p> <p>At the end of the day, what your client truly cares about is their return on investment (ROI). In other words, if they can’t mentally make the connection between your SEO results and their revenue, then the client might not keep you around for long. </p> <figure><em><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd6259ff33.43544735.jpg" width="624" height="127" data-image="m4twzvdv0hga"></em><figcaption><em>From searcher to customer: I made this diagram for a past client to help demonstrate how they get revenue from SEO. </em></figcaption></figure> <p><br>But how can you do that? </p> <h2>10 tips for attaching value to organic success</h2> <p>If you want to help your clients get a clearer picture of the real value of your efforts, try some of the following methods.</p> <h3>1. Know what constitutes a conversion</h3> <p>What’s the main action your client wants people to take on their website? This is usually something like a form fill, a phone call, or an on-site purchase (e-commerce). Knowing how your client uses their website to make money is key. </p> <h3>2. Ask your clients what their highest value jobs are</h3> <p>Know what types of jobs/purchases your client is prioritizing so you can prioritize them too. It’s common for clients to want to balance their “cash flow” jobs (usually lower value but higher volume) with their “big time” jobs (higher value but lower volume). You can pay special attention to performance and conversions on these pages.</p> <h3>3. Know your client’s close rate</h3> <p>How many of the leads your campaigns generate end up becoming customers? This will help you assign values to goals (tip #6). </p> <h3>4. Know your client’s average customer value</h3> <p>This can get tricky if your client offers different services that all have different values, but you can combine average customer value with close rate to come up with a monetary value to attach to goals (tip #6). </p> <h3>5. Set up goals in Google Analytics</h3> <p>Once you know what constitutes a conversion on your client’s website (tip #1), you can set up a goal in Google Analytics. If you’re not sure how to do this, read up on <a href="https://support.google.com/analytics/answer/1012040?hl=en&utm_id=ad#goal_value">Google’s documentation</a>. </p> <h3>6. Assign goal values</h3> <p>Knowing that the organic channel led to a conversion is great, but knowing the estimated value of that conversion is even better! For example, if you know that your client closes 10% of the leads that come through contact forms, and the average value of their customers is $500, you could assign a value of $50 per goal completion. <br></p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd62ccf995.39361681.png" width="250" height="243" data-image="692bns7n3h5c"></figure> <p></p> <h3>7. Consider having an Organic-only view in Google Analytics</h3> <p>For the purpose of clarity, it could be valuable to set up an additional Google Analytics view just for your client’s organic traffic. That way, when you’re looking at your goal report, you know you’re checking organic conversions and value only.<br> </p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd63639f56.30846372.jpg" width="221" height="259" data-image="svd6twybzqy7"></figure> <p></p> <h3>8. Calculate how much you would have had to pay for that traffic in Google Ads</h3> <p>I like to use the Keywords Everywhere plugin when viewing Google Search Console performance reports because it adds a cost per click (CPC) column next to your clicks column. This screenshot is from a personal blog website that I admittedly don’t do much with, hence the scant metrics, but you can see how easy this makes it to calculate how much you would have had to pay for the clicks you got your client for “free” (organically). </p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd63d8bf76.82229010.png" width="624" height="216" data-image="qlejswe3w0va"></figure> <p></p> <h3>9. Use Multi-Channel Funnels</h3> <p>Organic has value beyond last-click! Even when it’s not the channel your client’s customer came through, organic may have assisted in that conversion. Go to Google Analytics &gt; Conversions &gt; Multi-Channel Funnels. </p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd64503225.81705990.jpg" width="422" height="254" data-image="azgbztmwa8gt"></figure> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/seo-value-for-clients/5c92cd64c458d8.52923762.png" width="464" height="134" data-image="kjfxusk1d5it"></figure> <p></p> <h3>10. Bring all your data together</h3> <p>How you communicate all this data is just as important as the data itself. Use <a href="https://moz.com/blog/impactful-data-storytelling">smart visualizations</a> and helpful explanations to drive home the impact your work had on your client’s bottom line.</p> <hr> <p>As many possibilities as we have for proving our value, doing so can be difficult and time-consuming. Additional factors can even complicate this further, such as: </p> <ul><li>Client is using multiple methods for customer acquisition, each with its own platform, metrics, and reporting</li><li>Client has <a href="https://moz.com/blog/client-seo-maturity">low SEO maturity</a> </li><li>Client is somewhat disorganized and doesn’t have a good grasp of things like average customer value or close rate</li></ul> <p>The challenges can seem endless, but there are ways to make this easier. I’ll be co-hosting a webinar on March 28th that focuses on this very topic. If you’re looking for ways to not only add value as an SEO but also prove it, check it out:</p> <p align="center"><a href="https://hsinfo.moz.com/proving-value-seo-agency-registration" class="button-primary large-cta">Save my spot!</a></p> <p>And let’s not forget, we’re in this together! If you have any tips for showing your value to your SEO clients, share them in the comments below.<br><br><br></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11172187.gif" height="1" width="1"/> SoFi Money Review: Online Checking https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/banking/sofi-money-review/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:d7e6ddc5-0579-28fd-fe9d-c668df6ec6da Wed, 20 Mar 2019 23:56:40 +0000   The bottom line SoFi Money is an online checking account by SoFi, a company best known for its student loan refinance loans. SoFi’s account has a top-of-the-line interest rate… <p>Where SoFi Money shines: 2.25% APY with no minimum balance. No monthly fees, no overdraft fees. Unlimited ATM fee reimbursements and no ATM fees from SoFi. Highly rated mobile apps with a spending tracker. Where SoFi Money falls short: No branches or CDs. No cash deposits accepted. No chat support and no 24/7 phone support....</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Spencer Tierney is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: spencer.tierney@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @SpencerNerd. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article SoFi Money Review: Online Checking originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="620527"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=620527" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Wells Fargo Propel Hikes Potential Bonus to 50K Points (Limited Time) https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/credit-cards/wells-fargo-propel-welcome-offer-50k-points/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:a8febc4b-20e9-d180-6604-9b114e39e1ba Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:02:10 +0000 For a limited time, the Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card is giving new cardholders an opportunity to earn an even richer welcome offer than it boasted previously. The new offer from… <p>For a limited time, the Wells Fargo Propel American Express® Card is giving new cardholders an opportunity to earn an even richer welcome offer than it boasted previously. The new offer from the $0-annual-fee card is structured this way: Earn 30,000 bonus points when you spend $3,000 on purchases in the first three months of opening the...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Robin Saks Frankel is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: rfrankel@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @robinsaks. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Wells Fargo Propel Hikes Potential Bonus to 50K Points (Limited Time) originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="628290"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=628290" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> 3 Steps to Spring-Clean Your Credit Card Debt https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/credit-cards/3-steps-spring-clean-credit-card-debt/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:cdef8327-23a0-e736-db3f-e97c2ceb12bd Wed, 20 Mar 2019 21:00:39 +0000 Aja McClanahan, a Chicago-based writer, and her husband were staring down $120,000 in debt — about $20,000 of it credit card balances — and realized they needed to clean house.… <p>Aja McClanahan, a Chicago-based writer, and her husband were staring down $120,000 in debt — about $20,000 of it credit card balances — and realized they needed to clean house. Literally. They found less expensive housing arrangements, and along the way in those seven years that they carried the debt, they also became meticulous about...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Melissa Lambarena is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: mlambarena@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @LissaLambarena. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article 3 Steps to Spring-Clean Your Credit Card Debt originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="625540"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=625540" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> First Tech Credit Union Student Loan Refinancing Review https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/loans/student-loans/first-tech-credit-union-student-loan-review/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:1a219095-d165-9f21-22c4-76266a9dddc7 Wed, 20 Mar 2019 20:54:35 +0000 First Tech Federal Credit Union primarily serves the technology industry — people who work at places like Amazon, Intel and Microsoft. But with repayment options that allow lower monthly payments starting out, its student loan… <p>First Tech Federal Credit Union primarily serves the technology industry — people who work at places like Amazon, Intel and Microsoft. But with repayment options that allow lower monthly payments starting out, its student loan refinancing product could be a fit for other professionals whose incomes are expected to grow over time. You must be — or become — a member of First...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Teddy Nykiel is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: teddy@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @teddynykiel. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article First Tech Credit Union Student Loan Refinancing Review originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="621064"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=621064" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Is the Chase Freedom Unlimited Card’s In-Branch Offer Worth Your Time? https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/travel/chase-freedom-unlimited-cards-branch-offer-worth-time/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:3a3326c8-511e-7435-e849-4c1c11ebbb66 Wed, 20 Mar 2019 17:36:33 +0000 A new offer for the Chase Freedom Unlimited® creates an interesting challenge for credit card users looking to maximize their rewards. It’s almost like a game: Choose one option and… <p>A new offer for the Chase Freedom Unlimited® creates an interesting challenge for credit card users looking to maximize their rewards. It’s almost like a game: Choose one option and you can easily earn $150 cash back. Choose a second option and you have a shot at putting $600 in your pocket — or you...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> June Casagrande is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: travel@nerdwallet.com. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Is the Chase Freedom Unlimited Card’s In-Branch Offer Worth Your Time? originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="627744"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=627744" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Southwest’s Service to Hawaii: A Report Card https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/travel/southwests-service-hawaii-report-card/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:3b14e552-4e96-cbd6-1d2b-be9f1f73de87 Wed, 20 Mar 2019 17:35:49 +0000 A few weeks after Southwest Airlines finally began service to Hawaii, the dust from those introductory $49 fares is settling and we’re getting a sense of what Southwest’s Hawaii service will look like in… <p>A few weeks after Southwest Airlines finally began service to Hawaii, the dust from those introductory $49 fares is settling and we’re getting a sense of what Southwest’s Hawaii service will look like in the long term. Here’s how it’s played out so far. Boeing 737 Max 8 ban hits Southwest hard, but not Hawaii service If you booked...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> June Casagrande is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: travel@nerdwallet.com. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Southwest’s Service to Hawaii: A Report Card originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="627778"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=627778" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Iowa First-Time Home Buyer Programs of 2019 https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/mortgages/iowa-first-time-home-buyer-programs/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:88188059-ddf5-d98b-9e95-19a9fe055e44 Wed, 20 Mar 2019 14:00:17 +0000 The Iowa Finance Authority is the state gateway to affordable mortgages. The IFA offers assistance to first-time home buyers as well as those who have previously owned a home. It… <p>The Iowa Finance Authority is the state gateway to affordable mortgages. The IFA offers assistance to first-time home buyers as well as those who have previously owned a home. It also provides a military homeownership program for service members and veterans. Buying your first home might be the highest financial hurdle you’ll ever face. It’s...</p><p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Iowa First-Time Home Buyer Programs of 2019 originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="627269"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=627269" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> How to Add Alt Text to Instagram Posts https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-add-alt-text-instagram-posts/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:ceac166d-77bc-014e-1570-aebbf466941f Wed, 20 Mar 2019 10:00:26 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-alt-text-how-to-add-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-alt-text-how-to-add-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-alt-text-how-to-add-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-alt-text-how-to-add-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-alt-text-how-to-add-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-alt-text-how-to-add-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Want to make your Instagram posts accessible to a wider audience? Did you know you can add extra text to your Instagram posts that help the visually impaired consume your content? In this article, you’ll discover how to write and add alt text to your Instagram posts. What Are Alt Text Tags? Alt text is [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-add-alt-text-instagram-posts/">How to Add Alt Text to Instagram Posts</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> Win That Pitch: How SEO Agencies Can Land New Business http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11168192 Moz Blog urn:uuid:1f12bc63-7051-8838-5b3e-61234539ff51 Wed, 20 Mar 2019 00:03:00 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/12577573\">TheMozTeam</a></p><p>If you’re a digital agency, chances are you have your sights set on a huge variety of clients — from entertainment and automotive, to travel and finance — all with their own unique SEO needs.</p> <p>So how do you attract these companies and provide them with next-level SEO? By using a flexible tracking solution that delivers a veritable smorgasbord of SERP data every single day. Here are just four ways you can leverage <a href="https://getstat.com/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">STAT</a> to lock down new business.&nbsp;</p> <h2>1. Arm yourself with intel before you pitch&nbsp;</h2> <p>The best way to win over a potential client is to walk into a pitch already aware of the challenges and opportunities in their online space. In other words: come armed with intel.</p> <p>To get a lay of their search landscape, research which keywords are applicable to your prospect, load those puppies into STAT, and let them run for a few days (you can turn tracking on and off for however many keywords you like, whenever you like).</p> <p>This way, when it comes time to make your case, you can hit them with hard data on their search visibility and tailored strategies to help them improve.</p> <p>Walking into a pitch with deep insights in just a few days will make you look like an SEO wizard — and soon-to-be-new clients will know that you can handle any dark magic unleashed on the SERPs by a Google update or new competitors jumping into the mix.&nbsp;</p> <h2>2. Look at your data from every possible angle</h2> <p>As an SEO for an agency, you’re vying to manage the visibility of several clients at any given time, and all of them have multiple websites, operate in different industries and verticals worldwide, and target an ever-growing list of topics and products.</p> <p>So, when prospective clients expect individualized SEO recommendations, how can you possibly deliver without developing a permanent eye twitch? The answer lies in the ability to track and segment tons of keywords.</p> <h3>Get your mittens on more SERPs</h3> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2018-12-10-at-11-384411.jpg" data-image="hobeml99ejsg"></figure> <p>To start, you’ll need to <a href="https://moz.com/explorer" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">research and compile</a> a complete list of keywords for every prospective client. When one keyword only returns one SERP, and people’s searches are as unique as they are, the longer the list, the greater the scope of insight. It’s the difference between a peek and peruse — getting a snapshot or the whole picture.</p> <p>For example, let's say your would-be client is a clothing chain with an online store and a brick-and-mortar in every major Canadian city. You’ll want to know how each of their products appears to the majority of searchers — does <em>[men’s jeans]</em> (and every iteration thereof) return a different SERP than <em>[jeans for men]</em>?<a href="https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?text=See%20SERPs%20from%20any%20city,%20neighbourhood,%20zip%20code,%20or%20even%20geo%20coordinate.&url=https://getstat.com/blog/how-seo-agencies-can-win-new-business/?i=17076" target="_blank"></a><a href="https://plus.google.com/share?url=https://getstat.com/blog/how-seo-agencies-can-win-new-business/?i=17076" target="_blank" onclick="javascript:window.open(this.href,'', 'menubar=no,toolbar=no,resizable=yes,scrollbars=yes,height=600,width=600');return false;"></a><a href="https://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php?u=https://getstat.com/blog/how-seo-agencies-can-win-new-business/?i=17076" target="_blank" onclick="javascript:window.open(this.href,'', 'menubar=no,toolbar=no,resizable=yes,scrollbars=yes,height=270,width=550');return false;"></a><a href="http://www.linkedin.com/shareArticle?mini=true&url=https://getstat.com/blog/how-seo-agencies-can-win-new-business/?i=17076&title=Filter%20and%20tag%20keywords%20by%20location&summary=See+SERPs+from+any+city%2C+neighbourhood%2C+zip+code%2C+or+even+geo+coordinate." target="_blank" onclick="javascript:window.open(this.href,'', 'menubar=no,toolbar=no,resizable=yes,scrollbars=yes,height=400,width=550');return false;"></a></p> <p>Next, it’s time to play international SEO spy and factor in the languages, locations, and devices of target audiences. By tracking pin-point locations in influential global markets, you can keep apprised of how businesses in your industry are performing in different cities all over the world.</p> <p>For our example client, this is where the two keywords above are joined by <em>[jeans pour hommes]</em>, <em>[jeans for men in Montreal]</em>, and <em>[jeans pour hommes dans Montreal]</em>, and are tracked in the Montreal postal code where their bricks-and-mortar sit, on desktop and mobile devices — giving you with 10 SERPs-worth of insight. Swap in “in Quebec City,” track in a postal code there, and gain another 10 SERPs lickety-split.</p> <h3>Unlock multiple layers of insights</h3> <p>While a passel of keywords is essential, it’s impossible to make sense of what they’re telling you when they’re all lumped together. This is why segmentation is a must. By slicing and dicing your keywords into different segments, called “tags” in STAT, you produce manageable data views with deep, targeted insight.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/stat-local-tracking-data-views-1-98228-37823.jpg" data-image="pnyopxx5iooc"></figure> <p>You can divvy up and tag your keywords however you like: by device, <a href="https://getstat.com/blog/tracking-seo-funnel/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">search intent</a>, location, and more. Still running with our earlier example, by comparing a tag that tracks jeans keywords in Montreal against jeans keywords in Vancouver, you can inform your prospect of which city is bringing up the rear on the SERPs, and how they can better target that location.</p> <p>STAT also lets you to segment any SERP feature you’re interested in — like snippets, videos, and knowledge graphs — allowing you to identify exactly where opportunities (and threats) lie on the SERP.</p> <p>So, if your tag is tracking the all-important local places pack and your prospect’s brick-and-mortar store isn’t appearing in them, you can avoid the general “we’ll improve your rankings” approach, and focus your pitch around ways to get them listed. And once you’ve been hired to do the job, you’ll be able to prove your local pack success.</p> <p>For more tag ideas, we created a post with some of the <a href="https://getstat.com/blog/essential-keyword-segments/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">keyword segments that we recommend</a> our clients set up in STAT.</p> <h2>3. Put a tail on the competition</h2> <p>Monitoring a client’s site is one thing, but keeping an eagle-eye on their competition at the same time will give you a serious leg up on other agencies.</p> <p>With an automated site syncing option, STAT lets you track every known competitor site your prospect has, without any additional keyword management on your part.</p> <p>All you need to do is plunk in competitor URLs and watch them track against your prospect’s keywords. And because you’ve already segmented the bejesus out of those keywords, you can tell exactly how they stack up in each segment.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/amazon-share-of-voice-246293.jpg" data-image="m8tg76jamby6"></figure> <p>To make sure that you’re tracking true search competitors, as well as emerging and dwindling threats, you should be all over <a href="https://getstat.com/blog/share-of-voice/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">STAT’s organic share of voice</a>. By taking the rank and search volume of a given keyword, STAT calculates the percentage of eyeballs that players on the SERPs actually earn.</p> <p>When you know the ins and outs of everyone in the industry — like who consistently ranks in the top 10 of your SERPs — you can give clients a more comprehensive understanding of where they fit into the big picture and uncover new market opportunities for them to break into. They’ll be thanking their lucky stars they chose you over the other guys.<br></p> <h2>4. Think big while respecting client budgets</h2> <p>As an enterprise SEO, having economies of scale is a critical factor in beating out other agencies for new business. In order to achieve this, you’ll want to collect and crunch data at an affordable rate.</p> <p>STAT’s highly competitive per-keyword pricing is designed for scale, which is precisely why STAT and agencies are a match made in heaven. Thinking big won’t break anyone’s bank.</p> <p>Plus, STAT’s billing is as flexible as the tracking. So, if you only need a few days’ worth of data, whether for a pitch or a project, you can jump into STAT and toggle tracking on or off for any number of keywords, and your billing will follow suit. In simpler terms: you’re only billed for the days you track.</p> <p>And with no limits on users and no per-seat charges, you’re welcome to invite anyone on your team — even clients or vendors — to see your projects, allowing you to deliver transparency in conjunction with your SEO awesomeness.</p> <p>If you’d like to do any or all of these things and are looking for the perfect SERP data tool to get the job done, say hello and <a href="https://getstat.com/demo/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">request a demo</a>!</p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/12577573\">TheMozTeam</a></p><p>If you’re a digital agency, chances are you have your sights set on a huge variety of clients — from entertainment and automotive, to travel and finance — all with their own unique SEO needs.</p> <p>So how do you attract these companies and provide them with next-level SEO? By using a flexible tracking solution that delivers a veritable smorgasbord of SERP data every single day. Here are just four ways you can leverage <a href="https://getstat.com/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">STAT</a> to lock down new business.&nbsp;</p> <h2>1. Arm yourself with intel before you pitch&nbsp;</h2> <p>The best way to win over a potential client is to walk into a pitch already aware of the challenges and opportunities in their online space. In other words: come armed with intel.</p> <p>To get a lay of their search landscape, research which keywords are applicable to your prospect, load those puppies into STAT, and let them run for a few days (you can turn tracking on and off for however many keywords you like, whenever you like).</p> <p>This way, when it comes time to make your case, you can hit them with hard data on their search visibility and tailored strategies to help them improve.</p> <p>Walking into a pitch with deep insights in just a few days will make you look like an SEO wizard — and soon-to-be-new clients will know that you can handle any dark magic unleashed on the SERPs by a Google update or new competitors jumping into the mix.&nbsp;</p> <h2>2. Look at your data from every possible angle</h2> <p>As an SEO for an agency, you’re vying to manage the visibility of several clients at any given time, and all of them have multiple websites, operate in different industries and verticals worldwide, and target an ever-growing list of topics and products.</p> <p>So, when prospective clients expect individualized SEO recommendations, how can you possibly deliver without developing a permanent eye twitch? The answer lies in the ability to track and segment tons of keywords.</p> <h3>Get your mittens on more SERPs</h3> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2018-12-10-at-11-384411.jpg" data-image="hobeml99ejsg"></figure> <p>To start, you’ll need to <a href="https://moz.com/explorer" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">research and compile</a> a complete list of keywords for every prospective client. When one keyword only returns one SERP, and people’s searches are as unique as they are, the longer the list, the greater the scope of insight. It’s the difference between a peek and peruse — getting a snapshot or the whole picture.</p> <p>For example, let's say your would-be client is a clothing chain with an online store and a brick-and-mortar in every major Canadian city. You’ll want to know how each of their products appears to the majority of searchers — does <em>[men’s jeans]</em> (and every iteration thereof) return a different SERP than <em>[jeans for men]</em>?<a href="https://twitter.com/intent/tweet?text=See%20SERPs%20from%20any%20city,%20neighbourhood,%20zip%20code,%20or%20even%20geo%20coordinate.&url=https://getstat.com/blog/how-seo-agencies-can-win-new-business/?i=17076" target="_blank"></a><a href="https://plus.google.com/share?url=https://getstat.com/blog/how-seo-agencies-can-win-new-business/?i=17076" target="_blank" onclick="javascript:window.open(this.href,'', 'menubar=no,toolbar=no,resizable=yes,scrollbars=yes,height=600,width=600');return false;"></a><a href="https://www.facebook.com/sharer/sharer.php?u=https://getstat.com/blog/how-seo-agencies-can-win-new-business/?i=17076" target="_blank" onclick="javascript:window.open(this.href,'', 'menubar=no,toolbar=no,resizable=yes,scrollbars=yes,height=270,width=550');return false;"></a><a href="http://www.linkedin.com/shareArticle?mini=true&url=https://getstat.com/blog/how-seo-agencies-can-win-new-business/?i=17076&title=Filter%20and%20tag%20keywords%20by%20location&summary=See+SERPs+from+any+city%2C+neighbourhood%2C+zip+code%2C+or+even+geo+coordinate." target="_blank" onclick="javascript:window.open(this.href,'', 'menubar=no,toolbar=no,resizable=yes,scrollbars=yes,height=400,width=550');return false;"></a></p> <p>Next, it’s time to play international SEO spy and factor in the languages, locations, and devices of target audiences. By tracking pin-point locations in influential global markets, you can keep apprised of how businesses in your industry are performing in different cities all over the world.</p> <p>For our example client, this is where the two keywords above are joined by <em>[jeans pour hommes]</em>, <em>[jeans for men in Montreal]</em>, and <em>[jeans pour hommes dans Montreal]</em>, and are tracked in the Montreal postal code where their bricks-and-mortar sit, on desktop and mobile devices — giving you with 10 SERPs-worth of insight. Swap in “in Quebec City,” track in a postal code there, and gain another 10 SERPs lickety-split.</p> <h3>Unlock multiple layers of insights</h3> <p>While a passel of keywords is essential, it’s impossible to make sense of what they’re telling you when they’re all lumped together. This is why segmentation is a must. By slicing and dicing your keywords into different segments, called “tags” in STAT, you produce manageable data views with deep, targeted insight.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/stat-local-tracking-data-views-1-98228-37823.jpg" data-image="pnyopxx5iooc"></figure> <p>You can divvy up and tag your keywords however you like: by device, <a href="https://getstat.com/blog/tracking-seo-funnel/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">search intent</a>, location, and more. Still running with our earlier example, by comparing a tag that tracks jeans keywords in Montreal against jeans keywords in Vancouver, you can inform your prospect of which city is bringing up the rear on the SERPs, and how they can better target that location.</p> <p>STAT also lets you to segment any SERP feature you’re interested in — like snippets, videos, and knowledge graphs — allowing you to identify exactly where opportunities (and threats) lie on the SERP.</p> <p>So, if your tag is tracking the all-important local places pack and your prospect’s brick-and-mortar store isn’t appearing in them, you can avoid the general “we’ll improve your rankings” approach, and focus your pitch around ways to get them listed. And once you’ve been hired to do the job, you’ll be able to prove your local pack success.</p> <p>For more tag ideas, we created a post with some of the <a href="https://getstat.com/blog/essential-keyword-segments/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">keyword segments that we recommend</a> our clients set up in STAT.</p> <h2>3. Put a tail on the competition</h2> <p>Monitoring a client’s site is one thing, but keeping an eagle-eye on their competition at the same time will give you a serious leg up on other agencies.</p> <p>With an automated site syncing option, STAT lets you track every known competitor site your prospect has, without any additional keyword management on your part.</p> <p>All you need to do is plunk in competitor URLs and watch them track against your prospect’s keywords. And because you’ve already segmented the bejesus out of those keywords, you can tell exactly how they stack up in each segment.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/amazon-share-of-voice-246293.jpg" data-image="m8tg76jamby6"></figure> <p>To make sure that you’re tracking true search competitors, as well as emerging and dwindling threats, you should be all over <a href="https://getstat.com/blog/share-of-voice/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">STAT’s organic share of voice</a>. By taking the rank and search volume of a given keyword, STAT calculates the percentage of eyeballs that players on the SERPs actually earn.</p> <p>When you know the ins and outs of everyone in the industry — like who consistently ranks in the top 10 of your SERPs — you can give clients a more comprehensive understanding of where they fit into the big picture and uncover new market opportunities for them to break into. They’ll be thanking their lucky stars they chose you over the other guys.<br></p> <h2>4. Think big while respecting client budgets</h2> <p>As an enterprise SEO, having economies of scale is a critical factor in beating out other agencies for new business. In order to achieve this, you’ll want to collect and crunch data at an affordable rate.</p> <p>STAT’s highly competitive per-keyword pricing is designed for scale, which is precisely why STAT and agencies are a match made in heaven. Thinking big won’t break anyone’s bank.</p> <p>Plus, STAT’s billing is as flexible as the tracking. So, if you only need a few days’ worth of data, whether for a pitch or a project, you can jump into STAT and toggle tracking on or off for any number of keywords, and your billing will follow suit. In simpler terms: you’re only billed for the days you track.</p> <p>And with no limits on users and no per-seat charges, you’re welcome to invite anyone on your team — even clients or vendors — to see your projects, allowing you to deliver transparency in conjunction with your SEO awesomeness.</p> <p>If you’d like to do any or all of these things and are looking for the perfect SERP data tool to get the job done, say hello and <a href="https://getstat.com/demo/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">request a demo</a>!</p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11168192.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Sapphire Preferred Boosts Bonus but No Longer Waives Fee https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/credit-cards/chase-sapphire-preferred-higher-bonus-no-waived-annual-fee/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:d17d692b-7829-5857-cee5-3efb7ae58d5e Tue, 19 Mar 2019 22:37:37 +0000 Chase has tweaked its offer for new cardholders on the popular Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card. Overall, the new offer provides more value to cardholders than the previous version, but the annual… <p>Chase has tweaked its offer for new cardholders on the popular Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card. Overall, the new offer provides more value to cardholders than the previous version, but the annual fee is no longer waived in the first year. Learn More As of March 19, 2018: The sign-up bonus is as follows: Earn 60,000 bonus points after...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Gregory Karp is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: gkarp@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @spendingsmart. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Sapphire Preferred Boosts Bonus but No Longer Waives Fee originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="622367"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=622367" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Reclaim Tax Breaks You May Have Missed in Recent Years https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/taxes/reclaim-tax-money/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:142e29d5-b52c-7486-3d11-3c7ca825ce27 Tue, 19 Mar 2019 22:19:05 +0000 If doing this year’s taxes made you wish you could go back in time and claim tax breaks you’ve realized you overlooked or forgot on an old tax return, then… <p>If doing this year’s taxes made you wish you could go back in time and claim tax breaks you’ve realized you overlooked or forgot on an old tax return, then congratulations, McFly — time travel is possible at the IRS. Here’s how you can rewind the clock on old tax returns and recoup money you...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Tina Orem is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: torem@nerdwallet.com. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Reclaim Tax Breaks You May Have Missed in Recent Years originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="621712"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=621712" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> The Best Financial Advice at Every Age https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/the-best-financial-advice-at-every-age NerdWallet urn:uuid:44e437bc-92b2-7954-d627-4f0b403fde6e Tue, 19 Mar 2019 13:00:05 +0000 Money doesn’t really age: It’s never too late to make smart financial decisions. But there are certain times in your life that are prime for specific money moves, times when… <p>Money doesn’t really age: It’s never too late to make smart financial decisions. But there are certain times in your life that are prime for specific money moves, times when making the right choice will set your future self up for success. Below, the best financial moves to make by decade. In your 20s: Lay...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Arielle O'Shea is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: aoshea@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @arioshea. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article The Best Financial Advice at Every Age originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="625573"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=625573" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> 17 Charts That Show Where Content Marketing is Heading https://neilpatel.com/blog/content-marketing-future/ The KISSmetrics Marketing Blog urn:uuid:4b69b4c4-c2cd-d790-f5dd-3fec023755f0 Tue, 19 Mar 2019 10:44:24 +0000 <p>I started content marketing in the early days. So early that when I first met the WordPress founder, he had just raised $1.1 million for WordPress. Fast forward to today and WordPress is worth over a billion dollars. Similarly, when I first started with content marketing, there were less than 30 million blogs that existed [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://neilpatel.com/blog/content-marketing-future/">17 Charts That Show Where Content Marketing is Heading</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://neilpatel.com">Neil Patel</a>.</p> <p>I started content marketing in the early days. So early that when I first met the WordPress founder, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automattic">he had just raised $1.1 million for WordPress</a>.</p> <p>Fast forward to today and WordPress is worth over a billion dollars.</p> <p>Similarly, when I first started with content marketing, there were less than 30 million blogs that existed and now there are over a billion.</p> <p>In other words, things have changed drastically and now it&#8217;s what more competitive.</p> <p>We are at a point where you already know you need to leverage content marketing. But what areas of content marketing should you focus on?</p> <p>How many blog posts do you need to write? What are the best ways to monetize your traffic?</p> <p>How can you ensure that what you are doing will work in the future?</p> <p>To shed some light on where content marketing is headed, I’ve gathered data from 183 companies who are all leveraging content marketing. Each company makes at least 5 million dollars in revenue a year and generates less than $1.9 billion a year.</p> <p>These companies are in all different sectors, from B2B to B2C, and are part of all the major industries out there. Most importantly, they have been leveraging content marketing for at least 8 years.</p> <p>Now, I know many of you don’t have a company that generates at least 5 million dollars a year, but the stats and data I will show you are still relevant to your blog.</p> <p>So, let’s dive into the stats to see where content marketing is headed.<span id="more-78787"></span></p> <h2><strong>Expect less traffic from social sites</strong></h2> <p>What do you think has happened to social shares over time?</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/averagenumberofsocialshares.png" alt="social shares" /></p> <p>As you probably guessed, social shares have gone down because the algorithms (like on Facebook) really limit organic reach.</p> <p>In the early days, people saw big lifts in their social share count due to the fact that these social sites were still growing in popularity. But once their growth slowed down, so did the number of times the shares each piece of content generated.</p> <p>If you are wondering why just think of it this way… when people share content on social sites it drives users off of the platform. By keeping people on Facebook longer (or any other social platform), they make more money as people click on ads.</p> <p>If you are expecting to grow your blog through the social web, think again. It’s slowly driving less and less traffic each year and you should expect it to get worse.</p> <h2><strong>You need to take an omnichannel approach, but focus on search</strong></h2> <p>Can you guess what’s the most popular traffic channel for a blog?</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/percentageofblogtrafficbychannel.png" alt="traffic by channel" /></p> <p>SEO made up 51% of the blog&#8217;s traffic and to no surprise, social media was the 5th most popular channel.</p> <p>But what was surprising is that referral traffic was in 3rd place at 11% and email was at 9%.</p> <p>Instead of just focusing on link building to boost your rankings, you should focus on link building to also increase your referral traffic. In essence, you can get more bang for your buck by increasing two different ways to drive traffic with one strategy.</p> <p>Whether it is guest posting or generating PR, you should try and get as much referral traffic as possible as it creates steady traffic that isn’t too affected by algorithm updates.</p> <p>As for email, you may think it’s dead, but it’s alive and kicking strong. Remember, everyone who works in the corporate world still uses email.</p> <p>Don’t be shy about collecting emails. You can use tools like <a href="https://hellobar.com/">Hello Bar</a> to do this with ease.</p> <p>Now going back to SEO for a moment… here’s why you have to blog.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/organicsearchtraffic.png" alt="organic traffic" /></p> <p>As you can see from the graph above, Google has continually shifted from ranking web pages to pushing up content over time. And it doesn’t look like that the trend is stopping anytime soon.</p> <p>Blogs are generating, on average, 60 to 62 percent of a site&#8217;s search traffic. Sure, it’s going to be different for the Amazon’s of the world, but you aren’t them… and neither am I.</p> <p>SEO is also getting more competitive because there are more blogs popping up and people are creating tons of content. But you have no choice but to do the same if you want to keep up.</p> <h2><strong>You need to build a content marketing team&#8230;</strong></h2> <p>Well, just look at it this way…</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/employees.png" alt="employees" /></p> <p>On average, mid-sized companies now have at least 2 full-time employees managing their blog. It’s because they know content marketing isn’t going anywhere without putting in real effort and you need to take it seriously if you want to grow fast.</p> <p>And on top of having dedicated employees, the average mid-sized company has a bit more than 10 contractors working on their blog.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/contractors.png" alt="contractors" /></p> <p>Now, I don’t want you to get scared by that number as a lot of those contractors are writing content. They are not working full time… it’s as simple as some of them writing only a handful of content pieces a month.</p> <p>Or it could be as simple as them helping you produce video content or create infographics.</p> <p>With your blog, you should consider hiring more contractors as writers instead of hiring full-time employees as it is cheaper.</p> <p>It’s also more efficient to have contractors as you can scale up and down faster. On top of that, you&#8217;ll find that you will save money in the long run as contractors and consultant tends to be cheaper than full-time employees.</p> <h2><strong>You need to write on average 5.7 articles a week</strong></h2> <p>Out of the 183 blogs we talked to, they publish 22.8 pieces of content per month on average.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/postspublish.png" alt="posts published" /></p> <p>And can you guess how long each of them is?</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/postlength.png" alt="post length" /></p> <p>Well, they say that if you want to rank on page 1, you need to write content that is <a href="https://backlinko.com/search-engine-ranking">1,890 words</a>.</p> <p>Most of the blogs we analyzed and talked to all followed one common theme… as time went on, they started writing longer posts.</p> <p>They are now averaging 2,118 words per post. In 2016 that number peaked out at 2,381 words because people started producing in-depth guides, which caused that number to spike.</p> <p>But what they found over time is that writing content that is too in-depth, such as guides, doesn’t necessarily guarantee higher rankings.</p> <p>To give you an idea, years ago I wrote a <a href="https://www.quicksprout.com/the-advanced-guide-to-seo/">30,000-word guide on SEO</a>. Can you guess what page it ranks on for the term SEO?</p> <p><em>It ranks on page 2.</em></p> <p>Now, this <a href="https://neilpatel.com/what-is-seo/">guide to SEO</a> is much shorter and ranks on page 1.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/rankings.png" alt="rankings" /></p> <p>In other words, it is better for you to create more content than it is to create one super long blog post.</p> <p>Think of your content as fishing hooks. If you have more fishing hooks out, there is a greater chance of catching a fish.</p> <p>The same goes with blogging, the more content you create (assuming it is high quality), the higher the chance you’ll have of attracting more visitors.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/customersblogging.png" alt="customers blogging" /></p> <p>Think of your blog as a funnel.</p> <p>At the top of the funnel, you want to attract as many people as possible. The more people you attract, the more revenue you’ll eventually end up generating.</p> <p>As you can see from the graph above, 24% of customers first found out about the company through their blog.</p> <p>Now, that doesn’t mean they converted into a customer right when they landed on the blog for the first time. More so, they learned about the company first through their blog.</p> <p>Not only do search engines love blogs, so do people. And the trend is continually rising over time.</p> <h2><strong>Blog readers will boost your conversion rate</strong></h2> <p>When someone reads your blog, it builds trust and causes your conversion rate to increase.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/conversionrate.png" alt="conversion rate" /></p> <p>The graph above shows how someone who reads your blog is 74% more likely to convert into a customer compared to someone who hasn’t read your blog.</p> <p>Advertising is only getting more expensive each year. By blogging more frequently, you can boost your conversion rates.</p> <p>But don’t expect people to convert right away when they read your blog.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/numberofvisits.png" alt="number of visits" /></p> <p>The average number of times someone needs to come back to your blog before they convert is 3.15 times and they tend to convert over a 2-week period of time.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/weeks.png" alt="weeks" /></p> <p>Now, you’ll also find that as you create content people don’t just open up their wallets and give you their money. You need to push them to convert.</p> <p>The trend we saw is that blogs are leveraging more methods than ever to convert visitors into customers.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/convertblog.png" alt="convert blog" /></p> <p>Email marketing is the main method bloggers are using, which isn’t a surprise. But the number 2 method is remarketing.</p> <p>When I dug into it, these companies on average spend $51,409 a month on paid ads. And each year they saw their ad costs drastically increase. But what’s helped reduce their blended CPA is remarketing all of their blog readers.</p> <p>In the coming years, remarketing will overtake email as the main way companies are converting readers into customers.</p> <p>You’ll want to leverage this channel as well as it is much more affordable than search ads.</p> <h2><strong>Growth opportunities are outside the United States</strong></h2> <p>What countries do you think most blog readers are coming from? You probably are going to guess the United States or other native English speaking countries.</p> <p>It used to be that way 10 years ago, but things have changed.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/countries.png" alt="countries" /></p> <p>At one point it was 91% but now it has dropped down to 53%. This has also created a trend in which companies are now translating their content to different languages.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/languages.png" alt="languages" /></p> <p>It’s taken a while for companies to adopt the concept of globalization with their digital marketing but now it’s catching on fast.</p> <p>I was able to ride the trend before most people because I got pushed to do so by a <a href="https://neilpatel.com/blog/seo-strategy-google/">Google employee</a>. It was the best marketing advice and it seems to be true for pretty much every blogger out there.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/trafficgains.png" alt="traffic gains" /></p> <p>As you can see from the chart above, the biggest traffic gains content marketers are currently getting are from translating their content into multiple languages.</p> <p>The second biggest gain is coming from updating old content. Content marketing is no longer a game of cranking out hundreds of articles a month. If you want to continually do well, you have to maintain and keep your old content up to date.</p> <p>When you are building out your content marketing team, focus 50% of their effort on updating old content.</p> <h2><strong>Move over WordPress</strong></h2> <p>The last biggest trend is WordPress isn’t the only content player these days. If you are going to write a blog post, might as well get the most traffic by placing it everywhere.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/platforms.png" alt="platforms" /></p> <p>Medium and Tumblr are also great for content. Remember, <em>Google doesn’t penalize for duplicate content</em>. There is nothing wrong with putting content on your blog and then publishing it on Medium and Tumblr a week later.</p> <p>You can do the same with the social shares… in addition to sharing your content on Facebook, you can publish your whole post a week later on Facebook.</p> <p>And if you are creating video and audio content you can upload them to Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram and any other platform that will accept it.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/contenttypes.png" alt="content types" /></p> <p>You’ll see huge growth in video and audio content over the next few years.</p> <p>Facebook, YouTube, and every major platform want their slice of the television market.</p> <p>Because of that, their algorithms are acting more favorable to content types that keep people on their platform and engaged for hours… <em>hence, you need to expand outside of just text-based content</em>.</p> <p>It’s also why I’m big on YouTube right now. It diversifies your traffic sources in case you get hit by a <a href="https://neilpatel.com/blog/google-algorithm-change/">Google algorithm change</a>.</p> <h2><strong>Conclusion</strong></h2> <p>If you are going to take one thing from the charts above, you need to focus on translating your content to other languages as it isn’t as competitive.</p> <p>In addition to that, you need to focus on creating video and audio-based content. Videos have already starting to take off, podcasting isn’t there yet, but it will within the next few years.</p> <p>I would also tell you to blog, but you probably already have one. How to Promote Your Live Event on Facebook https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-promote-your-live-event-facebook/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:cb18d845-56c9-26f0-d894-6fffd6f7860d Tue, 19 Mar 2019 10:00:44 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/live-event-how-to-use-facebook-promotion-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/live-event-how-to-use-facebook-promotion-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/live-event-how-to-use-facebook-promotion-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/live-event-how-to-use-facebook-promotion-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/live-event-how-to-use-facebook-promotion-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/live-event-how-to-use-facebook-promotion-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Are you planning a live event? Wondering how to use Facebook marketing to reach and stay in touch with attendees? In this article, you’ll discover how to promote your live event or conference on Facebook before, during, and after the show. #1: Design a Facebook Frame for Your Event Facebook allows you to upload your [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-promote-your-live-event-facebook/">How to Promote Your Live Event on Facebook</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> Current CD Rates: March 2019 https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/banking/current-cd-rates/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:7c777b8c-4cf5-e8fe-ebb6-590d9e88630b Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:05:47 +0000 Interest rates on certificates of deposit have been rising, but that won’t last forever. Most CDs, unlike regular savings accounts, have fixed rates, so you can lock in a high… <p>Interest rates on certificates of deposit have been rising, but that won’t last forever. Most CDs, unlike regular savings accounts, have fixed rates, so you can lock in a high rate before a bank lowers its CD offerings. Here’s a look at current CD rates at some online banks and credit unions. » Want to...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Spencer Tierney is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: spencer.tierney@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @SpencerNerd. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Current CD Rates: March 2019 originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="619909"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=619909" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> 5 Google Business Profile Tweaks To Improve Foot Traffic http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11165548 Moz Blog urn:uuid:670be09c-0cbf-0006-f507-e8aa8bc943b7 Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:03:00 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/13017\">MiriamEllis</a></p><p>Your agency recommends all kinds of useful tactics to help improve the local SEO for your local business clients, but how many of those techniques are leveraging Google Business Profile (GBP) to attract as many walk-ins as possible?</p> <p>Today, I’m sharing five GBP tweaks worthy of implementation to help turn digital traffic into foot traffic.&nbsp;I've ordered them from easiest to hardest, but as you'll see, even the more difficult ones aren’t actually very daunting — all the more reason to try them out!</p> <p> </p> <h2>1) Answer Google Q&A quickly (they might be leads)</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Easy</h3> <p>If you have automotive industry clients, chances you’re familiar with <a href="https://www.dealeron.com/leadership-team/greg-gifford/">Greg Gifford from DealerOn</a>. At a recent local search conference, Greg shared that <a href="https://twitter.com/JoyanneHawkins/status/1093241213715652608">40 percent of the Google Q&A questions his clients receive are actually leads</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><em>40 percent</em>!</p> <p>Here's what that looks like in Google's Q&A:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc6199bfa73.55103772.jpg" width="624" height="173" data-image="122w63sizrst"></figure> <p>It looks like Coast Nissan has a customer who is ready to walk through the door if they receive an answer. But as you can see, the question has gone unanswered. Note, too, that four people have thumbed the question up, which signifies a shared interest in a potential answer, but it’s still not making it onto the radar of this particular dealership.</p> <p>Nearly all verticals could have overlooked leads sitting in their GBPs&nbsp;— from questions about dietary options at a restaurant, to whether a retailer stocks a product, to queries about ADA compliance or available parking. Every ask represents a possible lead, and in <a href="https://moz.com/blog/affordable-stat-based-retail-strategy-for-your-agency-s-clients">a competitive retail landscape</a>, who can afford to ignore such an opportunity?</p> <p>The easiest way for Google My Business (GMB) listing owners and managers to get notified of new questions is via the <a href="https://support.google.com/maps/answer/6139433?hl=en">Google Maps App</a>, as notifications are not yet part of the main GMB dashboard. This will help you catch questions as they arise. The faster your client responds to incoming queries, the better their chances of winning the foot traffic.</p> <h2>2) Post about your proximity to nearby major attractions</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Easy</h3> <p>Imagine someone has just spent the morning at a museum, a landmark, park, or theatre. After exploring, perhaps they want to go to lunch, go apparel shopping, find a gas station, or a bookstore near them. A well-positioned Google Post, like the one below, can guide them right to your client’s door:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61a105158.95123936.jpg" width="384" height="506" data-image="jjxn31513xzi"></figure> <p>This could become an especially strong draw for foot traffic if Google expands its experiment of showing Posts’ snippets not just in the Business Profile and Local Finder, but <a href="https://twitter.com/JoyanneHawkins/status/1098231561697222658">within local packs</a>:<br></p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61a745963.32813823.jpg" width="523" height="509" data-image="ozcuzjfgikqb"></figure> <p>Posting is so easy — there’s no reason <em>not</em> to give it a try. Need help getting your client started? <a href="https://support.google.com/business/answer/7342169?hl=en">Here’s Google’s intro</a> and here’s an <a href="https://moz.com/blog/boost-conversions-with-google-posts">interview I did last year with Joel Headley on using Google Posts to boost bookings and conversions</a>.</p> <h2>3) Turn GBPs into storefronts</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Easy for retailers</h3> <p>With a little help from <a href="https://blog.pointy.com/2018/06/12/introducing-see-whats-in-store/">SWIS and Pointy</a>, your retail clients’ GBPs can become the storefront window that beckons in highly-converting foot traffic.&nbsp;Your client’s "See What’s In Store inventory" appears within the Business Profile, letting customers know the business has the exact merchandise they’re looking for:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61ad2a1e4.26210812.jpg" width="244" height="538" data-image="vo5erun1k098"></figure> <p>Pointy is Google’s launch partner for this game-changing GBP feature.&nbsp;<a href="https://moz.com/blog/taking-local-inventory-online">I recently interviewed CEO Mark Cummins regarding the ultra-simple Pointy device</a> which makes it a snap for nearly all retailers to instantly bring their inventory online — without the fuss of traditional e-commerce systems and at a truly nominal cost.</p> <p>I’ll reiterate my prediction that SWIS is “next big thing” in local, and when last I spoke with Mark, one percent of all US retailers had already adopted his product. Encourage your retail clients to sign up and give them an amazing competitive edge on driving foot traffic!</p> <h2>4) Make your profile pic a selfie hotspot</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Medium (feasible for many storefronts)</h3> <p>When a client has a physical premise (and community ordinances permit it), an exterior mural can turn through traffic into foot traffic — it also helps to <a href="https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-business-of-street-art-20171013-story.html">convert Instagram selfie-takers into customers</a>. As I mentioned in a <a href="https://moz.com/blog/affordable-stat-based-retail-strategy-for-your-agency-s-clients">recent blog post</a>, a modest investment in this strategy could appeal to the 43–58 percent of survey respondents who are swayed to shop in locations that are visually appealing.</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61b394150.17143457.jpg" width="600" height="431" data-image="cbl4h3s1itul"></figure> <p>If a large outdoor mural isn’t possible, there’s plenty of inspiration for smaller indoor murals, <a href="https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/indoormurals/.">here</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>Once the client has made the investment in providing a cultural experience for the community, they can try experimenting with getting the artwork placed as the cover photo on their GBP — anyone looking at a set of competitors in a given area will see this appealing, extra reason to choose their business over others.</p> <p><strong>Mark my words, local search marketers</strong><strong>:</strong> We are on the verge of seeing Americans reject the constricted label of “consumer” in a quest for a more holistic view of themselves as whole persons. Local businesses that integrate art, culture, and community life into their business models will be well-placed to answer what, in my view, is a growing desire for authentic human experiences. As a local search marketer, myself, this is a topic I plan to explore further this year.</p> <h2>5) Putting time on your side</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Medium (feasible for willing clients)</h3> <p>Here’s a pet peeve of mine: businesses that serve working people but are only open 9–5. How can your client’s foot traffic achieve optimum levels if their doors are only open when everybody is at work?</p> <p>So, here’s the task: Do a quick audit of the hours posted on the GBPs of your client’s direct competitors. For example, I found three craft shops in one small city with these hours:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61c14ede1.38687434.jpg" width="400" height="408" data-image="lji6fn62a54l"></figure> <p>Guess which competitor is getting all of the business after 6 PM every day of the week, when <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2014/08/27/343415569/whos-in-the-office-the-american-workday-in-one-graph">most people</a> are off work and able to shop?</p> <p>Now, it may well be that some of your smaller clients are already working as many hours as they can, but have they explored whether their hours are actually ideal for their customers’ needs and whether any time slots aren’t being filled in the community by their competitors? What if, instead of operating under the traditional 9–5, your client switched to 11–7, since no other competitor in town is open after 5 PM? It’s the same number of hours and your client would benefit from getting all the foot traffic of the 9–5-ers.</p> <p>Alternatively, instead of closing on Saturdays, the business closed on Mondays — perhaps this is the slowest of their weekdays? Being open on the weekend could mean that the average worker can now access said business and become a customer.</p> <p>It will take some openness to change, but if a business agrees to implementation, don’t forget to update the GMB hours and push out the new hours to the major citation platforms via service like <a href="https://moz.com/products/local">Moz Local</a>.&nbsp;</p> <h2>Your turn to add your best GMB moves</h2> <p>I hope you’ll take some of these simple GBP tips to an upcoming client meeting. And if they decide to forge ahead with your tips,&nbsp;be sure to monitor the outcomes! How great if a simple audit of hours turned into a foot traffic win for your client?&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;In the meantime, if you have any favorite techniques, hacks, or easy GMB wins to share with our community, I’d love to read your comments!</p> <p></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/13017\">MiriamEllis</a></p><p>Your agency recommends all kinds of useful tactics to help improve the local SEO for your local business clients, but how many of those techniques are leveraging Google Business Profile (GBP) to attract as many walk-ins as possible?</p> <p>Today, I’m sharing five GBP tweaks worthy of implementation to help turn digital traffic into foot traffic.&nbsp;I've ordered them from easiest to hardest, but as you'll see, even the more difficult ones aren’t actually very daunting — all the more reason to try them out!</p> <p> </p> <h2>1) Answer Google Q&A quickly (they might be leads)</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Easy</h3> <p>If you have automotive industry clients, chances you’re familiar with <a href="https://www.dealeron.com/leadership-team/greg-gifford/">Greg Gifford from DealerOn</a>. At a recent local search conference, Greg shared that <a href="https://twitter.com/JoyanneHawkins/status/1093241213715652608">40 percent of the Google Q&A questions his clients receive are actually leads</a>.&nbsp;</p><p><em>40 percent</em>!</p> <p>Here's what that looks like in Google's Q&A:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc6199bfa73.55103772.jpg" width="624" height="173" data-image="122w63sizrst"></figure> <p>It looks like Coast Nissan has a customer who is ready to walk through the door if they receive an answer. But as you can see, the question has gone unanswered. Note, too, that four people have thumbed the question up, which signifies a shared interest in a potential answer, but it’s still not making it onto the radar of this particular dealership.</p> <p>Nearly all verticals could have overlooked leads sitting in their GBPs&nbsp;— from questions about dietary options at a restaurant, to whether a retailer stocks a product, to queries about ADA compliance or available parking. Every ask represents a possible lead, and in <a href="https://moz.com/blog/affordable-stat-based-retail-strategy-for-your-agency-s-clients">a competitive retail landscape</a>, who can afford to ignore such an opportunity?</p> <p>The easiest way for Google My Business (GMB) listing owners and managers to get notified of new questions is via the <a href="https://support.google.com/maps/answer/6139433?hl=en">Google Maps App</a>, as notifications are not yet part of the main GMB dashboard. This will help you catch questions as they arise. The faster your client responds to incoming queries, the better their chances of winning the foot traffic.</p> <h2>2) Post about your proximity to nearby major attractions</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Easy</h3> <p>Imagine someone has just spent the morning at a museum, a landmark, park, or theatre. After exploring, perhaps they want to go to lunch, go apparel shopping, find a gas station, or a bookstore near them. A well-positioned Google Post, like the one below, can guide them right to your client’s door:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61a105158.95123936.jpg" width="384" height="506" data-image="jjxn31513xzi"></figure> <p>This could become an especially strong draw for foot traffic if Google expands its experiment of showing Posts’ snippets not just in the Business Profile and Local Finder, but <a href="https://twitter.com/JoyanneHawkins/status/1098231561697222658">within local packs</a>:<br></p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61a745963.32813823.jpg" width="523" height="509" data-image="ozcuzjfgikqb"></figure> <p>Posting is so easy — there’s no reason <em>not</em> to give it a try. Need help getting your client started? <a href="https://support.google.com/business/answer/7342169?hl=en">Here’s Google’s intro</a> and here’s an <a href="https://moz.com/blog/boost-conversions-with-google-posts">interview I did last year with Joel Headley on using Google Posts to boost bookings and conversions</a>.</p> <h2>3) Turn GBPs into storefronts</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Easy for retailers</h3> <p>With a little help from <a href="https://blog.pointy.com/2018/06/12/introducing-see-whats-in-store/">SWIS and Pointy</a>, your retail clients’ GBPs can become the storefront window that beckons in highly-converting foot traffic.&nbsp;Your client’s "See What’s In Store inventory" appears within the Business Profile, letting customers know the business has the exact merchandise they’re looking for:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61ad2a1e4.26210812.jpg" width="244" height="538" data-image="vo5erun1k098"></figure> <p>Pointy is Google’s launch partner for this game-changing GBP feature.&nbsp;<a href="https://moz.com/blog/taking-local-inventory-online">I recently interviewed CEO Mark Cummins regarding the ultra-simple Pointy device</a> which makes it a snap for nearly all retailers to instantly bring their inventory online — without the fuss of traditional e-commerce systems and at a truly nominal cost.</p> <p>I’ll reiterate my prediction that SWIS is “next big thing” in local, and when last I spoke with Mark, one percent of all US retailers had already adopted his product. Encourage your retail clients to sign up and give them an amazing competitive edge on driving foot traffic!</p> <h2>4) Make your profile pic a selfie hotspot</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Medium (feasible for many storefronts)</h3> <p>When a client has a physical premise (and community ordinances permit it), an exterior mural can turn through traffic into foot traffic — it also helps to <a href="https://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-business-of-street-art-20171013-story.html">convert Instagram selfie-takers into customers</a>. As I mentioned in a <a href="https://moz.com/blog/affordable-stat-based-retail-strategy-for-your-agency-s-clients">recent blog post</a>, a modest investment in this strategy could appeal to the 43–58 percent of survey respondents who are swayed to shop in locations that are visually appealing.</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61b394150.17143457.jpg" width="600" height="431" data-image="cbl4h3s1itul"></figure> <p>If a large outdoor mural isn’t possible, there’s plenty of inspiration for smaller indoor murals, <a href="https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/indoormurals/.">here</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>Once the client has made the investment in providing a cultural experience for the community, they can try experimenting with getting the artwork placed as the cover photo on their GBP — anyone looking at a set of competitors in a given area will see this appealing, extra reason to choose their business over others.</p> <p><strong>Mark my words, local search marketers</strong><strong>:</strong> We are on the verge of seeing Americans reject the constricted label of “consumer” in a quest for a more holistic view of themselves as whole persons. Local businesses that integrate art, culture, and community life into their business models will be well-placed to answer what, in my view, is a growing desire for authentic human experiences. As a local search marketer, myself, this is a topic I plan to explore further this year.</p> <h2>5) Putting time on your side</h2> <h3>Difficulty level: Medium (feasible for willing clients)</h3> <p>Here’s a pet peeve of mine: businesses that serve working people but are only open 9–5. How can your client’s foot traffic achieve optimum levels if their doors are only open when everybody is at work?</p> <p>So, here’s the task: Do a quick audit of the hours posted on the GBPs of your client’s direct competitors. For example, I found three craft shops in one small city with these hours:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/5-google-business-profile-tweaks/5c8fc61c14ede1.38687434.jpg" width="400" height="408" data-image="lji6fn62a54l"></figure> <p>Guess which competitor is getting all of the business after 6 PM every day of the week, when <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2014/08/27/343415569/whos-in-the-office-the-american-workday-in-one-graph">most people</a> are off work and able to shop?</p> <p>Now, it may well be that some of your smaller clients are already working as many hours as they can, but have they explored whether their hours are actually ideal for their customers’ needs and whether any time slots aren’t being filled in the community by their competitors? What if, instead of operating under the traditional 9–5, your client switched to 11–7, since no other competitor in town is open after 5 PM? It’s the same number of hours and your client would benefit from getting all the foot traffic of the 9–5-ers.</p> <p>Alternatively, instead of closing on Saturdays, the business closed on Mondays — perhaps this is the slowest of their weekdays? Being open on the weekend could mean that the average worker can now access said business and become a customer.</p> <p>It will take some openness to change, but if a business agrees to implementation, don’t forget to update the GMB hours and push out the new hours to the major citation platforms via service like <a href="https://moz.com/products/local">Moz Local</a>.&nbsp;</p> <h2>Your turn to add your best GMB moves</h2> <p>I hope you’ll take some of these simple GBP tips to an upcoming client meeting. And if they decide to forge ahead with your tips,&nbsp;be sure to monitor the outcomes! How great if a simple audit of hours turned into a foot traffic win for your client?&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;In the meantime, if you have any favorite techniques, hacks, or easy GMB wins to share with our community, I’d love to read your comments!</p> <p></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11165548.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Chase Freedom Unlimited Offers a Year of 3% Cash Back at Branches https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/credit-cards/chase-freedom-unlimited-3-percent-offer/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:d84eb41d-6bfd-a1ef-98e1-6c61c205e008 Mon, 18 Mar 2019 22:02:31 +0000 Chase has tweaked the rewards structure for its popular flat-rate cash-back card, the Chase Freedom Unlimited® — but only for those who apply for the card in person at Chase bank branches.… <p>Chase has tweaked the rewards structure for its popular flat-rate cash-back card, the Chase Freedom Unlimited® — but only for those who apply for the card in person at Chase bank branches. The Chase Freedom Unlimited® ordinarily pays 1.5% cash back on all purchases, and new cardholders are eligible to earn a sign-up bonus: Earn a $150 Bonus...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Paul Soucy is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: paul@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @paulsoucy. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Chase Freedom Unlimited Offers a Year of 3% Cash Back at Branches originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="627352"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=627352" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> How to Save for Your Kids’ College Without Ignoring Retirement https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/investing/how-to-save-for-kids-college-and-retirement/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:4bee2c42-6139-6abe-6216-58aac3e019e5 Mon, 18 Mar 2019 21:34:12 +0000 Saving for both college and retirement is a daunting task and can involve some hard choices. To get it done, financial advisors recommend these three key steps. Step 1: Fund… <p>Saving for both college and retirement is a daunting task and can involve some hard choices. To get it done, financial advisors recommend these three key steps. Step 1: Fund your employee retirement account first Parents would lie down in traffic to protect their children. So the common recommendation — prioritize retirement savings over college...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Kevin Voigt is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: kevin@nerdwallet.com. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article How to Save for Your Kids’ College Without Ignoring Retirement originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="626624"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=626624" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Your Guide to Financial Aid https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/loans/student-loans/your-guide-to-financial-aid/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:b3a7e9ae-b740-b238-e5a0-7c783f0032f1 Mon, 18 Mar 2019 20:55:53 +0000 Applying for financial aid is the key to getting help with paying for college. Financial aid includes free money like grants, scholarships and work-study, as well as government loans that… <p>Applying for financial aid is the key to getting help with paying for college. Financial aid includes free money like grants, scholarships and work-study, as well as government loans that you repay. You’re likely to end up with a combination of sources, but you should always maximize all free aid before turning to loans. If...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Anna Helhoski is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: anna@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @AnnaHelhoski. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Your Guide to Financial Aid originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="626331"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=626331" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> How ‘Free Money’ Bank Promotions Can Boost Your Savings https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/banking/how-free-money-bank-promotions-can-boost-your-savings/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:bd141036-b677-750f-311d-5e899c3267cb Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:00:09 +0000 Bank interest rates are hardly considered a big perk — there are many Scrooge-like accounts out there that barely pay enough to offer loose change. But some people are getting… <p>Bank interest rates are hardly considered a big perk — there are many Scrooge-like accounts out there that barely pay enough to offer loose change. But some people are getting $100, $200, even more than $300 from their banks. Their secret? Free money promotions. Banks are paying customers to open savings and checking accounts. Bank...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Margarette Burnette is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: mburnette@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @Margarette. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article How ‘Free Money’ Bank Promotions Can Boost Your Savings originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="625874"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=625874" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Cost-Cutting Travel Tips to Bring Together Faraway Friends https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/finance/travel-tips-to-bring-together-faraway-friends/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:d4046105-3cf2-ab32-41ce-f79ccbdcc706 Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:00:00 +0000 Getting old friends back together to share a vacation is a great way to catch up and build new memories. However refreshing these vacations may be, they can also get… <p>Getting old friends back together to share a vacation is a great way to catch up and build new memories. However refreshing these vacations may be, they can also get costly. Airfare, lodging, dining out and all of the extras can add up to thousands of dollars. With some simple tips — and a bit...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Sean Pyles is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: spyles@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @SeanPyles. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Cost-Cutting Travel Tips to Bring Together Faraway Friends originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="626258"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=626258" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Should You Give Up Privacy for Car Insurance Discounts? https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/insurance/auto/car-insurance-discounts-driving-data-worth-risk/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:8c370499-b7db-8ab4-09bf-50af5c05d29f Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:36:16 +0000 Michael Aminov-Tobin almost forgot a car insurance company was tracking his driving. He wasn’t paying extra attention to how fast he drove or how hard he hit his brakes. So… <p>Michael Aminov-Tobin almost forgot a car insurance company was tracking his driving. He wasn’t paying extra attention to how fast he drove or how hard he hit his brakes. So he was astonished when the company offered to insure his 2016 Hyundai Veloster Turbo for $100 a month less than he’d been paying. “When it...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Lisa Green is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: lgreen@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @lisaccgreen. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Should You Give Up Privacy for Car Insurance Discounts? originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="620625"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=620625" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> What You Can Do About Gender-Based Rate Hikes for Car Insurance https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/insurance/auto/is-gender-raising-your-car-insurance-rates-how-to-fight-it/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:c41f6565-250d-7896-7f6c-8a7d5f8b2ffb Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:35:37 +0000 Your driving record may be flawless. Your car may be one of the safest on the road. But, in most states, you might pay more for car insurance than an… <p>Your driving record may be flawless. Your car may be one of the safest on the road. But, in most states, you might pay more for car insurance than an all-but-identical driver, simply because of your gender. No one is immune. While men traditionally have paid more, particularly when they’re younger, recent studies show women...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Lisa Green is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: lgreen@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @lisaccgreen. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article What You Can Do About Gender-Based Rate Hikes for Car Insurance originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="621519"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=621519" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> The Best Financial Advice at Every Age https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/the-best-financial-advice-at-every-age NerdWallet urn:uuid:5c988f80-3488-947e-8604-acf2f1b6bfde Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:05:05 +0000 Money doesn’t really age: It’s never too late to make smart financial decisions. But there are certain times in your life that are prime for specific money moves, times when… <p>Money doesn’t really age: It’s never too late to make smart financial decisions. But there are certain times in your life that are prime for specific money moves, times when making the right choice will set your future self up for success. Below, the best financial moves to make by decade. In your 20s: Lay...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Arielle O'Shea is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: aoshea@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @arioshea. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article The Best Financial Advice at Every Age originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="625573"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=625573" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> How to Grow Your Instagram Following: A Strategic Plan https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-grow-instagram-following-strategic-plan/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:fc6f5034-a7de-ddcc-dabe-a89f72da6ecc Mon, 18 Mar 2019 10:00:10 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-growth-strategy-how-to-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-growth-strategy-how-to-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-growth-strategy-how-to-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-growth-strategy-how-to-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-growth-strategy-how-to-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/instagram-growth-strategy-how-to-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Want to quickly grow your Instagram audience? Looking for a strategy that attracts the right kind of connections? In this article, you’ll discover how to combine an Instagram growth strategy with an ad sequence that can turn followers into customers. How This Instagram Growth Strategy Works On average, Instagram users share &#8220;more than 95 million [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-grow-instagram-following-strategic-plan/">How to Grow Your Instagram Following: A Strategic Plan</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> Why College Students Take on Loans They Can’t Repay https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/loans/student-loans/why-students-borrow-loans-cant-repay/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:d8245ae4-dd19-c068-3cfd-a74fe1dd85d9 Sun, 17 Mar 2019 15:04:27 +0000 Students take on college debt with the best of intentions. They’ve been told that a college degree is a ticket to success. That they should pursue their dreams. That student… <p>Students take on college debt with the best of intentions. They’ve been told that a college degree is a ticket to success. That they should pursue their dreams. That student debt is good debt. But how do smart students wind up with debt they can’t repay? Here are three reasons, plus ways to avoid these...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Teddy Nykiel is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: teddy@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @teddynykiel. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Why College Students Take on Loans They Can’t Repay originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="617607"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=617607" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Facebook Ad Relevance Metric Updates https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/facebook-ad-relevance-metric-updates/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:0adbcba9-1bf9-f3db-820f-e07140c8d024 Sat, 16 Mar 2019 10:00:32 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-16-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-16-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-16-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-16-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-16-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-16-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Welcome to this week&#8217;s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week&#8217;s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore updates to Facebook ad relevance metrics with special guest Amanda Bond. Watch the Social Media Marketing Talk [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/facebook-ad-relevance-metric-updates/">Facebook Ad Relevance Metric Updates</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> 5 Reasons to Get the Platinum Card From American Express https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/travel/reasons-to-get-the-platinum-card-from-american-express/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:fdbb5eac-111f-3cce-0165-d7bc7bc292d4 Fri, 15 Mar 2019 19:56:50 +0000 The Platinum Card® from American Express has a lot to offer to the right cardholder. The card comes with travel perks galore — and a hefty annual fee of $550.… <p>The Platinum Card® from American Express has a lot to offer to the right cardholder. The card comes with travel perks galore — and a hefty annual fee of $550. While that charge might scare some people off, plenty of others won’t be fazed. If you’re in the latter group, but need a little more convincing,...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Chris O'Shea is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: travel@nerdwallet.com. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article 5 Reasons to Get the Platinum Card From American Express originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="622332"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=622332" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Best Debt Consolidation Loans for 2019 https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/loans/best-debt-consolidation-loans/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:70625704-99be-0c1a-9518-a8a6b859021d Fri, 15 Mar 2019 17:54:55 +0000 If you’re like many Americans with rising credit card balances, you may be looking for ways to get your debt under control. Debt consolidation loans are one option that can… <p>If you’re like many Americans with rising credit card balances, you may be looking for ways to get your debt under control. Debt consolidation loans are one option that can reduce your debt and help you pay it off sooner. Debt consolidation is the process of combining multiple debts — such as credit cards, medical...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Steve Nicastro is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: steven.n@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @StevenNicastro. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Best Debt Consolidation Loans for 2019 originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="626361"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=626361" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Paying Debt Back Home Vexes Expats https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/finance/paying-debt-expat-can-pain/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:5861d94a-4d1c-f68c-9b9d-d1c027e3292a Fri, 15 Mar 2019 14:00:18 +0000 A close friend recently told me: “If I’d waited two years, my education would have cost half as much.” Not because she would have chosen a different graduate program or… <p>A close friend recently told me: “If I’d waited two years, my education would have cost half as much.” Not because she would have chosen a different graduate program or qualified for more scholarships. But because the value of the local currency dropped. She’s an American expat who works in Cape Town, South Africa, and...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Kelsey Sheehy is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: ksheehy@nerdwallet.com. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Paying Debt Back Home Vexes Expats originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="620188"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=620188" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> 6 Surefire Ways to Delay Your Tax Refund https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/taxes/surefire-ways-delay-tax-refund/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:711efbd9-f7d4-e717-a33b-da5d597b3c5f Fri, 15 Mar 2019 13:47:51 +0000 If you’ve got a tax refund headed your way, you’re probably itching to get your hands on it as soon as possible. But plenty of speed bumps can cause the… <p>If you’ve got a tax refund headed your way, you’re probably itching to get your hands on it as soon as possible. But plenty of speed bumps can cause the IRS to pump the brakes on delivering that precious pile of dough. Here are six to keep in mind this filing season. 1. Filing your...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Tina Orem is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: torem@nerdwallet.com. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article 6 Surefire Ways to Delay Your Tax Refund originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="620017"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=620017" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Daily Vlogging: How to Tell Video Stories https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/daily-vlogging-how-to-tell-video-stories-cody-wanner/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:33c969fa-95e2-7ec2-aa8b-6ac587ea1a7e Fri, 15 Mar 2019 10:00:09 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/daily-vlogging-video-stories-cody-wanner-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/daily-vlogging-video-stories-cody-wanner-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/daily-vlogging-video-stories-cody-wanner-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/daily-vlogging-video-stories-cody-wanner-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/daily-vlogging-video-stories-cody-wanner-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/daily-vlogging-video-stories-cody-wanner-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Wondering how to tell better stories with video? Wondering how to create interesting stories from mundane events or topics? To explore how to tell fascinating stories with video, I interview Cody Wanner. Cody is a classically trained filmmaker who specializes in telling compelling video stories. He&#8217;s also the founder of No Small Creator. You’ll learn [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/daily-vlogging-how-to-tell-video-stories-cody-wanner/">Daily Vlogging: How to Tell Video Stories</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 1: SEO Strategy - Whiteboard Friday http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11156468 Moz Blog urn:uuid:c67db414-6bb3-2035-6105-376e014198e7 Fri, 15 Mar 2019 00:02:00 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/63\">randfish</a></p><p>Can you learn SEO in an hour? Surprisingly, the answer is&nbsp;yes, at least when it comes to the fundamentals!&nbsp;</p> <p>With this edition of Whiteboard Friday, we're kicking off something special:&nbsp;a six-part series of roughly ten-minute-long videos designed to deliver core SEO concepts efficiently and effectively. It's our hope that this will serve as a helpful resource for a wide range of people:</p> <ul><li><strong>Beginner SEOs</strong> looking to get acquainted with the field concisely & comprehensively</li><li><strong>Clients, bosses, and stakeholders</strong> who would benefit from an enhanced understanding of your work</li><li><strong>New team members</strong> who need quick and easy&nbsp;onboarding</li><li><strong>Colleagues</strong> with SEO-adjacent roles, such as web developers and software engineers</li></ul> <p>Today we'll be covering <em>Part 1: SEO Strategy</em> with the man who wrote <a href="https://moz.com/beginners-guide-to-seo">the original guide on SEO</a>, our friend Rand. Settle in, and stay tuned next Friday for our second video covering keyword research!</p> <p style="text-align: center;"></p> <div class="wistia_responsive_padding" style="padding:56.25% 0 28px 0;position:relative;"><div class="wistia_responsive_wrapper" style="height:100%;left:0;position:absolute;top:0;width:100%;"><figure><iframe src="https://fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/kfjdy3anks?seo=false&videoFoam=true" title="The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 1: SEO Strategy - Whiteboard Friday Video" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" class="wistia_embed" name="wistia_embed" allowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="" oallowfullscreen="" msallowfullscreen="" width="100%" height="100%"></iframe></figure></div></div> <script src="https://fast.wistia.net/assets/external/E-v1.js" async=""></script> <p></p> <p></p> <figure><a href="https://i.imgur.com/1PEpi3s.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/4r4a9738-537903.jpg" data-image="jemk3th50p29"></a></figure> <p style="text-align: center;"><br> Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!<br> </p> <h2>Video Transcription</h2> <p>Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to a special edition of the Whiteboard Friday series. I'm Rand Fishkin, the founder and former CEO of Moz, and I'm here with you today because I'm going to deliver a one-hour guide to SEO, front and back, so that you can learn in just an hour the fundamentals of the practice and be smarter at choosing a great SEO firm to work with, hiring SEO people.&nbsp;</p> <h3>A handy SEO resource for your clients, team, and colleagues</h3> <p>If you are already in SEO, you might pick up some tips and tactics that you didn't otherwise know or hadn't previously considered. I want to ask those of you who are sort of intermediate level and advanced level SEOs — and I know there are many of you who have historically watched me on Whiteboard Friday and I really appreciate that — to give this video a chance even though it is at the beginner level, because my hope is that it will be valuable to you to send to your clients, your potential customers, people who join your team and work with you, developers or software engineers or web devs who you are working with and whose help you need but you want them to understand the fundamentals of SEO. </p> <p>If those are the people that you're talking to, excellent. This series is for you. We're going to begin with SEO strategy. That is our first part. Then we'll get into things like keyword research and technical SEO and link building and all of that good stuff as well.&nbsp;</p> <h3>The essentials: What is SEO, and what does it do?</h3> <p>So first off, SEO is search engine optimization. It is essentially the practice of influencing or being able to control some of the results that Google shows when someone types in or speaks a query to their system. </p> <p>I say Google. You can influence other search engines, like Bing and DuckDuckGo and Yahoo and Seznam if you're in the Czech Republic or Baidu. But we are primarily focused on Google because Google has more than a 90% market share in the United States and, in fact, in North America and South America, in most of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East with a few exceptions. </p> <h2>Start with business goals</h2> <p><strong>So SEO is a tactic. It's a way to control things. It is not a business goal. </strong>No one forms a new company or sits down with their division and says, "Okay, we need to rank for all of these keywords." Instead what you should be saying, what hopefully is happening in your teams is,<strong> "We have these business goals." </strong></p> <h3>Example: "Grow our online soccer jersey sales to a web-savvy, custom heavy audience."</h3> <p>Let's say we're an online e-commerce shop and we sell customized soccer jerseys, well, football for those of you outside of the United States. So we want to grow our online soccer jersey sales. Great, that is a true business goal. We're trying to build a bigger audience. We want to sell more of these jerseys. In order to do that, we have marketing goals that we want to achieve, things like we want to build brand awareness. </p> <h2>Next, marketing goals</h2> <h3>Build brand awareness</h3> <p>We want more people to know who we are, to have heard of our particular brand, because people who have heard of us are going to be more likely to buy from us. The first time you hear about someone, very unlikely to buy. The seventh time you've heard about someone, much more likely to buy from them. So that is a good marketing goal, and SEO can help with that. We'll talk about that in a sec. </p> <h3>Grow top-of-funnel traffic</h3> <p>You might want to grow top-of-funnel traffic. We want more people coming to the site overall so that we can do a better job of figuring out who is the right audience for us and converting some of those people, retargeting some of those people, capturing emails from some of those people, all those good things.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Attract ready-to-buy fans</h3> <p>We want to attract ready-to-buy fans, people who are chomping at the bit to buy our soccer jerseys, customize them and get them shipped. </p> <p>SEO, as a strategy, is essentially a set of tactics, things that you will do in the SEO world to rank for different keywords in the search engines or control and influence what already ranks in there so that you can achieve your marketing goals so that you can achieve your business goals. </p> <p>Don't get this backwards. <strong>Don't start from a place of SEO.</strong> Especially if you are an SEO specialist or a practitioner or you're joining a consulting firm, you should always have an excellent idea of what these are and why the SEO tactics that you are undertaking fit into them. If you don't, you should be asking those questions before you begin any SEO work. </p> <p>Otherwise you're going to accomplish things and do things that don't have the impact or don't tie directly to the impact that the business owners care about, and that's going to mean probably you won't get picked up for another contract or you won't accomplish the goals that mean you're valuable to the team or you do things that people don't necessarily need and want in the business and therefore you are seen as a less valuable part of it. </p> <h2>Finally, move into SEO strategy</h2> <p>But if you're accomplishing things that can clearly tie to these, the opposite. People will really value what you do.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Rank for low-demand, high-conversion keywords</h3> <p>So SEO can do things like rank for low demand, things that don't have a lot of searches per month but they are high conversion likely keywords, keywords like "I am looking for a customized Seattle Sounders soccer jersey that's in the away colors." Well, there's not a lot of search demand for that exact phrase. But if you're searching for it, you're very likely to convert.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Earn traffic from high-demand, low-competition, less commerce-focused keywords</h3> <p>You could try and earn traffic from high-demand, low competition keywords that are less focused directly on e-commerce. So it could be things like "Seattle Sounders news" or "Seattle Sounders stats" or a comparison of "Portland Timbers versus Seattle Sounders." These are two soccer or football clubs in the Pacific Northwest.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Build content that attracts links and influencer engagement</h3> <p>Or you might be trying to do things like building content that attracts links and influencer engagement so that in the future you can rank for more competitive keywords. We'll talk about that in a sec. SEO can do some amazing things, but there are also things that it cannot do. </p> <h2>What SEO <em>can</em> do:</h2> <p>If you put things in here, if you as an SEO pitch to your marketing team or your business owners that SEO can do things that it can't, you're going to be in trouble. So when we compose an SEO strategy, a set of tactics that tries to accomplish marketing goals that tie to business goals, SEO can do things like:</p> <ul><li> Attract searchers that are seeking your content. </li><li>Control how your brand is seen in search results when someone searches for your particular name.&nbsp;</li><li>Nudge searchers toward queries by influencing what gets suggested in the auto suggest or by suggesting related searches or people also ask boxes.&nbsp;</li></ul> <p>Anything that shows up in the search results, nearly anything can be influenced by what we as SEOs can do.</p> <h2>What SEO <em>cannot</em> do:</h2> <h3>Grow or create search demand on its own</h3> <p>But SEO cannot grow or create search demand by itself. So if someone says, "Hey, I want us to get more traffic for this specific keyword," if you're already ranking number one and you have some videos showing in the results and you're also in the image results and you've got maybe a secondary page that links off to you from the results, you might say, "Hey, there's just not more demand," and SEO by itself can't create that additional demand. </p> <h3>Build brand (by itself)</h3> <p>SEO also can't build brand, at least not by itself. It can certainly be a helpful part of that structure. But if someone says, "Hey, I want us to be better known among this audience,"you can say, "Well, SEO can help a little, but it can't build a brand on its own, and it certainly can't build brand perception on its own." People are going to go and visit your website. They're going to go and experience, have an interaction with what you've created on the web. That is going to be far more of a brand builder, a brand indicator than just what appears in the search results. So SEO can't do that alone.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Directly convert customers</h3> <p>It also can't directly convert customers. A lot of the time what we find is that someone will do a great job of ranking, but when you actually reach the website, when visitors reach the website, they are unsatisfied by the search, which by the way is one of the reasons why this one-hour guide is going to include a section on searcher satisfaction. </p> <p>When Google sees over time that searchers are unsatisfied by a result, they will push that result down in the rankings and find someone who does a great job of satisfying searchers, and they will rank them instead. So the website has to do this. It is part of SEO. It's certainly part of the equation, but SEO can't influence it or control it on its own. </p> <h3>WORK OVERNIGHT!</h3> <p>Finally, last but not least, <strong>SEO cannot work overnight.</strong> It just won't happen. SEO is a long-term investment. It is very different from paid search ads, PPC, also called SEM sometimes, buying from Google ads or from Bing ads and appearing in the sponsored results. That is a tactic where you can pour money in and optimize and get results out in 24 hours. <strong>SEO is more like a 24-month long process.&nbsp;</strong></p><h2><strong>The SEO Growth Path<br></strong></h2><p>I've tried to show that here. The fundamental concept is when you have a new website, you need to earn these things — links and engagement and historical performance in the rankings. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-14-at-12-434969.jpg" data-image="ft0kgiju4ist"></figure> <p><br><br>As you earn those things, other people are linking to you from around the web, people are talking about you, people are engaging with your pages and your brand, people start searching for your brand specifically, people are clicking you more in the search results and then having good experiences on your website, as all those great things happen, you will grow your historical engagement and links and ranking factors, all these things that we sort of put into the bucket of the authority and influence of a website. </p> <h3>3–6 months: Begin to rank for things in the long tail of search demand</h3> <p>As that grows, you will be able to first, over time, this might be three to six months down here, you might be able to rank for a few keywords in the long tail of search demand.&nbsp;</p> <h3>6–9 months: Begin to rank for more and more competitive keywords</h3> <p>After six to nine months, if you're very good at this, you may be able to rank for more and more competitive keywords. </p> <h3>12–18 months: Compete for tougher keywords</h3> <p>As you truly grow a brand that is well-known and well thought of on the internet and by search engines, 12 to 18 months in, maybe longer, you may be able to compete for tougher and tougher keywords. When I started the Moz website, back in the early days of Google, it took me years, literally two or three years before I was ranking for anything in Google, anything in the search engines, and that is because I had to first earn that brand equity, that trust, that relationship with the search engines, those links and that engagement. </p> <p>Today this is more true than ever because Google is so good at estimating these things. All right. I look forward to hearing all about the amazing strategies and structures that you've got probably in the comments down below. I'm sure it will be a great thread. We'll move on to the second part of our one-hour guide next time — keyword research. Take care.<br></p> <p><a href="http://www.speechpad.com/page/video-transcription/">Video transcription</a> by <a href="http://www.speechpad.com/">Speechpad.com</a> </p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/63\">randfish</a></p><p>Can you learn SEO in an hour? Surprisingly, the answer is&nbsp;yes, at least when it comes to the fundamentals!&nbsp;</p> <p>With this edition of Whiteboard Friday, we're kicking off something special:&nbsp;a six-part series of roughly ten-minute-long videos designed to deliver core SEO concepts efficiently and effectively. It's our hope that this will serve as a helpful resource for a wide range of people:</p> <ul><li><strong>Beginner SEOs</strong> looking to get acquainted with the field concisely & comprehensively</li><li><strong>Clients, bosses, and stakeholders</strong> who would benefit from an enhanced understanding of your work</li><li><strong>New team members</strong> who need quick and easy&nbsp;onboarding</li><li><strong>Colleagues</strong> with SEO-adjacent roles, such as web developers and software engineers</li></ul> <p>Today we'll be covering <em>Part 1: SEO Strategy</em> with the man who wrote <a href="https://moz.com/beginners-guide-to-seo">the original guide on SEO</a>, our friend Rand. Settle in, and stay tuned next Friday for our second video covering keyword research!</p> <p style="text-align: center;"></p> <div class="wistia_responsive_padding" style="padding:56.25% 0 28px 0;position:relative;"><div class="wistia_responsive_wrapper" style="height:100%;left:0;position:absolute;top:0;width:100%;"><figure><iframe src="https://fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/kfjdy3anks?seo=false&videoFoam=true" title="The One-Hour Guide to SEO, Part 1: SEO Strategy - Whiteboard Friday Video" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" class="wistia_embed" name="wistia_embed" allowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="" oallowfullscreen="" msallowfullscreen="" width="100%" height="100%"></iframe></figure></div></div> <script src="https://fast.wistia.net/assets/external/E-v1.js" async=""></script> <p></p> <p></p> <figure><a href="https://i.imgur.com/1PEpi3s.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/4r4a9738-537903.jpg" data-image="jemk3th50p29"></a></figure> <p style="text-align: center;"><br> Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!<br> </p> <h2>Video Transcription</h2> <p>Howdy, Moz fans, and welcome to a special edition of the Whiteboard Friday series. I'm Rand Fishkin, the founder and former CEO of Moz, and I'm here with you today because I'm going to deliver a one-hour guide to SEO, front and back, so that you can learn in just an hour the fundamentals of the practice and be smarter at choosing a great SEO firm to work with, hiring SEO people.&nbsp;</p> <h3>A handy SEO resource for your clients, team, and colleagues</h3> <p>If you are already in SEO, you might pick up some tips and tactics that you didn't otherwise know or hadn't previously considered. I want to ask those of you who are sort of intermediate level and advanced level SEOs — and I know there are many of you who have historically watched me on Whiteboard Friday and I really appreciate that — to give this video a chance even though it is at the beginner level, because my hope is that it will be valuable to you to send to your clients, your potential customers, people who join your team and work with you, developers or software engineers or web devs who you are working with and whose help you need but you want them to understand the fundamentals of SEO. </p> <p>If those are the people that you're talking to, excellent. This series is for you. We're going to begin with SEO strategy. That is our first part. Then we'll get into things like keyword research and technical SEO and link building and all of that good stuff as well.&nbsp;</p> <h3>The essentials: What is SEO, and what does it do?</h3> <p>So first off, SEO is search engine optimization. It is essentially the practice of influencing or being able to control some of the results that Google shows when someone types in or speaks a query to their system. </p> <p>I say Google. You can influence other search engines, like Bing and DuckDuckGo and Yahoo and Seznam if you're in the Czech Republic or Baidu. But we are primarily focused on Google because Google has more than a 90% market share in the United States and, in fact, in North America and South America, in most of Europe, Asia, and the Middle East with a few exceptions. </p> <h2>Start with business goals</h2> <p><strong>So SEO is a tactic. It's a way to control things. It is not a business goal. </strong>No one forms a new company or sits down with their division and says, "Okay, we need to rank for all of these keywords." Instead what you should be saying, what hopefully is happening in your teams is,<strong> "We have these business goals." </strong></p> <h3>Example: "Grow our online soccer jersey sales to a web-savvy, custom heavy audience."</h3> <p>Let's say we're an online e-commerce shop and we sell customized soccer jerseys, well, football for those of you outside of the United States. So we want to grow our online soccer jersey sales. Great, that is a true business goal. We're trying to build a bigger audience. We want to sell more of these jerseys. In order to do that, we have marketing goals that we want to achieve, things like we want to build brand awareness. </p> <h2>Next, marketing goals</h2> <h3>Build brand awareness</h3> <p>We want more people to know who we are, to have heard of our particular brand, because people who have heard of us are going to be more likely to buy from us. The first time you hear about someone, very unlikely to buy. The seventh time you've heard about someone, much more likely to buy from them. So that is a good marketing goal, and SEO can help with that. We'll talk about that in a sec. </p> <h3>Grow top-of-funnel traffic</h3> <p>You might want to grow top-of-funnel traffic. We want more people coming to the site overall so that we can do a better job of figuring out who is the right audience for us and converting some of those people, retargeting some of those people, capturing emails from some of those people, all those good things.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Attract ready-to-buy fans</h3> <p>We want to attract ready-to-buy fans, people who are chomping at the bit to buy our soccer jerseys, customize them and get them shipped. </p> <p>SEO, as a strategy, is essentially a set of tactics, things that you will do in the SEO world to rank for different keywords in the search engines or control and influence what already ranks in there so that you can achieve your marketing goals so that you can achieve your business goals. </p> <p>Don't get this backwards. <strong>Don't start from a place of SEO.</strong> Especially if you are an SEO specialist or a practitioner or you're joining a consulting firm, you should always have an excellent idea of what these are and why the SEO tactics that you are undertaking fit into them. If you don't, you should be asking those questions before you begin any SEO work. </p> <p>Otherwise you're going to accomplish things and do things that don't have the impact or don't tie directly to the impact that the business owners care about, and that's going to mean probably you won't get picked up for another contract or you won't accomplish the goals that mean you're valuable to the team or you do things that people don't necessarily need and want in the business and therefore you are seen as a less valuable part of it. </p> <h2>Finally, move into SEO strategy</h2> <p>But if you're accomplishing things that can clearly tie to these, the opposite. People will really value what you do.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Rank for low-demand, high-conversion keywords</h3> <p>So SEO can do things like rank for low demand, things that don't have a lot of searches per month but they are high conversion likely keywords, keywords like "I am looking for a customized Seattle Sounders soccer jersey that's in the away colors." Well, there's not a lot of search demand for that exact phrase. But if you're searching for it, you're very likely to convert.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Earn traffic from high-demand, low-competition, less commerce-focused keywords</h3> <p>You could try and earn traffic from high-demand, low competition keywords that are less focused directly on e-commerce. So it could be things like "Seattle Sounders news" or "Seattle Sounders stats" or a comparison of "Portland Timbers versus Seattle Sounders." These are two soccer or football clubs in the Pacific Northwest.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Build content that attracts links and influencer engagement</h3> <p>Or you might be trying to do things like building content that attracts links and influencer engagement so that in the future you can rank for more competitive keywords. We'll talk about that in a sec. SEO can do some amazing things, but there are also things that it cannot do. </p> <h2>What SEO <em>can</em> do:</h2> <p>If you put things in here, if you as an SEO pitch to your marketing team or your business owners that SEO can do things that it can't, you're going to be in trouble. So when we compose an SEO strategy, a set of tactics that tries to accomplish marketing goals that tie to business goals, SEO can do things like:</p> <ul><li> Attract searchers that are seeking your content. </li><li>Control how your brand is seen in search results when someone searches for your particular name.&nbsp;</li><li>Nudge searchers toward queries by influencing what gets suggested in the auto suggest or by suggesting related searches or people also ask boxes.&nbsp;</li></ul> <p>Anything that shows up in the search results, nearly anything can be influenced by what we as SEOs can do.</p> <h2>What SEO <em>cannot</em> do:</h2> <h3>Grow or create search demand on its own</h3> <p>But SEO cannot grow or create search demand by itself. So if someone says, "Hey, I want us to get more traffic for this specific keyword," if you're already ranking number one and you have some videos showing in the results and you're also in the image results and you've got maybe a secondary page that links off to you from the results, you might say, "Hey, there's just not more demand," and SEO by itself can't create that additional demand. </p> <h3>Build brand (by itself)</h3> <p>SEO also can't build brand, at least not by itself. It can certainly be a helpful part of that structure. But if someone says, "Hey, I want us to be better known among this audience,"you can say, "Well, SEO can help a little, but it can't build a brand on its own, and it certainly can't build brand perception on its own." People are going to go and visit your website. They're going to go and experience, have an interaction with what you've created on the web. That is going to be far more of a brand builder, a brand indicator than just what appears in the search results. So SEO can't do that alone.&nbsp;</p> <h3>Directly convert customers</h3> <p>It also can't directly convert customers. A lot of the time what we find is that someone will do a great job of ranking, but when you actually reach the website, when visitors reach the website, they are unsatisfied by the search, which by the way is one of the reasons why this one-hour guide is going to include a section on searcher satisfaction. </p> <p>When Google sees over time that searchers are unsatisfied by a result, they will push that result down in the rankings and find someone who does a great job of satisfying searchers, and they will rank them instead. So the website has to do this. It is part of SEO. It's certainly part of the equation, but SEO can't influence it or control it on its own. </p> <h3>WORK OVERNIGHT!</h3> <p>Finally, last but not least, <strong>SEO cannot work overnight.</strong> It just won't happen. SEO is a long-term investment. It is very different from paid search ads, PPC, also called SEM sometimes, buying from Google ads or from Bing ads and appearing in the sponsored results. That is a tactic where you can pour money in and optimize and get results out in 24 hours. <strong>SEO is more like a 24-month long process.&nbsp;</strong></p><h2><strong>The SEO Growth Path<br></strong></h2><p>I've tried to show that here. The fundamental concept is when you have a new website, you need to earn these things — links and engagement and historical performance in the rankings. </p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-14-at-12-434969.jpg" data-image="ft0kgiju4ist"></figure> <p><br><br>As you earn those things, other people are linking to you from around the web, people are talking about you, people are engaging with your pages and your brand, people start searching for your brand specifically, people are clicking you more in the search results and then having good experiences on your website, as all those great things happen, you will grow your historical engagement and links and ranking factors, all these things that we sort of put into the bucket of the authority and influence of a website. </p> <h3>3–6 months: Begin to rank for things in the long tail of search demand</h3> <p>As that grows, you will be able to first, over time, this might be three to six months down here, you might be able to rank for a few keywords in the long tail of search demand.&nbsp;</p> <h3>6–9 months: Begin to rank for more and more competitive keywords</h3> <p>After six to nine months, if you're very good at this, you may be able to rank for more and more competitive keywords. </p> <h3>12–18 months: Compete for tougher keywords</h3> <p>As you truly grow a brand that is well-known and well thought of on the internet and by search engines, 12 to 18 months in, maybe longer, you may be able to compete for tougher and tougher keywords. When I started the Moz website, back in the early days of Google, it took me years, literally two or three years before I was ranking for anything in Google, anything in the search engines, and that is because I had to first earn that brand equity, that trust, that relationship with the search engines, those links and that engagement. </p> <p>Today this is more true than ever because Google is so good at estimating these things. All right. I look forward to hearing all about the amazing strategies and structures that you've got probably in the comments down below. I'm sure it will be a great thread. We'll move on to the second part of our one-hour guide next time — keyword research. Take care.<br></p> <p><a href="http://www.speechpad.com/page/video-transcription/">Video transcription</a> by <a href="http://www.speechpad.com/">Speechpad.com</a> </p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11156468.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Average Dental School Debt in 2018 https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/loans/student-loans/average-dental-school-debt/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:26ae4e5b-c803-d125-62e3-142b26d494c9 Thu, 14 Mar 2019 21:06:27 +0000 Nearly 80% of dental school students in the class of 2018 took on dental school debt, according to a survey by the American Dental Education Association. Among class of 2018… <p>Nearly 80% of dental school students in the class of 2018 took on dental school debt, according to a survey by the American Dental Education Association. Among class of 2018 dental school graduates with any type of student debt — including from undergraduate studies — the average student loan balance was $285,184. With a $285,000...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Teddy Nykiel is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: teddy@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @teddynykiel. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Average Dental School Debt in 2018 originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="625647"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=625647" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Travel to Much of Europe Will Soon Require an Added Step https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/travel-to-much-of-europe-will-soon-require-an-added-step NerdWallet urn:uuid:a1297f88-4143-74bc-68e2-e14d551fea66 Thu, 14 Mar 2019 20:35:41 +0000 Starting in early 2021, Americans will need authorization to travel to about half of the countries in Europe. In the documentation and rollout of the new European Travel Information and… <p>Starting in early 2021, Americans will need authorization to travel to about half of the countries in Europe. In the documentation and rollout of the new European Travel Information and Authorisation System, or ETIAS, the European Commission sometimes calls the new authorization a visa waiver, sometimes a visa and other times simply an authorization. But...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> June Casagrande is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: travel@nerdwallet.com. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Travel to Much of Europe Will Soon Require an Added Step originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="626287"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=626287" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> How to Score a Free Stopover With Your United Miles https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/travel/how-to-score-a-free-stopover-with-your-united-miles/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:7884dbee-b732-e64b-a1b2-2e561e0a17d3 Thu, 14 Mar 2019 19:24:56 +0000 Stopovers — a break in air travel more than 24 hours long — give travelers the chance to explore a city that may be en route to or on the… <p>Stopovers — a break in air travel more than 24 hours long — give travelers the chance to explore a city that may be en route to or on the way back from their final destination. There’s nothing quite like getting two vacations for the price of one, but stopovers aren’t as available as they...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Meena Thiruvengadam is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: travel@nerdwallet.com. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article How to Score a Free Stopover With Your United Miles originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="625626"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=625626" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Can Your Employer Cure Your Money Woes? https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/can-your-employer-cure-your-money-woes NerdWallet urn:uuid:f493f6a9-e401-f607-1650-4f18234f5cbd Thu, 14 Mar 2019 18:59:13 +0000 Millions of Americans get their health insurance and retirement accounts through their employers. Now some are getting help with their debt. Companies including insurer Aetna and accounting firm PwC help… <p>Millions of Americans get their health insurance and retirement accounts through their employers. Now some are getting help with their debt. Companies including insurer Aetna and accounting firm PwC help employees pay down student loans. Others partner with startups to offer debt solutions as an employee benefit. Among the approaches: MedPut negotiates discounts on medical...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Liz Weston is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: lweston@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @lizweston. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article Can Your Employer Cure Your Money Woes? originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="618089"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=618089" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> 3 Steps to Spring-Clean Your Credit Card Debt https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/credit-cards/3-steps-spring-clean-credit-card-debt/ NerdWallet urn:uuid:e118425e-e1d2-8b36-78e3-c6c7eccc8231 Thu, 14 Mar 2019 18:00:39 +0000 Aja McClanahan, a Chicago-based writer, and her husband were staring down $120,000 in debt — about $20,000 of it credit card balances — and realized they needed to clean house.… <p>Aja McClanahan, a Chicago-based writer, and her husband were staring down $120,000 in debt — about $20,000 of it credit card balances — and realized they needed to clean house. Literally. They found less expensive housing arrangements, and along the way in those seven years that they carried the debt, they also became meticulous about...</p> <div class="nw-author-box-wp" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box - WP" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box_wp"> <div class="nw-author-box-wp--inner"> <aside itemscope itemprop="author" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person" class="nw-author-box" data-nw-component-type-name="Author Box" data-nw-component-type-slug="nw_author_box"><p> Melissa Lambarena is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: mlambarena@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @LissaLambarena. </p> </aside></div> </div> <p class="nw-originally-posted-link">The article 3 Steps to Spring-Clean Your Credit Card Debt originally appeared on NerdWallet.</p><span data-post-id="625540"></span><img height="1" width="1" src="https://www.nerdwallet.com/blog/wp-content/themes/nerdwallet/assets/tracking/nw-pixel-v1.gif?post_id=625540" style="display: none;" data-has-syndication-rights="1" /> Our Own Sarah Bird Joins the 2019 Class of Henry Crown Fellows! http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11155923 Moz Blog urn:uuid:b8bde7ce-4624-04cb-0d9f-afd6776867ca Thu, 14 Mar 2019 17:56:16 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/12577573\">TheMozTeam</a></p><p>Mozzers believe in doing good, whether we’re helping new SEOs learn the ropes, encouraging young girls to consider a career in STEM, or just maintaining a <a target="_blank" href="https://seomoz.wistia.com/medias/d5jzxof039">dog-friendly</a> (and thus smile-friendly) office. It’s why so much of our <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/learn/seo">content</a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/free-seo-tools">tools</a> are available for free. It’s why Moz has a generous employee donation-match program that matched over $500,000 between 2013 and 2017, supporting organizations making the world a more just and charitable place. It’s why we partner with programs like <a target="_blank" href="https://www.yearup.org/">Year Up</a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.igniteworldwide.org/">Ignite</a>, and <a target="_blank" href="https://techbridgegirls.org/">Techbridge</a> to inspire the next generation of technology leaders. </p> <p>And of course, <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/about/culture">TAGFEE</a> is the beating heart of everything we do. It’s part of our DNA. That’s why we’re incredibly proud (and humbled!) to announce that our very own CEO and Disney-karaoke-extraordinaire, Sarah Bird, has been accepted into The Aspen Institute’s <a target="_blank" href="https://agln.aspeninstitute.org/fellowships/henrycrown/classes/XXIII">23rd class of Henry Crown Fellows</a>, a program whose values resonate deeply with our own.</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/sarah-bird-henry-crown-fellowship/5c8af82f8d66e6.56135673.jpg" width="624" height="469" data-image="dx6v3637g7w4"></figure> <p>The Henry Crown Fellowship is an influential program that enables leaders to embrace their inner do-gooder. Every year, around twenty leaders from around the world are accepted into the fellowship. Having proven their success in the private sector, each new Fellow uses this opportunity to play a similar role in their communities, their country, or the world. </p> <p>Pretty exciting, right? The best part of all, though: it’s not just about reflection. It’s about action. Fellows in the program have <a target="_blank" href="https://agln.aspeninstitute.org/ventures">launched over 2,500 leadership ventures</a>, using the opportunity to tackle everything from improving healthcare access, to battling domestic violence, to enhancing sustainable living, and beyond. It’s important, highly impactful stuff.</p> <p>“Executives are often criticized for building successful businesses without giving back to the communities that helped them along the way,” says Sarah, “but we must lead as much in our communities as we do in our businesses.”</p> <p>Tech companies and executives often face deserved scrutiny for the second- and third-order impacts of their successes. It’s a hard truth that the benefits and costs of technology advances aren’t shared equally between all people, and the cost to our environment is often not fully accounted for. The consequence is an understandable backlash against technologists. </p> <p>“In order to change this,” adds Sarah, “we need to earnestly and with rigor dive into the sociological and ecological consequences of our work. Those of us with great power and privilege need to recognize and embrace our role in creating a more just and healthy future. I feel called to make a difference, and I’m glad there is a program out there to provide a framework and accountability for action.”</p> <p>Here at Moz, we’ve been lucky enough to benefit from Sarah’s influence for years — we know she’s good people, inside and out. And now, we can’t wait to see her make waves in the world at large with the support of the Henry Crown Fellowship. </p> <p>We’d love for you to join us in congratulating her in the comments below, and bonus points if you share the cause that’s closest to your heart!</p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/12577573\">TheMozTeam</a></p><p>Mozzers believe in doing good, whether we’re helping new SEOs learn the ropes, encouraging young girls to consider a career in STEM, or just maintaining a <a target="_blank" href="https://seomoz.wistia.com/medias/d5jzxof039">dog-friendly</a> (and thus smile-friendly) office. It’s why so much of our <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/learn/seo">content</a> and <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/free-seo-tools">tools</a> are available for free. It’s why Moz has a generous employee donation-match program that matched over $500,000 between 2013 and 2017, supporting organizations making the world a more just and charitable place. It’s why we partner with programs like <a target="_blank" href="https://www.yearup.org/">Year Up</a>, <a target="_blank" href="http://www.igniteworldwide.org/">Ignite</a>, and <a target="_blank" href="https://techbridgegirls.org/">Techbridge</a> to inspire the next generation of technology leaders. </p> <p>And of course, <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/about/culture">TAGFEE</a> is the beating heart of everything we do. It’s part of our DNA. That’s why we’re incredibly proud (and humbled!) to announce that our very own CEO and Disney-karaoke-extraordinaire, Sarah Bird, has been accepted into The Aspen Institute’s <a target="_blank" href="https://agln.aspeninstitute.org/fellowships/henrycrown/classes/XXIII">23rd class of Henry Crown Fellows</a>, a program whose values resonate deeply with our own.</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/sarah-bird-henry-crown-fellowship/5c8af82f8d66e6.56135673.jpg" width="624" height="469" data-image="dx6v3637g7w4"></figure> <p>The Henry Crown Fellowship is an influential program that enables leaders to embrace their inner do-gooder. Every year, around twenty leaders from around the world are accepted into the fellowship. Having proven their success in the private sector, each new Fellow uses this opportunity to play a similar role in their communities, their country, or the world. </p> <p>Pretty exciting, right? The best part of all, though: it’s not just about reflection. It’s about action. Fellows in the program have <a target="_blank" href="https://agln.aspeninstitute.org/ventures">launched over 2,500 leadership ventures</a>, using the opportunity to tackle everything from improving healthcare access, to battling domestic violence, to enhancing sustainable living, and beyond. It’s important, highly impactful stuff.</p> <p>“Executives are often criticized for building successful businesses without giving back to the communities that helped them along the way,” says Sarah, “but we must lead as much in our communities as we do in our businesses.”</p> <p>Tech companies and executives often face deserved scrutiny for the second- and third-order impacts of their successes. It’s a hard truth that the benefits and costs of technology advances aren’t shared equally between all people, and the cost to our environment is often not fully accounted for. The consequence is an understandable backlash against technologists. </p> <p>“In order to change this,” adds Sarah, “we need to earnestly and with rigor dive into the sociological and ecological consequences of our work. Those of us with great power and privilege need to recognize and embrace our role in creating a more just and healthy future. I feel called to make a difference, and I’m glad there is a program out there to provide a framework and accountability for action.”</p> <p>Here at Moz, we’ve been lucky enough to benefit from Sarah’s influence for years — we know she’s good people, inside and out. And now, we can’t wait to see her make waves in the world at large with the support of the Henry Crown Fellowship. </p> <p>We’d love for you to join us in congratulating her in the comments below, and bonus points if you share the cause that’s closest to your heart!</p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11155923.gif" height="1" width="1"/> 4 Facebook Ad Techniques That Deliver Results https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/4-facebook-ad-techniques-deliver-results/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:c784cb8a-5421-51a6-3510-0b5c462efc9d Wed, 13 Mar 2019 10:00:04 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/facebook-ads-how-to-generate-leads-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/facebook-ads-how-to-generate-leads-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/facebook-ads-how-to-generate-leads-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/facebook-ads-how-to-generate-leads-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/facebook-ads-how-to-generate-leads-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/facebook-ads-how-to-generate-leads-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Want to improve your Facebook advertising results? Looking for successful examples you can model? In this article, you&#8217;ll discover four ways to generate clicks, leads, and conversions using Facebook ads. #1: Offer Free Content at Each Stage of the Sales Funnel People who aren&#8217;t familiar with your brand are unlikely to convert on your core [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/4-facebook-ad-techniques-deliver-results/">4 Facebook Ad Techniques That Deliver Results</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> 5 Reasons Legacy Brands Struggle With SEO (and What to Do About Them) http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11150004 Moz Blog urn:uuid:8ccd6957-23ce-dfc8-b3b5-aba6d60b698a Wed, 13 Mar 2019 00:02:00 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/726559\">Tom.Capper</a></p><p>Given the increasing <a href="https://www.slideshare.net/THCapper/the-two-tiered-serp-tom-capper-searchlove-london-2018">importance</a> of <a href="https://moz.com/blog/rankings-correlation-study-domain-authority-vs-branded-search-volume">brand in SEO</a>, it seems a cruel irony that many household name-brands seem to struggle with managing the channel. Yet, in my time at <a href="https://www.distilled.net/">Distilled</a>, I've seen just that: numerous name-brand sites in various states of stagnation and even more frustrated SEO managers attempting to prevent said stagnation.&nbsp;</p> <p>Despite global brand recognition and other established advantages that ought to <a href="https://www.epiphanysearch.co.uk/thoughts/is-brand-the-only-future-ranking-factor">drive growth</a>, the reality is that having a household name doesn't ensure SEO success. In this post, I’m going to explore why large, well-known brands can run into difficulties with organic performance, the patterns I’ve noticed, and some of the recommended tactics to address those challenges.<br></p> <h2>What we talk about when we talk about a legacy brand</h2> <p>For the purposes of this post, the term “legacy brand” applies to companies that have a very strong association with the product they sell, and may well have, in the past, been the ubiquitous provider for that product. This could mean that they were household names in the 20th century, or it could be that they pioneered and dominated their field in the early days of mass consumer web usage. A few varied examples (that Distilled has never worked with or been contacted by) include:</p> <ul><li>Wells Fargo (US)</li><li>Craigslist (US)</li><li>Tesco (UK)</li></ul> <p>These are cherry-picked, potentially extreme examples of legacy brands, but all three of the above, and most that fit this description have shown a marked decline in the last five years, in terms of organic visibility (confirmed by <a href="https://www.sistrix.com/">Sistrix</a>, my tool of choice — your tool-of-choice may vary). It’s a common issue for large, well-established sites — peaking in 2013 and 2014 and never again reaching those highs.</p> <p>Given that large, well-known brands aren’t performing well, one would think that less known brands (brands that don’t fit the above description) would be closing the gap. But it’s the opposite. In fact, said brands are under-performing in organic and showing signs of stagnation — and they aren’t showing any signs of catching up.</p> <p>The question is: why does it keep happening?</p> <h2>Reason 1: Brand</h2> <p>Quite possibly the biggest hurdle standing in the way of a brand’s performance is the brand itself. This may seem like a bit of an odd one — we’d already established that the companies we’re talking about are big, recognized, household names. That in and of itself should <a href="https://www.distilled.net/resources/how-to-rank-for-head-terms/">help them</a> in SEO, right?</p> <p>The thing is, though, a lot of these big household names are recognized, but they’re not the one-stop shops that they used to be.</p> <p>Here's how the above name-brand examples are performing on search:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208c7d8d65.93328470.png" width="624" height="293" data-image="0idth8sqot4r"></figure> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208cc83588.91149684.png" width="624" height="292" data-image="1qq071g00jgc"></figure> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208d10e868.73595971.png" width="624" height="293" data-image="1202gldop5o4"></figure> <p>Other dominant, clearly vertical-leading brands in the UK, in general, are also not doing so well in branded search:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208d559563.69500352.png" width="624" height="291" data-image="7jj424ndffs8"></figure> <p>There’s a lot of potential reasons for why this may be — and we’ll even address some of them later — but a few notable ones include:</p> <ul><li>Complacency — particularly for brands that were early juggernauts of the web, they may have forgotten the need to reinforce their brand image and recognition.</li><li>More and more credible competitors. When you’re the only competent operator, as many of these brands once were, you had the whole pie. Now, you have to share it.</li><li>People trust search engines. In a lot of cases, ubiquitous brands decline, while the generic term is on the rise.</li></ul> <p>Check out this for the real estate example in the UK:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208d9b9229.64067234.png" width="624" height="332" data-image="icsc8otgtbot"></figure> <p>Rightmove and Zoopla are the two biggest brands in this space and have been for some time. There’s only one line there that’s trending upwards, though, and it’s the generic term, “houses for sale."</p> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>Basically, get a move on! A lot of incumbents have been very slow to take action on things like top-of-funnel content, or only produce low-effort, exceptionally dry social media posts (I’ve posted before about some of these tactics <a href="https://moz.com/blog/seo-above-the-funnel">here</a>.) In fairness, it’s easy to see why — these channels and approaches likely have the least measurable returns. However, leaving a vacuum higher in your funnel is playing with fire, especially when you’re a recognized name. It opens an opportunity for smaller players to close the gap in recognition — at almost no cost.</p> <h2>Reason 2: Tech debt</h2> <p>I’m sure many people reading this will have experienced how hard it can be to get technical changes — particularly higher effort ones — implemented by larger, older organizations. This can stem from complex bureaucracy, aging and highly bespoke platforms, risk aversion, and, particularly for SEO, an inability to get senior buy-in for what can often be fairly abstract changes with little guaranteed reward.</p> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>At Distilled, we run into these challenges fairly often. I’ve seen dev queues that span, literally, for years. I’ve also seen organizations that are completely unable to change the most basic information on their sites, such as opening times or title tags. In fact, it was this exact issue that prompted the development of our <a href="https://www.distilled.net/odn-as-a-meta-cms/">ODN platform</a> a few years ago as a way to circumvent technical limitations and prove the benefits when we did so.</p> <p>There are less heavy-duty options available — <a href="https://moz.com/blog/seo-changes-using-google-tag-manager">GTM</a> can be used for a range of changes as the last resort, albeit without the measurement component. CDN-level solutions like Cloudflare’s <a href="https://www.distilled.net/resources/blurring-the-line-cdn-cms/">edge workers</a> are also starting to gain traction within the SEO community.</p> <p>Eventually, though, it’s necessary to tackle the problem at the source — by making headway within the politics of the organization. There’s a whole other post to be had there, if not several, but basically, it comes down to making yourself heard without undermining anyone. I’ve found that focusing on the downside is actually the most effective angle within big, risk-averse bureaucracies — essentially preying on the risk-aversion itself — as well as shouting loudly about any successes, however small.</p> <h2>Reason 3: Not updating tactics due to long-standing, ingrained practices</h2> <p>In a way, this comes back to risk aversion and politics — after all, legacy brands have a lot to lose. One particular manifestation I’ve often noticed in larger organizations is ongoing campaigns and tactics that haven’t been linked to improved rankings or revenue in years.</p> <p>One conversation with a senior SEO at a major brand left me quite confused. I recall he said to me something along the lines of “we know this campaign isn’t right for us strategically, but we can’t get buy-in for anything else, so it’s this or lose the budget”. Fantastic.</p> <p>This type of scenario can become commonplace when senior decision-makers don’t trust their staff — often, it's a CMO, or similar executive leader, that hasn't dipped their toe in SEO for a decade or more. When they do, they are unpleasantly surprised to discover that their SEO team isn’t buying any links this week and, actually, hasn’t for quite some time. Their reaction, then, is predictable: “No wonder the results are so poor!”</p> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>Unfortunately, you may have to humor this behavior in the short term. That doesn’t mean you should start (or continue) buying links, but it might be a good idea to ensure there’s similar-sounding activity in your strategy while you work on proving the ROI of your projects.</p> <p>Medium-term, if you can get senior stakeholders out to conferences (I highly recommend <a href="https://www.distilled.net/events/">SearchLove</a>, though I may be biased), softly share articles and content “they may find interesting”, and drown them in news of the success of whatever other programs you’ve managed to get headway with, you can start to move them in the right direction.</p> <h2>Reason 4: Race to the bottom</h2> <p>It’s fair to say that, over time, it’s only become easier to launch an online business with a reasonably well-sorted site. I’ve <a href="https://www.distilled.net/resources/how-to-rank-for-head-terms/">observed</a> in the past that new entrants don’t necessarily have to match tenured juggernauts like-for-like on factors like Domain Authority to hit the top spots.</p> <p>As a result, it’s become common-place to see plucky, younger businesses rising quickly, and, at the very least, increasing the apparent level of choice where historically a legacy business might have had a monopoly on basic competence.</p> <p>This is even more complicated when price is involved. Most <a href="https://twitter.com/randfish/status/1093795218753814528">SEOs agree</a> that SERP behavior factors into rankings, so it’s easy to imagine legacy businesses, which disproportionately have a premium angle, struggling for clicks vs. attractively priced competitors. Google does not understand or care that you have a premium proposition — they’ll throw you in with the businesses competing purely on price all the same.</p> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>As I see it, there are two main approaches. One is abusing your size to crowd out smaller players (for instance, disproportionately targeting the keywords where they’ve managed to find a gap in your armor), and the second is, essentially, Conversion Rate Optimization.</p> <p>Simple tactics like sorting a landing page by default by price (ascending), having clicky titles with a value-focused USP (e.g. free delivery), or well targeted (and not overdone) post-sales retention emails — all go a long way to mitigating the temptation of a cheaper or hackier competitor.</p> <h2>Reason 5: Super-aggregators (Amazon, Google)</h2> <p>In a lot of verticals, the pie is getting smaller, so it stands to reason the dominant players will be facing a diminishing slice.</p> <p>A few obvious examples:</p> <ul><li>Local packs eroding <a href="https://moz.com/blog/do-you-need-local-pages">local landing pages</a></li><li>Google Flights, Google Jobs, etc. eroding specialist sites</li><li>Amazon taking a huge chunk of e-commerce search</li></ul> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>Again, there are two separate angles here, and one is a lot harder than the other. The first is similar to some of what I’ve mentioned above — move further up the funnel and lock in business before this ever comes to your prospective client Googling your head term and seeing Amazon and/or Google above you. This is only a mitigating tactic, however.</p> <p>The second, which will be impossible for many or most businesses, is to jump into bed with the devil. If you ever do have the opportunity to be a data partner behind a Google or Amazon product, you may do well to swallow your pride and take it. You may be the only one of your competitors left in a few years, and if you don’t, it’ll be someone else.</p> <h2>Wrapping up</h2> <p>While a lot of the issues relate to complacency, and a lot of my suggested solutions relate to reinvesting as if you weren’t a dominant brand that might win by accident, I do think it’s worth exploring the mechanisms by which this translates into poorer performance.</p> <p>This topic is unavoidably very tinted by my own experiences and opinions, so I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below. Similarly, I’m conscious that any one of my five reasons could have been a post in its own right — which ones would you like to see more fleshed out?</p> <p></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/726559\">Tom.Capper</a></p><p>Given the increasing <a href="https://www.slideshare.net/THCapper/the-two-tiered-serp-tom-capper-searchlove-london-2018">importance</a> of <a href="https://moz.com/blog/rankings-correlation-study-domain-authority-vs-branded-search-volume">brand in SEO</a>, it seems a cruel irony that many household name-brands seem to struggle with managing the channel. Yet, in my time at <a href="https://www.distilled.net/">Distilled</a>, I've seen just that: numerous name-brand sites in various states of stagnation and even more frustrated SEO managers attempting to prevent said stagnation.&nbsp;</p> <p>Despite global brand recognition and other established advantages that ought to <a href="https://www.epiphanysearch.co.uk/thoughts/is-brand-the-only-future-ranking-factor">drive growth</a>, the reality is that having a household name doesn't ensure SEO success. In this post, I’m going to explore why large, well-known brands can run into difficulties with organic performance, the patterns I’ve noticed, and some of the recommended tactics to address those challenges.<br></p> <h2>What we talk about when we talk about a legacy brand</h2> <p>For the purposes of this post, the term “legacy brand” applies to companies that have a very strong association with the product they sell, and may well have, in the past, been the ubiquitous provider for that product. This could mean that they were household names in the 20th century, or it could be that they pioneered and dominated their field in the early days of mass consumer web usage. A few varied examples (that Distilled has never worked with or been contacted by) include:</p> <ul><li>Wells Fargo (US)</li><li>Craigslist (US)</li><li>Tesco (UK)</li></ul> <p>These are cherry-picked, potentially extreme examples of legacy brands, but all three of the above, and most that fit this description have shown a marked decline in the last five years, in terms of organic visibility (confirmed by <a href="https://www.sistrix.com/">Sistrix</a>, my tool of choice — your tool-of-choice may vary). It’s a common issue for large, well-established sites — peaking in 2013 and 2014 and never again reaching those highs.</p> <p>Given that large, well-known brands aren’t performing well, one would think that less known brands (brands that don’t fit the above description) would be closing the gap. But it’s the opposite. In fact, said brands are under-performing in organic and showing signs of stagnation — and they aren’t showing any signs of catching up.</p> <p>The question is: why does it keep happening?</p> <h2>Reason 1: Brand</h2> <p>Quite possibly the biggest hurdle standing in the way of a brand’s performance is the brand itself. This may seem like a bit of an odd one — we’d already established that the companies we’re talking about are big, recognized, household names. That in and of itself should <a href="https://www.distilled.net/resources/how-to-rank-for-head-terms/">help them</a> in SEO, right?</p> <p>The thing is, though, a lot of these big household names are recognized, but they’re not the one-stop shops that they used to be.</p> <p>Here's how the above name-brand examples are performing on search:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208c7d8d65.93328470.png" width="624" height="293" data-image="0idth8sqot4r"></figure> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208cc83588.91149684.png" width="624" height="292" data-image="1qq071g00jgc"></figure> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208d10e868.73595971.png" width="624" height="293" data-image="1202gldop5o4"></figure> <p>Other dominant, clearly vertical-leading brands in the UK, in general, are also not doing so well in branded search:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208d559563.69500352.png" width="624" height="291" data-image="7jj424ndffs8"></figure> <p>There’s a lot of potential reasons for why this may be — and we’ll even address some of them later — but a few notable ones include:</p> <ul><li>Complacency — particularly for brands that were early juggernauts of the web, they may have forgotten the need to reinforce their brand image and recognition.</li><li>More and more credible competitors. When you’re the only competent operator, as many of these brands once were, you had the whole pie. Now, you have to share it.</li><li>People trust search engines. In a lot of cases, ubiquitous brands decline, while the generic term is on the rise.</li></ul> <p>Check out this for the real estate example in the UK:</p> <figure><img src="http://d2v4zi8pl64nxt.cloudfront.net/legacy-brands-seo/5c88208d9b9229.64067234.png" width="624" height="332" data-image="icsc8otgtbot"></figure> <p>Rightmove and Zoopla are the two biggest brands in this space and have been for some time. There’s only one line there that’s trending upwards, though, and it’s the generic term, “houses for sale."</p> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>Basically, get a move on! A lot of incumbents have been very slow to take action on things like top-of-funnel content, or only produce low-effort, exceptionally dry social media posts (I’ve posted before about some of these tactics <a href="https://moz.com/blog/seo-above-the-funnel">here</a>.) In fairness, it’s easy to see why — these channels and approaches likely have the least measurable returns. However, leaving a vacuum higher in your funnel is playing with fire, especially when you’re a recognized name. It opens an opportunity for smaller players to close the gap in recognition — at almost no cost.</p> <h2>Reason 2: Tech debt</h2> <p>I’m sure many people reading this will have experienced how hard it can be to get technical changes — particularly higher effort ones — implemented by larger, older organizations. This can stem from complex bureaucracy, aging and highly bespoke platforms, risk aversion, and, particularly for SEO, an inability to get senior buy-in for what can often be fairly abstract changes with little guaranteed reward.</p> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>At Distilled, we run into these challenges fairly often. I’ve seen dev queues that span, literally, for years. I’ve also seen organizations that are completely unable to change the most basic information on their sites, such as opening times or title tags. In fact, it was this exact issue that prompted the development of our <a href="https://www.distilled.net/odn-as-a-meta-cms/">ODN platform</a> a few years ago as a way to circumvent technical limitations and prove the benefits when we did so.</p> <p>There are less heavy-duty options available — <a href="https://moz.com/blog/seo-changes-using-google-tag-manager">GTM</a> can be used for a range of changes as the last resort, albeit without the measurement component. CDN-level solutions like Cloudflare’s <a href="https://www.distilled.net/resources/blurring-the-line-cdn-cms/">edge workers</a> are also starting to gain traction within the SEO community.</p> <p>Eventually, though, it’s necessary to tackle the problem at the source — by making headway within the politics of the organization. There’s a whole other post to be had there, if not several, but basically, it comes down to making yourself heard without undermining anyone. I’ve found that focusing on the downside is actually the most effective angle within big, risk-averse bureaucracies — essentially preying on the risk-aversion itself — as well as shouting loudly about any successes, however small.</p> <h2>Reason 3: Not updating tactics due to long-standing, ingrained practices</h2> <p>In a way, this comes back to risk aversion and politics — after all, legacy brands have a lot to lose. One particular manifestation I’ve often noticed in larger organizations is ongoing campaigns and tactics that haven’t been linked to improved rankings or revenue in years.</p> <p>One conversation with a senior SEO at a major brand left me quite confused. I recall he said to me something along the lines of “we know this campaign isn’t right for us strategically, but we can’t get buy-in for anything else, so it’s this or lose the budget”. Fantastic.</p> <p>This type of scenario can become commonplace when senior decision-makers don’t trust their staff — often, it's a CMO, or similar executive leader, that hasn't dipped their toe in SEO for a decade or more. When they do, they are unpleasantly surprised to discover that their SEO team isn’t buying any links this week and, actually, hasn’t for quite some time. Their reaction, then, is predictable: “No wonder the results are so poor!”</p> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>Unfortunately, you may have to humor this behavior in the short term. That doesn’t mean you should start (or continue) buying links, but it might be a good idea to ensure there’s similar-sounding activity in your strategy while you work on proving the ROI of your projects.</p> <p>Medium-term, if you can get senior stakeholders out to conferences (I highly recommend <a href="https://www.distilled.net/events/">SearchLove</a>, though I may be biased), softly share articles and content “they may find interesting”, and drown them in news of the success of whatever other programs you’ve managed to get headway with, you can start to move them in the right direction.</p> <h2>Reason 4: Race to the bottom</h2> <p>It’s fair to say that, over time, it’s only become easier to launch an online business with a reasonably well-sorted site. I’ve <a href="https://www.distilled.net/resources/how-to-rank-for-head-terms/">observed</a> in the past that new entrants don’t necessarily have to match tenured juggernauts like-for-like on factors like Domain Authority to hit the top spots.</p> <p>As a result, it’s become common-place to see plucky, younger businesses rising quickly, and, at the very least, increasing the apparent level of choice where historically a legacy business might have had a monopoly on basic competence.</p> <p>This is even more complicated when price is involved. Most <a href="https://twitter.com/randfish/status/1093795218753814528">SEOs agree</a> that SERP behavior factors into rankings, so it’s easy to imagine legacy businesses, which disproportionately have a premium angle, struggling for clicks vs. attractively priced competitors. Google does not understand or care that you have a premium proposition — they’ll throw you in with the businesses competing purely on price all the same.</p> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>As I see it, there are two main approaches. One is abusing your size to crowd out smaller players (for instance, disproportionately targeting the keywords where they’ve managed to find a gap in your armor), and the second is, essentially, Conversion Rate Optimization.</p> <p>Simple tactics like sorting a landing page by default by price (ascending), having clicky titles with a value-focused USP (e.g. free delivery), or well targeted (and not overdone) post-sales retention emails — all go a long way to mitigating the temptation of a cheaper or hackier competitor.</p> <h2>Reason 5: Super-aggregators (Amazon, Google)</h2> <p>In a lot of verticals, the pie is getting smaller, so it stands to reason the dominant players will be facing a diminishing slice.</p> <p>A few obvious examples:</p> <ul><li>Local packs eroding <a href="https://moz.com/blog/do-you-need-local-pages">local landing pages</a></li><li>Google Flights, Google Jobs, etc. eroding specialist sites</li><li>Amazon taking a huge chunk of e-commerce search</li></ul> <h3>What can I do about this?</h3> <p>Again, there are two separate angles here, and one is a lot harder than the other. The first is similar to some of what I’ve mentioned above — move further up the funnel and lock in business before this ever comes to your prospective client Googling your head term and seeing Amazon and/or Google above you. This is only a mitigating tactic, however.</p> <p>The second, which will be impossible for many or most businesses, is to jump into bed with the devil. If you ever do have the opportunity to be a data partner behind a Google or Amazon product, you may do well to swallow your pride and take it. You may be the only one of your competitors left in a few years, and if you don’t, it’ll be someone else.</p> <h2>Wrapping up</h2> <p>While a lot of the issues relate to complacency, and a lot of my suggested solutions relate to reinvesting as if you weren’t a dominant brand that might win by accident, I do think it’s worth exploring the mechanisms by which this translates into poorer performance.</p> <p>This topic is unavoidably very tinted by my own experiences and opinions, so I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below. Similarly, I’m conscious that any one of my five reasons could have been a post in its own right — which ones would you like to see more fleshed out?</p> <p></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11150004.gif" height="1" width="1"/> How to Find the Right Keywords to Rank #1 on Google For https://neilpatel.com/blog/right-keywords-seo/ The KISSmetrics Marketing Blog urn:uuid:0f983297-acef-76de-f03a-9eb9ff9df85e Tue, 12 Mar 2019 10:21:45 +0000 <p>Do you want more traffic? Well, who doesn’t? The reason you want more traffic is that you think more traffic equals more revenue. But here is what you’ll learn the hard way… as your traffic goes up, your revenue won’t increase at the same pace. And in many cases, as your traffic goes up, your [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://neilpatel.com/blog/right-keywords-seo/">How to Find the Right Keywords to Rank #1 on Google For</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://neilpatel.com">Neil Patel</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/keywordsseo.png" alt="keywords" /></p> <p>Do you want more traffic?</p> <p><em>Well, who doesn’t?</em></p> <p>The reason you want more traffic is that <a href="https://neilpatel.com/blog/seo-lessons/">you think more traffic equals more revenue</a>.</p> <p><em>But here is what you’ll learn the hard way… as your traffic goes up, your revenue won’t increase at the same pace.</em></p> <p>And in many cases, as your traffic goes up, your revenue won’t increase one bit.</p> <p>In other words, if you get the wrong kind of traffic, you’ll find yourself spinning your wheels and becoming frustrated.</p> <p><a href="https://neilpatel.com/blog/seo-failure/">It happens to all of us</a>, let me show you what I’ve learned the hard way.<span id="more-78707"></span></p> <h2><strong>So how good is my search traffic?</strong></h2> <p>Take a look at the screenshot below.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/neilpatelkeywords.png" alt="neil patel keywords" /></p> <p>That’s a laundry list of keywords that drive me the most traffic. But there is an issue with a lot of those keywords. They drive traffic but not revenue.</p> <p>Keywords like affiliate marketing, SEO analyzer, SEO checker, statistical significance calculator are all terms that won’t drive me any revenue.</p> <p>I don’t offer affiliate marketing services and anyone searching for terms like “SEO analyzer” are looking to do SEO themselves versus paying my agency to do it for them.</p> <p>Even terms like “statistical significance calculator” don&#8217;t drive revenue. Anyone searching for that is looking to see how their A/B tests are performing versus hiring my agency to run tests for them.</p> <p>If I naturally ranked for these terms without any effort, that’s one thing. But I created dedicated landing pages, <a href="https://neilpatel.com/ab-testing-calculator/">like this one</a>, because I was trying to rank for them.</p> <p>In other words, I spent time and money ranking for keywords that don’t drive any revenue.</p> <p>Now, there is a reason why I rank for these terms and I do want this traffic, even though they don’t drive revenue, but I will get to that later in this post.</p> <p>First, let&#8217;s go over how you can pick the right keywords to rank number 1 for.</p> <h2><strong>How to pick the right keywords</strong></h2> <p>You probably already have some ideas are a good fit for your business. I want you to type them into <a href="https://neilpatel.com/ubersuggest/">Ubersuggest</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/onlinemarketing.png" alt="online marketing" /></p> <p>Ubersuggest will show how many people search for that keyword within a particular region as well as the SEO difficulty and paid difficulty.</p> <p>In addition to that, you’ll see a laundry list of keyword ideas if you click on the “keyword ideas” navigational option.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/keywordideas.png" alt="keyword ideas" /></p> <p>What you’ll want to look for are keywords that have high paid difficulty, which means the keyword is so valuable that a lot of people are competing for the paid ad spots.</p> <p>In addition to looking at the paid difficulty number, you’ll want to find keywords that have a low SEO difficulty score.</p> <p>When a keyword meets those 2 requirements it means it is easy to rank and people find it valuable enough to buy ads on the keyword. And if they find it valuable enough for people to buy paid ads, that means the traffic is converting into customers.</p> <p>That’s more important than just finding popular keywords as traffic doesn’t always equal sales.</p> <p>And when you are doing keyword research, <em>make sure you pick the right regions</em>.</p> <h2><strong>Not all traffic is equal</strong></h2> <p>Again, you already know I get good traffic, but as I mentioned earlier, not all of the traffic is equal.</p> <p>Just look at the regions that made up my traffic in the last 7 days:</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/regions.png" alt="regions" /></p> <p>The United States makes up a large portion of my traffic. Over time I’ve <a href="https://neilpatel.com/blog/seo-strategy-google/">expanded globally</a>, hence you are seeing my traffic increase in regions like India and Brazil. Even Japan, which is the newest region I have been expanding to, has been growing rapidly.</p> <p>Knowing the split between regions, which ones would you say make up the largest portion of revenue?</p> <p>If you guess the United States, you are correct. But what region do you think is in second place?</p> <p><em>If you guess India or Brazil, you are wrong.</em></p> <p>I love those two countries, but the United Kingdom generates more revenue than both of those regions combined, even though it produces 25.6% of the traffic as Brazil and India combined.</p> <h2><strong>Are you picking the right regions?</strong></h2> <p>When you are doing keyword research, you need to think about regions. This is also the main reason why I integrated regions within Ubersuggest.</p> <p>You can’t just focus on keywords that have high paid difficulty and low SEO difficulty. You need to focus on the countries where the majority of your customer base is.</p> <p>Now, you know SEO is competitive and it takes a while to rank. So if you can go after up and coming regions that you know you’ll want to target in a few years, then you should go after those keywords right away.</p> <p>It takes a while for people to see this, but the reason I have done pretty well when it comes to picking the right terms is that I focus on regions that aren’t ready for my company just yet but will be over the next 5 to 10 years.</p> <p>I know that sounds crazy, but to do well you need long-term goals and a strategic outlook for your business.</p> <p>To give you an idea of how I think, let’s look at how the worlds GDP is going to change over the next 10 years:</p> <p><iframe width="700" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/T9l2yCH5wBk?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>That video bases GDP growth off of historical data. Companies like <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-01-08/world-s-biggest-economies-seen-dominated-by-asian-ems-by-2030">Standard Chartered</a> believe there will be much more aggressive GDP growth, especially coming out of Asia.</p> <ol> <li>China: $64.2 trillion</li> <li>India: $46.3 trillion</li> <li>US: $31 trillion</li> <li>Indonesia: $10.1 trillion</li> <li>Turkey: $9.1 trillion</li> <li>Brazil: $8.6 trillion</li> <li>Egypt: $8.2 trillion</li> <li>Russia: $7.9 trillion</li> <li>Japan: $7.2 trillion</li> <li>Germany: $6.9 trillion</li> </ol> <p>No matter what source you look at, almost everyone is coming to the same conclusion… <em>countries with big populations will see faster GDP growth</em>.</p> <p>If I were you and I was trying to pick the best keywords to rank number 1 on Google, I wouldn’t just focus on countries that are already established and saturated, I would also focus on countries that are growing fast and aren’t competitive yet.</p> <p>Even in the short run, although some of these countries may not have as much demand, there is no competition, which means it will be easier to take up a larger chunk of the market.</p> <h2><strong>How do you find popular keywords in these countries?</strong></h2> <p>Doing keyword research in new countries isn’t as simple as typing in random keywords and seeing what’s popular.</p> <p>You can do that with tools like Ubersuggest, but that may still cause you to pick the wrong ones.</p> <p>For example, in the United States, the keyword “SEO” is more lucrative than the phrase “digital marketing.&#8221; But in Brazil, the phrase “marketing digital” (their version of digital marketing) is more lucrative than the term SEO.</p> <p>In other words, cultures are different.</p> <p>So, what you should do is use a tool like <a href="https://www.similarweb.com/website/neilpatel.com#similarSites">Similar Web</a> to see who your closest competitors are. When I look at NeilPatel.com on Similar Web, it gives me the following results:</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/similarweb.png" alt="similar web" /></p> <p>You can then take those competing URLs and enter them into <a href="https://neilpatel.com/ubersuggest/">Ubersuggest</a>.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/ahrefs.png" alt="ahrefs" /></p> <p>What I want you to do is first look at the “top pages” report. This report shows you the most popular pages that are driving traffic to any given site.</p> <p>The best part about this report is that you can break down popular pages by country.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/toppages.png" alt="top pages" /></p> <p>From there you can see the popular pages and even the keywords that drive traffic to that page within that country.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/ahrefstoppages.png" alt="ahrefs top pages" /></p> <p>And similar to the top pages report, you can do the same thing with the keywords report.</p> <p><img src="https://neilpatel.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/ahrefskeywords.png" alt="ahrefs keywords" /></p> <p>With the combination of the top pages and keywords report, you should have a list of great keywords to go after. Not just from a domestic standpoint, but from a global standpoint as you can see the popular keywords for each country in Ubersuggest.</p> <h2><strong>But how do I rank number 1?</strong></h2> <p>Once you have a list of keywords, it’s time to create content and focus on ranking at the top of Google. But you already know that. How Google Dishes Out Content by Search Intent http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11147611 Moz Blog urn:uuid:58dd4ede-e760-a212-0ef3-dc2b42034953 Tue, 12 Mar 2019 10:05:24 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/12577573\">TheMozTeam</a></p><p>This post was originally published on the <a href="https://getstat.com/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">STAT blog</a>.</p> <hr> <p>In the STAT whitepaper, <a href="https://getstat.com/blog/whitepaper-using-search-intent-to-connect-with-consumers/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);"><em>Using search intent to connect with consumers</em></a>, we looked at how SERP features change with a searcher’s intent — informational, commercial, transactional, or local. It was so chock-full of research that it sparked oodles of other content inspiration — from <a href="https://moz.com/blog/the-basics-of-building-an-intent-based-keyword-list" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">the basics of building an intent-based keyword list</a> to <a href="https://moz.com/blog/a-guide-to-setting-up-your-very-own-search-intent-projects" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">setting up your own search intent project</a>, to Scott Taft's <a href="https://moz.com/blog/build-a-search-intent-dashboard-to-unlock-better-opportunities" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">guide to building your own search intent dashboard</a>.</p> <p>But while doing the research for the whitepaper, we found ourselves pondering another question: is there a similar relationship between search intent and the kind of page content that Google sources results from?</p> <p>We know from our study that as searchers head down the intent funnel, the SERP feature landscape shifts accordingly. For example, Google serves up progressively more shopping boxes, which help close the deal, as a searcher moves from awareness to purchase.</p> <p>So, as consumers hunt for that perfect product, does the content that Google serves up shift from, say, category pages to product pages? To get to the bottom of this mystery, we mounted a three-pronged attack.</p> <h2>Prong 1:&nbsp;Uncover the top SERP players</h2> <p>Since Google delivers the content they deem most helpful, figuring out who their SERP favs are ensured that we were analyzing the best performing content.</p> <p>To do this, we used the same 6,422 retail keywords from our original research, segmented them by search intent, and then gathered the top 12 results (give or take a few) that appeared on each SERP.</p> <p>This gave us:</p> <ul><li>6,338 informational intent results,</li><li>35,210 commercial intent results,</li><li>24,633 transactional intent results,</li><li>and 10,573 local intent results</li></ul> <p>…to analyze the stink out of. (That’s 76,754 results all told.)</p> <p>From there, we dug into root domains (e.g. eBay.com and Amazon.com) to uncover the four most frequently occurring businesses for each search intent category.</p> <p>We made an executive decision to exclude Google, who claimed top billing across the board, from our analysis for two reasons. One, because we attribute shopping boxes and images to them, which show up <em>a lot</em> for retail keywords, and two, because they aren’t exactly a competitor you can learn from.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-141039.jpg" data-image="mfrcihptfqry"></figure> <h2>Prong 2: Identify content page managers</h2> <p>After compiling the winningest sites to snoop on, it was time to see what kind of content they were offering up to the Google gods — which should’ve been easy, right? Wrong. Unfortunately, examining URL structures for frequently occurring page markers is a somewhat painful process.</p> <p>Some sites, like Homedepot.com (who we wish had made the list for this very reason), have clean, easy to decipher URL structures: all product and category pages are identified with a “/p/” and “/b/” that always show up in the same spot in the URL.</p> <p>And then you have the Amazon.coms of the world that use a mix of seemingly random markers, like “/s?rh=” and “/dp” that appear all over the place.</p> <p>In the end — thanks to Stack Overflow, SequelPro, and a lot of patience — we were able to classify our URLs, bringing us to our third and final prong.</p> <h2>Prong 3: Mash everything together and analyze</h2> <p>Once we got all of our ducks in a row, it was time to get our super-sleuth on.</p> <h3>Informational intent&nbsp;(6,338 results)</h3> <p>This is the very top of the intent funnel. The searcher has identified a need and is looking for information on the best solution — is a [<em>laptop</em>] or [<em>desktop computer</em>] the right choice for their home office; what’s the difference between a [<em>blender</em>] and a [<em>food processor</em>] when making smoothies?</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-93023.jpg" data-image="vu2v7rrcxkd7"></figure> <p>Thanks to the retail nature of our keywords, three product powerhouses — Amazon, Walmart, and Best Buy — rose to the top, along with Wikipedia, whose sole purpose in life is to provide the kind of information that searchers usually want to see at this stage of intent.</p> <p>Although Wikipedia doesn’t have page markers, we chose to categorize their search results as product pages. This is because each Wikipedia entry typically focuses on a single person, place, or thing. Also, because they weren’t important to our analysis: while Wikipedia is a search competitor, they’re not a product competitor. (We still love you though, Wikipedia!)</p> <p>Diving into the type of content that Amazon, Walmart, and Best Buy served up (the stuff we were really after), category pages surfaced as the preferred choice.</p> <p>Given the wide net that a searcher is casting with their informational query, it made sense to see more category pages at this stage — they help searchers narrow down their hunt by providing a wide range of options to choose from.</p> <p>What did have us raising our eyebrows a little was the number of product pages that appeared. Product pages showcase one specific item and are typically optimized for conversion, so we expected to see these in large quantities further down the funnel — when a searcher has a better idea of what they want.</p> <h3>Commercial intent (35,210 results)</h3> <p>When <strong></strong>it comes to a commercial intent query, the searcher is starting to dig deeper into the product they’re after — they’re doing comparative research, reading reviews, and looking into specific functionality.<br></p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-94165.jpg" data-image="nzu0514r029q"></figure> <p>Here, Amazon continued to rule the URL roost, Wikipedia dropped off, eBay judo-chopped Walmart out of second place, and Best Buy stayed put at the bottom.</p> <p>In terms of the content that these sites offered up, we saw the addition of review pages from Amazon, and buyer guides from Amazon, eBay, and Best Buy. We figured this would be the case, seeing as how we used modifiers like “best,” “compare,” and “reviews” to apply commercial intent to our keywords.</p> <p>But while these two types of content fit perfectly with the intent behind a commercial query, especially reviews, oddly enough they still paled in comparison to the number of category and product pages. Weird, right?</p> <h3>Transactional intent (24,633 results)</h3> <p>At the transactional intent stage of the game, the searcher has narrowed their hunt down to a few best options and is ready to throw their hard-earned shekels at the winner.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-98193.jpg" data-image="e88jt3ibrm2z"></figure> <p>As far as the most frequently appearing sites go, there was a little do-si-do between eBay and Walmart, but overall, these top four sites did an excellent job following searchers down the intent funnel.</p> <p>In terms of the kind of pages appearing, once again, we saw a huge number of category pages. Product pages made a respectable showing, but given the readiness to buy at the bottom of the funnel, we expected to see the scales tip in their favor.</p> <p>Alack and alas, no dice.</p> <h3>Local intent (10,573 results)</h3> <p>Technically, we categorize local intent as a subsection of transactional intent. It’s likely that the only reason a searcher would be considering an in-store visit is if the product is something they want to take home with them. But because local searches typically surface different results from our other transactional queries, we look at them separately.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-91302.jpg" data-image="q24k5d5434uf"></figure> <p>Here, Amazon’s reign was finally usurped by its biggest competitor, Walmart, and Yelp made a stunning first appearance to knock Best Buy down and eBay off the list.</p> <p>Given that local intent searchers are on the hunt for a brick-and-mortar store, it made sense that Walmart would win out over Amazon. That said, it’s an incredible feat that Amazon doesn’t let a lack of physical location derail its retail dominance, especially when local&nbsp;is the name of the game (a location is literally part of these queries).</p> <p>As for Yelp, they’re a trusted source for people trying to find a business IRL — so it wasn’t surprising to see them jump on our local intent SERPs. Like Wikipedia, Yelp doesn’t have product or category pages per se, but they do have markers that indicate pages with multiple business listings (we classified these as category pages), as well as markers that indicate single business listings (our product pages). We also found markers for reviews, which were a perfect fit for our analysis.</p> <p>Finally, when it came to content, category and product pages (again!) showed up the most on these SERPs. So what’s going on here?</p> <h2>The (unexpected) takeaway</h2> <p>When we set out to examine the type of content that appears for the different search intents, we expected to see far more variation from one level to the next. We thought we’d find lots of category pages for informational intent, more reviews and buyer guides for commercial intent, and mostly product pages for transactional intent.</p> <p>Instead, we found that category pages are Google’s top choice for retail keywords throughout all levels of search intent. Regardless of how specific a query is, category pages seem to be the first point of access when hunting for retail items. So why might this be?</p> <p>Looking to our winning sites for answers, it appears that intent-blended pages are the bomb dot com for Amazon, Walmart, eBay, and Best Buy.</p> <p>Their category pages contain: an image of each type of product and short, descriptive copy to help searchers narrow down their options (informational intent); a review or rating system for quick comparisons (commercial intent); and pricing information and a clear way to make a purchase (transactional intent).</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/bestbuy_speaker_category_page-145537.jpg" data-image="gzxpo517vrjd"></figure> <p>Following any of the items to their designated product page — the second most returned type of content — you’ll find a similar intent-blended approach. In fact, by having alternative suggestions, like “people also bought” and “similar products,” appear on them, they almost resemble category pages.</p> <p>This product page approach is different from what we often see with smaller boutique-style shops. Take <a href="https://stutterheim.com/ca/man/raincoats/stockholm-green" target="_blank">Stutterheim</a> for example (they sell raincoats perfect for our Vancouver weather). Their product pages have a single focus: buy this one thing.</p> <p>Since smaller shops don’t have a never-ending supply of goods, their product pages have to push harder for the transaction — no distractions allowed. Large retailers like Amazon? They have enough stuff to keep searchers around until they stumble across something they like.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/stutterheim_raincoats-84670.jpg" data-image="xe4chcgdogv9"></figure> <p>To find out what type of content you should serve at each step of the intent funnel, segment your keywords by search intent and track which of your pages rank, as well as how well they convert. This will help reveal what your searchers find most useful.</p> <p>Ready to get your mitts on even more intent-based insights? Grab the full whitepaper: <em><a href="https://getstat.com/blog/whitepaper-using-search-intent-to-connect-with-consumers/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">Using search intent to connect with consumers.</a></em></p> <p>What search-intent insights have you dug up? Let us know in the comments!</p> <p></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/12577573\">TheMozTeam</a></p><p>This post was originally published on the <a href="https://getstat.com/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">STAT blog</a>.</p> <hr> <p>In the STAT whitepaper, <a href="https://getstat.com/blog/whitepaper-using-search-intent-to-connect-with-consumers/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);"><em>Using search intent to connect with consumers</em></a>, we looked at how SERP features change with a searcher’s intent — informational, commercial, transactional, or local. It was so chock-full of research that it sparked oodles of other content inspiration — from <a href="https://moz.com/blog/the-basics-of-building-an-intent-based-keyword-list" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">the basics of building an intent-based keyword list</a> to <a href="https://moz.com/blog/a-guide-to-setting-up-your-very-own-search-intent-projects" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">setting up your own search intent project</a>, to Scott Taft's <a href="https://moz.com/blog/build-a-search-intent-dashboard-to-unlock-better-opportunities" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">guide to building your own search intent dashboard</a>.</p> <p>But while doing the research for the whitepaper, we found ourselves pondering another question: is there a similar relationship between search intent and the kind of page content that Google sources results from?</p> <p>We know from our study that as searchers head down the intent funnel, the SERP feature landscape shifts accordingly. For example, Google serves up progressively more shopping boxes, which help close the deal, as a searcher moves from awareness to purchase.</p> <p>So, as consumers hunt for that perfect product, does the content that Google serves up shift from, say, category pages to product pages? To get to the bottom of this mystery, we mounted a three-pronged attack.</p> <h2>Prong 1:&nbsp;Uncover the top SERP players</h2> <p>Since Google delivers the content they deem most helpful, figuring out who their SERP favs are ensured that we were analyzing the best performing content.</p> <p>To do this, we used the same 6,422 retail keywords from our original research, segmented them by search intent, and then gathered the top 12 results (give or take a few) that appeared on each SERP.</p> <p>This gave us:</p> <ul><li>6,338 informational intent results,</li><li>35,210 commercial intent results,</li><li>24,633 transactional intent results,</li><li>and 10,573 local intent results</li></ul> <p>…to analyze the stink out of. (That’s 76,754 results all told.)</p> <p>From there, we dug into root domains (e.g. eBay.com and Amazon.com) to uncover the four most frequently occurring businesses for each search intent category.</p> <p>We made an executive decision to exclude Google, who claimed top billing across the board, from our analysis for two reasons. One, because we attribute shopping boxes and images to them, which show up <em>a lot</em> for retail keywords, and two, because they aren’t exactly a competitor you can learn from.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-141039.jpg" data-image="mfrcihptfqry"></figure> <h2>Prong 2: Identify content page managers</h2> <p>After compiling the winningest sites to snoop on, it was time to see what kind of content they were offering up to the Google gods — which should’ve been easy, right? Wrong. Unfortunately, examining URL structures for frequently occurring page markers is a somewhat painful process.</p> <p>Some sites, like Homedepot.com (who we wish had made the list for this very reason), have clean, easy to decipher URL structures: all product and category pages are identified with a “/p/” and “/b/” that always show up in the same spot in the URL.</p> <p>And then you have the Amazon.coms of the world that use a mix of seemingly random markers, like “/s?rh=” and “/dp” that appear all over the place.</p> <p>In the end — thanks to Stack Overflow, SequelPro, and a lot of patience — we were able to classify our URLs, bringing us to our third and final prong.</p> <h2>Prong 3: Mash everything together and analyze</h2> <p>Once we got all of our ducks in a row, it was time to get our super-sleuth on.</p> <h3>Informational intent&nbsp;(6,338 results)</h3> <p>This is the very top of the intent funnel. The searcher has identified a need and is looking for information on the best solution — is a [<em>laptop</em>] or [<em>desktop computer</em>] the right choice for their home office; what’s the difference between a [<em>blender</em>] and a [<em>food processor</em>] when making smoothies?</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-93023.jpg" data-image="vu2v7rrcxkd7"></figure> <p>Thanks to the retail nature of our keywords, three product powerhouses — Amazon, Walmart, and Best Buy — rose to the top, along with Wikipedia, whose sole purpose in life is to provide the kind of information that searchers usually want to see at this stage of intent.</p> <p>Although Wikipedia doesn’t have page markers, we chose to categorize their search results as product pages. This is because each Wikipedia entry typically focuses on a single person, place, or thing. Also, because they weren’t important to our analysis: while Wikipedia is a search competitor, they’re not a product competitor. (We still love you though, Wikipedia!)</p> <p>Diving into the type of content that Amazon, Walmart, and Best Buy served up (the stuff we were really after), category pages surfaced as the preferred choice.</p> <p>Given the wide net that a searcher is casting with their informational query, it made sense to see more category pages at this stage — they help searchers narrow down their hunt by providing a wide range of options to choose from.</p> <p>What did have us raising our eyebrows a little was the number of product pages that appeared. Product pages showcase one specific item and are typically optimized for conversion, so we expected to see these in large quantities further down the funnel — when a searcher has a better idea of what they want.</p> <h3>Commercial intent (35,210 results)</h3> <p>When <strong></strong>it comes to a commercial intent query, the searcher is starting to dig deeper into the product they’re after — they’re doing comparative research, reading reviews, and looking into specific functionality.<br></p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-94165.jpg" data-image="nzu0514r029q"></figure> <p>Here, Amazon continued to rule the URL roost, Wikipedia dropped off, eBay judo-chopped Walmart out of second place, and Best Buy stayed put at the bottom.</p> <p>In terms of the content that these sites offered up, we saw the addition of review pages from Amazon, and buyer guides from Amazon, eBay, and Best Buy. We figured this would be the case, seeing as how we used modifiers like “best,” “compare,” and “reviews” to apply commercial intent to our keywords.</p> <p>But while these two types of content fit perfectly with the intent behind a commercial query, especially reviews, oddly enough they still paled in comparison to the number of category and product pages. Weird, right?</p> <h3>Transactional intent (24,633 results)</h3> <p>At the transactional intent stage of the game, the searcher has narrowed their hunt down to a few best options and is ready to throw their hard-earned shekels at the winner.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-98193.jpg" data-image="e88jt3ibrm2z"></figure> <p>As far as the most frequently appearing sites go, there was a little do-si-do between eBay and Walmart, but overall, these top four sites did an excellent job following searchers down the intent funnel.</p> <p>In terms of the kind of pages appearing, once again, we saw a huge number of category pages. Product pages made a respectable showing, but given the readiness to buy at the bottom of the funnel, we expected to see the scales tip in their favor.</p> <p>Alack and alas, no dice.</p> <h3>Local intent (10,573 results)</h3> <p>Technically, we categorize local intent as a subsection of transactional intent. It’s likely that the only reason a searcher would be considering an in-store visit is if the product is something they want to take home with them. But because local searches typically surface different results from our other transactional queries, we look at them separately.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-12-at-8-91302.jpg" data-image="q24k5d5434uf"></figure> <p>Here, Amazon’s reign was finally usurped by its biggest competitor, Walmart, and Yelp made a stunning first appearance to knock Best Buy down and eBay off the list.</p> <p>Given that local intent searchers are on the hunt for a brick-and-mortar store, it made sense that Walmart would win out over Amazon. That said, it’s an incredible feat that Amazon doesn’t let a lack of physical location derail its retail dominance, especially when local&nbsp;is the name of the game (a location is literally part of these queries).</p> <p>As for Yelp, they’re a trusted source for people trying to find a business IRL — so it wasn’t surprising to see them jump on our local intent SERPs. Like Wikipedia, Yelp doesn’t have product or category pages per se, but they do have markers that indicate pages with multiple business listings (we classified these as category pages), as well as markers that indicate single business listings (our product pages). We also found markers for reviews, which were a perfect fit for our analysis.</p> <p>Finally, when it came to content, category and product pages (again!) showed up the most on these SERPs. So what’s going on here?</p> <h2>The (unexpected) takeaway</h2> <p>When we set out to examine the type of content that appears for the different search intents, we expected to see far more variation from one level to the next. We thought we’d find lots of category pages for informational intent, more reviews and buyer guides for commercial intent, and mostly product pages for transactional intent.</p> <p>Instead, we found that category pages are Google’s top choice for retail keywords throughout all levels of search intent. Regardless of how specific a query is, category pages seem to be the first point of access when hunting for retail items. So why might this be?</p> <p>Looking to our winning sites for answers, it appears that intent-blended pages are the bomb dot com for Amazon, Walmart, eBay, and Best Buy.</p> <p>Their category pages contain: an image of each type of product and short, descriptive copy to help searchers narrow down their options (informational intent); a review or rating system for quick comparisons (commercial intent); and pricing information and a clear way to make a purchase (transactional intent).</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/bestbuy_speaker_category_page-145537.jpg" data-image="gzxpo517vrjd"></figure> <p>Following any of the items to their designated product page — the second most returned type of content — you’ll find a similar intent-blended approach. In fact, by having alternative suggestions, like “people also bought” and “similar products,” appear on them, they almost resemble category pages.</p> <p>This product page approach is different from what we often see with smaller boutique-style shops. Take <a href="https://stutterheim.com/ca/man/raincoats/stockholm-green" target="_blank">Stutterheim</a> for example (they sell raincoats perfect for our Vancouver weather). Their product pages have a single focus: buy this one thing.</p> <p>Since smaller shops don’t have a never-ending supply of goods, their product pages have to push harder for the transaction — no distractions allowed. Large retailers like Amazon? They have enough stuff to keep searchers around until they stumble across something they like.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/stutterheim_raincoats-84670.jpg" data-image="xe4chcgdogv9"></figure> <p>To find out what type of content you should serve at each step of the intent funnel, segment your keywords by search intent and track which of your pages rank, as well as how well they convert. This will help reveal what your searchers find most useful.</p> <p>Ready to get your mitts on even more intent-based insights? Grab the full whitepaper: <em><a href="https://getstat.com/blog/whitepaper-using-search-intent-to-connect-with-consumers/" onclick="_gaq.push(['_trackEvent', 'blog', 'POST TITLE', 'TOOL']);">Using search intent to connect with consumers.</a></em></p> <p>What search-intent insights have you dug up? Let us know in the comments!</p> <p></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11147611.gif" height="1" width="1"/> How to Set Up a YouTube Ads Campaign https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-set-up-youtube-ads-campaign/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:ba9a5973-34a8-800e-145e-3bd0a893b45e Tue, 12 Mar 2019 10:00:16 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/youtube-ad-campaign-how-to-set-up-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/youtube-ad-campaign-how-to-set-up-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/youtube-ad-campaign-how-to-set-up-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/youtube-ad-campaign-how-to-set-up-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/youtube-ad-campaign-how-to-set-up-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/youtube-ad-campaign-how-to-set-up-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Wondering how to advertise on YouTube? Looking for a guide to creating a YouTube advertising campaign? In this article, you&#8217;ll learn how to set up and optimize a YouTube ads campaign. #1: Set Up YouTube Advertising With the newly redesigned Google Ads interface, managing YouTube ads is now easier than ever. If you have experience [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-set-up-youtube-ads-campaign/">How to Set Up a YouTube Ads Campaign</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> How to Improve Your Social Video Content: 10 Tips From the Pros https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-improve-social-video-content-10-tips-pros/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:adf7ac1b-8df9-661d-8fa6-fcc2084a398a Mon, 11 Mar 2019 10:00:22 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/social-video-content-pro-tips-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/social-video-content-pro-tips-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/social-video-content-pro-tips-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/social-video-content-pro-tips-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/social-video-content-pro-tips-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/social-video-content-pro-tips-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Want to create better social video content? Looking for tips and tools to try? In this article, 10 video experts share the tactics and tools they use to create successful video content. #1: Simplify Livestream Production Flow With Elgato Stream Deck One of my favorite live streaming tools is the Elgato Stream Deck, a video [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-improve-social-video-content-10-tips-pros/">How to Improve Your Social Video Content: 10 Tips From the Pros</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> How to Set Up GTM Cookie Tracking (and Better Understand Content Engagement) http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11144058 Moz Blog urn:uuid:3efefe7d-80f3-2516-2627-ca111e06abf3 Mon, 11 Mar 2019 09:01:40 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/11946593\">Joel.Mesherghi</a></p><p><br>The more you understand the behaviour of your users, the better you can market your product or service — which is why&nbsp;Google Tag Manager (GTM) is a marketer's best friend.&nbsp;With built-in tag templates, such as scroll depth and click tracking, GTM is a powerful tool to measure the engagement and success of your content.&nbsp;</p> <p>If you’re only relying on tag templates in GTM, or the occasionally <a href="https://moz.com/blog/misuses-4-google-analytics-metrics-debunked">limiting out-of-box Google Analytics</a>, then you could be missing out on insights that go beyond normal engagement metrics. Which means you may be getting an incomplete story from your data.</p> <p>This post will teach you how to get even more insight by setting up cookies in GTM. You'll learn how to tag and track multiple page views in a single session, track a specific set number of pages, based on specific on-page content elements, and understand how users are engaging with your content so you can make data-based decisions to better drive conversions.</p> <h2>Example use case</h2> <p>I recently worked with a client that wanted to better understand the behavior of users that landed on their blog content.&nbsp;The main barrier they faced was their URL structure. Their content didn’t live on logical URL structures — they placed their target keyword straight after the root. So, instead of <em>example.com/blog/some-content</em>, their URL structure looked like <em>example.com/some-content</em>.</p> <p></p><p>You can use advanced segments in Google Analytics (GA) to track any number of metrics, but if you don’t have a logically defined URL, then tracking and measuring those metrics becomes a manual and time-consuming practice — especially when there’s a large number of pages to track.</p> <p>Fortunately, leveraging a custom cookie code, which I provide below, helps you to cut through that time, requires little implementation effort, and can surface powerful insights: </p> <p></p> <ol><li>It can indicate that users are engaged with your content and your brand.</li><li>The stored data could be used for content scoring — if a page is included in the three pages of an event it may be more valuable than others. You may want to target these pages with more upsell or cross-sell opportunities, if so.</li><li>The same scoring logic could apply to authors. If blogs written by certain authors have more page views in a session, then their writing style/topics could be more engaging and you may want to further leverage their content writing skills.</li><li>You can build remarketing audience lists to target these seemingly engaged users to align with your business goals — people who are more engaged with your content could be more likely to convert.</li></ol> <p>So, let’s briefly discuss the anatomy of the custom code that you will need to add to set cookies before we walk through a step by step implementation guide.</p> <h2>Custom cookie code</h2> <p>Cookies, as we all know, are a small text file that is stored in your browser — it helps servers remember who you are and its code is comprised of three elements:</p> <ul><li>a name-value pair containing data</li><li>an expiry date after which it is no longer valid</li><li>the domain and path of the server it should be sent to.</li></ul> <p>You can create a custom code to add to cookies to help you track and store numerous page views in a session across a set of pages.</p> <p>The code below forms the foundation in setting up your cookies. It defines specific rules, such as the events required to trigger the cookie and the expiration of the cookie. I'll provide the code, then break it up into two parts to explain each segment.</p> <h3>The code</h3> <pre>&lt;script&gt; function createCookie(name,value,hours) {</pre> <pre> if (hours) { var date = new Date();</pre> <pre> date.setTime(date.getTime()+(hours*60*60*1000)); var expires = "; expires="+date.toGMTString();</pre> <pre> } else var expires = "";</pre> <pre> document.cookie = name+"="+value+expires+"; path=/"; }</pre> <pre>if (document.querySelectorAll("CSS SELECTOR GOES HERE"").length &gt; 0) { var y = {{NumberOfBlogPagesVisited}}</pre> <pre>if (y == null) { createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',1,1);</pre> <pre>} else if (y == 1) {</pre> <pre> createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',2,1); } </pre> <pre> else if (y == 2) { var newCount = Number(y) + 1;</pre> <pre> createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',newCount,12); }</pre> <pre> if (newCount == 3) {</pre> <pre> dataLayer.push({ 'event': '3 Blog Pages'</pre> <pre> }); }</pre> <pre>} &lt;/script&gt; </pre> <h3>Part 1</h3> <pre>&lt;script&gt; function createCookie(name,value,hours) {</pre> <pre> if (hours) { var date = new Date();</pre> <pre> date.setTime(date.getTime()+(hours*60*60*1000)); var expires = "; expires="+date.toGMTString();</pre> <pre> } else var expires = "";</pre> <pre> document.cookie = name+"="+value+expires+"; path=/"; }</pre> <h4>Explanation:</h4> <p>This function, as the name implies, will create a cookie if you specify a name, a value, and the time a cookie should be valid for. I’ve specified "hours," but if you want to specify "days," you’ll need to iterate variables of the code. Take a peek at this <a href="https://www.quirksmode.org/js/cookies.html">great resource on setting up cookies</a>.</p> <ul></ul> <h3>Part 2</h3> <pre>if (document.querySelectorAll("CSS SELECTOR GOES HERE").length &gt; 0) { var y = {{NumberOfBlogPagesVisited}}</pre> <pre>if (y == null) { createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',1,1);</pre> <pre>} else if (y == 1) {</pre> <pre>createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',2,1); }</pre> <pre>else if (y == 2) { var newCount = Number(y) + 1;</pre> <pre>createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',newCount,12); }</pre> <pre> if (newCount == 3) {</pre> <pre>dataLayer.push({ 'event': '3 Blog Pages'</pre> <pre>}); }</pre> <pre> &lt;/script&gt;</pre> <h4> <br>Explanation:</h4> <p>The second part of this script will count the number of page views:</p> <ul><li>The “CSS SELECTOR GOES HERE”, which I’ve left blank for now, will be where you add your<a href="https://www.link-assistant.com/support/index.php?/Knowledgebase/Article/View/168/7/css-selectors-custom-search-and-usage"> CSS selector</a>. This will instruct the cookie to fire if the CSS selector matches an element on a page. You can use DevTools to hover over an on-page element, like an author name, and copy the CSS selector.</li><li>“y” represents the cookie and "NumberOfBlogPagesVisited" is the name I’ve given to the variable. You’ll want to iterate the variable name as you see fit, but the variable name you set up in GTM should be consistent with the variable name in the code (we’ll go through this during the step-by-step guide).</li><li>“createCookie” is the actual name of your cookie. I’ve called my cookie "BlogPagesVisited." You can call your cookie whatever you want, but again, it’s imperative that the name you give your cookie in the code is consistent with the cookie name field when you go on to create your variable in GTM. Without consistency, the tag won’t fire correctly.</li></ul> <ul><li>You can also change the hours at which the cookie expires. If a user accumulates three page views in a single session, the code specifies a 12 hour expiration. The reasoning behind this is that if someone comes back after a day or two and views another blog, we won’t consider that to be part of the same "session," giving us a clearer insight of the user behaviour of people that trigger three&nbsp;page views in a session.</li><li>This is rather arbitrary, so you can iterate the cookie expiration length to suit your business goals and customers.</li></ul> <p>Note: if you want the event to fire after more than three page views (for example, four-page views) then the code would look like the following:</p> <pre>var y = {{NumberOfBlogPagesVisited}} if (y == null) {</pre> <pre>createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',1,1); }</pre> <pre>else if (y == 1) { createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',2,1);</pre> <pre>} }</pre> <pre>else if (y == 2) { createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',3,1);</pre> <pre>} else if (y == 3) {</pre> <pre>var newCount = Number(y) + 1; createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',newCount,12);</pre> <pre>} </pre> <pre>if (newCount == 4) { dataLayer.push({</pre> <pre>'event': '4 Blog Pages' });</pre> <p><br>Now that we have a basic understanding of the script, we can use GTM to implement everything.</p> <p>First, you’ll need the set up the following "Tags," "Triggers", and&nbsp;"Variables":</p> <h4>Tags</h4> <p>Custom HTML tag: contains the cookie script</p> <p>Event tag: fires the event and sends the data to GA after a third pageview is a session.</p> <h4>Triggers</h4> <p>Page View trigger: defines the conditions that will fire your Custom HTML Tag.</p> <p>Custom Event trigger: defines the conditions that will fire your event.</p> <h4>Variable</h4> <p>First Party Cookie variable: This will define a value that a trigger needs to evaluate whether or not your Custom HTML tag should fire.</p> <p>Now, let's walk through the steps of setting this up in GTM.</p> <h2>Step 1: Create a custom HTML tag</h2> <p>First, we'll need to create a Custom HTML Tag that will contain the cookie script. This time, I’ve added the CSS selector, below:</p> <pre> #content &gt; div.post.type-post.status-publish.format-standard.hentry &gt; div.entry-meta &gt; span &gt; span.author.vcard &gt; a</pre> <p>This matches authors on Distilled’s blog pages, so you’ll want to add your own unique selector.</p> <p>Navigate to Tags &gt; New &gt; Custom HTML Tag &gt; and paste the script into the custom HTML tag box.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-48981.png" data-image="08htdy0x8zz7"></figure> <p>You’ll want to ensure your tag name is descriptive and intuitive. Google recommends the following tag naming convention: Tag Type - Detail - Location. This&nbsp;will allow you to easily identify and sort related tags from the overview tag interface. You can also create separate folders for different projects to keep things more organized.</p> <p>Following Google's example, I’ve called my tag Custom HTML - 3 Page Views Cookie - Blog.</p> <p>Once you’ve created your tag, remember to click save.</p> <h2>Step 2: Create a trigger</h2> <p>Creating a trigger will define the conditions that will fire your custom HTML tag. If you want to learn more about triggers, you can read up on <a href="https://www.simoahava.com/analytics/trigger-guide-google-tag-manager/">Simo Ahava’s trigger guide.</a> </p> <p>Navigate to Triggers &gt; New &gt; PageView.</p> <p>Once you’ve clicked the trigger configuration box, you’ll want to select “Page View” as a trigger type. I’ve also named my trigger Page View - Cookie Trigger - Blog, as I’m going to set up the tag to fire when users land on blog content.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-15780.png" data-image="285nwv155i0y"></figure> <p>Next, you’ll want to define the properties of your trigger.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-20397.png" data-image="00qyr2ijmkp0"></figure> <p>Since we’re relying on the CSS selector to trigger the cookie across the site, select “All Page Views”.</p> <p>Once you’ve defined your trigger, click save.</p> <h2>Step 3: Create your variable</h2> <p>Just like how a Custom HTML tag relies on a trigger to fire, a trigger relies on a variable. A variable defines a value that a trigger needs to evaluate whether or not a tag should fire. If you want to learn more about variables, I recommend reading up on <a href="https://www.simoahava.com/analytics/variable-guide-google-tag-manager/">Simo Ahava’s variable guide.</a> </p> <p>Head over to Variables &gt; User-Defined Variables &gt; Select 1st Party Cookie. You’ll also notice that I’ve named this variable “NumberOfBlogPagesVisited” — you’ll want this variable name to match what is in your cookie code.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-29992.png" data-image="zbb69dly7fca"></figure> <p>Having selected “1st Party Cookie," you’ll now need to input your cookie name. Remember: the cookie name <em>needs</em> to replicate the name you’ve given your cookie in the code. I named my cookie BlogPagesVisited, so I’ve replicated that in the Cookie Name field, as seen below.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-20152.png" data-image="856q2wehpsgy"></figure> <h2>Step 4: Create your event tag</h2> <p>When a user triggers a third-page view, we'll want to have it recorded and sent to GA. To do this, we need to set up an "Event" tag.<br></p> <p>First, navigate to Tags &gt; New &gt; Select Google Analytics - Universal Analytics:</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-25253.png" data-image="8owjkseuoy0g"></figure> <p>Once you’ve made your tag type “Google Analytics - Universal Analytics”, make sure track type is an “Event” and you name your "Category" and "Action" accordingly. You can also fill in a label and value if you wish.&nbsp;I’ve also selected “True” in the “Non-interaction Hit” field, as I still want to track bounce rate metrics.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-69437.jpg" data-image="gi4okfgvaviu"></figure> <p>Finally, you’ll want to select a GA Setting variable that will pass on stored cookie information to a GA property.</p> <h2>Step 5: Create your trigger</h2> <p>This trigger will reference your event.</p> <p>Navigate to Trigger &gt; New &gt; Custom Event</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-24219.png" data-image="fzlnbpi6wgo5"></figure> <p>Once you’ve selected Custom Event, you’ll want to ensure the “Event name” field matches the name you have given your event in the code. In my case, I called the event “3 Blog Pages”.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-20837.png" data-image="wq6r48v8zy11"></figure> <h2>Step 6: Audit your cookie in preview mode</h2> <p>After you’ve selected the preview mode, you should conduct an audit of your cookie to ensure everything is firing properly. To do this, navigate to the site you where you’ve set up cookies.</p> <p>Within the debugging interface, head on over to Page View &gt; Variables.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-20101.png" data-image="t83448p2j8gq"></figure> <p>Next, look to a URL that contains the CSS selector. In the case of the client, we used the CSS selector that referenced an on-page author. All their content pages used the same CSS selector for authors. Using the GTM preview tool you’ll see that “NumberOfBlogPagesVisited” variable has been executed.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-48337.jpg" data-image="kwjv2qdnayj5"></figure> <p>And the actual “BlogPagesVisited” cookie has fired at a value of “1” in Chrome DevTools. To see this, click Inspect &gt; Application &gt; Cookies.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-86290.png" data-image="iujmobdke7z3"></figure> <p>If we skip the second-page view and execute our third-page view on another blog page, you’ll see that both our GA event and our Custom HTML tag fired, as it’s our third-page view.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-41325.png" data-image="nsarnxwh4haw"></figure> <p>You’ll also see the third-page view triggered our cookie value of “3” in Chrome DevTools.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-144523.jpg" data-image="xjtqzs6pk8v0"></figure> <h2>Step 7: Set up your advanced segment</h2> <p>Now that you’ve set up your cookie, you’ll want to pull the stored cookie data into GA, which will allow you to manipulate the data as you see fit.</p> <p>In GA, go to Behaviour &gt; Events &gt; Overview &gt; Add Segment &gt; New Segment &gt; Sequences &gt; Event Action &gt; and then add the event name you specified in your event tag. I specified “3 Blog Page Views."</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-87429.jpg" data-image="vp66uyijnu9b"></figure> <p>And there you have it!&nbsp;</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>Now that you know how to set up a cookie in GTM, you can get heaps of additional insight into the engagement of your content.</p> <p>You also know how also to play around with the code snippet and iterate the number of page views required to fire the cookie event as well as the expiration of the cookies at each stage to suit your needs.</p> <p>I’d be interested to hear what other use cases you can think of for this cookie, or what other types of cookies you set up in GTM and what data you get from them.</p> <p></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/11946593\">Joel.Mesherghi</a></p><p><br>The more you understand the behaviour of your users, the better you can market your product or service — which is why&nbsp;Google Tag Manager (GTM) is a marketer's best friend.&nbsp;With built-in tag templates, such as scroll depth and click tracking, GTM is a powerful tool to measure the engagement and success of your content.&nbsp;</p> <p>If you’re only relying on tag templates in GTM, or the occasionally <a href="https://moz.com/blog/misuses-4-google-analytics-metrics-debunked">limiting out-of-box Google Analytics</a>, then you could be missing out on insights that go beyond normal engagement metrics. Which means you may be getting an incomplete story from your data.</p> <p>This post will teach you how to get even more insight by setting up cookies in GTM. You'll learn how to tag and track multiple page views in a single session, track a specific set number of pages, based on specific on-page content elements, and understand how users are engaging with your content so you can make data-based decisions to better drive conversions.</p> <h2>Example use case</h2> <p>I recently worked with a client that wanted to better understand the behavior of users that landed on their blog content.&nbsp;The main barrier they faced was their URL structure. Their content didn’t live on logical URL structures — they placed their target keyword straight after the root. So, instead of <em>example.com/blog/some-content</em>, their URL structure looked like <em>example.com/some-content</em>.</p> <p></p><p>You can use advanced segments in Google Analytics (GA) to track any number of metrics, but if you don’t have a logically defined URL, then tracking and measuring those metrics becomes a manual and time-consuming practice — especially when there’s a large number of pages to track.</p> <p>Fortunately, leveraging a custom cookie code, which I provide below, helps you to cut through that time, requires little implementation effort, and can surface powerful insights: </p> <p></p> <ol><li>It can indicate that users are engaged with your content and your brand.</li><li>The stored data could be used for content scoring — if a page is included in the three pages of an event it may be more valuable than others. You may want to target these pages with more upsell or cross-sell opportunities, if so.</li><li>The same scoring logic could apply to authors. If blogs written by certain authors have more page views in a session, then their writing style/topics could be more engaging and you may want to further leverage their content writing skills.</li><li>You can build remarketing audience lists to target these seemingly engaged users to align with your business goals — people who are more engaged with your content could be more likely to convert.</li></ol> <p>So, let’s briefly discuss the anatomy of the custom code that you will need to add to set cookies before we walk through a step by step implementation guide.</p> <h2>Custom cookie code</h2> <p>Cookies, as we all know, are a small text file that is stored in your browser — it helps servers remember who you are and its code is comprised of three elements:</p> <ul><li>a name-value pair containing data</li><li>an expiry date after which it is no longer valid</li><li>the domain and path of the server it should be sent to.</li></ul> <p>You can create a custom code to add to cookies to help you track and store numerous page views in a session across a set of pages.</p> <p>The code below forms the foundation in setting up your cookies. It defines specific rules, such as the events required to trigger the cookie and the expiration of the cookie. I'll provide the code, then break it up into two parts to explain each segment.</p> <h3>The code</h3> <pre>&lt;script&gt; function createCookie(name,value,hours) {</pre> <pre> if (hours) { var date = new Date();</pre> <pre> date.setTime(date.getTime()+(hours*60*60*1000)); var expires = "; expires="+date.toGMTString();</pre> <pre> } else var expires = "";</pre> <pre> document.cookie = name+"="+value+expires+"; path=/"; }</pre> <pre>if (document.querySelectorAll("CSS SELECTOR GOES HERE"").length &gt; 0) { var y = {{NumberOfBlogPagesVisited}}</pre> <pre>if (y == null) { createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',1,1);</pre> <pre>} else if (y == 1) {</pre> <pre> createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',2,1); } </pre> <pre> else if (y == 2) { var newCount = Number(y) + 1;</pre> <pre> createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',newCount,12); }</pre> <pre> if (newCount == 3) {</pre> <pre> dataLayer.push({ 'event': '3 Blog Pages'</pre> <pre> }); }</pre> <pre>} &lt;/script&gt; </pre> <h3>Part 1</h3> <pre>&lt;script&gt; function createCookie(name,value,hours) {</pre> <pre> if (hours) { var date = new Date();</pre> <pre> date.setTime(date.getTime()+(hours*60*60*1000)); var expires = "; expires="+date.toGMTString();</pre> <pre> } else var expires = "";</pre> <pre> document.cookie = name+"="+value+expires+"; path=/"; }</pre> <h4>Explanation:</h4> <p>This function, as the name implies, will create a cookie if you specify a name, a value, and the time a cookie should be valid for. I’ve specified "hours," but if you want to specify "days," you’ll need to iterate variables of the code. Take a peek at this <a href="https://www.quirksmode.org/js/cookies.html">great resource on setting up cookies</a>.</p> <ul></ul> <h3>Part 2</h3> <pre>if (document.querySelectorAll("CSS SELECTOR GOES HERE").length &gt; 0) { var y = {{NumberOfBlogPagesVisited}}</pre> <pre>if (y == null) { createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',1,1);</pre> <pre>} else if (y == 1) {</pre> <pre>createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',2,1); }</pre> <pre>else if (y == 2) { var newCount = Number(y) + 1;</pre> <pre>createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',newCount,12); }</pre> <pre> if (newCount == 3) {</pre> <pre>dataLayer.push({ 'event': '3 Blog Pages'</pre> <pre>}); }</pre> <pre> &lt;/script&gt;</pre> <h4> <br>Explanation:</h4> <p>The second part of this script will count the number of page views:</p> <ul><li>The “CSS SELECTOR GOES HERE”, which I’ve left blank for now, will be where you add your<a href="https://www.link-assistant.com/support/index.php?/Knowledgebase/Article/View/168/7/css-selectors-custom-search-and-usage"> CSS selector</a>. This will instruct the cookie to fire if the CSS selector matches an element on a page. You can use DevTools to hover over an on-page element, like an author name, and copy the CSS selector.</li><li>“y” represents the cookie and "NumberOfBlogPagesVisited" is the name I’ve given to the variable. You’ll want to iterate the variable name as you see fit, but the variable name you set up in GTM should be consistent with the variable name in the code (we’ll go through this during the step-by-step guide).</li><li>“createCookie” is the actual name of your cookie. I’ve called my cookie "BlogPagesVisited." You can call your cookie whatever you want, but again, it’s imperative that the name you give your cookie in the code is consistent with the cookie name field when you go on to create your variable in GTM. Without consistency, the tag won’t fire correctly.</li></ul> <ul><li>You can also change the hours at which the cookie expires. If a user accumulates three page views in a single session, the code specifies a 12 hour expiration. The reasoning behind this is that if someone comes back after a day or two and views another blog, we won’t consider that to be part of the same "session," giving us a clearer insight of the user behaviour of people that trigger three&nbsp;page views in a session.</li><li>This is rather arbitrary, so you can iterate the cookie expiration length to suit your business goals and customers.</li></ul> <p>Note: if you want the event to fire after more than three page views (for example, four-page views) then the code would look like the following:</p> <pre>var y = {{NumberOfBlogPagesVisited}} if (y == null) {</pre> <pre>createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',1,1); }</pre> <pre>else if (y == 1) { createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',2,1);</pre> <pre>} }</pre> <pre>else if (y == 2) { createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',3,1);</pre> <pre>} else if (y == 3) {</pre> <pre>var newCount = Number(y) + 1; createCookie('BlogPagesVisited',newCount,12);</pre> <pre>} </pre> <pre>if (newCount == 4) { dataLayer.push({</pre> <pre>'event': '4 Blog Pages' });</pre> <p><br>Now that we have a basic understanding of the script, we can use GTM to implement everything.</p> <p>First, you’ll need the set up the following "Tags," "Triggers", and&nbsp;"Variables":</p> <h4>Tags</h4> <p>Custom HTML tag: contains the cookie script</p> <p>Event tag: fires the event and sends the data to GA after a third pageview is a session.</p> <h4>Triggers</h4> <p>Page View trigger: defines the conditions that will fire your Custom HTML Tag.</p> <p>Custom Event trigger: defines the conditions that will fire your event.</p> <h4>Variable</h4> <p>First Party Cookie variable: This will define a value that a trigger needs to evaluate whether or not your Custom HTML tag should fire.</p> <p>Now, let's walk through the steps of setting this up in GTM.</p> <h2>Step 1: Create a custom HTML tag</h2> <p>First, we'll need to create a Custom HTML Tag that will contain the cookie script. This time, I’ve added the CSS selector, below:</p> <pre> #content &gt; div.post.type-post.status-publish.format-standard.hentry &gt; div.entry-meta &gt; span &gt; span.author.vcard &gt; a</pre> <p>This matches authors on Distilled’s blog pages, so you’ll want to add your own unique selector.</p> <p>Navigate to Tags &gt; New &gt; Custom HTML Tag &gt; and paste the script into the custom HTML tag box.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-48981.png" data-image="08htdy0x8zz7"></figure> <p>You’ll want to ensure your tag name is descriptive and intuitive. Google recommends the following tag naming convention: Tag Type - Detail - Location. This&nbsp;will allow you to easily identify and sort related tags from the overview tag interface. You can also create separate folders for different projects to keep things more organized.</p> <p>Following Google's example, I’ve called my tag Custom HTML - 3 Page Views Cookie - Blog.</p> <p>Once you’ve created your tag, remember to click save.</p> <h2>Step 2: Create a trigger</h2> <p>Creating a trigger will define the conditions that will fire your custom HTML tag. If you want to learn more about triggers, you can read up on <a href="https://www.simoahava.com/analytics/trigger-guide-google-tag-manager/">Simo Ahava’s trigger guide.</a> </p> <p>Navigate to Triggers &gt; New &gt; PageView.</p> <p>Once you’ve clicked the trigger configuration box, you’ll want to select “Page View” as a trigger type. I’ve also named my trigger Page View - Cookie Trigger - Blog, as I’m going to set up the tag to fire when users land on blog content.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-15780.png" data-image="285nwv155i0y"></figure> <p>Next, you’ll want to define the properties of your trigger.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-20397.png" data-image="00qyr2ijmkp0"></figure> <p>Since we’re relying on the CSS selector to trigger the cookie across the site, select “All Page Views”.</p> <p>Once you’ve defined your trigger, click save.</p> <h2>Step 3: Create your variable</h2> <p>Just like how a Custom HTML tag relies on a trigger to fire, a trigger relies on a variable. A variable defines a value that a trigger needs to evaluate whether or not a tag should fire. If you want to learn more about variables, I recommend reading up on <a href="https://www.simoahava.com/analytics/variable-guide-google-tag-manager/">Simo Ahava’s variable guide.</a> </p> <p>Head over to Variables &gt; User-Defined Variables &gt; Select 1st Party Cookie. You’ll also notice that I’ve named this variable “NumberOfBlogPagesVisited” — you’ll want this variable name to match what is in your cookie code.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-29992.png" data-image="zbb69dly7fca"></figure> <p>Having selected “1st Party Cookie," you’ll now need to input your cookie name. Remember: the cookie name <em>needs</em> to replicate the name you’ve given your cookie in the code. I named my cookie BlogPagesVisited, so I’ve replicated that in the Cookie Name field, as seen below.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-20152.png" data-image="856q2wehpsgy"></figure> <h2>Step 4: Create your event tag</h2> <p>When a user triggers a third-page view, we'll want to have it recorded and sent to GA. To do this, we need to set up an "Event" tag.<br></p> <p>First, navigate to Tags &gt; New &gt; Select Google Analytics - Universal Analytics:</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-25253.png" data-image="8owjkseuoy0g"></figure> <p>Once you’ve made your tag type “Google Analytics - Universal Analytics”, make sure track type is an “Event” and you name your "Category" and "Action" accordingly. You can also fill in a label and value if you wish.&nbsp;I’ve also selected “True” in the “Non-interaction Hit” field, as I still want to track bounce rate metrics.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-69437.jpg" data-image="gi4okfgvaviu"></figure> <p>Finally, you’ll want to select a GA Setting variable that will pass on stored cookie information to a GA property.</p> <h2>Step 5: Create your trigger</h2> <p>This trigger will reference your event.</p> <p>Navigate to Trigger &gt; New &gt; Custom Event</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-24219.png" data-image="fzlnbpi6wgo5"></figure> <p>Once you’ve selected Custom Event, you’ll want to ensure the “Event name” field matches the name you have given your event in the code. In my case, I called the event “3 Blog Pages”.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-20837.png" data-image="wq6r48v8zy11"></figure> <h2>Step 6: Audit your cookie in preview mode</h2> <p>After you’ve selected the preview mode, you should conduct an audit of your cookie to ensure everything is firing properly. To do this, navigate to the site you where you’ve set up cookies.</p> <p>Within the debugging interface, head on over to Page View &gt; Variables.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-20101.png" data-image="t83448p2j8gq"></figure> <p>Next, look to a URL that contains the CSS selector. In the case of the client, we used the CSS selector that referenced an on-page author. All their content pages used the same CSS selector for authors. Using the GTM preview tool you’ll see that “NumberOfBlogPagesVisited” variable has been executed.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-48337.jpg" data-image="kwjv2qdnayj5"></figure> <p>And the actual “BlogPagesVisited” cookie has fired at a value of “1” in Chrome DevTools. To see this, click Inspect &gt; Application &gt; Cookies.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-86290.png" data-image="iujmobdke7z3"></figure> <p>If we skip the second-page view and execute our third-page view on another blog page, you’ll see that both our GA event and our Custom HTML tag fired, as it’s our third-page view.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-41325.png" data-image="nsarnxwh4haw"></figure> <p>You’ll also see the third-page view triggered our cookie value of “3” in Chrome DevTools.</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-144523.jpg" data-image="xjtqzs6pk8v0"></figure> <h2>Step 7: Set up your advanced segment</h2> <p>Now that you’ve set up your cookie, you’ll want to pull the stored cookie data into GA, which will allow you to manipulate the data as you see fit.</p> <p>In GA, go to Behaviour &gt; Events &gt; Overview &gt; Add Segment &gt; New Segment &gt; Sequences &gt; Event Action &gt; and then add the event name you specified in your event tag. I specified “3 Blog Page Views."</p> <figure><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/image-87429.jpg" data-image="vp66uyijnu9b"></figure> <p>And there you have it!&nbsp;</p> <h2>Conclusion</h2> <p>Now that you know how to set up a cookie in GTM, you can get heaps of additional insight into the engagement of your content.</p> <p>You also know how also to play around with the code snippet and iterate the number of page views required to fire the cookie event as well as the expiration of the cookies at each stage to suit your needs.</p> <p>I’d be interested to hear what other use cases you can think of for this cookie, or what other types of cookies you set up in GTM and what data you get from them.</p> <p></p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11144058.gif" height="1" width="1"/> Pinterest Catalogs and Shopping Ads Roll Out to More Businesses https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/pinterest-catalogs-and-shopping-ads-roll-out-to-more-businesses/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:83b15451-86e2-327f-c638-ed6045ff37bc Sat, 09 Mar 2019 11:00:12 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-09-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-09-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-09-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-09-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-09-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/SMMT-Show-2019-03-09-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Welcome to this week&#8217;s edition of the Social Media Marketing Talk Show, a news show for marketers who want to stay on the leading edge of social media. On this week&#8217;s Social Media Marketing Talk Show, we explore Pinterest Catalogs and Shopping Ads and new Twitter analytics tools with special guests Alisa Meredith and Madalyn [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/pinterest-catalogs-and-shopping-ads-roll-out-to-more-businesses/">Pinterest Catalogs and Shopping Ads Roll Out to More Businesses</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> How to Become a Powerful Influencer: The Nathan Latka Story https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-become-powerful-influencer-nathan-latka/ Social Media Examiner urn:uuid:b99796dd-cd1b-ba4b-1f2e-feb3b9108551 Fri, 08 Mar 2019 11:00:03 +0000 <img width="1200" height="630" src="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/build-powerful-influence-nathan-latka-1200.png" class="webfeedsFeaturedVisual wp-post-image" alt="" style="display: block; margin-bottom: 5px; clear:both;max-width: 100%;" link_thumbnail="" srcset="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/build-powerful-influence-nathan-latka-1200.png 1200w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/build-powerful-influence-nathan-latka-1200-150x79.png 150w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/build-powerful-influence-nathan-latka-1200-300x158.png 300w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/build-powerful-influence-nathan-latka-1200-768x403.png 768w, https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/build-powerful-influence-nathan-latka-1200-1024x538.png 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /><p>Are you wondering how to grow your social influence? Do you have big dreams but need direction? To explore how to build powerful influence, I interview Nathan Latka. Nathan hosts The Top Entrepreneurs podcast and is the former CEO of Heyo. His new book is How to Be a Capitalist Without Any Capital, and his new TV [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com/how-to-become-powerful-influencer-nathan-latka/">How to Become a Powerful Influencer: The Nathan Latka Story</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.socialmediaexaminer.com">Social Media Marketing | Social Media Examiner</a>.</p> How to Use Domain Authority 2.0 for SEO - Whiteboard Friday http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/9375/11135755 Moz Blog urn:uuid:276accad-09ba-fe77-0f38-190fb74ed391 Fri, 08 Mar 2019 00:05:00 +0000 <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/155620\">Cyrus-Shepard</a></p><p>Domain&nbsp;Authority is an incredibly well-known metric throughout the SEO industry, but what exactly is the right way to use it? In this week's edition of Whiteboard Friday, we're delighted to welcome Cyrus Shepard as he explains both what's new with the new Domain Authority 2.0 update, and how to best harness its power for your own SEO success.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"></p> <div class="wistia_responsive_padding" style="padding:56.25% 0 28px 0;position:relative;"><div class="wistia_responsive_wrapper" style="height:100%;left:0;position:absolute;top:0;width:100%;"><figure><iframe src="https://fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/8pzrkjiir6?seo=false&videoFoam=true" title="How to Use Domain Authority for SEO - Whiteboard Friday Video" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" class="wistia_embed" name="wistia_embed" allowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="" oallowfullscreen="" msallowfullscreen="" width="100%" height="100%"></iframe></figure></div></div> <script src="https://fast.wistia.net/assets/external/E-v1.js" async=""></script> <p></p> <p></p> <figure><a target="_blank" href="https://i.imgur.com/IQAVsfT.jpg"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/4r4a9788-400567.jpg" data-image="kr6wjjobbqh8"></a></figure> <p style="text-align: center;" class="caption">Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!<br> </p> <h2>Video Transcription</h2> <p>Howdy, SEO fans. Welcome to a very special edition of Whiteboard Friday. I'm Cyrus Shepard. I'm honored to be here today with Moz to talk about the <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/learn/seo/domain-authority">new Domain Authority</a>. I want to talk about how to use Domain Authority to do actual SEO. </p> <h2>What is Domain Authority?</h2> <p>Let's start with a definition of what Domain Authority actually is because there's a lot of confusion out there. A Domain Authority is a metric, from 1 to 100, which predicts how well a domain will rank in Google. Now let's break that down a little bit and talk about some of the myths of Domain Authority.&nbsp;</p> <p>Is Domain Authority a ranking factor? No, Domain Authority is not a ranking factor. Does Google use Domain Authority in its algorithm?<strong> No, Google does not use Domain Authority in its algorithm.</strong> Now Google may use some domain-like metrics based on links similar to Domain Authority, but they do not use Domain Authority itself. In fact, it's best if you don't bring it up with them. They don't tend to like that very much. </p> <p>So if it's not a ranking factor, if Google doesn't use it, what does Domain Authority actually do? It does one thing very, very well. <strong>It predicts rankings</strong>. That's what it was built to do. That's what it was designed to do, and it does that job very, very well. And because of that, we can use it for SEO in a lot of different ways. So Domain Authority has been around since 2010, about 8 years now, and since then it's become a very popular metric, used and abused in different ways. </p> <h2>What's New With Domain Authority 2.0?</h2> <p>So what's new about the new Domain Authority that makes it so great and less likely to be abused and gives it so many more uses? Before I go into this, a big shout-out to two of the guys who helped develop this — Russ Jones and Neil Martinsen-Burrell — and many other smart people at Moz. Some of our search scientists did a tremendous job of updating this metric for 2019. </p> <h3>1. Bigger Link Index</h3> <p>So the first thing is the new Domain Authority is based on a new, bigger link index, and that is <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/link-explorer">Link Explorer</a>, which was released last year. It contains 35 trillion links. There are different ways of judging index sizes, but that is one of the biggest or if not the biggest link indexes publicly available that we know of. </p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-4-27227.jpg" data-image="k69rdy1didgw"></figure> <p><strong>Thirty-five trillion links</strong>, to give you an idea of how big that is, if you were to count one link per second, you would be counting for 1.1 million years. That's a lot of links, and that's how many links are in the index that the new Domain Authority is based upon. Second of all, it uses a new machine learning model. Now part of Domain Authority looks at Google rankings and uses machine learning to try to fit the model in to predict how those rankings are stacked. </p> <h3>2. New Machine Learning Model</h3> <p>Now the new Domain Authority not only looks at what's winning in Google search, but it's also looking at what's not ranking in Google search. The old model used to just look at the winners. This makes it much more accurate at determining where you might fall or where any domain or URL might fall within that prediction.&nbsp;</p> <h3>3. Spam Score Incorporation</h3> <p>Next the new Domain Authority incorporates spam detection. </p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/help/link-explorer/link-building/spam-score">Spam Score</a> is a proprietary Moz metric that looks at a bunch of on-page factors, and those have been incorporated into the new metric, which makes it much more reliable.&nbsp;</p> <h3>4. Detects Link Manipulation</h3> <p>It also, and this is very important, the new Domain Authority detects link manipulation. This is people that are buying and selling links, PBNs, things like that.</p> <p>It's much better. In fact, Russ Jones, in a recent webinar, said that link buyers with the new Domain Authority will drop an average of 11 points. So the new Domain Authority is much better at rooting out this link manipulation, just like Google is attempting to do. So it much more closely resembles what Google is attempting. </p> <h3>5. Daily Updates</h3> <p>Lastly, the new Domain Authority is updated daily. This is a huge improvement. The old Domain Authority used to update about approximately every month or so.* The new Domain Authority is constantly being updated, and our search scientists are constantly adding improvements as they come along. <br></p> <p>So it's being updated much more frequently and improved much more frequently. So what does this mean? The new Domain Authority is the most accurate domain-level metric to predict Google search results that we know of. When you look at ranking factors that we know of, like title tags or even generally backlinks, they predict a certain amount of rankings. But Domain Authority blows those out of the water in its ranking potential. </p> <p><em>*Note: Our former link research tool, Open Site Explorer, updated on a monthly cadence, resulting in monthly updates to DA scores. With the launch of Link Explorer in April 2018, Domain Authority scores moved to a daily update cadence. This remains true with the new underlying algorithm, Domain Authority 2.0.</em></p> <h2>How to Use Domain Authority for SEO</h2> <p>So the question is how do we actually use this? We have this tremendous power with Domain Authority that can predict rankings to a certain degree. How do we use this for SEO? So I want to go over some general tips for success.&nbsp;</p> <p>The first tip, <strong>never use Domain Authority in isolation</strong>. You always want to use it with other metrics and in context, because it can only tell you so much. </p> <p>It's a powerful tool, but it's limited. For example, when you're looking at rankings on-page, you're going to want to look at the <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/blog/visual-guide-to-keyword-targeting-onpage-optimization">keyword targeting</a>. You're going to want to look at the <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/learn/seo/on-page-factors">on-page content</a>, the domain history, other things like that. So never use Domain Authority by itself. That's a key tip.&nbsp;</p> <p>Second, you want to keep in mind that the scale of Domain Authority is <strong>roughly logarithmic</strong>. </p> <p>It's not linear. Now what does this mean? It's fairly easy to move from a zero Domain Authority or a one Domain Authority to a ten Domain Authority. You can get a handful of links, and that works pretty well. But moving from like a 70 to an 80 is much, much harder. It gets harder as you get higher. So a DA 40 is not twice a DA 20. </p> <p>It's actually much, much bigger because as you go higher and higher and higher, until you get to 100, it gets much harder. Sites like Google and Facebook, they're near the 100 range, and everything else comes into it. It's almost like a funnel.&nbsp;</p> <p>Next, keep in mind that DA is a <strong>relative metric</strong>. When you're using DA, <em>you always want to compare between competitors or your past scores</em>. </p> <p>Having a DA 50 doesn't really tell you much unless you're comparing it to other DA scores. So if you're looking in Google and a site has a DA of 50, it doesn't make much sense unless you put it in the context of "what do the other sites have?" Are they 40? Are they 60? In that regard, when you're looking at your own DA, you can compare against past performance or competitors. </p> <p>So if I have a 50 this month and a 40 last month, that might tell me that my ability to rank in Google has increased in that time period.&nbsp;</p> <h3>1. Evaluate Potential Value of a Link</h3> <p>So talking about SEO use cases, we have this. We understand how to use it. What are some practical ways to use Domain Authority? Well, a very popular one with the old DA as well is judging the potential value of a link. </p> <p>For instance, you have 1,000 outreach targets that you're thinking about asking for a link, but you only have time for 100 because you want to spend your time wisely and it's not worth it to ask all 1,000. So you might use DA as a filter to find the most valuable link targets. A DA 90 might be more valuable than a DA 5 or a 10. </p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-3-59387.jpg" data-image="xxqsdx97zfrs"></figure> <p>But again, you do not want to use it in isolation. You'd be looking at other metrics as well, such as Page Authority, relevance, and traffic. But still DA might be a valuable metric to add to that experience.&nbsp;</p> <h3>2. Judging Keyword Difficulty</h3> <p>Judging keyword difficulty, judging when you look at SERPs and see what is my potential of ranking for this SERP with this particular keyword? </p> <p>If you look at a SERP and everybody has a DA 95, it's going to be pretty hard to rank in that SERP. But if everybody has a lower DA, you might have a chance. But again, you're going to want to look at other metrics, such as Page Authority, keyword volume, on-page targeting. You can use <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/tools/keyword-difficulty">Moz's Keyword Difficulty Score</a> to run these calculations as well. </p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-3-113418.jpg" data-image="7ooj0zf3zlux"></figure> <h3>3. Campaign Performance</h3> <p>Very popular in the agency world is link campaign performance or campaign performance in general, and this kind of makes sense. If you're building links for a client and you want to show progress, a common way of doing this is showing Domain Authority, meaning that we built these links for you and now your potential to rank is higher. </p> <p>It's a good metric, but it's not the only metric I would report. I would definitely report rankings for targeted keywords. I would report traffic and conversions, because ranking potential is one thing, but I'd actually like to show that those links actually did something. So I'd be more inclined to show the other things. But DA is perfectly fine to report for campaign performance as long as you show it in context. </p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-4-48195.jpg" data-image="nnycavt4pxn5"></figure> <h3>4. Purchasing Existing Domains</h3> <p>A popular one on the marketplaces is buying existing domains. Sites like Flippa often show DA or some similar metric like that. Again, the new Domain Authority is going to be much better at rooting out link manipulation, so these scores might be a little more trustworthy in this sense. But again,<strong> </strong>never buy a domain just on Domain Authority alone. </p> <p>You're going to want to look at a lot of factors, such as the content, the traffic, the domain history, things like that. But Domain Authority might be a good first-line filter for you.&nbsp;</p> <h2>How to Find Domain Authority Metrics</h2> <p>So where can you find the new Domain Authority? It is available right now. You can go to <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/link-explorer">Link Explorer</a>. It's available through the <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/products/api">Moz API</a>. </p> <p>The free MozBar, you can <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/products/pro/seo-toolbar">download the MozBar</a> for free and turn on SERP overlay, and it will show you the DA of everything as you browse through Google.&nbsp;</p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-4-96301.jpg" data-image="mhpebiissjb7"></figure> <p>It's available in <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/products/pro">Moz Campaigns</a> and also <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/explorer">Keyword Explorer</a>. I hope this gives you some ideas about how to use Domain Authority. Please share your ideas and thoughts in the comments below. If you like this video, please share. </p> <p>Thanks a lot, everybody. Have a great day.<br></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.speechpad.com/page/video-transcription/">Video transcription</a> by <a target="_blank" href="http://www.speechpad.com/">Speechpad.com</a> </p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p> <p>Posted by <a href=\"https://moz.com/community/users/155620\">Cyrus-Shepard</a></p><p>Domain&nbsp;Authority is an incredibly well-known metric throughout the SEO industry, but what exactly is the right way to use it? In this week's edition of Whiteboard Friday, we're delighted to welcome Cyrus Shepard as he explains both what's new with the new Domain Authority 2.0 update, and how to best harness its power for your own SEO success.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"></p> <div class="wistia_responsive_padding" style="padding:56.25% 0 28px 0;position:relative;"><div class="wistia_responsive_wrapper" style="height:100%;left:0;position:absolute;top:0;width:100%;"><figure><iframe src="https://fast.wistia.net/embed/iframe/8pzrkjiir6?seo=false&videoFoam=true" title="How to Use Domain Authority for SEO - Whiteboard Friday Video" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" class="wistia_embed" name="wistia_embed" allowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="" oallowfullscreen="" msallowfullscreen="" width="100%" height="100%"></iframe></figure></div></div> <script src="https://fast.wistia.net/assets/external/E-v1.js" async=""></script> <p></p> <p></p> <figure><a target="_blank" href="https://i.imgur.com/IQAVsfT.jpg"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/4r4a9788-400567.jpg" data-image="kr6wjjobbqh8"></a></figure> <p style="text-align: center;" class="caption">Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab!<br> </p> <h2>Video Transcription</h2> <p>Howdy, SEO fans. Welcome to a very special edition of Whiteboard Friday. I'm Cyrus Shepard. I'm honored to be here today with Moz to talk about the <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/learn/seo/domain-authority">new Domain Authority</a>. I want to talk about how to use Domain Authority to do actual SEO. </p> <h2>What is Domain Authority?</h2> <p>Let's start with a definition of what Domain Authority actually is because there's a lot of confusion out there. A Domain Authority is a metric, from 1 to 100, which predicts how well a domain will rank in Google. Now let's break that down a little bit and talk about some of the myths of Domain Authority.&nbsp;</p> <p>Is Domain Authority a ranking factor? No, Domain Authority is not a ranking factor. Does Google use Domain Authority in its algorithm?<strong> No, Google does not use Domain Authority in its algorithm.</strong> Now Google may use some domain-like metrics based on links similar to Domain Authority, but they do not use Domain Authority itself. In fact, it's best if you don't bring it up with them. They don't tend to like that very much. </p> <p>So if it's not a ranking factor, if Google doesn't use it, what does Domain Authority actually do? It does one thing very, very well. <strong>It predicts rankings</strong>. That's what it was built to do. That's what it was designed to do, and it does that job very, very well. And because of that, we can use it for SEO in a lot of different ways. So Domain Authority has been around since 2010, about 8 years now, and since then it's become a very popular metric, used and abused in different ways. </p> <h2>What's New With Domain Authority 2.0?</h2> <p>So what's new about the new Domain Authority that makes it so great and less likely to be abused and gives it so many more uses? Before I go into this, a big shout-out to two of the guys who helped develop this — Russ Jones and Neil Martinsen-Burrell — and many other smart people at Moz. Some of our search scientists did a tremendous job of updating this metric for 2019. </p> <h3>1. Bigger Link Index</h3> <p>So the first thing is the new Domain Authority is based on a new, bigger link index, and that is <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/link-explorer">Link Explorer</a>, which was released last year. It contains 35 trillion links. There are different ways of judging index sizes, but that is one of the biggest or if not the biggest link indexes publicly available that we know of. </p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-4-27227.jpg" data-image="k69rdy1didgw"></figure> <p><strong>Thirty-five trillion links</strong>, to give you an idea of how big that is, if you were to count one link per second, you would be counting for 1.1 million years. That's a lot of links, and that's how many links are in the index that the new Domain Authority is based upon. Second of all, it uses a new machine learning model. Now part of Domain Authority looks at Google rankings and uses machine learning to try to fit the model in to predict how those rankings are stacked. </p> <h3>2. New Machine Learning Model</h3> <p>Now the new Domain Authority not only looks at what's winning in Google search, but it's also looking at what's not ranking in Google search. The old model used to just look at the winners. This makes it much more accurate at determining where you might fall or where any domain or URL might fall within that prediction.&nbsp;</p> <h3>3. Spam Score Incorporation</h3> <p>Next the new Domain Authority incorporates spam detection. </p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/help/link-explorer/link-building/spam-score">Spam Score</a> is a proprietary Moz metric that looks at a bunch of on-page factors, and those have been incorporated into the new metric, which makes it much more reliable.&nbsp;</p> <h3>4. Detects Link Manipulation</h3> <p>It also, and this is very important, the new Domain Authority detects link manipulation. This is people that are buying and selling links, PBNs, things like that.</p> <p>It's much better. In fact, Russ Jones, in a recent webinar, said that link buyers with the new Domain Authority will drop an average of 11 points. So the new Domain Authority is much better at rooting out this link manipulation, just like Google is attempting to do. So it much more closely resembles what Google is attempting. </p> <h3>5. Daily Updates</h3> <p>Lastly, the new Domain Authority is updated daily. This is a huge improvement. The old Domain Authority used to update about approximately every month or so.* The new Domain Authority is constantly being updated, and our search scientists are constantly adding improvements as they come along. <br></p> <p>So it's being updated much more frequently and improved much more frequently. So what does this mean? The new Domain Authority is the most accurate domain-level metric to predict Google search results that we know of. When you look at ranking factors that we know of, like title tags or even generally backlinks, they predict a certain amount of rankings. But Domain Authority blows those out of the water in its ranking potential. </p> <p><em>*Note: Our former link research tool, Open Site Explorer, updated on a monthly cadence, resulting in monthly updates to DA scores. With the launch of Link Explorer in April 2018, Domain Authority scores moved to a daily update cadence. This remains true with the new underlying algorithm, Domain Authority 2.0.</em></p> <h2>How to Use Domain Authority for SEO</h2> <p>So the question is how do we actually use this? We have this tremendous power with Domain Authority that can predict rankings to a certain degree. How do we use this for SEO? So I want to go over some general tips for success.&nbsp;</p> <p>The first tip, <strong>never use Domain Authority in isolation</strong>. You always want to use it with other metrics and in context, because it can only tell you so much. </p> <p>It's a powerful tool, but it's limited. For example, when you're looking at rankings on-page, you're going to want to look at the <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/blog/visual-guide-to-keyword-targeting-onpage-optimization">keyword targeting</a>. You're going to want to look at the <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/learn/seo/on-page-factors">on-page content</a>, the domain history, other things like that. So never use Domain Authority by itself. That's a key tip.&nbsp;</p> <p>Second, you want to keep in mind that the scale of Domain Authority is <strong>roughly logarithmic</strong>. </p> <p>It's not linear. Now what does this mean? It's fairly easy to move from a zero Domain Authority or a one Domain Authority to a ten Domain Authority. You can get a handful of links, and that works pretty well. But moving from like a 70 to an 80 is much, much harder. It gets harder as you get higher. So a DA 40 is not twice a DA 20. </p> <p>It's actually much, much bigger because as you go higher and higher and higher, until you get to 100, it gets much harder. Sites like Google and Facebook, they're near the 100 range, and everything else comes into it. It's almost like a funnel.&nbsp;</p> <p>Next, keep in mind that DA is a <strong>relative metric</strong>. When you're using DA, <em>you always want to compare between competitors or your past scores</em>. </p> <p>Having a DA 50 doesn't really tell you much unless you're comparing it to other DA scores. So if you're looking in Google and a site has a DA of 50, it doesn't make much sense unless you put it in the context of "what do the other sites have?" Are they 40? Are they 60? In that regard, when you're looking at your own DA, you can compare against past performance or competitors. </p> <p>So if I have a 50 this month and a 40 last month, that might tell me that my ability to rank in Google has increased in that time period.&nbsp;</p> <h3>1. Evaluate Potential Value of a Link</h3> <p>So talking about SEO use cases, we have this. We understand how to use it. What are some practical ways to use Domain Authority? Well, a very popular one with the old DA as well is judging the potential value of a link. </p> <p>For instance, you have 1,000 outreach targets that you're thinking about asking for a link, but you only have time for 100 because you want to spend your time wisely and it's not worth it to ask all 1,000. So you might use DA as a filter to find the most valuable link targets. A DA 90 might be more valuable than a DA 5 or a 10. </p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-3-59387.jpg" data-image="xxqsdx97zfrs"></figure> <p>But again, you do not want to use it in isolation. You'd be looking at other metrics as well, such as Page Authority, relevance, and traffic. But still DA might be a valuable metric to add to that experience.&nbsp;</p> <h3>2. Judging Keyword Difficulty</h3> <p>Judging keyword difficulty, judging when you look at SERPs and see what is my potential of ranking for this SERP with this particular keyword? </p> <p>If you look at a SERP and everybody has a DA 95, it's going to be pretty hard to rank in that SERP. But if everybody has a lower DA, you might have a chance. But again, you're going to want to look at other metrics, such as Page Authority, keyword volume, on-page targeting. You can use <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/tools/keyword-difficulty">Moz's Keyword Difficulty Score</a> to run these calculations as well. </p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-3-113418.jpg" data-image="7ooj0zf3zlux"></figure> <h3>3. Campaign Performance</h3> <p>Very popular in the agency world is link campaign performance or campaign performance in general, and this kind of makes sense. If you're building links for a client and you want to show progress, a common way of doing this is showing Domain Authority, meaning that we built these links for you and now your potential to rank is higher. </p> <p>It's a good metric, but it's not the only metric I would report. I would definitely report rankings for targeted keywords. I would report traffic and conversions, because ranking potential is one thing, but I'd actually like to show that those links actually did something. So I'd be more inclined to show the other things. But DA is perfectly fine to report for campaign performance as long as you show it in context. </p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-4-48195.jpg" data-image="nnycavt4pxn5"></figure> <h3>4. Purchasing Existing Domains</h3> <p>A popular one on the marketplaces is buying existing domains. Sites like Flippa often show DA or some similar metric like that. Again, the new Domain Authority is going to be much better at rooting out link manipulation, so these scores might be a little more trustworthy in this sense. But again,<strong> </strong>never buy a domain just on Domain Authority alone. </p> <p>You're going to want to look at a lot of factors, such as the content, the traffic, the domain history, things like that. But Domain Authority might be a good first-line filter for you.&nbsp;</p> <h2>How to Find Domain Authority Metrics</h2> <p>So where can you find the new Domain Authority? It is available right now. You can go to <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/link-explorer">Link Explorer</a>. It's available through the <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/products/api">Moz API</a>. </p> <p>The free MozBar, you can <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/products/pro/seo-toolbar">download the MozBar</a> for free and turn on SERP overlay, and it will show you the DA of everything as you browse through Google.&nbsp;</p> <figure class="full-width"><img src="http://d1avok0lzls2w.cloudfront.net/uploads/blog/screen-shot-2019-03-07-at-4-96301.jpg" data-image="mhpebiissjb7"></figure> <p>It's available in <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/products/pro">Moz Campaigns</a> and also <a target="_blank" href="https://moz.com/explorer">Keyword Explorer</a>. I hope this gives you some ideas about how to use Domain Authority. Please share your ideas and thoughts in the comments below. If you like this video, please share. </p> <p>Thanks a lot, everybody. Have a great day.<br></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.speechpad.com/page/video-transcription/">Video transcription</a> by <a target="_blank" href="http://www.speechpad.com/">Speechpad.com</a> </p><br /><p><a href="https://moz.com/moztop10">Sign up for The Moz Top 10</a>, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!</p><img src="http://feedpress.me/9375/11135755.gif" height="1" width="1"/>