BREAKING NEWS: Psychology & Self-Help http://feed.informer.com/digests/JRPDNCRBYB/feeder BREAKING NEWS: Psychology & Self-Help Respective post owners and feed distributors Fri, 14 Feb 2014 11:59:17 -0500 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ A Guy’s Neuroscientist https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/darwins-subterranean-world/201906/guy-s-neuroscientist Psychology Today urn:uuid:113e4f29-5ecc-3626-c72a-ef57fdd1d96d Thu, 20 Jun 2019 01:42:08 -0400 Dr. Joel Alexander of Western Oregon University was tragically taken from us this week. He was a brilliant neuroscientist and a regular guy—at the same time. A rare combination. Princeton Study Uses AI to Find Autism Clues in “Junk” DNA https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-future-brain/201906/princeton-study-uses-ai-find-autism-clues-in-junk-dna Psychology Today urn:uuid:82dce78f-6703-8e7a-d3d4-e317c4e1cc27 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 23:35:37 -0400 Recently, Princeton University-led researchers used genomics and artificial intelligence (AI) deep learning to identify the contribution of noncoding mutations to autism risk. Rolling the Dice with Other People's Lives https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-human-equation/201906/rolling-the-dice-other-peoples-lives Psychology Today urn:uuid:11ef47ac-7431-0005-bd8a-ef6ab2be7a31 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 21:49:52 -0400 For pathological gamblers, what starts out as fun turns into a compulsion that takes over their lives. And for anyone who stands in the way, the results can be deadly. Time Management Tips for Introverted Parents https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/live-life-creatively/201906/time-management-tips-introverted-parents Psychology Today urn:uuid:fd4e9f9d-cb12-c3d6-9fd4-1b79c374cf92 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 19:57:48 -0400 Are you an introvert looking to find balance as a new parent? Here are four tips to help you make space for you and your little one. Serotonin Malfunctions May Be a Harbinger of Parkinson's https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-athletes-way/201906/serotonin-malfunctions-may-be-harbinger-parkinsons Psychology Today urn:uuid:2b061cdf-676b-39b7-be66-e3c9868d187d Wed, 19 Jun 2019 18:36:57 -0400 Years before a Parkinson's disease patient experiences dopamine-related problems with movement, the serotonin system may start malfunctioning in subtle ways, a new study reports. Self-Compassion Can Help Prevent Re-Victimization https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-compassion-chronicles/201906/self-compassion-can-help-prevent-re-victimization Psychology Today urn:uuid:8807beda-c6c6-7487-11ff-1300c6fdb08b Wed, 19 Jun 2019 18:33:36 -0400 By practicing self-compassion former victims of child sexual abuse can help prevent being sexually re-traumatized as adults. Anybody Can Serve https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/all-grown/201906/anybody-can-serve Psychology Today urn:uuid:5693707a-a843-ec50-9acc-938d4cd3ac00 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 18:29:05 -0400 Does the question of how you can make a difference seem overwhelming? A few simple answers can help considerably. What It Takes to Be a Champion https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/points-the-board/201906/what-it-takes-be-champion Psychology Today urn:uuid:31df4dc3-a41a-cc60-78a7-6e43f95a5071 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 18:23:47 -0400 Part 1: How the Toronto Raptors exemplified resilience in ways we can all learn from. Stress During Pregnancy and Mental Disorders in Children https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/finding-new-home/201906/stress-during-pregnancy-and-mental-disorders-in-children Psychology Today urn:uuid:629c5cc2-0e50-f1fb-57c9-dbba4e7c40d7 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 17:55:38 -0400 New research suggests mothers’ subjective stress during pregnancy is linked to psychiatric disorders in their children. A Stab to the Heart: Mothering Middle Schoolers https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/girls-women-and-wellness/201906/stab-the-heart-mothering-middle-schoolers Psychology Today urn:uuid:58cd9729-15d2-a4e3-13e9-3e25c6d8742d Wed, 19 Jun 2019 17:11:33 -0400 Does parenting a middle schooler sometimes feel like a stab to the heart? A few strategies for helping parents cope during this difficult season. Solo Sex https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/underneath-the-sheets/201906/solo-sex Psychology Today urn:uuid:5282245e-404e-934c-a6e0-6b3402b70344 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 16:41:56 -0400 Expanding your definition of what "solo sex" is may help you have a better sex life. Do Tests Stress Out Your Child? https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/radical-teaching/201906/do-tests-stress-out-your-child Psychology Today urn:uuid:219f20a4-b449-e525-00b4-cce6b5b03bcc Wed, 19 Jun 2019 16:37:26 -0400 When kids have parental support, emotional awareness and practiced skills of emotional self-regulation, even the most challenging tests can be approached with positive attitudes. For Some, Self-Tracking Means More Than Self-Help https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/hacking-life/201906/some-self-tracking-means-more-self-help Psychology Today urn:uuid:16d91c43-f2a5-9595-d696-49274db08529 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 16:32:24 -0400 What does all that self-tracked data mean to you? How to Effectively Manage Your High Blood Pressure https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/how-healing-works/201906/how-effectively-manage-your-high-blood-pressure Psychology Today urn:uuid:398336ce-de2b-c9af-d799-0083c2f6e416 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 16:25:48 -0400 Hypertension is the largest preventable and treatable risk factor for chronic disease in the world. We provided a list of ways to help keep your blood pressure under control Toxic Behavior Can Stifle a Gratitude Attitude https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/love-and-gratitude/201906/toxic-behavior-can-stifle-gratitude-attitude Psychology Today urn:uuid:84c168f7-a793-7133-dc44-439cd664579c Wed, 19 Jun 2019 15:14:20 -0400 Researchers suggest avoiding toxic behavior whenever possible. Just think of what happens when you touch poison ivy. Do We Need to Respect Others' Memories When Forming Our Own? https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/maybe-its-just-me/201906/do-we-need-respect-others-memories-when-forming-our-own Psychology Today urn:uuid:d916ffa6-257d-6c47-3d9f-b9f43c6717ff Wed, 19 Jun 2019 14:47:49 -0400 In my last past, I discussed the role we play in forming our memories—but what if we remember things differently than someone else? Should their opinion "count" in our memories? The Challenges and Benefits of Pet Ownership for Seniors https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/fellow-creatures/201906/the-challenges-and-benefits-pet-ownership-seniors Psychology Today urn:uuid:f4352d53-7e2f-595e-f95f-1cdf00158ab7 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 14:17:01 -0400 A new report that reveals a need for more pet-friendly housing and family conversations about worst-case scenarios. Is Empathy Your Greatest Strength and Greatest Weakness? https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/presence-mind/201906/is-empathy-your-greatest-strength-and-greatest-weakness Psychology Today urn:uuid:c23fbf4c-18ff-4714-efda-60a95d75ebf6 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 14:16:35 -0400 Does your empathy get you into helping trouble? Here's how to manage your empathy for healthy helping boundaries. Why Young People Are So Anxious and Depressed https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-human-beast/201906/why-young-people-are-so-anxious-and-depressed Psychology Today urn:uuid:a03530c6-a93b-fc10-cf3b-1075ed2148df Wed, 19 Jun 2019 14:05:53 -0400 A startling increase in depression for adolescents and young adults suggests they are being attacked by something very recent, like social media. Free Live Webinar: Breaking Free from Perfectionism (Ignore that Voice in Your Head!) https://psychcentral.com/blog/free-live-webinar-breaking-free-from-perfectionism-ignore-that-voice-in-your-head/ World of Psychology urn:uuid:6aae0eb2-87c6-3a78-f6f2-fe5e3aed80b1 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 13:30:28 -0400 (Please note: Registration is required. This free live webinar will be recorded and a copy made available to all who register.) Perfectionism can be far too easily defined as your... <p>(Please note: Registration is required. This free live webinar will be recorded and a copy made available to all <a href="https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3196058600159602435" rel="noopener nofollow" target="newwin">who register</a>.)</p> <p>Perfectionism can be far too easily defined as your most reliable skill. You’re known to get the job done and make it look easy as you go. Your life is extremely busy, but you always make time for others when they need you. You’re upbeat, each smiling selfie another testament to how good your life really is. How could you possibly question the value of creating what looks to others like the <span class="details">perfect life? Because underneath perfectionism can lie intense loneliness and despair, stuffed away because pain or vulnerability isn’t allowed in this perfect-looking world, and never was encouraged or supported in the past.<br /> </span></p> <p><span id="more-133641"></span></p> <h3><span class="details">What you can look forward to learning: </span></h3> <p><span class="details">1) The ten characteristics of perfectly hidden depression (when perfectionism is masking depression).</span></p> <p><span class="details">2) Three forms of perfectionism and which one is the most dangerous.</span></p> <p><span class="details">3) How to discover the shaming inner voice (She calls hers “Bob”) that keeps you silent.</span></p> <p><span class="details">4) How to identify and question the rigid rules from your past that you’re following that no longer need to exist.</span></p> <p><span class="details">5) The specific directions you want to move toward in your life as you begin to uncover feelings long suppressed and make your own choices about how to live your life. </span></p> <p><span class="details">Dr. Rutherford will also provide a link to a questionnaire that can give you a clue of where you might fall on the spectrum of perfectly hidden depression, ten specific journal prompts that can act as a comforting and supportive guide as your work begins, and suggestions for further learning. </span></p> <p><strong><span class="details">PRESENTER BIO:</span></strong></p> <p><span class="details"><img class="alignleft size-full wp-image-133642" src="https://psychcentral.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/DrMargaret_headshot_bw-e1560875940287.jpeg" alt="" width="175" height="219" />Dr. Margaret Rutherford, a clinical psychologist, has practiced for twenty-six years in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Her work can be found at <a href="http://www.DrMargaretRutherford.com" rel="noopener nofollow" target="newwin">www.DrMargaretRutherford.com</a>, as well as HuffPost, Psych Central, The Mighty, the Gottman Blog and others. She hosts a weekly podcast, SelfWork with Dr. Margaret Rutherford. Her new book, Perfectly Hidden Depression, will be published by New Harbinger in 2019.<br /> </span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Wednesday, June 26, 2019 6:00 PM &#8211; 7:00 PM Eastern (EDT)</p> <p>This webinar is a live, 45-minute seminar with a PowerPoint presentation followed by a Q&amp;A moderated by <a href="http://gabehoward.com" rel="noopener nofollow" target="newwin">Gabe Howard</a>, host of <a href="https://psychcentral.com/show" rel="noopener">The Psych Central Show podcast</a>. There is no charge for the webinar, but registration is required. <strong>All registrants will receive a link to the recording.</strong></p> <p><a href="https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3196058600159602435" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer"><img class="alignnone" src="http://g.psychcentral.com/sym-arrow.gif" alt="Signup here" width="60" height="60" align="left" hspace="5" /></a><a href="https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3196058600159602435" rel="noopener nofollow" target="newwin">Space is limited,</a><br /> <a href="https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3196058600159602435" rel="noopener nofollow" target="newwin">so signup today!</a></p> <p style="text-align: right;"><em><strong><br /> Space is limited so please register early. Thank you.</strong></em></p> Understanding Gaming Disorder: A New Diagnosis https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-race-good-health/201906/understanding-gaming-disorder-new-diagnosis Psychology Today urn:uuid:ccfef39c-ee27-a22b-0491-c54083c682e6 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 13:28:56 -0400 Despite concerns about children and teens being overly focused on smart phones and gaming, their remains a lot to be known about gaming disorder. Spite: What We Do for the Sweet Sake of Revenge https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/evolution-the-self/201906/spite-what-we-do-the-sweet-sake-revenge Psychology Today urn:uuid:20c4b567-f70a-2c53-cb33-92ebb138e678 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 13:15:37 -0400 If you hurt yourself, thinking you’ll thereby hurt someone else much more, is that a fair price to pay for upholding your dignity and self-respect? Are You Mean? https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/memory-catcher/201906/are-you-mean Psychology Today urn:uuid:320c09e5-4812-4bba-6cb2-0b1d696ea811 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 13:12:07 -0400 What do you do when your mother is mean? Stigma Surrounding Mental Illness https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-first-impression/201906/stigma-surrounding-mental-illness Psychology Today urn:uuid:2de02a21-ca91-a51b-9732-f6873e00a2a8 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 13:00:04 -0400 Recent research identifies how mental illness stigma varies in different communities. Is Violence Inevitable? https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/wired-love/201906/is-violence-inevitable Psychology Today urn:uuid:ccc6e05f-d6fe-470a-764c-0d264973c021 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 12:17:54 -0400 To harness the power of neuroplasticity to pull us off the fatal ledge, we must begin to identify what we are feeding our nervous systems.  Why Following the Evidence Is So Hard: The Case of GMOs https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/are-we-done-fighting/201906/why-following-the-evidence-is-so-hard-the-case-gmos Psychology Today urn:uuid:7bdcca35-e803-d029-736e-331bd2e07ff9 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 11:57:23 -0400 How do conflicts like that about GMOs become so polarized? What can we learn from this for when we're in any kind of tough conversation? Cat Lessons. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/shifting-forward/201906/cat-lessons Psychology Today urn:uuid:4261288f-fc20-f18f-dcd2-d21531239373 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 11:24:17 -0400 Pay attention to your cats. They know more than you do about living a good life and making commitments. Joint hypermobility related to anxiety, also in animals https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190619111250.htm ScienceDaily: Psychology News urn:uuid:57670061-b5e6-8f97-c6c7-4ed05445d9ed Wed, 19 Jun 2019 11:12:50 -0400 Researchers report the first evidence in a non-human species, the domestic dog, of a relation between joint hypermobility and excitability: dogs with more joint mobility and flexibility tend to have more anxiety problems.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciencedaily/mind_brain/psychology/~4/uaNdW7cNSpk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> 'Goldilocks' neurons promote REM sleep https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190619111248.htm ScienceDaily: Psychology News urn:uuid:431c7004-e786-6bfa-3cd5-213e3c6cd4b3 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 11:12:48 -0400 It has been a mystery why REM sleep, or dream sleep, increases when the room temperature is 'just right'. Neuroscientists show that melanin-concentrating hormone neurons within the hypothalamus increase REM sleep when the need for body temperature defense is minimized, such as when sleeping in a warm and comfortable room temperature. These data have important implications for the function of REM sleep.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciencedaily/mind_brain/psychology/~4/eioCqQT7ftk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> How arousal impacts physiological synchrony in relationships https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190619094844.htm ScienceDaily: Social Psychology News urn:uuid:14fad01a-b910-9d5b-8b24-7c5c35dc8f62 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 09:48:44 -0400 A team of researchers has examined what type of social interaction is required for people to display physiological synchrony -- mutual changes in autonomic nervous system activity. The study also looked at whether the levels of autonomic arousal people share predicts affiliation and friendship interest between people. Anxiety vs. ADHD in a Relationship: How to Stop the Battle https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/fixing-families/201906/anxiety-vs-adhd-in-relationship-how-stop-the-battle Psychology Today urn:uuid:d90c62a9-ccfa-dbf1-1802-f7fa197848fa Wed, 19 Jun 2019 09:39:54 -0400 The combination of an anxious partner and one with ADHD easily leads to stress and frustration. Here's how to stop the battles. LGBT Health Is Inseparable from LGBT Rights https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/talking-about-health/201906/lgbt-health-is-inseparable-lgbt-rights Psychology Today urn:uuid:b2f53909-d6a5-0cb9-0d82-84beba8081da Wed, 19 Jun 2019 09:26:12 -0400 During Pride month, it is important to remember that LGBT individuals cannot be healthy when they are denied basic rights. 10 Mental Health Benefits of Gardening https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/think-act-be/201906/10-mental-health-benefits-gardening Psychology Today urn:uuid:9a55772f-30c8-c960-4c71-101732e1ec61 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 07:55:24 -0400 There are many advantages to spending time in your garden—not just for your body but for your mind. Antidepressants May Hinder Empathy for Others’ Pain https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/06/19/antidepressants-may-hinder-empathy-for-others-pain/147993.html Psych Central News urn:uuid:55d46167-4d3c-ddb2-a979-3382c81b5bd3 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 07:00:50 -0400 Until recently, research has suggested that severe episodes of depression can reduce a person’s ability to feel empathy, an essential skill for successful social interactions and understanding others. However, most... <p>Until recently, research has suggested that severe episodes of depression can reduce a person’s ability to feel empathy, an essential skill for successful social interactions and understanding others. However, most of these studies have been conducted with groups of patients taking antidepressant medications.</p> <p>Now in a new Austrian study, an interdisciplinary team of social neuroscientists, neuroimaging experts, and psychiatrists  from the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna set out to disentangle the effects of acute depressive episodes and antidepressant treatment on empathy.</p> <p>The researchers discovered that it is the antidepressant treatment — not the depressive episode — which can lead to impaired empathy toward perception of pain.</p> <p>For the study, patients with severe depression underwent two experiments testing their empathic responses to the pain of others: First, they were tested during an acute depressive episode before they had received any medication. Then they were tested again after three months of psychopharmacological treatment with antidepressants (mostly selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs).</p> <p>In both sessions, patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while watching videos of people undergoing painful medical procedures. Their brain activity and self-reported empathy levels were compared to those of a group of healthy controls.</p> <p>The findings show that, before treatment, depressed patients and healthy controls responded in a comparable way.</p> <p>But after three months of antidepressant treatment, the researchers discovered notable differences: Medicated patients reported their levels of empathy to be lower, and brain activation was reduced in areas previously associated with empathy.</p> <p>First author Dr. Markus Rütgen underlines that reduced empathic responses were not caused by a general dampening of negative emotions. &#8220;The lowered emotional impact of negative events in a social context possibly allows patients to recover more easily. Nevertheless, the actual impact of reduced empathy on patients&#8217; social behavior remains to be explored,” he said.</p> <p>The findings are published in the scientific journal <em>Translational Psychiatry</em>.</p> <p>Source: <a href="https://www.univie.ac.at/en/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">University of Vienna</a></p> Inside Schizophrenia: A Look into Possible Links Between Violence and Schizophrenia https://psychcentral.com/blog/inside-schizophrenia-a-look-into-possible-links-between-violence-and-schizophrenia/ World of Psychology urn:uuid:edf4eff6-e1ae-18e2-5434-77cd142467b8 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 06:30:14 -0400 An in-depth look at violence and its relation to schizophrenia. Is violence a symptom of schizophrenia? Do mass attackers always have schizophrenia? Are schizophrenics dangerous? Studies say people with schizophrenia... <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe style="border: none;" height="90" scrolling="no" src="//html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/10200371/height/90/theme/custom/thumbnail/no/direction/backward/render-playlist/no/custom-color/793fb7/menu/no/" width="100%"></iframe></p> <p style="font-weight: 400;">An in-depth look at violence and its relation to schizophrenia. Is violence a symptom of schizophrenia? Do mass attackers always have schizophrenia? Are schizophrenics dangerous?</p> <p>Studies say people with schizophrenia are more likely to be a victim of a crime than the perpetrator. However, James Holmes, the movie theater mass murderer, was said to have paranoid schizophrenia. And a person can plead not-guilty by reason of insanity in court. This seems to be contrary to the idea of non-violence in mental illness.<br /> <span id="more-133649"></span><br /> Host Rachel Star Withers, a diagnosed schizophrenic, and co-host Gabe Howard delve into these intense subjects in this episode of the Inside Schizophrenia podcast. Officer Rebecca Skillern, the senior trainer within the mental health division of the Houston Police Department, joins as a special guest to explain police protocol in answering crisis emergencies and what people with schizophrenia, and their loved ones, should do when an episode puts someone in danger.</p> <h2 class="p5"><span class="s1">Highlights From &#8216;Violence &amp; Schizophrenia&#8217; Episode </span></h2> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[01:48]</b> “Have you ever killed anyone?”</span></p> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[03:21]</b> Stigma is not knowing.</span></p> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[07:10]</b> Consequences of people finding out you have schizophrenia.</span></p> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[14:22]</b> Not guilty by reason of insanity.</span></p> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[17:33] </b>Paranoid schizophrenia and mass attackers.</span></p> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[24:00] </b>Has Rachel ever been violent due to my schizophrenia?</span></p> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[25:30]</b> Guest interview with Officer Rebecca Skillern.</span></p> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[27:22]</b> How is a mental crisis team response different than a typical police response?</span></p> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[31:00] </b>What to do if I need help for a mental health crisis.</span></p> <p class="p7"><span class="s1"><b>[43:55]</b> During a mental health crisis, what do I want to happen?</span></p> <p class="p8"><span class="s1"><b>[46:00] </b>Confusion and fear during an episode.</span></p> <h2>About Our Guest</h2> <p>Officer Rebecca Skillern, the senior trainer within the mental health division of the Houston Police Department, joins as a special guest to explain police protocol in answering crisis emergencies and what people with schizophrenia, and their loved ones, should do when an episode puts someone in danger.</p> <p><span class="s1">She is an expert in CIT Training (Crisis Intervention Team) which is a program that provides the foundation necessary to promote community and statewide solutions to assist individuals with a mental illness and/or addictions. The CIT Model reduces both stigma and the need for further involvement with the criminal justice system. CIT provides a forum for effective problem solving regarding the interaction between the criminal justice and mental health care system and creates the context for sustainable change. Learn more by visiting </span><span class="s2"><a href="http://www.citinternational.org/" rel="noopener nofollow" target="newwin">www.citinternational.org.</a></span></p> <h2>Computer Generated Transcript for &#8220;Violence and Schizophrenia&#8221; Episode</h2> <p><b>Editor’s Note</b>: <i>Please be mindful that this transcript has been computer generated and therefore may contain inaccuracies and grammar errors. Thank you.</i></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Announcer: </b>Welcome to Inside Schizophrenia, a look into better understanding and living well with schizophrenia. Hosted by renowned advocate and influencer Rachel Star Withers and featuring Gabe Howard. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>Hello, listeners, could a change in your schizophrenia treatment plan make a difference for you? There are options out there you might not know about. Please visit <a href="http://oncemonthlydifference.com/"><span class="s2">oncemonthlydifference.com</span></a> to find out more about the benefits of once monthly injections for adults with schizophrenia. Welcome to Inside Schizophrenia. I&#8217;m Rachel Star Withers here with Gabe Howard. Today we&#8217;re going to take an in-depth look into violence and schizophrenia. Is violence an actual symptom of schizophrenia? Do mass attackers always have schizophrenia? Basically, are schizophrenics dangerous?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>This is fascinating because it comes up so incredibly often and I imagine that as somebody who lives with schizophrenia people that believe this particular misinformation campaign or myth or misunderstanding sort of visit their fears onto your life. Is that fair?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>Yes, I&#8217;m very open about my schizophrenia and not just online and in podcasts but everyday life. OK. Most people who meet me as far as more than once, not just random strangers and I&#8217;m just screaming it out. But if you work with me you probably know at some point and I get a lot of different like crazy questions. Some people have asked me like, &#8220;What do you see colors?&#8221; Yes. I&#8217;m not colorblind. That has nothing to do with schizophrenia at all. Oh but the weirdest I&#8217;ve gotten that I&#8217;ve never quite understand why is, &#8220;Have you ever killed anyone?&#8221; </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>Just do they just straight up? When they&#8217;re asking questions about schizophrenia. Do they come straight out and say, &#8220;Have you killed anyone?&#8221;</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>No this is like something they lead up to. It&#8217;s like OK I&#8217;ve been like I know her you know and we&#8217;re finally talking and maybe I feel like I can finally ask this question. That would be offensive if I asked right away. But I&#8217;ve definitely been thinking about it for the past three weeks I&#8217;ve been working with her</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>So it&#8217;s on their mind from the moment they find out that you have schizophrenia? I mean when they find out about your illness this is something that pops into their head almost instantly?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>I personally think so.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>And does it worry you? Is it a concern?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>To me, it doesn&#8217;t worry me. I always like to turn it into a joke. People say, &#8220;Have you ever killed anyone?&#8221; Not yet. I should like to just kind of pause there for a long time, take a nice deep breath and slowly turn my gaze to them and score right. But.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>But that&#8217;s something that you have of course the privilege to do.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>Yes.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>I mean it</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>Yes.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>You know just both by way of being. I&#8217;m trying not to say a tiny little white woman but . . . But you know what I mean. You don&#8217;t look physically imposing. It does. Does that make sense?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>No, it does. Yes.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>I mean if you were, if you were a giant man. If you were you know a giant African-American male?<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>But if you weren&#8217;t as articulate or funny or as approachable or as friendly this kind of a stereotype would be? It could be really impactful to your ability to find a work or a job or housing if they think that you&#8217;re dangerous.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>Oh absolutely. You know people hear the word stigma and you always associate it with something bad like. Okay well stigma must mean that everybody thinks schizophrenics are violent or have killed people. But I think a lot of it is also you just don&#8217;t know anything. Like the unknown. Like I don&#8217;t know what this person is capable of. I don&#8217;t know much about schizophrenia so yeah on such and such TV show that was the killer and that I think is more scary than anything.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>So you think that people are taking their ignorance essentially because they don&#8217;t know if you are safe or unsafe. </span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>Yes. And it&#8217;s one reason that I go out of my way to be so open about my schizophrenia. And that&#8217;s a luxury that I have. You know certain jobs I can&#8217;t go around saying that if I were to work. So I&#8217;m not saying everybody with a mental disorder should you know just tell the world hey guess what. I mean right now I&#8217;m working on this podcast with you, Gabe, Inside Schizophrenia. I don&#8217;t think I would get fired if anyone found out I actually had schizophrenia.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>In this particular case it was an advantage. Obviously the show was looking for somebody who had a lot of knowledge about schizophrenia. Somebody who was open to talking about schizophrenia and somebody who was living publicly with schizophrenia. Do you believe, Rachel, that the people who think this are just mean malicious people who just dislike you? You sort of alluded to the fact that you think that it&#8217;s just all misunderstanding?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>I&#8217;m not going to say all of it&#8217;s misunderstanding. There&#8217;s horrible people all over the world who are going to believe whatever they want. But I&#8217;d say the majority of the people who&#8217;ve actually asked me the question, &#8220;Have you ever killed anyone?&#8221; They weren&#8217;t mean people. It was just kind of like someone who was genuinely curious and honestly didn&#8217;t know anything about schizophrenia really except for the media.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>Once you do your humor thing and I agree with you I think that humor has a lot of benefits. It diffuses situations it makes people comfortable in a way. After that sort of dissipates and people are like OK now I&#8217;ve realized that accusing you of killing somebody or even thinking that can be really hurtful. Do good conversations come out of that and how do you handle those?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>I usually like to follow that with actually people with schizophrenia are more likely to be the victim of a crime than to be committing the crime and people be like. &#8220;Oh really?&#8221; Like it that&#8217;s just kind of like oh they&#8217;re like completely kind of change their thoughts like I just had no clue. I&#8217;m like Yeah. So it&#8217;s a nice little segue into some fun learning.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>When you say that people with schizophrenia are more likely to be the victim of a crime, do people believe you? Did they give pushback? Do they ask why that is?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>No one in real life has ever challenged me on that, but definitely over the Internet. People write, &#8220;Well, that&#8217;s just stupid. I don&#8217;t see how that&#8217;s possible.&#8221; Or they&#8217;ll say well schizophrenics hurt lots of people. And I just say again that goes back to kind of not all of it&#8217;s ignorance is just refusing to want to look at facts and believe what is true.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>I think that everybody in America understands why comforting lies are better than uncomfortable truths in the short term. I would rather have somebody tell me that I&#8217;m completely right and I don&#8217;t have to change. That&#8217;s really really easy. But of course you can&#8217;t grow and be open to new experiences and the danger of believing these things about people with schizophrenia is that you may be avoiding a diagnosis yourself because after all if you believe that all people with schizophrenia are violent and you think that you might have it, you&#8217;re thinking to yourself I&#8217;m not violent therefore I don&#8217;t have to go get help. You could think this about a loved one you could think Oh my God I&#8217;m really worried about my son, daughter, niece, nephew, brother, sister, or best friend but they would never hurt a fly. So I&#8217;m not going to get them a diagnosis. I&#8217;m not going to take them in . How does that strike you?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>Back years ago the very first time I sat my parents down I tell them Look I have went to the doctor and this is what happened. I&#8217;ve been diagnosed with schizophrenia. My mother did not want me to tell anybody, like anybody. When I made the first video I did about schizophrenia she was mortified and she repeatedly was like, &#8220;You can&#8217;t talk about this, Rachel.&#8221; And she was so scared that I was gonna get kicked out of college, that no one would ever hire me, that people would be scared of me. Which is just, you&#8217;re never going to get married, you&#8217;re never gonna have a job, you&#8217;re never gonna finish school. All of those things weren&#8217;t real reasons for her to think that, it was just she was frightened of what that word labeled on me. You know what it would do when other people saw that label.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>So she was more concerned about the reactions of the general public than she was about the illness that you were battling? That does add an extra layer though, right? If everybody thinks that you, and then by extension your family, are violent or dangerous or scary that makes it that much harder to get care. Because like you said, your family&#8217;s initial thought was OK how do we manage this information. It wasn&#8217;t, how do we manage the illness?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>And I think whenever you have something like a mental illness versus a physical illness you know some sort of disorders and whatnot obviously run in families. But if you hear oh well that person their daughter has schizophrenia they kind of tend to think Oh I bet the whole family&#8217;s crazy. My parents never came out and said it. But I think they were worried that if people found out I had schizophrenia they were going to assume my brother did also. So I&#8217;m not only potentially ruining my life, but I could be ruining my little brother&#8217;s life because well she has it why doesn&#8217;t he?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>And it is. It&#8217;s a very scary diagnosis to get. And if you aren&#8217;t used to anything with mental illness, you&#8217;re not used to hearing about bipolar, you&#8217;re not used to even hearing about depression, and then suddenly you got schizophrenia on the line. I feel like that can really scare a family.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>Do you think that the number one reason that people are scared of schizophrenia is its link to violence in pop culture in the media and in the minds of the public?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>Yes. I think it&#8217;s just, and I always say this, that schizophrenia it is just a scary sounding word. It has a Z in it. Like it just sounds like oh my gosh. It&#8217;s just so great. I have I&#8217;m writing in a movie like Oh man I&#8217;m gonna have the character say schizophrenic or schizophrenia and she&#8217;s automatically like whoa. And I&#8217;ll even have people try and combat me online and they&#8217;ll say well you&#8217;d understand because most crime and what not it&#8217;s caused by people with mental illness and you know you have to be crazy to go and do all these bad things. Yes I believe a lot of us just in the world, not a lot of schizophrenics, but a lot of people in the world we do suffer from different things. You know if you are in a relationship and you get your heart broken you&#8217;re probably going to have some depression. It might not be long term depression and it could be just related and it might have you know ease up after a few months but you&#8217;re going to go through some sort of mental situation that is not just optimal mental health. However when you have crime, I think an easy way to just explain it is say, &#8220;Oh, they were crazy. Oh, they had schizophrenia. Let&#8217;s ignore the fact that they were on drugs. Let&#8217;s ignore the fact that they&#8217;ve already shown issues with let&#8217;s say beating their wife and things like that now because they have schizophrenia.&#8221; There&#8217;s no other health issue that automatically is linked to violence the way mental illnesses are.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>I have often postulated that one of the reasons that people are so quick to believe this is because extreme violence. I mean your mass shootings your you know even just murder in general. It is so far outside of the realm of what a typical person is comfortable doing. I understand why people are like well. Doesn&#8217;t that have to be mental illness? I mean taking somebodies life is extreme. I mean it&#8217;s just really really extreme. There has to be a component of mental illness in there, but that&#8217;s not actually what we&#8217;re talking about here. We&#8217;re talking about does schizophrenia make you kill people? Does it make you hurt people? Is there something innate about the illness that violence is a likely outcome? And that&#8217;s where it gets tricky right. Because nobody is saying that people with schizophrenia have never committed a violent crime. You&#8217;re just saying that the majority of people with schizophrenia have never committed a violent crime.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>Yes. When you have people mental illness or you&#8217;re specifically talking about schizophrenia and you know the majority of us don&#8217;t hurt anyone. You&#8217;re like, &#8220;Well, Rachel, I mean but some of you do.&#8221; That still sounds scary. But not all husbands beat their wives. Some of them do but not all of them and that&#8217;s not going to keep me from getting married. That&#8217;s not going to keep me and or most people from finding a husband.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>But when it comes to mental illness, we&#8217;ve decided that somehow that connects. That all violence is caused by people with schizophrenia and that connection just doesn&#8217;t exist in any study that&#8217;s been looked at and it&#8217;s kind of scary that people are so desperate to believe it. Why do you think that people want to believe this so much?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>I think one of the main reasons is just being able to say somebody who did this horrible thing has mental illness. It makes you feel safer. OK. So I don&#8217;t know anyone personally like that so I can feel safe and if I ever met anyone like that I could obviously tell you know they&#8217;re like twitching and screaming and things. That&#8217;s the person I should be scared of. You know you hear these horrible stories of like a disgruntled employee who comes in and unfortunately does something you know very violent at the office. And a lot of times are like well so-and-so he was suffering from depression for so long. Well you know he was being treated by a psychiatrist. It&#8217;s never oh he broke his leg last year. You&#8217;d be like well what about him breaking his leg?</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>And even in the cases of schizophrenia the very very very tiny percentage of people with schizophrenia that do have a dangerous or violent outcome. They&#8217;re almost universally uncared for or untreated. They&#8217;re almost always left to their own devices with a very very very serious illness that isn&#8217;t being maintained or managed.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Rachel Star Withers: </b>And many times that&#8217;s unfortunately being self managed by taking illegal drugs. So that plays a big part in it. Also we talk about mental health. Mental health is for everybody. Like that&#8217;s just a blanket term for all of us and too many people hear it and think oh well you only need mental health if something is wrong with your head. And it&#8217;s not. It&#8217;s working too much. You know that work life balance with your family. It&#8217;s being able to enjoy being out with people, like mental health is so many things. It&#8217;s not just dealing with disorders.</span></p> <p class="p1"><span class="s1"><b>Gabe Howard: </b>But to bring it back around to schizophreni Gut Microbes Linked to Temperament Traits in Infants https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/06/19/gut-microbes-linked-to-temperament-traits-in-infants/147998.html Psych Central News urn:uuid:bbfe5206-c587-fdb9-7c33-2458349b3d00 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 06:00:53 -0400 A new Finnish study of 303 infants finds that the gut microbiome of a two-month-old appears to be associated with the child’s temperament traits at six months of age. The... <p>A new Finnish study of 303 infants finds that the gut microbiome of a two-month-old appears to be associated with the child’s temperament traits at six months of age.</p> <p>The University of Turku researchers found that different temperament traits are connected with individual microbe genera, microbial diversity and different microbe clusters. For example, greater diversity in gut bacteria was connected to lesser negative emotionality and fear reactivity.</p> <p>&#8220;It was interesting that, for example, the Bifidobacterium genus including several lactic acid bacteria was associated with higher positive emotions in infants,” said doctoral candidate Anna Aatsinki from the FinnBrain research project at the University of Turku, Finland.</p> <p>“Positive emotionality is the tendency to experience and express happiness and delight, and it can also be a sign of an extrovert personality later in life.”</p> <p>The study, published in the journal <em>Brian, Behavior, and Immunity</em>, is the first to investigate the link between microbes and behavior in infants so young. Previously, rodent studies have shown that the composition of gut microbiota and its remodelling is connected to behavior. In humans, research has shown that gut microbes can be associated with different diseases, such as Parkinson&#8217;s disease, depression and autism spectrum disorders. But few studies have been conducted on infants.</p> <p>The new study also considered other factors that can significantly affect the diversity of the microbiota, such as the delivery method and breastfeeding.</p> <p>Strong fear reaction and negative emotionality can be connected to depression risk later in life. However, the association with later diseases is not straightforward and  are also dependent on the environment.</p> <p>&#8220;Although we discovered connections between diversity and temperament traits, it is not certain whether early microbial diversity affects disease risk later in life. It is also unclear what are the exact mechanisms behind the association,&#8221; Aatsinki said. &#8220;This is why we need follow-up studies as well as a closer examination of metabolites produced by the microbes.&#8221;</p> <p>Source: <a href="https://www.utu.fi/en" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">University of Turku</a></p> Plastic Perfection: Wanting the "Love Island" Body https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/perfect-me/201906/plastic-perfection-wanting-the-love-island-body Psychology Today urn:uuid:afdc8c3b-b1da-3cb2-58b9-3bbba29007fa Wed, 19 Jun 2019 05:40:26 -0400 The message of "Love Island" is that bodies matter – and only if you have a perfect body can you succeed, can you be loved, can you be good enough. Lack of Sleep Linked to Mental Health Problems for College Students http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=126133&url=http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/healthNews/~3/fv6Oc1ADExc/lack-of-sleep-linked-to-mental-health-problems-for-college-students-idUSKCN1TK281 Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:0287ffe4-727b-84d3-1d96-41c271781926 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 05:31:33 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://today.reuters.com/news/newsChannel.aspx?type=healthNews" rel="tag" target="_blank">Reuters - Health</a></p>Poor sleep may be linked to a greater risk for poor mental health on college campuses, new research suggests.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/C7QiDEhqt74" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> White House Envoy Calls for Armed Guards at Every Jewish Synagogue http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=126127&url=https://www.newsweek.com/trump-envoy-anti-semitism-synagogue-jewish-schools-guards-shootings-1444797?utm_source=TopNews&utm_medium=Feed&utm_campaign=Partnerships Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:2babdc39-48af-9043-ae3b-b8a8556fdc25 Wed, 19 Jun 2019 05:31:24 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032542/" rel="tag" target="_blank">MSNBC - Newsweek</a></p>&quot;If you go after the Jews, we're coming after you,&quot; the White House's anti-Semitism envoy said.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/Vw1iF9meuZo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> How This Honolulu Bike Exchange Supports Community Mental Health https://psychcentral.com/blog/how-this-honolulu-bike-exchange-supports-community-mental-health/ World of Psychology urn:uuid:5494916e-d5b8-239c-7150-01cbc8e9c452 Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:30:18 -0400 Every day at 3:30 p.m., young men in a neighborhood near downtown Honolulu participate in a culture circle at the Kalihi Valley Instructional Bike Exchange (KVIBE), where they learn how... <p><img class="alignleft size-medium wp-image-133446" src="https://psychcentral.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/bike-on-beach-ocean-300x200.jpg" alt="" width="300" height="200" srcset="//psychcentral.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/bike-on-beach-ocean-300x200.jpg 300w, //psychcentral.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/bike-on-beach-ocean-140x93.jpg 140w, //psychcentral.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/bike-on-beach-ocean-155x103.jpg 155w, //psychcentral.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/bike-on-beach-ocean-202x135.jpg 202w, //psychcentral.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/bike-on-beach-ocean.jpg 900w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /></p> <p>Every day at 3:30 p.m., young men in a neighborhood near downtown Honolulu participate in a culture circle at the Kalihi Valley Instructional Bike Exchange (KVIBE), where they learn how to repair bikes. For the young men in Kalihi Valley, KVIBE is a second home that offers play, mentorship, and skill-building. They begin each culture circle by sharing their names, homes, and ancestors. This opening practice reinforces their sense of identity and why they matter.</p> <p>Jeffrey Acido, an education and training specialist who works with KVIBE, says, “Anyone who can say these things with confidence has love for themselves &#8212; this is mental wellbeing.”<span id="more-133445"></span></p> <p>KVIBE is set within Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services (KKV), a comprehensive community health center that uses the community’s cultural traditions to help community members—many of whom are immigrants who feel dislocated from their homelands—heal and thrive. KKV recognizes that social connection and physical activity directly impact mental health, which is why 15 of their programs focus on improving the physical, mental, and spiritual health of more than 10,000 people each year.</p> <p>The bike exchange is a creative example of how to improve community mental health and address larger community needs like social cohesion, a sense of belonging, and physical activity. This is especially important in Kalilhi Valley, where structural inequities that perpetuate poverty, loss of cultural identity, and low-educational attainment have put men and boys at risk of depression, stress, and chronic physical health conditions.</p> <h3>Recreation and Social Connections Boost Mental Health and General Wellness</h3> <p>Positive self-image, environmental stewardship, and physical activity are at the core of what it means to be a young man in the bike exchange, where members support one another as mechanics and athletes. In addition to their daily culture circles, each year KVIBE youth leaders host the Kalihi Ahupua`a Ride, an educational bike ride open to the public where cyclists ride from mauka (mountain) to makai (ocean).</p> <p>The eight-mile ride includes “story stops” where riders can learn about the cultural and historical significance of each place. KVIBE uses physical activity strategically, linking it back to cultural identity and social connection, which addresses many of the issues that community members in Kalihi face.</p> <h3>Mental Health Is Impacted by Community Conditions</h3> <p>KVIBE is part of the Making Connections for Mental Health and Wellbeing Among Men and Boys initiative, funded by the Movember Foundation. Making Connections is made up of 13 community-based coalitions that are working to improve the community conditions that exacerbate mental health challenges and support wellbeing for men and boys of color and military servicemembers, veterans and their families. All the Making Connections sites—like the one in Honolulu—are taking innovative approaches to improving mental health and wellbeing by focusing on strategies like increasing social connection, creating opportunities for sports and recreation, and improving the availability of safe, affordable housing.</p> <p>They also make sure the men and boys who are part of their programs—whose voices are often left out of the conversation about mental health, despite experiencing depression, anxiety, and social trauma first-hand—are part of the decision-making about what the programs will focus on. At KVIBE, the young men and boys are encouraged to lead the design of program activities, become mentors to younger boys, advocate for community improvements like increased and improved bike lanes with policymakers, and coordinate major efforts like the Kalihi Ahupua`a Ride.</p> <p>The deliberate culture that KVIBE has created should not be the exception to the rule. The ability to build a community where young people can talk about their ancestors with pride while literally keeping their blood flowing, is a crucial support to their mental health. Our nation’s mental health stands a lot to gain from incorporating opportunities for recreation and physical activity into all neighborhoods and communities.</p> <p><em>This post courtesy of <a href="http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/blog/how-bike-exchange-honolulu-supports-community-mental-health" rel="noopener nofollow" target="newwin">Mental Health America</a>.</em></p> Afraid of food? The answer may be in the basal forebrain https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190618132042.htm ScienceDaily: Psychology News urn:uuid:c2b7a564-ff21-0eab-69a6-6eea999a76fd Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:20:42 -0400 A brain circuit in the mouse basal forebrain that is involved in perceiving the outside world, connects with and overrides feeding behaviors regulated by the hypothalamus.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/sciencedaily/mind_brain/psychology/~4/uoQc0Vc2b1s" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Remote Lets Disabled People Control TV with Their Eyes http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=126004&url=http://rssfeeds.usatoday.com/~/603179972/0/usatoday-techtopstories~Comcast-remote-lets-people-with-physical-disabilities-control-the-TV-with-their-eyes/ Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:a7eeb799-2b15-c5a5-0f03-52f899201f9f Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:17:24 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/tech/index/" rel="tag" target="_blank">USA Today - Technology</a></p>Comcast launches a free X1 TV remote that lets customers with physical disabilities change channels, surf and sets recordings with their eyes. &amp;#160; &amp;#160; &amp;#160; &amp;#160; &amp;#160; &amp;#160;.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/QWI8X_O98tc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Blood Pressure Pill Has Potential to Slow Down Alzheimer’s Disease http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=126005&url=https://news.yahoo.com/blood-pressure-pill-potential-slow-123213363.html Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:2d82b1ca-f0a5-9e84-f88a-be07f39fd9bb Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:16:54 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=index&cid=753/" rel="tag" target="_blank">Yahoo News - Science</a></p>A cheap&nbsp;blood pressure pill could slow down Alzheimer's disease by improving flow of blood to parts of the brain linked to memory, research suggests. Dutch research found that those given the pills for six months saw a 20 per cent increase in circulation of blood to the hippocampus.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/RcB9hnu3Olk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Taylor Swift Releases Song and Petition Calling for LGBTQ Equality http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=126041&url=http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/reuters/topNews/~3/YKAnoYCcIG8/taylor-swift-releases-song-and-petition-calling-for-lgbtq-equality-idUSKCN1TI2HX Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:b36ecc93-2e79-9ebc-d556-1b61102ae9e3 Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:16:17 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://www.reuters.com/" rel="tag" target="_blank">Reuters - Top News</a></p>Pop singer and songwriter Taylor Swift on Monday released a star-studded music video that scolded social media trolls and urged fans to sign a petition demanding U.S. legal protections for gays, lesbians and transgender people.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/nX4horwR9PE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> New Eating Disorders App Teaches Healthy Eating Behavior http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=125943&url=https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/06/14/new-eating-disorders-app-teaches-normal-eating-behavior/147785.html Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:abd65506-94a4-89e4-7a2a-6d36acb391ff Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:15:56 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://psychcentral.com/" rel="tag" target="_blank">Psych Central</a></p>Swedish researchers have developed a pioneering method to help people with anorexia learn to eat again. The scientists take the position that eating disorders should be considered just that...</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/U0kNqEkvqIg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> MasterCard Allows Transgender People to Use Chosen Name on Cards http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=126042&url=https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/mastercard-true-name-card-1.5178793?cmp=rss Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:268c30e7-30d5-25e7-9773-70d42ac3e78c Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:14:47 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://www.cbc.ca/" rel="tag" target="_blank">Canadian Broadcasting Company - Canadian News</a></p>MasterCard is working with Canadian banks to issue a new credit card called True Name that will allow transgender people to use their chosen names on their card.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/whZUPQR2PWQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Social Media Making You Anxious? How to De-Stress Over E-Stress http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=126012&url=http://www.startribune.com/how-to-keep-social-media-from-driving-you-nuts/511314152/ Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:d50c7b6a-9f2c-6209-2f36-a0259f80a948 Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:14:16 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://www.startribune.com/" rel="tag" target="_blank">Star Tribune</a></p>Tips on reaping the benefits of social media without letting it harm your mental health.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/rJE2dnEuDNk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Photographer Captures the Humanity of South Africa's LGBT Community http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=126051&url=http://rss.cnn.com/~r/rss/cnn_topstories/~3/08Bqa3kafHs/index.html Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:5047c4fd-8a83-da84-a177-940ded7047e8 Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:11:02 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://cnn.com/" rel="tag" target="_blank">CNN - Top Stories</a></p>Last week, Botswana's High Court made history when it overturned colonial-era laws criminalizing consensual same-sex relations. The ruling, which came mere weeks after Kenya's High Court ruled to uphold its own 19th-century laws criminalizing &quot;carnal knowledge against the order of nature,&quot; is being seen as a landmark victory for LGBTQ activists across the continent.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/iuG3sWw_-vI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Cognitive Decline May Speed Up After Heart Attack, Study Suggests http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=126047&url=https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2019/06/17/Cognitive-decline-may-speed-up-after-heart-attack-study-says/9431560801096/ Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:17e8e5cd-f2f6-6864-bf3b-5813dcc54261 Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:10:27 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://www.upi.com/Science_News/" rel="tag" target="_blank">United Press International - Science News</a></p>Having a cardiovascular episode may affect the brain as well as the body, new findings show.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/k504aRUF8rQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Lady Gaga Expands Teen Mental Health Program http://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?from=rss_feed&id=125922&url=https://www.newsweek.com/lady-gaga-expands-teen-mental-health-program-hopes-grow-include-every-school-this-country-1444030?utm_source=TopNews&utm_medium=Feed&utm_campaign=Partnerships Psychology Headlines Around the World urn:uuid:021b5e5d-57e4-663f-d764-ad6e450eef8d Tue, 18 Jun 2019 13:09:25 -0400 <div><p>Source: <a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/3032542/" rel="tag" target="_blank">MSNBC - Newsweek</a></p>It aims to teach high schoolers about mental health.</div><h6 style="clear: both; padding: 8px 0 0 0; height: 2px; font-size: 1px; border: 0; margin: 0; padding: 0;"></h6><br /><a href="https://www.socialpsychology.org/client/redirect.php?action=rssHomepage" target="_blank"><img title="Brought to you by Social Psychology Network" alt="Brought to you by SocialPsychology Network" src="https://www.socialpsychology.org/images/rss-footer-large.png" border="0" width="400" height="45" /></a><br><br><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/psychology-headlines/~4/cbNxC2BrA4k" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>