Catalysis News http://feed.informer.com/digests/KLQN7YPJZV/feeder Catalysis News Respective post owners and feed distributors Tue, 22 Nov 2016 12:42:09 -0600 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ Podcast, The Lens – COVID-19 8. Practical Steps for Supporting People in Times of Uncertainty https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/podcast-lens-covid-19-8-practical-steps-supporting-people-times-uncertainty/ ThedaCare Center for Healthcare Value » Articles & News urn:uuid:a13317a0-d485-fe5d-b718-3833397f488c Mon, 06 Jul 2020 15:14:50 -0500 <p>            The COVID-19 pandemic turned many of our lives upside down and inside out, which highlighted the need for leaders to be able to help their staff by translating behavior and shifting thinking to help keep work environments positive for everyone. Today Kerri Burchill, Organizational Development Leader at Southern Illinois [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/podcast-lens-covid-19-8-practical-steps-supporting-people-times-uncertainty/">Podcast, The Lens &#8211; COVID-19 8. Practical Steps for Supporting People in Times of Uncertainty</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p> <p><iframe src="https://anchor.fm/the-lens-by-catalysis/embed/episodes/COVID-19-8--Practical-Steps-for-Supporting-People-in-Times-of-Uncertainty-egd0ue" width="400px" height="102px" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"></iframe></p> <div><a href="https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-lens/id1498519918?uo=4"><img class=" wp-image-15447 alignnone" src="https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/apple-podcasts-300x90.jpg" alt="" width="253" height="76" srcset="https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/apple-podcasts-300x90.jpg 300w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/apple-podcasts-1024x308.jpg 1024w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/apple-podcasts-768x231.jpg 768w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/apple-podcasts-90x27.jpg 90w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/apple-podcasts-150x45.jpg 150w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/apple-podcasts-250x75.jpg 250w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/apple-podcasts.jpg 1129w" sizes="(max-width: 253px) 100vw, 253px" /></a>             <a href="https://open.spotify.com/show/5X3IctwRvIYFKgHCPzGB6f" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img class=" wp-image-15448 alignnone" src="https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/images-300x83.png" alt="" width="246" height="68" srcset="https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/images-300x83.png 300w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/images-90x25.png 90w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/images-150x41.png 150w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/images-250x69.png 250w, https://createvalue.org/wp-content/uploads/images.png 428w" sizes="(max-width: 246px) 100vw, 246px" /></a></div> <div> <p>The COVID-19 pandemic turned many of our lives upside down and inside out, which highlighted the need for leaders to be able to help their staff by translating behavior and shifting thinking to help keep work environments positive for everyone. Today Kerri Burchill, Organizational Development Leader at Southern Illinois Health, will share a methodology that leaders can use to help staff who are struggling in the rapidly changing environment that COVID-19 has presented.</p> <p>In this episode you will hear examples of conversations around tough topics facing healthcare workers across the country. These scenarios demonstrate the 4 step process that Kerri Burchill teaches.</p> </div> <p><a href="https://createvalue.org/blog/four-strategies-supporting-staff-uncertain-times/">Read more</a> about these strategies</p> <p>Check out our <a href="https://createvalue.org/workshops/">NEW Virtual Learning</a> opportunities</p> <p><a href="https://anchor.fm/the-lens-by-catalysis" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer">Visit our podcast channel</a></p> <p>Or find The Lens, by Catalysis wherever you get your podcasts</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/podcast-lens-covid-19-8-practical-steps-supporting-people-times-uncertainty/">Podcast, The Lens &#8211; COVID-19 8. Practical Steps for Supporting People in Times of Uncertainty</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p> When is it safe to go to the doctor again? Ask four questions https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/when-is-it-safe-to-go-to-the-doctor-again-ask-four-questions/ ThedaCare Center for Healthcare Value » Articles & News urn:uuid:86790536-970a-93fd-9e48-816afe3a915d Mon, 29 Jun 2020 09:08:27 -0500 <p>Patient Volumes have not returned to normal in most health care organizations in the U.S.  One of the main reasons is people are scared to go to the doctor’s office. We might get infected from workers, other patients, even doctors. To assure it’s safe look for the following four things. Is a drive through visit [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/when-is-it-safe-to-go-to-the-doctor-again-ask-four-questions/">When is it safe to go to the doctor again? Ask four questions</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p> <p>Patient Volumes have not returned to normal in most health care organizations in the U.S.  One of the main reasons is people are scared to go to the doctor’s office. We might get infected from workers, other patients, even doctors. To assure it’s safe look for the following four things.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Is a drive through <u>visit</u> available? </strong>Everyone has heard about drive through testing; what about a drive through doctor’s visit? At the Christie clinic, a multispecialty physician clinic in Champaign Illinois, urgent care visits have been completely redesigned. As the number of COVID cases diminished at the beginning of May, non-COVID patients weren’t coming in for urgent care visits. Patients thought COVID patients might be seen in the clinic increasing their risk of contagion. Christie clinic created a process based on a “care at the curbside” idea from staff. They dedicated an urgent care clinic to COVID curbside care and started seeing patients in their cars. When symptomatic patients called their primary provider at other sites, they were directed to the COVID designated urgent care center. Providers, mostly advanced practitioners, in protective gear stood in a makeshift car port on the side of the building and not only tested suspected COVID patients but also examined them. If lab or x-rays were ordered, patients entered the clinic through a side door and donned PPE given to them by staff. No other patients were exposed because they didn’t check in at the desk and they didn’t sit in the waiting room. Patients went directly back to their car after testing to wait for results and prescriptions. By mid-May the waiting room at the urgent care clinic was empty most days despite seeing close to the same number of patients each day.</li> <li><strong>Do you have to wait more than 5 minutes for anything?</strong> If the waiting room is even half full there is a problem. In addition to urgent care, Christie runs many outpatient clinics. What they learned from the urgent care center were applied to the clinics. Doctors realized that the traditional way of checking in patients was an infection waiting to happen. At peak hours, as many as 10 people were standing in line. A team of medical assistants (MAs) and nurses had the idea to prescreen patients on the phone thereby reducing the face time in the clinic. They could easily gather information before the patient arrived at the clinic and speed the visit process. The goal was to have no one waiting anywhere. Pre-COVID, the MAs would room the patients. It took 11 minutes. With virtual rooming the day before, they reduced that time to 3 minutes. They gathered the usual information including medication reconciliation, allergies, med/surg history and chief complaint without seeing the patient. The result: 70% of the patients were prescreened. As of June 15<sup>th</sup>, prescreening has been more difficult due to people returning to work and not being available, but still the rate has been maintained at 60%.</li> <li><strong>How many times do you have to register?</strong> Utilizing the principle of one-piece flow, patients were instructed to come only 5 minutes before their scheduled appointment unless they had ambulation issues. Pre-COVID all patients had to register first at central scheduling at Christie’s large multispecialty clinic. There are 115 physicians and 85 advanced practitioners covering 40 departments at all of the campuses. That could take several minutes waiting in line. Then they had to register again at the specific specialty office. Then they sat in the waiting room. But the Christie team that included staff from clinical serves, facilities, and business services created a new process in which there was fast check-in at the clinic, meaning no stop at central scheduling. For return patients this takes 3 minutes, for new patients about 5 minutes. The patient goes directly from registration to the exam room therefore no public waiting.</li> <li><strong>Is a video visit available</strong>? Outpatient visits moved to phone visits at Christie Clinic early in the pandemic but have now transitioned to video visits. About 20% of all visits are virtual. Video visits have had unintended positive consequences. Providers who were chronically behind in their daily schedule began to intersperse video visits with face-to-face visits. This allowed them to catch-up as the video visits were usually check-ins for follow-up, which were less intensive and could be accomplished faster than face-to-face visits. With patients arriving only 5 minutes before their appointment and doctors generally on time, patients didn’t see each other in the waiting room or anywhere else along the way. Some patients did not want to be seen in the clinic despite the above processes designed to protect them.  Physicians have realized how effective video visits can be. A physician recently commented, “I can see where the patient lives, meet their cat, and have a more personal connection, I could never do that at the clinic”. Pre-COVD Christie clinic saw 2200 patients a day as of the week of June 15<sup>th</sup> they were at 2000 +per day and increasing.</li> </ol> <p>There are some important lessons from the Christie experience that are applicable to all providers anywhere. Flow management is one. Flow was at the center of the work in curbside care, registration, virtual pre-visit, and even video visits. Whether patients were driving up in cars or arriving immediately before their scheduled appointment, flow was the key to not being exposed to patients who might be sick. Improved flow required doctors to change. Standing in car ports waiting for patients and in car examinations is not usual physician practice and seeing patients on a video screen isn’t either.</p> <p>They kept constant focus on reducing wait times. Every improvement reduced or eliminated waiting and therefore, reduced contagion opportunities. At the same time overproduction was reduced. Single registration is a great example of eliminating nonvalue added steps in a process.</p> <p>Leaders and clinicians applied the fundamental principle of customer value and embraced radical redesign ideas over incremental change. The change in thinking led to the remarkable work at Christie Clinic. The work is fluid, however. Changes in the financing of care allowed Christie to innovate. Medicare early in the pandemic began reimbursing video outpatient clinic visits at the same rate as face to face. Most commercial insurers followed suit. This has allowed for the continuation and potential growth of video visits. Some clinics in Northern California are reporting as many as 40% of visits are now virtual. But will this financing be continued?</p> <p>The innovations at Christie are facing other barriers.  As the temperatures have risen this summer, providers are complaining about standing outside in the overheated car port. Winter will be a different challenge. But front-line design teams are well versed in applying PDSA cycles to improve the standard while capturing new staff ideas. In this time of crisis every new idea may have a chance to be tested and our old thinking about care delivery forgotten so we can create better and safer ways and follow the lead of Christie clinic.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/when-is-it-safe-to-go-to-the-doctor-again-ask-four-questions/">When is it safe to go to the doctor again? Ask four questions</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p> Health Care Workers Protect Us. It’s Time to Protect Them. https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/health-care-workers-protect-us-time-protect/ ThedaCare Center for Healthcare Value » Articles & News urn:uuid:54e9b9a2-6b02-793d-ef58-23ce1d1c293a Fri, 19 Jun 2020 09:17:32 -0500 <p>Before Covid-19 pandemic struck, the U.S. health care industry suffered more than 550,000 work-related injuries and illnesses per year, or 150,000 more than any other industry in the country. Therefore, it is no surprise that health care workers have been harmed at tragic rates during the Covid-19 pandemic. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/health-care-workers-protect-us-time-protect/">Health Care Workers Protect Us. It’s Time to Protect Them.</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p> <p>Before Covid-19 pandemic struck, the U.S. health care industry suffered <a href="https://www.bls.gov/iif/soii-charts-2018.pdf">more than 550,000 work-related injuries and illnesses per year</a>, or 150,000 more than any other industry in the country. Therefore, it is no surprise that health care workers have been harmed at tragic rates during the Covid-19 pandemic. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as of June 4, 72,346 U.S. health care workers had been infected, a figure it acknowledges is an undercount. A comprehensive <a href="https://khn.org/news/exclusive-investigation-nearly-600-and-counting-us-health-workers-have-died-of-covid-19/">national analysis</a> indicates that almost 600 health care workers have died.</p> <p>Every instance of a health care worker being harmed on the job is preventable. Every single one. So it is time to finally take the safety of health care staff seriously. It is time for the industry to go from the worst to the first in safety. A few visionary leaders and organizations have set out on that course and proven that it is possible. Drawing from their practices before and during the pandemic, we offer five leadership imperatives.</p> <p><a href="https://hbr.org/2020/06/health-care-workers-protect-us-its-time-to-protect-them">Read full article by John Toussaint, MD and Ken Segal in HBR</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <h3><strong>Related Items</strong></h3> <p>NEW virtual workshop: <a href="https://createvalue.org/workshops/">Principles and Behaviors of Operational Excellence</a></p> <p>NEW virtual workshop: <a href="https://createvalue.org/workshops/">Creating a Lean Management System </a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/health-care-workers-protect-us-time-protect/">Health Care Workers Protect Us. It’s Time to Protect Them.</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p> Cleveland Clinic: Creating a Safe Workspace https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/cleveland-clinic-creating-safe-workspace/ ThedaCare Center for Healthcare Value » Articles & News urn:uuid:4cecfe9a-3ace-9ca5-0333-23d9f21c932b Mon, 15 Jun 2020 09:14:41 -0500 <p>Catalysis Healthcare Value Network member, Cleveland Clinic, has compiled information about creating a safe workplace for healthcare and other industries. The COVID-19 pandemic has created a number of new challenges, especially for businesses looking to reopen. While managers and employees may feel a sense of urgency to get their business back to normal as soon as possible, [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/cleveland-clinic-creating-safe-workspace/">Cleveland Clinic: Creating a Safe Workspace</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p> <p>Catalysis Healthcare Value Network member, Cleveland Clinic, has compiled information about creating a safe workplace for healthcare and other industries.</p> <p>The <a href="https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/21214-coronavirus">COVID-19</a> pandemic has created a number of new challenges, especially for businesses looking to reopen. While managers and employees may feel a sense of urgency to get their business back to normal as soon as possible, there are new guidelines and revised practices that should be followed to allow for a safe, stable return.</p> <p>These resources will help you through the key steps of reopening your business in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, including:</p> <ul> <li>Making sure your facility is fully clean, disinfected and equipped with a blueprint for maintaining safe conditions.</li> <li>Setting up a support system in place for employees as they return to work and adjust to new realities and emotional challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic.</li> <li>Creating a plan for a safe work environment that protects employees and customers alike from risks connected to COVID-19, including exposure and transmission.</li> </ul> <p><a href="https://my.clevelandclinic.org/departments/employer-healthcare-solutions/covid-19-workplace-safety">See Cleveland Clinic Resources</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/cleveland-clinic-creating-safe-workspace/">Cleveland Clinic: Creating a Safe Workspace</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p> NYC Health + Hospitals’ Rapid Responses To COVID-19 Were Built On A Foundation Of Emergency Management, Incident Command, and Analytics https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/nyc-health-hospitals-rapid-responses-covid-19-built-foundation-emergency-management-incident-command-analytics/ ThedaCare Center for Healthcare Value » Articles & News urn:uuid:18c8ab89-eeb9-f167-bf27-58fdc1a5d04a Mon, 15 Jun 2020 08:33:43 -0500 <p>March 1, 2020, marked the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in New York City. It was not long before the disease had reached epidemic proportions. As cases surged, NYC Health + Hospitals (NYC H+H)—the United States’ oldest and largest municipal health care delivery system—began providing care to many, many patients fighting for their lives. Soon, [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/nyc-health-hospitals-rapid-responses-covid-19-built-foundation-emergency-management-incident-command-analytics/">NYC Health + Hospitals’ Rapid Responses To COVID-19 Were Built On A Foundation Of Emergency Management, Incident Command, and Analytics</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p> <p>March 1, 2020, marked the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in New York City. It was not long before the disease had reached epidemic proportions. As cases surged, NYC Health + Hospitals (NYC H+H)—the United States’ oldest and largest municipal health care delivery system—began providing care to many, many patients fighting for their lives. Soon, it became clear that our community represented, essentially, the very epicenter of the epicenter of this terrible outbreak. NYC H+H has a rich history of responding to a wide range of infectious disease outbreaks, but the impacts of COVID-19 have exceeded all modern-day epidemics, emerging as the worst public health crisis in a century.</p> <p>At its most fundamental, our challenge has been a race against time to open more hospital beds, onboard more staff, procure more equipment and supplies, develop new systems, and above all, save lives. Just as fast as these resources were brought online, the ongoing surge in demand consumed them, effectively testing every facet of our health care system, from postacute care to ambulatory care to (most intensely) our 11 acute care hospitals. COVID-19 created patient loads well beyond the system’s baseline capacities, especially in intensive care units (ICUs). From March through May of 2020, NYC H+H admitted 10,437 patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19, including more than 2,000 patients to the ICU.</p> <p>This post serves as the introduction to a series of articles describing how our system grappled with this unprecedented crisis. Our hope is that our early experiences may offer useful lessons for those facing the pandemic’s ongoing and future threats—health system leaders, policy makers, elected officials, researchers, patients, caregivers, and clinicians, among many others.</p> <p><a href="https://www.healthaffairs.org/do/10.1377/hblog20200609.171463/full/">Read full article in Health Affairs</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org/articles_and_news/nyc-health-hospitals-rapid-responses-covid-19-built-foundation-emergency-management-incident-command-analytics/">NYC Health + Hospitals’ Rapid Responses To COVID-19 Were Built On A Foundation Of Emergency Management, Incident Command, and Analytics</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://createvalue.org">Catalysis</a>.</p>