Montana State News http://feed.informer.com/digests/I2XAUDOSSQ/feeder Montana State News Respective post owners and feed distributors Sat, 12 Sep 2020 05:04:54 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ Montana adds 224 new COVID-19 cases (Friday, Sept. 18) https://www.kpax.com/news/coronavirus/montana-adds-224-new-covid-19-cases-friday-sept-18 Montana News urn:uuid:66c989b7-85e5-d7ad-7aee-30356c589df1 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 15:30:50 +0000 Daily update of new COVID-19 cases reported by the State of Montana. Montana added 224 new COVID-19 cases to its total on the Montana Response COVID-19 tracking map on Friday.A complete list of new cases reported by county is below.Note: Numbers reported by the state each day may differ from those reported by county public health departments due to periodic lag times in reporting data to the state. MTN News counts the updated data individual counties report throughout a given day. TOTAL CASES & RECOVERIES: Montana now reports 9,871 cumulative cases statewide, with 7,500 people recovered.HOSPITALIZATIONS: The state reports 105 active hospitalizations, 555 total hospitalizations.ACTIVE CASES: The state reports there are currently 2,225 active COVID-19 cases in Montana.TESTING: The number of tests increased by 3,256 over the previous 24-hour reporting period, for a new cumulative state-wide total of 298,555.DEATHS: The cumulative number of deaths in Montana is at 146.Governor Steve Bullock announced a statewide directive requiring face coverings/masks in Montana on July 15. The directive applies to counties that have four or more active cases of COVID-19.The directive requires that masks be used in most indoor settings and where social distancing cannot be maintained. Bullock said businesses will have the right to deny entry of anyone not wearing a mask.Click here to read the full text of the face-covering/mask directive.Total Confirmed, New Daily, Active Cases by CountyYellowstone County Cases2,677 Total | 61 New | 810 ActiveRosebud County Cases538 Total | 34 New | 215 ActiveBig Horn County Cases814 Total | 14 New | 134 ActiveRoosevelt County Cases101 Total | 14 New | 62 ActiveGallatin County Cases1,179 Total | 13 New | 47 ActiveMeagher County Cases23 Total | 13 New | 15 ActiveSilver Bow County Cases194 Total | 11 New | 62 ActiveMissoula County Cases514 Total | 9 New | 78 ActiveLake County Cases252 Total | 7 New | 39 ActiveCuster County Cases91 Total | 6 New | 17 ActiveFlathead County Cases740 Total | 6 New | 140 ActiveHill County Cases124 Total | 5 New | 22 ActiveDawson County Cases67 Total | 3 New | 15 ActiveMusselshell County Cases31 Total | 3 New | 7 ActiveCarbon County Cases106 Total | 2 New | 10 ActiveCascade County Cases483 Total | 2 New | 225 ActiveGlacier County Cases171 Total | 2 New | 30 ActivePark County Cases86 Total | 2 New | 12 ActivePondera County Cases20 Total | 2 New | 4 ActiveToole County Cases66 Total | 2 New | 9 ActiveBeaverhead County Cases76 Total | 1 New | 4 ActiveDeer Lodge County Cases88 Total | 1 New | 50 ActiveLewis and Clark County Cases216 Total | 1 New | 17 ActiveRavalli County Cases120 Total | 1 New | 7 ActiveSanders County Cases43 Total | 1 New | 2 ActiveWheatland County Cases8 Total | 1 New | 1 ActiveBlaine County Cases15 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveBroadwater County Cases17 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveChouteau County Cases18 Total | 0 New | 7 ActiveDaniels County Cases3 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveFallon County Cases4 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveFergus County Cases53 Total | 0 New | 3 ActiveGarfield County Cases16 Total | 0 New | 3 ActiveGolden Valley County Cases3 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveGranite County Cases22 Total | 0 New | 1 ActiveJefferson County Cases48 Total | 0 New | 4 ActiveJudith Basin County Cases6 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveLiberty County Cases15 Total | 0 New | 8 ActiveLincoln County Cases105 Total | 0 New | 14 ActiveMadison County Cases97 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveMcCone County Cases19 Total | 0 New | 4 ActiveMineral County Cases2 Total | 0 New | 0 ActivePhillips County Cases116 Total | 0 New | 1 ActivePowder River County Cases2 Total | 0 New | 0 ActivePowell County Cases10 Total | 0 New | 0 ActivePrairie County Cases1 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveRichland County Cases71 Total | 0 New | 6 ActiveSheridan County Cases7 Total | 0 New | 2 ActiveStillwater County Cases49 Total | 0 New | 12 ActiveSweet Grass County Cases37 Total | 0 New | 2 ActiveTeton County Cases20 Total | 0 New | 2 ActiveTreasure County Cases3 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveValley County Cases52 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveWibaux County Cases8 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveCounty Gender Age Range Date Reported Montana adds 224 new COVID-19 cases (Friday, Sept. 18) https://www.kbzk.com/news/coronavirus/montana-adds-224-new-covid-19-cases-friday-sept-18 Montana News urn:uuid:90bc745b-3fac-3df0-6229-13a3efa8673b Fri, 18 Sep 2020 15:30:24 +0000 Daily update of new COVID-19 cases reported by the State of Montana. Montana added 224 new COVID-19 cases to its total on the Montana Response COVID-19 tracking map on Friday.A complete list of new cases reported by county is below.Note: Numbers reported by the state each day may differ from those reported by county public health departments due to periodic lag times in reporting data to the state. MTN News counts the updated data individual counties report throughout a given day. TOTAL CASES & RECOVERIES: Montana now reports 9,871 cumulative cases statewide, with 7,500 people recovered.HOSPITALIZATIONS: The state reports 105 active hospitalizations, 555 total hospitalizations.ACTIVE CASES: The state reports there are currently 2,225 active COVID-19 cases in Montana.TESTING: The number of tests increased by 3,256 over the previous 24-hour reporting period, for a new cumulative state-wide total of 298,555.DEATHS: The cumulative number of deaths in Montana is at 146.Governor Steve Bullock announced a statewide directive requiring face coverings/masks in Montana on July 15. The directive applies to counties that have four or more active cases of COVID-19.The directive requires that masks be used in most indoor settings and where social distancing cannot be maintained. Bullock said businesses will have the right to deny entry of anyone not wearing a mask.Click here to read the full text of the face-covering/mask directive.Total Confirmed, New Daily, Active Cases by CountyYellowstone County Cases2,677 Total | 61 New | 810 ActiveRosebud County Cases538 Total | 34 New | 215 ActiveBig Horn County Cases814 Total | 14 New | 134 ActiveRoosevelt County Cases101 Total | 14 New | 62 ActiveGallatin County Cases1,179 Total | 13 New | 47 ActiveMeagher County Cases23 Total | 13 New | 15 ActiveSilver Bow County Cases194 Total | 11 New | 62 ActiveMissoula County Cases514 Total | 9 New | 78 ActiveLake County Cases252 Total | 7 New | 39 ActiveCuster County Cases91 Total | 6 New | 17 ActiveFlathead County Cases740 Total | 6 New | 140 ActiveHill County Cases124 Total | 5 New | 22 ActiveDawson County Cases67 Total | 3 New | 15 ActiveMusselshell County Cases31 Total | 3 New | 7 ActiveCarbon County Cases106 Total | 2 New | 10 ActiveCascade County Cases483 Total | 2 New | 225 ActiveGlacier County Cases171 Total | 2 New | 30 ActivePark County Cases86 Total | 2 New | 12 ActivePondera County Cases20 Total | 2 New | 4 ActiveToole County Cases66 Total | 2 New | 9 ActiveBeaverhead County Cases76 Total | 1 New | 4 ActiveDeer Lodge County Cases88 Total | 1 New | 50 ActiveLewis and Clark County Cases216 Total | 1 New | 17 ActiveRavalli County Cases120 Total | 1 New | 7 ActiveSanders County Cases43 Total | 1 New | 2 ActiveWheatland County Cases8 Total | 1 New | 1 ActiveBlaine County Cases15 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveBroadwater County Cases17 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveChouteau County Cases18 Total | 0 New | 7 ActiveDaniels County Cases3 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveFallon County Cases4 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveFergus County Cases53 Total | 0 New | 3 ActiveGarfield County Cases16 Total | 0 New | 3 ActiveGolden Valley County Cases3 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveGranite County Cases22 Total | 0 New | 1 ActiveJefferson County Cases48 Total | 0 New | 4 ActiveJudith Basin County Cases6 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveLiberty County Cases15 Total | 0 New | 8 ActiveLincoln County Cases105 Total | 0 New | 14 ActiveMadison County Cases97 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveMcCone County Cases19 Total | 0 New | 4 ActiveMineral County Cases2 Total | 0 New | 0 ActivePhillips County Cases116 Total | 0 New | 1 ActivePowder River County Cases2 Total | 0 New | 0 ActivePowell County Cases10 Total | 0 New | 0 ActivePrairie County Cases1 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveRichland County Cases71 Total | 0 New | 6 ActiveSheridan County Cases7 Total | 0 New | 2 ActiveStillwater County Cases49 Total | 0 New | 12 ActiveSweet Grass County Cases37 Total | 0 New | 2 ActiveTeton County Cases20 Total | 0 New | 2 ActiveTreasure County Cases3 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveValley County Cases52 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveWibaux County Cases8 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveCounty Gender Age Range Date Reported Grandparents provide a safety net during COVID https://www.kpax.com/rebound/grandparents-provide-a-safety-net-during-covid Montana News urn:uuid:cf50ebed-e654-701a-8c00-c93689d44a5f Fri, 18 Sep 2020 15:17:58 +0000 The coronavirus pandemic has upended work and school life for so many families, who are only able to rebound from the fallout because of the safety net grandparents are providing.It's said, you never know the love of a grandparent until you become one. Laurie Matzelle is grandma to Anson, who is 4 and Ali, who is 1 and Megan is Laurie's daughter. She is a single mom who works two jobs, at a bakery and in real estate to make ends meet."I was working 5 days a week from 6 a.m. to 1 p.m. day cares were closed," said Megan.Like so many working parents the pandemic turned her life upside down and she didn't know what she was going to do with her kids.Then Laurie stepped in and became their child care provider. She said it was fated since she had just quit her job in February but the demands of this work are different."I know why women my age do not have children! They're wonderful but yeah, it's exhausting!" said Laurie.And although it's exhausting, Laurie continues to care for the children today."To see them growing as they do and be there when Ally takes her first steps and all these things, she's learning words now and really growing it is a blessing. I wouldn't have it any other way.""It means so much to me I don't know how I can every repay her," said Megan. "She's just my angel."For more resources to help you through the financial impacts of the coronavirus, please visit our website KPAX dot com slash Rebound. Semi blocking northbound lanes on Highway 93 South https://www.kpax.com/news/local-news/semi-blocking-northbound-lanes-on-highway-93-south Montana News urn:uuid:8a24dd09-02fc-c8f8-2417-5860141de6a1 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 14:43:43 +0000 The Montana Department of Transportation sent out an alert that a semi is blocking both northbound lanes of Highway 93 South. (UPDATE) 9:00 AM, 9/18/20- Montana Department of Transportation says that the scene has been cleared. (Original story 8:30 AM, 9/18/20)The Montana Department of Transportation sent out an alert that a semi is blocking both northbound lanes of Highway 93 South. The semi is approximately a half mile south of Lolo. People heading to Lolo should expect delays. Orphaned wolf pup at ZooMontana is adjusting to his new home https://www.krtv.com/news/montana-and-regional-news/orphaned-wolf-pup-at-zoomontana-is-adjusting-to-his-new-home Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:b8d92393-3b0a-77f5-945b-ddbef5618707 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 14:05:13 +0000 In June, ZooMontana took in a seven-week-old Grey Wolf pup abandoned by his pack near Condon. Simpson, as he became known, has had a long summer in his new surroundings, and it seems he's found a new home and a new pack.Krystal Whetham, a relief keeper at the zoo, told MTN News that this little guy is now not so little. “Simpson, we’ve had him for a few months now and he is just really blossoming,” she says. “He is starting to gain the weight. He is up about 40 pounds since we originally got him, which is incredible how fast he has grown. He still has big feet. He’s got a lot of room to grow."Whetham says that Simpson not only gets three hearty meals a day, but works at enrichment games to help his developing mind. He’s even started to meet the other wolves, Kali and Kahlua, at the zoo.“We have started introductions with Simpson and our other two wolves. We have a male and a female. They both have been here for nine to 10 years. We started with a barrier. Lots of licking, smelling and vocals. And then we recently did a free contact with our male wolf, bringing him into the back holding where Simpson is, and that all went really well.”Simpson is full of puppy energy. After all, he’s only about five months old, so he is still learning his manners. “Kahlua, every once and a while, will give him a little growl. Nothing physical, just something to let him know that he’s the boss,” Whetham said.Once Simpson is large enough, he will join Kalia and Kahlua in their habitat and he will finally have a pack to call his own.“My hope for Simpson is that he really just lives a happy life here,” says Whetham. “He’s going to have a great life. He is going to be fed well, have a ton of things to do. We spend a lot of time bonding with him, to keep our hands on him for vet work and he is going to flourish.”Click here to visit the ZooMontana website. Bear goes for a swim in Flathead Lake (video) https://www.krtv.com/news/montana-and-regional-news/bear-goes-for-a-swim-in-flathead-lake-video Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:b78e4604-a231-d949-b4fd-a5499ef7f36f Fri, 18 Sep 2020 13:54:34 +0000 A black bear was spotted Monday swimming to Wild Horse Island in Flathead Lake. A black bear was spotted Monday swimming to Wild Horse Island in Flathead Lake.Photographer Andy Austin told MTN News he was in a pontoon boat at around 11:30 a.m. giving a tour when he saw a black speck a few hundred yards out."I thought it was a duck at first until I noticed a wake behind it. So we got closer to get a look and it was exactly what I hoped it was - it is indeed a black bear," said Austin.Austin, being a professional freelance photographer, was able to capture this clip of the bear swimming across the lake.He said this summer, he has logged about 10,000 miles taking photographs across Montana. Wildfires’ toxic air leaves damage long after the smoke clears https://www.ktvq.com/community/healthwatch/wildfires-toxic-air-leaves-damage-long-after-the-smoke-clears Montana News urn:uuid:a5ba01ba-d14e-627a-6b8a-04ca6e0f87d6 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 13:52:34 +0000 Researchers have found that people’s lung capacity declined in the first two years after the smoke cleared. SEELEY LAKE, Mont. — When researchers arrived in this town tucked in the Northern Rockies three years ago, they could still smell the smoke a day after it cleared from devastating wildfires. Their plan was to chart how long it took for people to recover from living for seven weeks surrounded by relentless smoke.They still don’t know, because most residents haven’t recovered. In fact, they’ve gotten worse.Forest fires had funneled hazardous air into Seeley Lake, a town of fewer than 2,000 people, for 49 days. The air quality was so bad that on some days the monitoring stations couldn’t measure the extent of the pollution. The intensity of the smoke and the length of time residents had been trapped in it were unprecedented, prompting county officials to issue their first evacuation orders due to smoke, not fire risk.Many people stayed. That made Seeley Lake an ideal place to track the long-term health of people inundated by wildfire pollution.So far, researchers have found that people’s lung capacity declined in the first two years after the smoke cleared. Chris Migliaccio, an immunologist with the University of Montana, and his team found the percentage of residents whose lung function sank below normal thresholds more than doubled in the first year after the fire and remained low a year after that.“There’s something wrong there,” Migliaccio said.While it’s long been known that smoke can be dangerous when in the thick of it — triggering asthma attacks, cardiac arrests, hospitalizations and more — the Seeley Lake research confirmed what public health experts feared: Wildfire haze can have consequences long after it’s gone.That doesn’t bode well for the 78 million people in the western United States now confronting historic wildfires.Toxic air from fires has blanketed California and the Pacific Northwest for weeks now, causing some of the world’s worst air quality. California fires have burned roughly 2.3 million acres so far this year, and the wildfire season isn’t over yet. Oregon estimates 500,000 people in the state have been under a notice to either prepare to evacuate or leave. Smoke from the West Coast blazes has drifted as far away as Europe.Extreme wildfires are predicted to become a regular occurrence due to climate change. And, as more people increasingly settle in fire-prone places, the risks increase. That’s shifted wildfires from being a perennial reality for rural mountain towns to becoming an annual threat for areas across the West.Dr. Perry Hystad, an associate professor in the College of Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University, said the Seeley Lake research offers unique insights into wildfire smoke’s impact, which until recently had largely been unexplored. He said similar studies are likely to follow because of this fire season.“This is the question that everybody is asking,” Hystad said. “‘I’ve been sitting in smoke for two weeks, how concerned should I be?’”Migliaccio wants to know whether the lung damage he saw in Seeley Lake is reversible — or even treatable. (Think of an inhaler for asthma or other medication that prevents swollen airways.)But those discoveries will have to wait. The team hasn’t been able to return to Seeley Lake this year because of the coronavirus pandemic.Migliaccio said more research is needed on whether wildfire smoke damages organs besides the lungs, and whether routine exposure makes people more susceptible to diseases.The combination of the fire season and the pandemic has spurred other questions as well, like whether heavy smoke exposure could lead to more COVID-19 deaths. A recent study showed a spike in influenza cases following major fire seasons.“Now you have the combination of flu season and COVID and the wildfires,” Migliaccio said. “How are all these things going to interact come late fall or winter?”A Case StudySeeley Lake has long known smoke. It sits in a narrow valley between vast stretches of thick forests.On a recent September day, Boyd Gossard stood on his back porch and pointed toward the mountains that were ablaze in 2017.Gossard, 80, expects to have some summer days veiled in haze. But that year, he said, he could hardly see his neighbor’s house a few hundred feet away.“I’ve seen a lot of smoke in my career,” said Gossard, who worked in timber management and served as a wildland firefighter. “But having to just live in it like this was very different. It got to you after a while.”When Missoula County health officials urged people to leave town and flee the hazardous smoke, many residents stayed close to home. Some said their jobs wouldn’t let them leave. Others didn’t have a place to go — or the money to get there.Health officials warned those who stayed to avoid exercising and breathing too hard, to remain inside and to follow steps to make their homes as smoke-free as possible. The health department also worked to get air filters to those who needed them most.But when flames got too close, some people had to sleep outside in campsites on the other side of town.Understanding the Science of SmokeOne of the known dangers of smoke is particulate matter. Smaller than the width of a human hair, it can bypass a body’s defenses, lodging deep into lungs. Lu Hu, an atmospheric chemist with the University of Montana, said air quality reports are based on how much of that pollution is in the air.“It’s like lead; there’s no safe level, but still we have a safety measure for what’s allowable,” Hu said. “Some things kill you fast and some things kill you slowly.”While air quality measurements can gauge the overall amount of pollution, they can’t assess which specific toxins people are inhaling. Hu is collaborating with other scientists to better predict how smoke travels and what pollutants people actually breathe.He said smoke’s chemistry changes based on how far it travels and what’s burning, among other factors.Over the past few years, teams of researchers drove trucks along fire lines to collect smoke samples. Other scientists boarded cargo planes and flew into smoke plumes to take samples right from a fire’s source. Still others stationed at a mountain lookout captured smoke drifting in from nearby fires. And ground-level machines at a Missoula site logged data over two summers.Bob Yokelson, a longtime smoke researcher with the University of Montana, said scientists are getting closer to understanding its contents. And, he said, “it’s not all bad news.”Temperature and sunlight can change some pollutants over time. Some dangerous particles seem to disappear. But others, such as ozone, can increase as smoke ages.Yokelson said scientists are still a long way from determining a safe level of exposure to the 100-odd pollutants in smoke.“We can complete the circle by measuring not only what’s in smoke, but measuring what’s happening to the people who breathe it,” Yokelson said. “That’s where the future of health research on smoke is going to go.”Coping With Nowhere to FleeIn the meantime, those studying wildland smoke hope what they’ve learned so far can better prepare people to live in the haze when evacuation isn’t an option.Joan Wollan, 82, was one of the Seeley Lake study participants. She stayed put during the 2017 fire because her house at the time sat on a border of the evacuation zone.The air made her eyes burn and her husband cough. She ordered air filters to create cleaner air inside her home, which helped.On a recent day, the air in Wollan’s new neighborhood in Missoula turned that familiar gray-orange as traces of fires from elsewhere appeared. Local health officials warned that western Montana could get hit by some of the worst air quality the state had seen since those 2017 fires.If it got bad enough, Wollan said, she’d get the filters out of storage or look for a way to get to cleaner air — “if there is someplace in Montana that isn’t smoky.”_________________________________Katheryn Houghton: katherynhoughton@gmail.com, @K_Hought Helena City Commission discusses police procedures https://www.krtv.com/news/helena-city-commission-hosts-2nd-work-session-on-hpd-polices-and-procedures Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:c418e061-c741-6485-afda-c516ce0a1b1d Fri, 18 Sep 2020 13:42:12 +0000 Helena Police Chief, Steve Hagen, conducted another presentation regarding HPD policies and procedures, this time, topics included: the Use of Force, body cameras, misconduct, and many more. Helena Police Chief, Steve Hagen, conducted another presentation regarding HPD policies and procedures, this time, topics included: the Use of Force, body cameras, misconduct, and many more.Chief Hagen began the presentation discussing the Use Of Force policy. All officers are required to submit a written, “Use of Force Report” with any hands-on actions with the minimum being, for example, handcuffing. Helena PD has an order banning what is known as a “chokehold.” This order was set in 2017 by former Helena PD Chief, Troy McGee. Hagen says they have this order until the ban becomes officially a policy. It hasn’t become a policy yet because laws are constantly changing.“Best practices are constantly changing, case laws, state law, they're constantly changing,” says Hagen. “So, what we're looking at is getting a policy service in place. There's companies that actually write law enforcement policies and then you change and adapt them to what your agency needs, what your city wants, which our citizens want."Chief Hagen then discussed body camera procedures. They are required with every investigative public contact. HPD is on their second generation of body cameras. They also have car cameras that automatically turn on when the emergency lights go on. The body camera has this same feature. However, the officers are responsible for recording the audio along with the video by pressing a button on the camera. When the body cameras are stored away, all recorded footage will automatically upload to a server. This server can keep the footage for 90 days unless it is flagged as evidence in a case.Hagen explains that if a case opens after the 90-day period on the body cam footage, the investigation must go on without the footage.Chief Hagen then discusses the internal investigation, complaint process.Hagen states complaints can be received in multiple forms, even anonymously. HPD promises to contact the complainant with the results, which is usually 30 days. If the investigation leads to any discipline, the City Manager holds the final decision on the discipline outcome such as suspension with pay, adverse action, or administrative leave with pay.According to the presentation, the last full revision to HPD policy occured in 2001.“We have policies. We need to update those policies,” says Hagen. “We would like to work with the community to say 'what's important that your Police Department is doing.'"Chief Hagen gave his last presentation, September 17th. The Helena City Commission will focus on hosting work groups where community members can get involved, sharing their opinions reviewing HPD policies and procedures.The work groups will cover HPD categories from Data Management to Mental Health. Orphaned wolf pup at ZooMontana adjusting to his new home https://www.kbzk.com/news/local-news/orphaned-wolf-pup-at-zoomontana-adjusting-to-his-new-home Montana News urn:uuid:05c6ebc0-f193-1e9f-8490-8394262b3262 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 13:29:49 +0000 "He is up about 40 pounds since we originally got him which is incredible..." In June, ZooMontana took in a seven-week-old Grey Wolf pup abandoned by his pack near Condon. Simpson, as he became known, has had a long summer in his new surroundings, and it seems he's found a new home and a new pack.Krystal Whetham, a relief keeper at the zoo, told MTN News how this little guy is now, not so little. “So Simpson, we’ve had him for a few months now and he is just really blossoming,” she says. “He is starting to gain the weight. He is up about 40 pounds since we originally got him, which is incredible how fast he has grown. He still has big feet. He’s got a lot of room to grow."Whetham says that Simpson not only gets three hearty meals a day, but works at enrichment games to help his developing mind. He’s even started to meet the other wolves, Kali and Kahlua, at the zoo.“We have started introductions with Simpson and our other two wolves. We have a male and a female. They both have been here for nine to 10 years. We started with a barrier. Lots of licking, smelling and vocals. And then we recently did a free contact with our male wolf, bringing him into the back holding where Simpson is, and that all went really well.”Simpson is fully of puppy energy. After all, he’s only about five months old, so he is still learning his manners.“Kahlua, every once and a while, will give him a little growl. Nothing physical, just something to let him know that he’s the boss,” Whetham said.Once Simpson is large enough, he will join Kalia and Kahlua in their habitat and he will finally have a pack to call his own.“My hope for Simpson is that he really just lives a happy life here,” says Whetham. “He’s going to have a great life. He is going to be fed well, have a ton of things to do. We spend a lot of time bonding with him, to keep our hands on him for vet work and he is going to flourish.”For more information on Simpson and all the other animals at ZooMontana, log onto their website here: https://www.zoomontana.org/ VIDEO: Black bear swimming in Flathead lake https://www.ktvq.com/news/montana-news/video-black-bear-swimming-in-flathead-lake Montana News urn:uuid:a2eee0b1-6fbe-baf4-dd9f-0c296e1aab04 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 13:29:13 +0000 A black bear was spotted swimming at Flathead Lake on Monday at 11:30am. A black bear was spotted Monday morning swimming to Wild Horse Island on Flathead Lake.Photographer Andy Austin told MTN News he was in a pontoon boat around 11:30 a.m. giving a tour when he saw a black speck a few hundred yards out."I thought it was a duck at first until I noticed a wake behind it. So we got closer to get a look and it was exactly what I hoped it was. It is indeed a black bear," said Austin.Austin, being a professional freelance photographer, was able to capture this clip of the bear swimming across the lake.He said this summer, he has been able to photograph around 10,000 miles of Montana. VIDEO: Black bear swimming in Flathead lake https://www.kbzk.com/news/montana-news/video-black-bear-swimming-in-flathead-lake Montana News urn:uuid:d868ae6b-39e0-eeba-93d9-2888220b296b Fri, 18 Sep 2020 04:31:30 +0000 A black bear was spotted swimming at Flathead Lake on Monday at 11:30am. A black bear was spotted Monday morning swimming to Wild Horse Island on Flathead Lake.Photographer Andy Austin told MTN News he was in a pontoon boat around 11:30 a.m. giving a tour when he saw a black speck a few hundred yards out."I thought it was a duck at first until I noticed a wake behind it. So we got closer to get a look and it was exactly what I hoped it was. It is indeed a black bear," said Austin.Austin, being a professional freelance photographer, was able to capture this clip of the bear swimming across the lake.He said this summer, he has been able to photograph around 10,000 miles of Montana. Another COVID-19 spike reported at the University of Montana https://www.kbzk.com/news/missoula-county/another-covid-19-spike-reported-at-the-university-of-montana Montana News urn:uuid:1fc5c477-ab5e-e690-2a9d-281ab2407beb Fri, 18 Sep 2020 04:29:32 +0000 Missoula County officials have linked another spike in COVID cases to the University of Montana. COVID is spreading, and we know a good chunk of Missoula County’s cases are tied to the University of Montana, but more specifically, the cases are clustered in the athletics department and Greek life.According to COVID Incident Commander Cindy Farr, seeing cases in clusters is good news. "The fact that we're seeing it in clusters is actually a good thing because what we don't want to see are sporadic cases popping up, whether it's out in the community or related to the University of Montana or related to one of our schools. We don't want those cases to be popping up sporadically and not know where they came from," said Farr. Positive cases and their close contacts, even if identified within a cluster, still need a place to isolate or quarantine.Spokesperson for the University of Montana Paula Short said the University has identified a number of units for isolation and quarantine. UM can’t share where those units are located, but Short said they’re equipped with the essentials - bedding, restroom and kitchen facilities, along with a handful of dining accommodations."We try to make it as homey as we can. We also have a quarantine coordinator that is available, essentially 24 hours a day by phone and email, if a situation arises where they need something immediately or they need additional support," said Short.UM hasn’t reached their quarantine housing capacity yet, but the simple question of capacity really isn’t simple at all."I want to say it's around 100 individuals," said Short, "but it's hard to pin that number because some of those spaces are configured differently."Daily COVID meetings for the University tackle every issue you could think of and more.Short said like everyone else, they’re learning as they go."First thing in the morning we have a meeting to discuss our capacity and how we're able to meet that, and we also talk about contingencies for when we exceed our campus capacity and what options we might have off campus."UM officials say they’re not at a point where they need to move entirely online, but as cases rise, we could see gradual adjustments made to campus operations, events, or individual classes. Dems decry GOP legislative rule proposals as `power grab’ https://www.kbzk.com/news/montana-politics/dems-decry-gop-legislative-rule-proposals-as-power-grab Montana News urn:uuid:5626688c-ba0c-be41-af15-b41b3fee6af1 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:42:29 +0000 At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.” At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.”The Joint Rules Committee meeting, instigated and attended only by Republicans, did not have a full quorum and did not approve any new rules for operating the Legislature.But GOP committee members, meeting in-person at the Capitol and online, did suggest changes that could allow lawmakers to be polled on issuing “proclamations” when not in session and define how lawmakers could participate in a session if they’re not at the Capitol.Republicans on the panel also said they’d like leaders to be able to break a tie vote on bipartisan interim committees, when they vote on staff contracts or whether to object to state-agency rules.GOP members said they’re asking all other state lawmakers and the public to comment on the proposals, before the committee may take action next week.Democratic members of the committee, who boycotted the meeting, said Thursday it was illegally convened and that the party stood ready to sue to block any action taken by the panel.“This is not saber-rattling,” said House Minority Leader Casey Schreiner of Great Falls, who’s also running for lieutenant governor. “We’re willing to follow through on whatever it takes to get these illegitimate actions stopped.”Schreiner said the meeting is a “brazen, partisan power-grab” meant to undo Bullock’s emergency orders on the coronavirus pandemic, including his order allowing counties to conduct an all-mail ballot for the Nov. 3 election.He and other Democrats pointed to the proposed change that would allow the polling of lawmakers, while out of session, on whether to issue “proclamations” that could override Bullock’s orders.“They want to pass a joint resolution … so that they can tear down the emergency order that is keeping people safe and healthy and protecting our economy,” Schreiner said.When asked about the intent of the “proclamation” change, Sen. Fred Thomas of Stevensville – the chair of the committee – said it would serve mostly to allow lawmakers to comment on national issues before Congress, while the Legislature is not in session.He also denied that Republicans were trying to undo the mail-ballot order.House Speaker Greg Hertz, a Polson Republican, also told MTN News that he doubted any resolution by an out-of-session Legislature could retroactively undo actions taken by the governor.However, he did say that many Republicans lawmakers believe the state no longer needs to be under a declared emergency, because of the coronavirus, and are looking for ways to undo Bullock’s powers.“We don’t need to be under a state of emergency,” Hertz said. “I think most businesses, schools and public places seem to be quite capable of handling the coronavirus on their own and making sure their customers and employees are safe.”Hertz also said he thinks it would be “very difficult” for the 2021 Legislature, which convenes in January, to be held without most lawmakers being in the Capitol in-person, and that Thursday’s committee was part of the discussion on rules for participation at the upcoming session.Rep. Derek Skees, R-Kalispell, a member of the Rules Committee, said Thursday it would be “near impossible” to run a so-called “hybrid session” with many legislators participating virtually.“If you can’t participate in the normal way, then I would suggest you resign your seat and let someone who will,” he said.Skees and nearly all Republicans appeared at the Rules Committee meeting at the Capitol without face-coverings, despite a governor’s order that says face-coverings should be worn in buildings where the public congregates.Democrats said the meeting was illegal, because the Rules Committee can meet only during a legislative session or after a general election in the weeks directly before the start of a regular session, which convenes in January of odd-numbered years. Dems decry GOP legislative rule proposals as `power grab’ https://www.kpax.com/news/montana-politics/dems-decry-gop-legislative-rule-proposals-as-power-grab Montana News urn:uuid:7d8bb7c8-ce9c-6c07-0c65-d1282ac8b126 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:42:29 +0000 At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.” At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.”The Joint Rules Committee meeting, instigated and attended only by Republicans, did not have a full quorum and did not approve any new rules for operating the Legislature.But GOP committee members, meeting in-person at the Capitol and online, did suggest changes that could allow lawmakers to be polled on issuing “proclamations” when not in session and define how lawmakers could participate in a session if they’re not at the Capitol.Republicans on the panel also said they’d like leaders to be able to break a tie vote on bipartisan interim committees, when they vote on staff contracts or whether to object to state-agency rules.GOP members said they’re asking all other state lawmakers and the public to comment on the proposals, before the committee may take action next week.Democratic members of the committee, who boycotted the meeting, said Thursday it was illegally convened and that the party stood ready to sue to block any action taken by the panel.“This is not saber-rattling,” said House Minority Leader Casey Schreiner of Great Falls, who’s also running for lieutenant governor. “We’re willing to follow through on whatever it takes to get these illegitimate actions stopped.”Schreiner said the meeting is a “brazen, partisan power-grab” meant to undo Bullock’s emergency orders on the coronavirus pandemic, including his order allowing counties to conduct an all-mail ballot for the Nov. 3 election.He and other Democrats pointed to the proposed change that would allow the polling of lawmakers, while out of session, on whether to issue “proclamations” that could override Bullock’s orders.“They want to pass a joint resolution … so that they can tear down the emergency order that is keeping people safe and healthy and protecting our economy,” Schreiner said.When asked about the intent of the “proclamation” change, Sen. Fred Thomas of Stevensville – the chair of the committee – said it would serve mostly to allow lawmakers to comment on national issues before Congress, while the Legislature is not in session.He also denied that Republicans were trying to undo the mail-ballot order.House Speaker Greg Hertz, a Polson Republican, also told MTN News that he doubted any resolution by an out-of-session Legislature could retroactively undo actions taken by the governor.However, he did say that many Republicans lawmakers believe the state no longer needs to be under a declared emergency, because of the coronavirus, and are looking for ways to undo Bullock’s powers.“We don’t need to be under a state of emergency,” Hertz said. “I think most businesses, schools and public places seem to be quite capable of handling the coronavirus on their own and making sure their customers and employees are safe.”Hertz also said he thinks it would be “very difficult” for the 2021 Legislature, which convenes in January, to be held without most lawmakers being in the Capitol in-person, and that Thursday’s committee was part of the discussion on rules for participation at the upcoming session.Rep. Derek Skees, R-Kalispell, a member of the Rules Committee, said Thursday it would be “near impossible” to run a so-called “hybrid session” with many legislators participating virtually.“If you can’t participate in the normal way, then I would suggest you resign your seat and let someone who will,” he said.Skees and nearly all Republicans appeared at the Rules Committee meeting at the Capitol without face-coverings, despite a governor’s order that says face-coverings should be worn in buildings where the public congregates.Democrats said the meeting was illegal, because the Rules Committee can meet only during a legislative session or after a general election in the weeks directly before the start of a regular session, which convenes in January of odd-numbered years. Dems decry GOP legislative rule proposals as `power grab’ https://www.ktvq.com/news/montana-politics/dems-decry-gop-legislative-rule-proposals-as-power-grab Montana News urn:uuid:f77e46a9-8690-3dad-9414-4bc88b375a18 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:42:29 +0000 At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.” At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.”The Joint Rules Committee meeting, instigated and attended only by Republicans, did not have a full quorum and did not approve any new rules for operating the Legislature.But GOP committee members, meeting in-person at the Capitol and online, did suggest changes that could allow lawmakers to be polled on issuing “proclamations” when not in session and define how lawmakers could participate in a session if they’re not at the Capitol.Republicans on the panel also said they’d like leaders to be able to break a tie vote on bipartisan interim committees, when they vote on staff contracts or whether to object to state-agency rules.GOP members said they’re asking all other state lawmakers and the public to comment on the proposals, before the committee may take action next week.Democratic members of the committee, who boycotted the meeting, said Thursday it was illegally convened and that the party stood ready to sue to block any action taken by the panel.“This is not saber-rattling,” said House Minority Leader Casey Schreiner of Great Falls, who’s also running for lieutenant governor. “We’re willing to follow through on whatever it takes to get these illegitimate actions stopped.”Schreiner said the meeting is a “brazen, partisan power-grab” meant to undo Bullock’s emergency orders on the coronavirus pandemic, including his order allowing counties to conduct an all-mail ballot for the Nov. 3 election.He and other Democrats pointed to the proposed change that would allow the polling of lawmakers, while out of session, on whether to issue “proclamations” that could override Bullock’s orders.“They want to pass a joint resolution … so that they can tear down the emergency order that is keeping people safe and healthy and protecting our economy,” Schreiner said.When asked about the intent of the “proclamation” change, Sen. Fred Thomas of Stevensville – the chair of the committee – said it would serve mostly to allow lawmakers to comment on national issues before Congress, while the Legislature is not in session.He also denied that Republicans were trying to undo the mail-ballot order.House Speaker Greg Hertz, a Polson Republican, also told MTN News that he doubted any resolution by an out-of-session Legislature could retroactively undo actions taken by the governor.However, he did say that many Republicans lawmakers believe the state no longer needs to be under a declared emergency, because of the coronavirus, and are looking for ways to undo Bullock’s powers.“We don’t need to be under a state of emergency,” Hertz said. “I think most businesses, schools and public places seem to be quite capable of handling the coronavirus on their own and making sure their customers and employees are safe.”Hertz also said he thinks it would be “very difficult” for the 2021 Legislature, which convenes in January, to be held without most lawmakers being in the Capitol in-person, and that Thursday’s committee was part of the discussion on rules for participation at the upcoming session.Rep. Derek Skees, R-Kalispell, a member of the Rules Committee, said Thursday it would be “near impossible” to run a so-called “hybrid session” with many legislators participating virtually.“If you can’t participate in the normal way, then I would suggest you resign your seat and let someone who will,” he said.Skees and nearly all Republicans appeared at the Rules Committee meeting at the Capitol without face-coverings, despite a governor’s order that says face-coverings should be worn in buildings where the public congregates.Democrats said the meeting was illegal, because the Rules Committee can meet only during a legislative session or after a general election in the weeks directly before the start of a regular session, which convenes in January of odd-numbered years. Dems decry GOP legislative rule proposals as 'power grab' https://www.kpax.com/news/montana-politics/dems-decry-gop-legislative-rule-proposals-as-power-grab Montana News urn:uuid:60d051d0-a356-6e04-e5ec-ae4af5be5f9f Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:42:29 +0000 At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.” At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.”The Joint Rules Committee meeting, instigated and attended only by Republicans, did not have a full quorum and did not approve any new rules for operating the Legislature.But GOP committee members, meeting in-person at the Capitol and online, did suggest changes that could allow lawmakers to be polled on issuing “proclamations” when not in session and define how lawmakers could participate in a session if they’re not at the Capitol.Republicans on the panel also said they’d like leaders to be able to break a tie vote on bipartisan interim committees, when they vote on staff contracts or whether to object to state-agency rules.GOP members said they’re asking all other state lawmakers and the public to comment on the proposals, before the committee may take action next week.Democratic members of the committee, who boycotted the meeting, said Thursday it was illegally convened and that the party stood ready to sue to block any action taken by the panel.“This is not saber-rattling,” said House Minority Leader Casey Schreiner of Great Falls, who’s also running for lieutenant governor. “We’re willing to follow through on whatever it takes to get these illegitimate actions stopped.”Schreiner said the meeting is a “brazen, partisan power-grab” meant to undo Bullock’s emergency orders on the coronavirus pandemic, including his order allowing counties to conduct an all-mail ballot for the Nov. 3 election.He and other Democrats pointed to the proposed change that would allow the polling of lawmakers, while out of session, on whether to issue “proclamations” that could override Bullock’s orders.“They want to pass a joint resolution … so that they can tear down the emergency order that is keeping people safe and healthy and protecting our economy,” Schreiner said.When asked about the intent of the “proclamation” change, Sen. Fred Thomas of Stevensville – the chair of the committee – said it would serve mostly to allow lawmakers to comment on national issues before Congress, while the Legislature is not in session.He also denied that Republicans were trying to undo the mail-ballot order.House Speaker Greg Hertz, a Polson Republican, also told MTN News that he doubted any resolution by an out-of-session Legislature could retroactively undo actions taken by the governor.However, he did say that many Republicans lawmakers believe the state no longer needs to be under a declared emergency, because of the coronavirus, and are looking for ways to undo Bullock’s powers.“We don’t need to be under a state of emergency,” Hertz said. “I think most businesses, schools and public places seem to be quite capable of handling the coronavirus on their own and making sure their customers and employees are safe.”Hertz also said he thinks it would be “very difficult” for the 2021 Legislature, which convenes in January, to be held without most lawmakers being in the Capitol in-person, and that Thursday’s committee was part of the discussion on rules for participation at the upcoming session.Rep. Derek Skees, R-Kalispell, a member of the Rules Committee, said Thursday it would be “near impossible” to run a so-called “hybrid session” with many legislators participating virtually.“If you can’t participate in the normal way, then I would suggest you resign your seat and let someone who will,” he said.Skees and nearly all Republicans appeared at the Rules Committee meeting at the Capitol without face-coverings, despite a governor’s order that says face-coverings should be worn in buildings where the public congregates.Democrats said the meeting was illegal, because the Rules Committee can meet only during a legislative session or after a general election in the weeks directly before the start of a regular session, which convenes in January of odd-numbered years. Dems decry GOP legislative rule proposals as 'power grab' https://www.ktvq.com/news/montana-politics/dems-decry-gop-legislative-rule-proposals-as-power-grab Montana News urn:uuid:1bf7ada7-5b1b-2f5e-c92d-d75c831bf082 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:42:29 +0000 At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.” At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.”The Joint Rules Committee meeting, instigated and attended only by Republicans, did not have a full quorum and did not approve any new rules for operating the Legislature.But GOP committee members, meeting in-person at the Capitol and online, did suggest changes that could allow lawmakers to be polled on issuing “proclamations” when not in session and define how lawmakers could participate in a session if they’re not at the Capitol.Republicans on the panel also said they’d like leaders to be able to break a tie vote on bipartisan interim committees, when they vote on staff contracts or whether to object to state-agency rules.GOP members said they’re asking all other state lawmakers and the public to comment on the proposals, before the committee may take action next week.Democratic members of the committee, who boycotted the meeting, said Thursday it was illegally convened and that the party stood ready to sue to block any action taken by the panel.“This is not saber-rattling,” said House Minority Leader Casey Schreiner of Great Falls, who’s also running for lieutenant governor. “We’re willing to follow through on whatever it takes to get these illegitimate actions stopped.”Schreiner said the meeting is a “brazen, partisan power-grab” meant to undo Bullock’s emergency orders on the coronavirus pandemic, including his order allowing counties to conduct an all-mail ballot for the Nov. 3 election.He and other Democrats pointed to the proposed change that would allow the polling of lawmakers, while out of session, on whether to issue “proclamations” that could override Bullock’s orders.“They want to pass a joint resolution … so that they can tear down the emergency order that is keeping people safe and healthy and protecting our economy,” Schreiner said.When asked about the intent of the “proclamation” change, Sen. Fred Thomas of Stevensville – the chair of the committee – said it would serve mostly to allow lawmakers to comment on national issues before Congress, while the Legislature is not in session.He also denied that Republicans were trying to undo the mail-ballot order.House Speaker Greg Hertz, a Polson Republican, also told MTN News that he doubted any resolution by an out-of-session Legislature could retroactively undo actions taken by the governor.However, he did say that many Republicans lawmakers believe the state no longer needs to be under a declared emergency, because of the coronavirus, and are looking for ways to undo Bullock’s powers.“We don’t need to be under a state of emergency,” Hertz said. “I think most businesses, schools and public places seem to be quite capable of handling the coronavirus on their own and making sure their customers and employees are safe.”Hertz also said he thinks it would be “very difficult” for the 2021 Legislature, which convenes in January, to be held without most lawmakers being in the Capitol in-person, and that Thursday’s committee was part of the discussion on rules for participation at the upcoming session.Rep. Derek Skees, R-Kalispell, a member of the Rules Committee, said Thursday it would be “near impossible” to run a so-called “hybrid session” with many legislators participating virtually.“If you can’t participate in the normal way, then I would suggest you resign your seat and let someone who will,” he said.Skees and nearly all Republicans appeared at the Rules Committee meeting at the Capitol without face-coverings, despite a governor’s order that says face-coverings should be worn in buildings where the public congregates.Democrats said the meeting was illegal, because the Rules Committee can meet only during a legislative session or after a general election in the weeks directly before the start of a regular session, which convenes in January of odd-numbered years. Dems decry GOP legislative rule proposals as 'power grab' https://www.kbzk.com/news/montana-politics/dems-decry-gop-legislative-rule-proposals-as-power-grab Montana News urn:uuid:40d12923-e0f3-f348-019d-24c5d62f3739 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:42:29 +0000 At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.” At a Thursday meeting that Democrats decried as an illegal attempt by GOP lawmakers to rein in Gov. Steve Bullock’s emergency powers during the coronavirus pandemic, Republicans recommended several legislative rule changes – but denied it was any sort of a “partisan power grab.”The Joint Rules Committee meeting, instigated and attended only by Republicans, did not have a full quorum and did not approve any new rules for operating the Legislature.But GOP committee members, meeting in-person at the Capitol and online, did suggest changes that could allow lawmakers to be polled on issuing “proclamations” when not in session and define how lawmakers could participate in a session if they’re not at the Capitol.Republicans on the panel also said they’d like leaders to be able to break a tie vote on bipartisan interim committees, when they vote on staff contracts or whether to object to state-agency rules.GOP members said they’re asking all other state lawmakers and the public to comment on the proposals, before the committee may take action next week.Democratic members of the committee, who boycotted the meeting, said Thursday it was illegally convened and that the party stood ready to sue to block any action taken by the panel.“This is not saber-rattling,” said House Minority Leader Casey Schreiner of Great Falls, who’s also running for lieutenant governor. “We’re willing to follow through on whatever it takes to get these illegitimate actions stopped.”Schreiner said the meeting is a “brazen, partisan power-grab” meant to undo Bullock’s emergency orders on the coronavirus pandemic, including his order allowing counties to conduct an all-mail ballot for the Nov. 3 election.He and other Democrats pointed to the proposed change that would allow the polling of lawmakers, while out of session, on whether to issue “proclamations” that could override Bullock’s orders.“They want to pass a joint resolution … so that they can tear down the emergency order that is keeping people safe and healthy and protecting our economy,” Schreiner said.When asked about the intent of the “proclamation” change, Sen. Fred Thomas of Stevensville – the chair of the committee – said it would serve mostly to allow lawmakers to comment on national issues before Congress, while the Legislature is not in session.He also denied that Republicans were trying to undo the mail-ballot order.House Speaker Greg Hertz, a Polson Republican, also told MTN News that he doubted any resolution by an out-of-session Legislature could retroactively undo actions taken by the governor.However, he did say that many Republicans lawmakers believe the state no longer needs to be under a declared emergency, because of the coronavirus, and are looking for ways to undo Bullock’s powers.“We don’t need to be under a state of emergency,” Hertz said. “I think most businesses, schools and public places seem to be quite capable of handling the coronavirus on their own and making sure their customers and employees are safe.”Hertz also said he thinks it would be “very difficult” for the 2021 Legislature, which convenes in January, to be held without most lawmakers being in the Capitol in-person, and that Thursday’s committee was part of the discussion on rules for participation at the upcoming session.Rep. Derek Skees, R-Kalispell, a member of the Rules Committee, said Thursday it would be “near impossible” to run a so-called “hybrid session” with many legislators participating virtually.“If you can’t participate in the normal way, then I would suggest you resign your seat and let someone who will,” he said.Skees and nearly all Republicans appeared at the Rules Committee meeting at the Capitol without face-coverings, despite a governor’s order that says face-coverings should be worn in buildings where the public congregates.Democrats said the meeting was illegal, because the Rules Committee can meet only during a legislative session or after a general election in the weeks directly before the start of a regular session, which convenes in January of odd-numbered years. Orphaned wolf pup at ZooMontana adjusting to his new home https://www.kpax.com/news/local-news/orphaned-wolf-pup-at-zoomontana-adjusting-to-his-new-home Montana News urn:uuid:db2dd312-0092-2691-3ab8-d93bd5dbfd05 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 01:52:51 +0000 "He is up about 40 pounds since we originally got him which is incredible..." In June, ZooMontana took in a seven-week-old Grey Wolf pup abandoned by his pack near Condon. Simpson, as he became known, has had a long summer in his new surroundings, and it seems he's found a new home and a new pack.Krystal Whetham, a relief keeper at the zoo, told MTN News how this little guy is now, not so little. “So Simpson, we’ve had him for a few months now and he is just really blossoming,” she says. “He is starting to gain the weight. He is up about 40 pounds since we originally got him, which is incredible how fast he has grown. He still has big feet. He’s got a lot of room to grow."Whetham says that Simpson not only gets three hearty meals a day, but works at enrichment games to help his developing mind. He’s even started to meet the other wolves, Kali and Kahlua, at the zoo.“We have started introductions with Simpson and our other two wolves. We have a male and a female. They both have been here for nine to 10 years. We started with a barrier. Lots of licking, smelling and vocals. And then we recently did a free contact with our male wolf, bringing him into the back holding where Simpson is, and that all went really well.”Simpson is fully of puppy energy. After all, he’s only about five months old, so he is still learning his manners.“Kahlua, every once and a while, will give him a little growl. Nothing physical, just something to let him know that he’s the boss,” Whetham said.Once Simpson is large enough, he will join Kalia and Kahlua in their habitat and he will finally have a pack to call his own.“My hope for Simpson is that he really just lives a happy life here,” says Whetham. “He’s going to have a great life. He is going to be fed well, have a ton of things to do. We spend a lot of time bonding with him, to keep our hands on him for vet work and he is going to flourish.”For more information on Simpson and all the other animals at ZooMontana, log onto their website here: https://www.zoomontana.org/ VIDEO: Black bear swimming in Flathead lake https://www.kpax.com/news/montana-news/video-black-bear-swimming-in-flathead-lake Montana News urn:uuid:70a04508-6841-11c8-ae83-7eecdb766a85 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 01:07:10 +0000 A black bear was spotted swimming at Flathead Lake on Monday at 11:30am. A black bear was spotted Monday morning swimming to Wild Horse Island on Flathead Lake.Photographer Andy Austin told MTN News he was in a pontoon boat around 11:30 a.m. giving a tour when he saw a black speck a few hundred yards out."I thought it was a duck at first until I noticed a wake behind it. So we got closer to get a look and it was exactly what I hoped it was. It is indeed a black bear," said Austin.Austin, being a professional freelance photographer, was able to capture this clip of the bear swimming across the lake.He said this summer, he has been able to photograph around 10,000 miles of Montana. VIDEO: Black bear swimming in Flathead lake https://www.ktvq.com/news/montana-news/video-black-bear-swimming-in-flathead-lake Montana News urn:uuid:614d4d28-4038-981f-13f2-c5ec4de733a5 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 01:07:10 +0000 A black bear was spotted swimming at Flathead Lake on Monday at 11:30am. A black bear was spotted Monday morning swimming to Wild Horse Island on Flathead Lake.Photographer Andy Austin told MTN News he was in a pontoon boat around 11:30 a.m. giving a tour when he saw a black speck a few hundred yards out."I thought it was a duck at first until I noticed a wake behind it. So we got closer to get a look and it was exactly what I hoped it was. It is indeed a black bear," said Austin.Austin, being a professional freelance photographer, was able to capture this clip of the bear swimming across the lake.He said this summer, he has been able to photograph around 10,000 miles of Montana. Another COVID-19 spike reported at the University of Montana https://www.kpax.com/news/missoula-county/another-covid-19-spike-reported-at-the-university-of-montana Montana News urn:uuid:da6b25d7-0c12-6c28-e31e-6f95bca9157a Fri, 18 Sep 2020 00:37:49 +0000 Missoula County officials have linked another spike in COVID cases to the University of Montana. Missoula County officials have linked another spike in COVID cases to the University of Montana.Missoula’s COVID Incident Commander Cindy Farr said her team expected cases connected to the University, but they didn’t expect a jump this substantial or this quicklyIn Missoula County, we now have 114 active cases, that’s up 23 cases from yesterday, and the majority of cases fall within the 20 to 29 year old age group.Initially, the Health Department planned to report University specific cases only once a week, but Farr says they're considering reporting cases more frequently now that they’re coming in at a higher rate.UM’s cases are considered clusters at this time, and we know the clusters have been identified within the athletic department and Greek life.Spokesperson for UM Paula Short said they’re not ready to move entirely online, but as cases rise, we could see gradual adjustments made.There could be adjustments to campus operations there could be adjustments to planned events there could be adjustments to instructional delivery individually by by instructors, I mean, that can happen with COVID, we're also seeing it with a wildfire smoke," said University of Montana Director of Communications, Paula Short.Tonight at 10 we’ll have more on how the University is approaching quarantine and isolation for those who have tested positive or are considered close contacts. Hundreds attend virtual summit on Montana passenger rail service https://www.kpax.com/news/montana-news/hundreds-attend-virtual-summit-on-montana-passenger-rail-service Montana News urn:uuid:32273af3-afe0-2b2d-39d8-c878431f4fdd Fri, 18 Sep 2020 00:21:14 +0000 Judging from the audience for a virtual Passenger Rail Summit on Thursday, the idea of bringing passenger trains to Montana's "southern route" is generating a lot of interest.The Rail Summit was organized by Missoula County, and others working to establish the Big Sky Rail Authority, the legal entity needed to lobby for the restoration of rail service across Southern Montana for the first time in more than 40-years.More than 5-hundred people registered, and over 3-hundred followed the three-hour discussion. At the same time, panelists were also concerned about upcoming Amtrak service cuts on the "Empire Builder", across the Hi-Line.Presenters explained how other regions, from the Southeast to the Cascadia Corridor in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia are benefiting from federal funding and organization. And Montana backers were urged to organize and follow the money.“When you start talking about passenger rail everybody wants to know if the train is gonna make a profit," said Passenger Rail Association President and CEO, Jim Matthews. "And I think if we can start to assess the benefits of rail to the community and start to view this as the investment that it actually is, and to start to see the returns that come to the communities as the taxpayers return on equity or return on investment, I think we can change the conversation.”Matthews said the Empire Builder already generates nearly five-and-a-half million dollars in direct spending and jobs in Montana, with over three million in direct visitor spending, with an overall economic impact of nearly 6-hundred million. But he warned that could fall dramatically if Amtrak goes through with service cuts. Explaining air quality categories and health risks https://www.krtv.com/news/montana-and-regional-news/explaining-air-quality-categories Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:b9e7dfe8-dea4-af75-f770-929dccf0f301 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 00:14:07 +0000 Air quality across many parts of Montana this week took a dive Air quality across many parts of Montana this week took a dive, and was rated by the state Department of Environmental Quality as ranging from "unhealthy for sensitive groups" to "hazardous."The cause of the poor air quality is smoke pouring in to Montana from wildfires in several western states, including Oregon and California.Here is an explanation from MT DEQ about the different categories:HAZARDOUS: All children and adults should avoid or limit all outdoor exertionVERY UNHEALTHY: Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid all outdoor exertion; everyone else, especially children, should limit outdoor exertionUNHEALTHY: Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should avoid prolonged outdoor exertion; everyone else, especially children, should limit prolonged outdoor exertionUNHEALTHY FOR SENSITIVE GROUPS: Active children and adults, and people with respiratory disease, such as asthma, should limit prolonged outdoor exertionMODERATE: Unusually sensitive people should consider limiting prolonged outdoor exertion Orphaned wolf pup at ZooMontana adjusting to his new home https://www.ktvq.com/news/local-news/orphaned-wolf-pup-at-zoomontana-adjusting-to-his-new-home Montana News urn:uuid:fb0e9d25-5397-2c84-a097-cb7d59e5491a Fri, 18 Sep 2020 00:06:23 +0000 "He is up about 40 pounds since we originally got him which is incredible..." In June, ZooMontana took in a seven-week-old Grey Wolf pup abandoned by his pack near Condon. Simpson, as he became known, has had a long summer in his new surroundings, and it seems he's found a new home and a new pack.Krystal Whetham, a relief keeper at the zoo, told MTN News how this little guy is now, not so little. “So Simpson, we’ve had him for a few months now and he is just really blossoming,” she says. “He is starting to gain the weight. He is up about 40 pounds since we originally got him, which is incredible how fast he has grown. He still has big feet. He’s got a lot of room to grow."Whetham says that Simpson not only gets three hearty meals a day, but works at enrichment games to help his developing mind. He’s even started to meet the other wolves, Kali and Kahlua, at the zoo.“We have started introductions with Simpson and our other two wolves. We have a male and a female. They both have been here for nine to 10 years. We started with a barrier. Lots of licking, smelling and vocals. And then we recently did a free contact with our male wolf, bringing him into the back holding where Simpson is, and that all went really well.”Simpson is fully of puppy energy. After all, he’s only about five months old, so he is still learning his manners.“Kahlua, every once and a while, will give him a little growl. Nothing physical, just something to let him know that he’s the boss,” Whetham said.Once Simpson is large enough, he will join Kalia and Kahlua in their habitat and he will finally have a pack to call his own.“My hope for Simpson is that he really just lives a happy life here,” says Whetham. “He’s going to have a great life. He is going to be fed well, have a ton of things to do. We spend a lot of time bonding with him, to keep our hands on him for vet work and he is going to flourish.”For more information on Simpson and all the other animals at ZooMontana, log onto their website here: https://www.zoomontana.org/ Bus driver arrested on suspicion of DUI while taking kids to school https://www.krtv.com/news/montana-and-regional-news/bus-driver-arrested-on-suspicion-of-dui-while-taking-kids-to-school Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:eec28362-b115-86ed-4dda-594303ab0d39 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 22:47:04 +0000 Wooley said Jones was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of drugs and could face up to 28 counts of felony criminal endangerment A school bus driver heading to Ben Steele Middle School in Billings on Thursday is facing numerous felony charges after he was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of drugs while driving students to school.Keith Jones was arrested following reports at around 8 a.m. of a First Student bus being driven erratically and in an unsafe manner, according to a news release from Billings Police Lt. Brandon Wooley.A Ben Steele school resource officer contacted the driver and started a DUI investigation, according to Wooley.Wooley said Jones was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of drugs and could face up to 28 counts of felony criminal endangerment for each student riding on the bus.Prosecutors have not yet determined exact charges.Jones, 46 years old, is currently being held in the Yellowstone County Detention Center. Grizzly bear relocated from Seeley Lake area https://www.ktvq.com/news/grizzly-bear-relocated-from-seeley-lake-area Montana News urn:uuid:2895d382-8581-af1b-0734-150b52ffbabd Thu, 17 Sep 2020 20:49:06 +0000 The bear did not have a history of conflicts and was relocated to a remote area in northwest Montana. Wildlife officials captured and relocated a male grizzly bear in Seeley Lake last week after repeated incidents of the bear getting into garbage and other attractants at campgrounds and home sites in the area.According to a news release from Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, the bear did not have a history of conflicts and was collared and relocated to a remote area in the Whitefish Mountain Range in northwest Montana.FWP confirmed there are still other bears in the Seeley Lake area looking for garbage and other food sources around homes and recreation areas. The area has a history of regular bear activity that has picked up in recent years. FWP bear specialist Jamie Jonkel emphasized that securing attractants—such as garbage-- has become increasingly important for people and bears.“The community of Seeley Lake is starting to come together to make sure bear attractants are cleaned up or out of reach, and doing so is important for everyone, including bears,” Jonkel said. “Bears that have easy access to things like garbage, fruit trees, bird seed and backyard chicken coops tend to stay around, which leads to safety concerns for people and the potential for offending bears to be lethally removed.”Once bears are exposed to these attractants, it is hard to break the pattern and they must be relocated or sometimes euthanized. “We want to work with the community to do all we can to prevent that outcome,” Jonkel said.Keeping attractants out of a bear’s reach in our neighborhoods and recreation areas is the best way to prevent conflicts. Store garbage indoors or inside a bear resistant container; pick fruit as soon as it is ripe; consider using electric fencing around chickens, garden areas and compost piles; and move other attractants such as pet food and barbecue grills into a secure building when not in use.Three grizzly bears relocated by FWP2 grizzly bears relocated after calf killedFWP relocates three grizzly bears Grizzly bear relocated from Seeley Lake area https://www.krtv.com/news/grizzly-bear-relocated-from-seeley-lake-area Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:df760638-c593-cf16-c516-8a4045178531 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 19:49:17 +0000 The bear did not have a history of conflicts and was relocated to a remote area in northwest Montana. Wildlife officials captured and relocated a male grizzly bear in Seeley Lake last week after repeated incidents of the bear getting into garbage and other attractants at campgrounds and home sites in the area.According to a news release from Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, the bear did not have a history of conflicts and was collared and relocated to a remote area in the Whitefish Mountain Range in northwest Montana.FWP confirmed there are still other bears in the Seeley Lake area looking for garbage and other food sources around homes and recreation areas. The area has a history of regular bear activity that has picked up in recent years. FWP bear specialist Jamie Jonkel emphasized that securing attractants—such as garbage-- has become increasingly important for people and bears.“The community of Seeley Lake is starting to come together to make sure bear attractants are cleaned up or out of reach, and doing so is important for everyone, including bears,” Jonkel said. “Bears that have easy access to things like garbage, fruit trees, bird seed and backyard chicken coops tend to stay around, which leads to safety concerns for people and the potential for offending bears to be lethally removed.”Once bears are exposed to these attractants, it is hard to break the pattern and they must be relocated or sometimes euthanized. “We want to work with the community to do all we can to prevent that outcome,” Jonkel said.Keeping attractants out of a bear’s reach in our neighborhoods and recreation areas is the best way to prevent conflicts. Store garbage indoors or inside a bear resistant container; pick fruit as soon as it is ripe; consider using electric fencing around chickens, garden areas and compost piles; and move other attractants such as pet food and barbecue grills into a secure building when not in use.Three grizzly bears relocated by FWP2 grizzly bears relocated after calf killedFWP relocates three grizzly bears How likely is a 'quarantine baby boom'? https://www.krtv.com/news/coronavirus/how-likely-is-a-quarantine-baby-boom Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:6532c923-3816-7a10-218a-8679fea41e0d Thu, 17 Sep 2020 18:42:10 +0000 With people spending more time at home and distancing themselves from others, it may lead them to drawing closer to a spouse or partner.MTN NEWS spoke with a midwife on her experiences with baby booms and could this pandemic lead to a quarantine baby boom nine months from now?“Historically, it could go either way. We’ve had lots of natural disasters that caused a baby boom. Just because in times of stress people come together, they need more emotional support, they need more physical contact. But also people consider financial stress, if they’ve lost their job. Sometimes people think they don’t necessarily need to add another person to the family,” explained Cassie Belzer, a midwife with Bozeman Health.There isn’t any scientific explanation that points to either. For many couples, it’s based on personal preference. Montana Ag Network: Wildfire recovery resources for ranchers https://www.kbzk.com/news/montana-ag-network/montana-ag-network-wildfire-recovery-resources-for-ranchers Montana News urn:uuid:30f465a2-9ee5-81f9-887d-fafceebe826e Thu, 17 Sep 2020 18:12:02 +0000 As livestock and landowners take inventory of the damage caused by wildfires, many are preparing to rebuild from the ashes.The Montana Stockgrowers Association (MSGA) is helping producers find resources they need to make this happen.“USDA’s Farm Service Agency FSA is the place to start,” said Jay Bodner, executive vice president of MSGA. “They have the livestock Indemnity Program. That program has been set up for direct losses for any adverse events that happen. So, either fire, weather, any of those the events. They do need some documentation to go through that. They also do have the Livestock Forage Disaster Program. There are some enrollment requirements but it’s a program that may be able to be of some assistance.”USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) also has resources available through the Environmental Quality Incentive Program.“That program is designed to help with soil erosion or any rehabilitation or recovery,” said Bodner. "It really helps out those producers who maybe have fences burned out, or stock tanks burned out. A lot of opportunity there to try to help with some of those things that producers have faced.”Producers grazing on federal or state lands may also have resources available.“In many cases, the Bureau of Land Management will supply at least fencing material. They don't supply the labor, but they do certainly the material if it's all on BLM land.”Hay stockpiles have also been lost due to fire. Montana's Hay hotline, an online portal where producers can donate, buy or sell hay can be found at the Montana Department of Agriculture's website.The state of Montana’s Disaster and Emergency Services also offers valuable information for those impacted by wildfire. 19-year-old Montana helicopter pilot joins the fight against wildfires in California https://www.kbzk.com/news/montana-news/19-year-old-montana-helicopter-pilot-joins-the-fight-against-wildfires-in-california Montana News urn:uuid:98c04cf4-f8f8-ec5f-a1b6-b587cd75242b Thu, 17 Sep 2020 17:11:37 +0000 "You have to be able to lean out the window basically and look at a water bucket underneath you and guide it where you want to go," she said. A 19-year-old helicopter pilot has joined the fight to help extinguish the wildfires that have burned 3 million acres in California. Ashli Blaine is just a teenager, but she flies one of the largest helicopter — the 40,000-pound CH-47 Chinook."You could say it's the family trade," Blaine told CBS News. "My dad's been fighting fires for close to 30 years now. As soon as I got into flying I knew that was going to be one of my end goals was to get into firefighting."Flying as her dad's co-pilot, Ashli makes sure the water they're carrying hits its target."You have to be able to lean out the window basically and look at a water bucket underneath you and guide it where you want to go," she said."Sometimes we can be flying in very adverse conditions," Blaine said. "Thick smoke or just lots of other aircraft working with us that we have to be cognizant of."But for a young woman who has been flying since she was 13, it's a dream summer job."I love what I do, especially getting to firefight with my dad. That's one of the best parts," she said."Other than flying, what's the most important lesson you've learned from your father?" CBS News asked."How to be a good person," Blaine replied. "He's a very compassionate and empathetic person. That's hopefully a trait that I can pick up from him and learn from him."When Blaine heads out on a mission, all she needs is a bottle of water and a Snickers.Click here to watch the full story. COVID-19 in Montana (Thursday September 17) https://www.krtv.com/news/coronavirus/covid-19-in-montana-thursday-september-17 Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:ba94d750-5a7a-b392-e13f-191c3edd689b Thu, 17 Sep 2020 16:46:49 +0000 There were 217 new cases and two new deaths reported on Thursday morning. There were 217 new cases and two new deaths added to the total on the Montana Response COVID-19 tracking site on Thursday morning. The 217 new cases is the most reported in one day in Montana. The data below is from the official Montana website on September 17:TOTAL CASES & RECOVERIES: Montana now reports 9,647 cumulative cases statewide, with 7,401 people recovered.HOSPITALIZATIONS: There are 107 patients hospitalized, and a total of 549 hospitalizations since the pandemic began.ACTIVE CASES: The state reports there are currently 2,103 active cases in Montana.DEATHS: The cumulative number of deaths attributed to COVID-19 in Montana is 143, an increase of two since yesterday.TESTING: The number of new tests is 2,989; the cumulative total of tests since March is now 295,299.The two new deaths were reported in Yellowstone County; the county health department says they were a man his 80s, and a woman in her 30s.Numbers reported by the state each day occasionally differ from those reported by county public health departments due to periodic lag times in reporting data to the state. We encourage people to check the official website and/or Facebook page of their respective county health department for any updates that are not yet included in the state's daily updates.As COVID-19 new cases accumulate daily in Montana, some people have asked what constitutes a recovery in official reports, and how that factors into the counting of active cases. Click here for details.Cascade County has reported a cumulative total of 483 cases, an increase of two from yesterday. Of those, 253 are listed as recovered, 225 are currently listed as active, and five people have died.Sheriff Jesse Slaughter said on Sunday that there are 37 new COVID-19 cases at the Cascade County detention center; click here for details.Great Falls Public Schools officials hosted a news conference on Monday in response to new COVID-19 cases identified at Great Falls High School. The cases caused the district to shut down the school on Monday and Tuesday. Click here for details.Alluvion Health in Great Falls is continuing to offer drive-through COVID-19 testing at Montana ExpoPark. The entrance is along 3rd Street NW. It is located in the Family Living Center until October 1st. The testing is open to anyone - asymptomatic, symptomatic, high risk, and direct contacts. The drive through is open Monday-Friday from 10am-6pm, and Saturday-Sunday 10am-3pm. For more information, call Alluvion at 406-454-6973.Governor Steve Bullock announced Wednesday that the state will be posting information online about positive COVID-19 cases in schools; click here for details. He announced last week a new set of protocols to help Montana schools deal with potential and confirmed COVID-19 cases. Click here to read more.The federal Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) released data in late August which emphasizes that people with contributing or underlying medical conditions are at much greater risk of dying from COVID-19. According to the CDC, an estimated 94% of all COVID-related deaths in the nation were people who had contributing medical conditions and diseases.The CDC report states: "For 6% of the deaths, COVID-19 was the only cause mentioned. For deaths with conditions or causes in addition to COVID-19, on average, there were 2.6 additional conditions or causes per death." The report states that the most common underlying medical conditions that contributed to COVID-related deaths include respiratory diseases such as pneumonia, asthma, COPD, and influenza; diabetes; hyptertensive diseases; and heart disease. Click here to read the complete report on the CDC website.COUNTIES REPORTING NEW CASESYellowstone County Cases2,677 Total | 61 New | 810 ActiveRosebud County Cases538 Total | 34 New | 215 ActiveBig Horn County Cases814 Total | 14 New | 134 ActiveRoosevelt County Cases101 Total | 14 New | 62 ActiveGallatin County Cases1,179 Total | 13 New | 47 ActiveMeagher County Cases23 Total | 13 New | 15 ActiveSilver Bow County Cases194 Total | 11 New | 62 ActiveMissoula County Cases514 Total | 9 New | 78 ActiveLake County Cases252 Total | 7 New | 39 ActiveCuster County Cases91 Total | 6 New | 17 ActiveFlathead County Cases740 Total | 6 New | 140 ActiveHill County Cases124 Total | 5 New | 22 ActiveDawson County Cases67 Total | 3 New | 15 ActiveMusselshell County Cases31 Total | 3 New | 7 ActiveCarbon County Cases106 Total | 2 New | 10 ActiveCascade County Cases483 Total | 2 New | 225 ActiveGlacier County Cases171 Total | 2 New | 30 ActivePark County Cases86 Total | 2 New | 12 ActivePondera County Cases20 Total | 2 New | 4 ActiveToole County Cases66 Total | 2 New | 9 ActiveBeaverhead County Cases76 Total | 1 New | 4 ActiveDeer Lodge County Cases88 Total | 1 New | 50 ActiveLewis & Clark County Cases216 Total | 1 New | 17 ActiveRavalli County Cases120 Total | 1 New | 7 ActiveSanders County Cases43 Total | 1 New | 2 ActiveWheatland County Cases8 Total | 1 New | 1 ActiveCOUNTIES WITH NO NEW CASESBlaine County Cases15 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveBroadwater County Cases17 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveChouteau County Cases18 Total | 0 New | 7 ActiveDaniels County Cases3 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveFallon County Cases4 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveFergus County Cases53 Total | 0 New | 3 ActiveGarfield County Cases16 Total | 0 New | 3 ActiveGolden Valley County Cases3 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveGranite County Cases22 Total | 0 New | 1 ActiveJefferson County Cases48 Total | 0 New | 4 ActiveJudith Basin County Cases6 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveLiberty County Cases15 Total | 0 New | 8 ActiveLincoln County Cases105 Total | 0 New | 14 ActiveMadison County Cases97 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveMcCone County Cases19 Total | 0 New | 4 ActiveMineral County Cases2 Total | 0 New | 0 ActivePhillips County Cases116 Total | 0 New | 1 ActivePowder River County Cases2 Total | 0 New | 0 ActivePowell County Cases10 Total | 0 New | 0 ActivePrairie County Cases1 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveRichland County Cases71 Total | 0 New | 6 ActiveSheridan County Cases7 Total | 0 New | 2 ActiveStillwater County Cases49 Total | 0 New | 12 ActiveSweet Grass County Cases37 Total | 0 New | 2 ActiveTeton County Cases20 Total | 0 New | 2 ActiveTreasure County Cases3 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveValley County Cases52 Total | 0 New | 0 ActiveWibaux County Cases8 Total | 0 New | 0 Active Montana reports 2 additional deaths, 217 new COVID-19 cases (Thursday, Sept. 17) https://www.kbzk.com/news/coronavirus/montana-reports-2-additional-deaths-217-new-covid-19-cases-thursday-sept-17 Montana News urn:uuid:72b0dc06-8286-ed7c-4b11-0ec6056439c8 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 16:14:15 +0000 The number of new cases sets a new single day record, eclipsing the previous single day record of 208 on July 24. Montana state health officials reported two additional deaths and 217 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday, according to the Montana Response COVID-19 tracking map.The number of new cases sets a new single day record, eclipsing the previous single day record of 208 on July 24.The state death toll now stands at 143. The two new deaths were reported in Yellowstone County. Here is the full press release from RiverStone Health:RiverStone Health, Yellowstone County’s public health department, reports two additional Yellowstone County residents have died due to COVID-19 related illness.On Tuesday, September 15, a man in his 80s passed away in a Yellowstone County hospital of COVID-19 related illness.On Wednesday, September 16, a woman in her 30s passed away due to COVID-19 related illness at a Yellowstone County hospital.To protect the privacy of the deceased and their families, RiverStone Health will not release further information.Both deaths are reflected on the Thursday, September 17 state COVID-19 tracking map.“I know that this is a sorrowful time for the families and friends of the deceased and I offer my sincere condolences,” said John Felton, Yellowstone County Health Officer, President and CEO of RiverStone Health.“This month, 10 Yellowstone County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 related illnesses. The Yellowstone County resident death toll from COVID-19 stands at 56, or 39% of all Montana COVID-19 deaths, yet we account for only 15% of the state’s population. I call on all Montanans to protect each other from this disease by correctly wearing masks, watching your distance, avoiding crowds, washing your hands and staying home when you are sick,” said Felton.To date, 2,677 Yellowstone County residents have been infected with COVID-19 and 56 have died.The highest number of new cases Thursday was reported in Yellowstone County with 61. The county now has a cumulative total of 2,677 cases with 1,811 recoveries and 810 active cases.Rosebud County reported the second highest number of new cases with 34, and Big Horn and Roosevelt counties each reported 14.The remaining new cases were spread across 22 Montana counties.New Cases By CountyYellowstone County Cases2,677 Total | 61 New | 810 ActiveRosebud County Cases538 Total | 34 New | 215 ActiveBig Horn County Cases814 Total | 14 New | 134 ActiveRoosevelt County Cases101 Total | 14 New | 62 ActiveGallatin County Cases1,179 Total | 13 New | 47 ActiveMeagher County Cases23 Total | 13 New | 15 ActiveSilver Bow County Cases194 Total | 11 New | 62 ActiveMissoula County Cases514 Total | 9 New | 78 ActiveLake County Cases252 Total | 7 New | 39 ActiveCuster County Cases91 Total | 6 New | 17 ActiveFlathead County Cases740 Total | 6 New | 140 ActiveHill County Cases124 Total | 5 New | 22 ActiveDawson County Cases67 Total | 3 New | 15 ActiveMusselshell County Cases31 Total | 3 New | 7 ActiveCarbon County Cases106 Total | 2 New | 10 ActiveCascade County Cases483 Total | 2 New | 225 ActiveGlacier County Cases171 Total | 2 New | 30 ActivePark County Cases86 Total | 2 New | 12 ActivePondera County Cases20 Total | 2 New | 4 ActiveToole County Cases66 Total | 2 New | 9 ActiveBeaverhead County Cases76 Total | 1 New | 4 ActiveDeer Lodge County Cases88 Total | 1 New | 50 ActiveLewis and Clark County Cases216 Total | 1 New | 17 ActiveRavalli County Cases120 Total | 1 New | 7 ActiveSanders County Cases43 Total | 1 New | 2 ActiveWheatland County Cases8 Total | 1 New | 1 ActiveNote: Numbers reported by the state each day may differ from those reported by county public health departments due to periodic lag times in reporting data to the state. MTN News counts the updated data individual counties report throughout a given day.Active Cases by County The cumulative total of cases in Montana now stands at 9,647 with 7,401 recoveries. There are 2,103 active cases in the state and 107 people are hospitalized for treatment.Total testing has reached 295,299, an increase of 2,989 during the previous 24-hour reporting period.Gender and Age of New CasesBeaverheadF30-39Big HornF70-79Big HornM10-19Big HornF40-49Big HornM30-39Big HornF0-9Big HornF0-9Big HornM10-19Big HornM50-59Big HornF50-59Big HornF60-69Big HornF60-69Big HornM40-49Big HornF40-49Big HornM10-19CarbonF70-79CarbonF30-39CascadeF10-19CascadeM60-69CusterF50-59CusterM60-69CusterF50-59CusterM60-69CusterM60-69CusterM40-49DawsonM40-49DawsonF60-69DawsonF60-69Deer LodgeF20-29FlatheadM50-59FlatheadF0-9FlatheadF40-49FlatheadF30-39FlatheadF50-59FlatheadF60-69GallatinF60-69GallatinF20-29GallatinF60-69GallatinF20-29GallatinM80-89GallatinF30-39GallatinM60-69GallatinM50-59GallatinF20-29GallatinM30-39GallatinM40-49GallatinF40-49GallatinF40-49GlacierF0-9GlacierF50-59HillF40-49HillF50-59HillM50-59HillF60-69HillM30-39LakeF30-39LakeM20-29LakeF10-19LakeF10-19LakeF10-19LakeF40-49LakeM0-9Lewis and ClarkM10-19MeagherF60-69MeagherF20-29MeagherF10-19MeagherM60-69MeagherF30-39MeagherM10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherF10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherM50-59MissoulaM0-9MissoulaF60-69MissoulaM20-29MissoulaF10-19MissoulaF10-19MissoulaF90-99MissoulaM60-69MissoulaM20-29MissoulaM40-49MusselshellF70-79MusselshellF0-9MusselshellM30-39ParkM30-39ParkM30-39PonderaM30-39PonderaF20-29RavalliF20-29RooseveltF60-69RooseveltF20-29RooseveltF20-29RooseveltM20-29RooseveltF50-59RooseveltF30-39RooseveltF60-69RooseveltM70-79RooseveltF30-39RooseveltM70-79RooseveltM0-9RooseveltM40-49RooseveltM20-29RooseveltM30-39RosebudF60-69RosebudF40-49RosebudM60-69RosebudF30-39RosebudM20-29RosebudF0-9RosebudF50-59RosebudM20-29RosebudM20-29RosebudF50-59RosebudF60-69RosebudM0-9RosebudF10-19RosebudF20-29RosebudM30-39RosebudF70-79RosebudM30-39RosebudM10-19RosebudF10-19RosebudF0-9RosebudM30-39RosebudF20-29RosebudF10-19RosebudF0-9RosebudM10-19RosebudF30-39RosebudM10-19RosebudM30-39RosebudM10-19RosebudM20-29RosebudF60-69RosebudF20-29RosebudM40-49RosebudM20-29SandersF70-79Silver BowM30-39Silver BowF60-69Silver BowM30-39Silver BowF10-19Silver BowF10-19Silver BowF60-69Silver BowF10-19Silver BowF20-29Silver BowF50-59Silver BowF50-59Silver BowF10-19TooleM10-19TooleM40-49WheatlandM80-89YellowstoneM80-89YellowstoneF20-29YellowstoneM60-69YellowstoneF0-9YellowstoneM0-9YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneF50-59YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM40-49YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneF30-39YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneF50-59YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneM0-9YellowstoneM80-89YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM60-69YellowstoneM10-19YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM50-59YellowstoneM0-9YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM80-89YellowstoneM80-89YellowstoneF20-29YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM60-69YellowstoneF30-39YellowstoneF30-39YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneF30-39YellowstoneM40-49YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneF50-59YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM50-59YellowstoneM70-79YellowstoneM10-19YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneF20-29YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneF20-29YellowstoneM40-49YellowstoneM10-19YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneF30-39Cases by Day Montana reports 2 additional deaths, 217 new COVID-19 cases (Thursday, Sept. 17) https://www.kpax.com/news/coronavirus/montana-reports-2-additional-deaths-217-new-covid-19-cases-thursday-sept-17 Montana News urn:uuid:0df5b92d-fea7-c34f-2fd3-0d165810437b Thu, 17 Sep 2020 16:14:01 +0000 The number of new cases sets a new single day record, eclipsing the previous single day record of 208 on July 24. Montana state health officials reported two additional deaths and 217 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday, according to the Montana Response COVID-19 tracking map.The number of new cases sets a new single day record, eclipsing the previous single day record of 208 on July 24.The state death toll now stands at 143. The two new deaths were reported in Yellowstone County. Here is the full press release from RiverStone Health:RiverStone Health, Yellowstone County’s public health department, reports two additional Yellowstone County residents have died due to COVID-19 related illness.On Tuesday, September 15, a man in his 80s passed away in a Yellowstone County hospital of COVID-19 related illness.On Wednesday, September 16, a woman in her 30s passed away due to COVID-19 related illness at a Yellowstone County hospital.To protect the privacy of the deceased and their families, RiverStone Health will not release further information.Both deaths are reflected on the Thursday, September 17 state COVID-19 tracking map.“I know that this is a sorrowful time for the families and friends of the deceased and I offer my sincere condolences,” said John Felton, Yellowstone County Health Officer, President and CEO of RiverStone Health.“This month, 10 Yellowstone County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 related illnesses. The Yellowstone County resident death toll from COVID-19 stands at 56, or 39% of all Montana COVID-19 deaths, yet we account for only 15% of the state’s population. I call on all Montanans to protect each other from this disease by correctly wearing masks, watching your distance, avoiding crowds, washing your hands and staying home when you are sick,” said Felton.To date, 2,677 Yellowstone County residents have been infected with COVID-19 and 56 have died.The highest number of new cases Thursday was reported in Yellowstone County with 61. The county now has a cumulative total of 2,677 cases with 1,811 recoveries and 810 active cases.Rosebud County reported the second highest number of new cases with 34, and Big Horn and Roosevelt counties each reported 14.The remaining new cases were spread across 22 Montana counties.New Cases By CountyYellowstone County Cases2,677 Total | 61 New | 810 ActiveRosebud County Cases538 Total | 34 New | 215 ActiveBig Horn County Cases814 Total | 14 New | 134 ActiveRoosevelt County Cases101 Total | 14 New | 62 ActiveGallatin County Cases1,179 Total | 13 New | 47 ActiveMeagher County Cases23 Total | 13 New | 15 ActiveSilver Bow County Cases194 Total | 11 New | 62 ActiveMissoula County Cases514 Total | 9 New | 78 ActiveLake County Cases252 Total | 7 New | 39 ActiveCuster County Cases91 Total | 6 New | 17 ActiveFlathead County Cases740 Total | 6 New | 140 ActiveHill County Cases124 Total | 5 New | 22 ActiveDawson County Cases67 Total | 3 New | 15 ActiveMusselshell County Cases31 Total | 3 New | 7 ActiveCarbon County Cases106 Total | 2 New | 10 ActiveCascade County Cases483 Total | 2 New | 225 ActiveGlacier County Cases171 Total | 2 New | 30 ActivePark County Cases86 Total | 2 New | 12 ActivePondera County Cases20 Total | 2 New | 4 ActiveToole County Cases66 Total | 2 New | 9 ActiveBeaverhead County Cases76 Total | 1 New | 4 ActiveDeer Lodge County Cases88 Total | 1 New | 50 ActiveLewis and Clark County Cases216 Total | 1 New | 17 ActiveRavalli County Cases120 Total | 1 New | 7 ActiveSanders County Cases43 Total | 1 New | 2 ActiveWheatland County Cases8 Total | 1 New | 1 ActiveNote: Numbers reported by the state each day may differ from those reported by county public health departments due to periodic lag times in reporting data to the state. MTN News counts the updated data individual counties report throughout a given day.Active Cases by County The cumulative total of cases in Montana now stands at 9,647 with 7,401 recoveries. There are 2,103 active cases in the state and 107 people are hospitalized for treatment.Total testing has reached 295,299, an increase of 2,989 during the previous 24-hour reporting period.Gender and Age of New CasesBeaverheadF30-39Big HornF70-79Big HornM10-19Big HornF40-49Big HornM30-39Big HornF0-9Big HornF0-9Big HornM10-19Big HornM50-59Big HornF50-59Big HornF60-69Big HornF60-69Big HornM40-49Big HornF40-49Big HornM10-19CarbonF70-79CarbonF30-39CascadeF10-19CascadeM60-69CusterF50-59CusterM60-69CusterF50-59CusterM60-69CusterM60-69CusterM40-49DawsonM40-49DawsonF60-69DawsonF60-69Deer LodgeF20-29FlatheadM50-59FlatheadF0-9FlatheadF40-49FlatheadF30-39FlatheadF50-59FlatheadF60-69GallatinF60-69GallatinF20-29GallatinF60-69GallatinF20-29GallatinM80-89GallatinF30-39GallatinM60-69GallatinM50-59GallatinF20-29GallatinM30-39GallatinM40-49GallatinF40-49GallatinF40-49GlacierF0-9GlacierF50-59HillF40-49HillF50-59HillM50-59HillF60-69HillM30-39LakeF30-39LakeM20-29LakeF10-19LakeF10-19LakeF10-19LakeF40-49LakeM0-9Lewis and ClarkM10-19MeagherF60-69MeagherF20-29MeagherF10-19MeagherM60-69MeagherF30-39MeagherM10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherF10-19MeagherM10-19MeagherM50-59MissoulaM0-9MissoulaF60-69MissoulaM20-29MissoulaF10-19MissoulaF10-19MissoulaF90-99MissoulaM60-69MissoulaM20-29MissoulaM40-49MusselshellF70-79MusselshellF0-9MusselshellM30-39ParkM30-39ParkM30-39PonderaM30-39PonderaF20-29RavalliF20-29RooseveltF60-69RooseveltF20-29RooseveltF20-29RooseveltM20-29RooseveltF50-59RooseveltF30-39RooseveltF60-69RooseveltM70-79RooseveltF30-39RooseveltM70-79RooseveltM0-9RooseveltM40-49RooseveltM20-29RooseveltM30-39RosebudF60-69RosebudF40-49RosebudM60-69RosebudF30-39RosebudM20-29RosebudF0-9RosebudF50-59RosebudM20-29RosebudM20-29RosebudF50-59RosebudF60-69RosebudM0-9RosebudF10-19RosebudF20-29RosebudM30-39RosebudF70-79RosebudM30-39RosebudM10-19RosebudF10-19RosebudF0-9RosebudM30-39RosebudF20-29RosebudF10-19RosebudF0-9RosebudM10-19RosebudF30-39RosebudM10-19RosebudM30-39RosebudM10-19RosebudM20-29RosebudF60-69RosebudF20-29RosebudM40-49RosebudM20-29SandersF70-79Silver BowM30-39Silver BowF60-69Silver BowM30-39Silver BowF10-19Silver BowF10-19Silver BowF60-69Silver BowF10-19Silver BowF20-29Silver BowF50-59Silver BowF50-59Silver BowF10-19TooleM10-19TooleM40-49WheatlandM80-89YellowstoneM80-89YellowstoneF20-29YellowstoneM60-69YellowstoneF0-9YellowstoneM0-9YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneF50-59YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM40-49YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneF30-39YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneF50-59YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneM0-9YellowstoneM80-89YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM60-69YellowstoneM10-19YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM50-59YellowstoneM0-9YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM80-89YellowstoneM80-89YellowstoneF20-29YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM60-69YellowstoneF30-39YellowstoneF30-39YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneF30-39YellowstoneM40-49YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneF50-59YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneM50-59YellowstoneM70-79YellowstoneM10-19YellowstoneF40-49YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneF20-29YellowstoneM20-29YellowstoneF20-29YellowstoneM40-49YellowstoneM10-19YellowstoneM30-39YellowstoneF60-69YellowstoneF30-39Cases by Day Montana reports 2 additional deaths, 217 new COVID-19 cases (Thursday, Sept. 17) https://www.ktvq.com/news/coronavirus/montana-reports-2-additional-deaths-217-new-covid-19-cases-thursday-sept-17 Montana News urn:uuid:8d86ba69-a6ba-5c0c-0527-4de8407ac847 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 16:00:30 +0000 The number of new cases sets a new single day record, eclipsing the previous single day record of 208 on July 24. Montana state health officials reported two additional deaths and 217 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday, according to the Montana Response COVID-19 tracking map.The number of new cases sets a new single day record, eclipsing the previous single day record of 208 on July 24.The state death toll now stands at 143. The two new deaths were reported in Yellowstone County. Here is the full press release from RiverStone Health:RiverStone Health, Yellowstone County’s public health department, reports two additional Yellowstone County residents have died due to COVID-19 related illness.On Tuesday, September 15, a man in his 80s passed away in a Yellowstone County hospital of COVID-19 related illness.On Wednesday, September 16, a woman in her 30s passed away due to COVID-19 related illness at a Yellowstone County hospital.To protect the privacy of the deceased and their families, RiverStone Health will not release further information.Both deaths are reflected on the Thursday, September 17 state COVID-19 tracking map.“I know that this is a sorrowful time for the families and friends of the deceased and I offer my sincere condolences,” said John Felton, Yellowstone County Health Officer, President and CEO of RiverStone Health.“This month, 10 Yellowstone County residents have lost their lives due to COVID-19 related illnesses. The Yellowstone County resident death toll from COVID-19 stands at 56, or 39% of all Montana COVID-19 deaths, yet we account for only 15% of the state’s population. I call on all Montanans to protect each other from this disease by correctly wearing masks, watching your distance, avoiding crowds, washing your hands and staying home when you are sick,” said Felton.To date, 2,677 Yellowstone County residents have been infected with COVID-19 and 56 have died.The highest number of new cases Thursday was reported in Yellowstone County with 61. The county now has a cumulative total of 2,677 cases with 1,811 recoveries and 810 active cases.Rosebud County reported the second highest number of new cases with 34, and Big Horn and Roosevelt counties each reported 14.The remaining new cases were spread across 22 Montana counties.New Cases By CountyYellowstone County Cases2,677 Total | 61 New | 810 ActiveRosebud County Cases538 Total | 34 New | 215 ActiveBig Horn County Cases814 Total | 14 New | 134 ActiveRoosevelt County Cases101 Total | 14 New | 62 ActiveGallatin County Cases1,179 Total | 13 New | 47 ActiveMeagher County Cases23 Total | 13 New | 15 ActiveSilver Bow County Cases194 Total | 11 New | 62 ActiveMissoula County Cases514 Total | 9 New | 78 ActiveLake County Cases252 Total | 7 New | 39 ActiveCuster County Cases91 Total | 6 New | 17 ActiveFlathead County Cases740 Total | 6 New | 140 ActiveHill County Cases124 Total | 5 New | 22 ActiveDawson County Cases67 Total | 3 New | 15 ActiveMusselshell County Cases31 Total | 3 New | 7 ActiveCarbon County Cases106 Total | 2 New | 10 ActiveCascade County Cases483 Total | 2 New | 225 ActiveGlacier County Cases171 Total | 2 New | 30 ActivePark County Cases86 Total | 2 New | 12 ActivePondera County Cases20 Total | 2 New | 4 ActiveToole County Cases66 Total | 2 New | 9 ActiveBeaverhead County Cases76 Total | 1 New | 4 ActiveDeer Lodge County Cases88 Total | 1 New | 50 ActiveLewis and Clark County Cases216 Total | 1 New | 17 ActiveRavalli County Cases120 Total | 1 New | 7 ActiveSanders County Cases43 Total | 1 New | 2 ActiveWheatland County Cases8 Total | 1 New | 1 ActiveNote: Numbers reported by the state each day may differ from those reported by county public health departments due to periodic lag times in reporting data to the state. MTN News counts the updated data individual counties report throughout a given day.Active Cases by CountyThe cumulative total of cases in Montana now stands at 9,647 with 7,401 recoveries. There are 2,103 active cases in the state and 107 people are hospitalized for treatment.Total testing has reached 295,299, an increase of 2,989 during the previous 24-hour reporting period.Cases by Day "Walldogs" create ghost sign at new Helena bank https://www.krtv.com/news/montana-and-regional-news/walldogs-create-ghost-sign-at-new-helena-bank Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:48f6ba35-82bc-9dc6-b2d1-c0c3362ce68c Thu, 17 Sep 2020 14:48:59 +0000 Ghost signs are known to fade away over time. However, one ghost sign is being painted on purposefully.They are known as the Walldogs, a group of sign painters and mural artists from all over the globe, hired to paint a ghost sign, among other things, for the soon-to-open Farmers State Bank on North Last Chance Gulch in Helena. The bank says they wanted to participate in the community by revisiting its history.“I think that's one thing that the bank is pretty excited about, specifically within the Helena market, the design and kind of tying it to that area,” says Justin Fries, the Farmers State Bank Vice President.The ghost sign will say “The Railyard” and pay homage to the neighboring railroad district. The artists will also paint the gas meter into a bug and paint the back side of the building into the bank’s steam punk theme. The artists say it’s not common for communities to want to create ghost signs.“Communities don't even know that these old, ghost signs are a way of the past, and they're no longer being done,” says Nancy Bennett, a Walldog artist. “There are not that many people who are doing them. Helena is one of the few communities who's done more than one, and it's highly unusual to incorporate that in a new build.”The Walldogs have been in Helena two times already. They’ve restored the ghost sign at Eddie’s Bakery and the ghost sign at Palmquist Electric. They say they are proud of the Helena community for preserving the ghost signs as a piece of history."The wall signs, they are there and it's like, they're fading away if there isn't something done to them, you know, they're going to be gone. So, our kids, grandkids won't ever get to enjoy that," says Jim Oskam, a Walldog artist.These paintings are expected to be finished by Friday, September 18th, 2020. The bank is scheduled to open in October 2020.Click here to learn more about the Walldogs. Montana to provide regular updates on COVID-19 cases in schools https://www.ktvq.com/news/state-of-montana-will-provide-regular-updates-on-covid-cases-in-schools Montana News urn:uuid:70f22cad-1553-659e-3e6c-e28a3cfe4c80 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 13:46:07 +0000 Gov. Steve Bullock announced Wednesday the State of Montana will be posting information online about positive COVID-19 cases in schools. HELENA - Gov. Steve Bullock announced Wednesday the State of Montana will be posting information online about positive COVID-19 cases in schools.Data will be provided on K-12 and higher education schools in the state, including private institutions, on the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services website each week.Bullock says it is critically important for the State to be transparent about cases in schools for the safety of families and educators.“Keeping safe and healthy during these times also means that parents and staff have access to information should there be cases of COVID-19 at their kid’s school,” said Bullock. “This is a system that protects student data in small schools while also providing a basic level of information and the transparency and the trust that parents in our community need.”According to the State, there have been 60 schools in Montana that have had a confirmed case of COVID-19 in either a student or staff member since the beginning of the school year.Bullock also noted that as for Wednesday there had been around 50 K-12 students that have tested positive for the virus during the school year out of the 147,000 students in the state.For schools that have more than 50 students, the school’s name, number of positive student and staff cases and the county the school is located in will be posted. Schools that have between 11 and 50 students, the number of cases won’t be distinguished between students and staff.Bullock says there will be no reporting on schools that have under 10 students attending in order to protect individual privacy.Superintendent of Public Instruction Elsie Arntzen, a Republican, decried the action of the democratic governor on social media.Arntzen wrote: “Today’s decision by the Governor goes beyond displaying data at the county level as is currently being done for general COVID-19 case reporting. Montana’s many rural schools have few students and staff... Displaying data for these individual schools will increase the risk of exposing personally identifiable medical information. I again ask the Governor to reverse this decision and display aggregate data only at the county level.”For the last two months Arntzen and Bullock have been publicly trading verbal jabs over the reopening of schools during COVID and the role of the Governor’s Office.The Superintendent has complained about a lack of communication from the Governor’s Office on the matter and being cut out of decision making regarding schools. The Governor has denied those claims, saying regular opportunities to meet with his staff were available. Montana Working Capital Program aimed at businesses that lost 15% or more due to COVD-19 https://www.ktvq.com/rebound/montana-working-capital-program-aimed-at-businesses-that-lost-15-or-more-due-to-covd-19 Montana News urn:uuid:c0258ded-c17d-a7a9-ec5a-b41ce1b044cf Thu, 17 Sep 2020 13:41:16 +0000 There are only a few more days for businesses to apply for the Montana Working Capital Program. There are only a few more days for businesses to apply for the Montana Working Capital Program.Under the CARES Act, this loan is for businesses that have lost more than fifteen percent of their revenue directly related to coronavirus.Freedom Bank President Don Bennett said that if a business is approved, this would allow that business to defer payments on a loan for a year.He explained that their bank has been combing through their customers and contacting those who qualify.Bennett said only Montana banks and Montana businesses qualify for this funding - adding this funding will really help tourism businesses."A customer can go basically an entire year without making a payment," said Bennett. "Which will really help them especially the tourism related businesses through this winter. It helps them kind of build up their cash reserves."Bennett suggests businesses go back through their revenue to see if they are eligible.The deadline to apply for funding is Sept. 18. Body of missing man recovered near Natural Bridge Falls https://www.krtv.com/news/local-news/body-of-missing-man-recovered-near-natural-bridge-falls Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:398c7a46-5bd7-3091-f503-8990575d5cad Thu, 17 Sep 2020 13:40:43 +0000 In a social media post, the Sweet Grass County Office reports Search and Rescue recovered the body of a man how had fallen into the Boulder River near Natural Bridge in May. In a social media post, the Sweet Grass County Sheriff's Office reports Search and Rescue recovered the body of a man who had fallen into the Boulder River near Natural Bridge in May. According to the post, the body of Joseph Crawford was discovered by a spelunker on Friday, Sept. 11, 2020, below the falls and the Sweet Grass Search and Rescue responded. Crawford had reportedly fallen into the Boulder River above the falls at Natural Bridge on May 17, 2020. Recovery efforts at the time were unsuccessful due to high water and difficult terrain. (Photo courtesy of Sweet Grass County Sheriff's Office)Crawford, 48, had been identified as the individual presumed dead May 17 after falling into the Boulder River at Natural Bridge south of Big Timber.Crawford, of Billings, was hiking in the Natural Bridge area when he walked off the marked trail toward the river and slipped, falling 50 to 60 feet into the water. Teen helicopter pilot from Montana joins the fight against CA wildfires https://www.krtv.com/news/fire-watch/teen-helicopter-pilot-from-montana-joins-the-fight-against-ca-wildfires Montana and Regional News urn:uuid:97197ee4-0e82-6390-bdba-a005267c9657 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 13:31:37 +0000 A 19-year-old helicopter pilot from the Billings area has joined the fight to help extinguish the wildfires that have burned 3 million acres in California. Ashli Blaine is just a teenager, but she flies one of the largest helicopters — the 40,000-pound CH-47 Chinook."You could say it's the family trade," Blaine told CBS News. "My dad's been fighting fires for close to 30 years now. As soon as I got into flying I knew that was going to be one of my end goals was to get into firefighting."Flying as her dad's co-pilot, Ashli makes sure the water they're carrying hits its target."You have to be able to lean out the window basically and look at a water bucket underneath you and guide it where you want to go," she said."Sometimes we can be flying in very adverse conditions," Blaine said. "Thick smoke or just lots of other aircraft working with us that we have to be cognizant of."But for a young woman who has been flying since she was 13, it's a dream summer job."I love what I do, especially getting to firefight with my dad. That's one of the best parts," she said."Other than flying, what's the most important lesson you've learned from your father?" CBS News asked."How to be a good person," Blaine replied. "He's a very compassionate and empathetic person. That's hopefully a trait that I can pick up from him and learn from him." Smoke Got You Down? You're Not Alone https://www.mtpr.org/post/smoke-got-you-down-youre-not-alone Montana Public Radio News urn:uuid:f9977576-d117-a64d-1e65-b732830b63a5 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 05:22:49 +0000 The deadly wildfires scorching the west coast have produced smoke that has reached the east coast and Europe. The smoke started seeping into Montana last weekend. Health care professionals say it’s taking a toll on our bodies and our minds. MTPR's Edward O'Brien reports. Montana Ag Network: Wildfire recovery resources for ranchers https://www.ktvq.com/news/montana-ag-network/montana-ag-network-wildfire-recovery-resources-for-ranchers Montana News urn:uuid:a3955660-9090-01fb-e9dd-52623c9d2ef2 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 04:28:47 +0000 As livestock and landowners take inventory of the damage caused by wildfires, many are preparing to rebuild from the ashes.The Montana Stockgrowers Association (MSGA) is helping producers find resources they need to make this happen.“USDA’s Farm Service Agency FSA is the place to start,” said Jay Bodner, executive vice president of MSGA. “They have the livestock Indemnity Program. That program has been set up for direct losses for any adverse events that happen. So, either fire, weather, any of those the events. They do need some documentation to go through that. They also do have the Livestock Forage Disaster Program. There are some enrollment requirements but it’s a program that may be able to be of some assistance.”USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) also has resources available through the Environmental Quality Incentive Program.“That program is designed to help with soil erosion or any rehabilitation or recovery,” said Bodner. "It really helps out those producers who maybe have fences burned out, or stock tanks burned out. A lot of opportunity there to try to help with some of those things that producers have faced.”Producers grazing on federal or state lands may also have resources available.“In many cases, the Bureau of Land Management will supply at least fencing material. They don't supply the labor, but they do certainly the material if it's all on BLM land.”Hay stockpiles have also been lost due to fire. Montana's Hay hotline, an online portal where producers can donate, buy or sell hay can be found at the Montana Department of Agriculture's website.The state of Montana’s Disaster and Emergency Services also offers valuable information for those impacted by wildfire. Interlocal agreement between Missoula City and County defines gas tax collection and distribution responsibilities https://www.kpax.com/news/missoula-county/interlocal-agreement-between-missoula-city-and-county-defines-gas-tax-collection-and-distribution-responsibilities Montana News urn:uuid:484fec26-0a76-cf46-1ca5-97357fe5c12d Thu, 17 Sep 2020 04:18:37 +0000 The City of Missoula and Missoula County passed an interlocal agreement on Wednesday outlining how the two entities will enforce the new 2 cent gas tax.The gas tax which was approved in June and took affect yesterday is estimated to bring in $400,000 annually from tourists and 1.2 million dollars in total each year.The interlocal agreement outlines how money made from the tax will be distributed between the city and county evenly and how it will be managed.Money made from the tax will go exclusively towards road maintenance and construction projects."The money has to be used for construction reconstruction maintenance or repair of public streets and roads. It’s fairly broad, we anticipate using this in part for street maintenance and in part into our capital improvement," City of Missoula Public Works Director Jeremy Keene said.Money will be distributed to different projects based of the public works department budget process and public works is also conducting a study on which areas around town need the most attention. 19-year-old Montana helicopter pilot joins the fight against wildfires in California https://www.ktvq.com/news/montana-news/19-year-old-montana-helicopter-pilot-joins-the-fight-against-wildfires-in-california Montana News urn:uuid:449a8c34-8de2-8628-eaff-202647e7c0f6 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 03:29:48 +0000 "You have to be able to lean out the window basically and look at a water bucket underneath you and guide it where you want to go," she said. A 19-year-old helicopter pilot has joined the fight to help extinguish the wildfires that have burned 3 million acres in California. Ashli Blaine is just a teenager, but she flies one of the largest helicopter — the 40,000-pound CH-47 Chinook."You could say it's the family trade," Blaine told CBS News. "My dad's been fighting fires for close to 30 years now. As soon as I got into flying I knew that was going to be one of my end goals was to get into firefighting."Flying as her dad's co-pilot, Ashli makes sure the water they're carrying hits its target."You have to be able to lean out the window basically and look at a water bucket underneath you and guide it where you want to go," she said."Sometimes we can be flying in very adverse conditions," Blaine said. "Thick smoke or just lots of other aircraft working with us that we have to be cognizant of."But for a young woman who has been flying since she was 13, it's a dream summer job."I love what I do, especially getting to firefight with my dad. That's one of the best parts," she said."Other than flying, what's the most important lesson you've learned from your father?" CBS News asked."How to be a good person," Blaine replied. "He's a very compassionate and empathetic person. That's hopefully a trait that I can pick up from him and learn from him."When Blaine heads out on a mission, all she needs is a bottle of water and a Snickers.Click here to watch the full story. Missoula Mobile Crisis Unit hiring on staff members https://www.kpax.com/news/missoula-county/missoula-mobile-crisis-unit-hiring-on-staff-members Montana News urn:uuid:048c0a94-276b-330e-ac69-1b119cd4998f Thu, 17 Sep 2020 02:50:38 +0000 Missoula’s Mobile Crisis Unit continues to be assembled, with staffing currently in the works.The unit will consist of two teams of three people…a mental health expert provided by partnership health center, one EMT and one case manager.The case manager will not be on the frontline for emergency calls but will instead help provide follow up services.The Missoula Fire department has already hired one EMT and officials say the program is moving along as quickly as possible"Fire has already hired the EMTs for this project and partnership health is advertising right now. Fire plans on having teams on the ground by mid October which is a little later than we anticipated but they really are moving as quickly as they can and there are still some policies and procedures that still need to be put in place," Criminal Justice Services Project Director and Division Manager Kristen Jordan said.Jordan said that the program is based on a similar program out of Eugene Oregon called Cahoots that has been helping that community for nearly 20 years. Montana Wildfire Update For September 16, 2020 https://www.mtpr.org/post/montana-wildfire-update-september-16-2020 Montana Public Radio News urn:uuid:545c9eea-d8d1-53d3-c61a-28f853a2ee5e Thu, 17 Sep 2020 02:10:35 +0000 Firefighters in southeast Montana are dealing with another large wildfire started by a coal seam. Montana Coronavirus And COVID-19 News https://www.mtpr.org/post/montana-coronavirus-and-covid-19-news Montana Public Radio News urn:uuid:2614efe5-bf01-a9a2-163a-7b30ff2b5329 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 01:23:20 +0000 Update 09-16-20 The state reported 190 new lab-confirmed cases of the novel coronavirus Wednesday from 2,035 tests. Montana Gov. Steve Bullock announced Wednesday that from now on the state will post weekly demographic info about positive COVID-19 cases in schools and universities. Researchers To Study How Lake Trout Removal Affects Flathead Lake Toxins https://www.mtpr.org/post/researchers-study-how-lake-trout-removal-affects-flathead-lake-toxins Montana Public Radio News urn:uuid:6f75eae2-b826-1fd4-0dab-50851e2ede99 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 01:00:45 +0000 The University of Montana’s Flathead Lake Biological Station will study how tribal efforts to suppress non-native lake trout populations are possibly shifting the buildup of toxins in other fish species. The project is part of an inaugural wave of federal funding announced Wednesday for projects along the Columbia River Basin. Missoula air quality marked unhealthy across the county https://www.kpax.com/news/missoula-county/missoula-air-quality-marked-unhealthy-across-the-county Montana News urn:uuid:c40259ae-81c9-2642-9237-c466aaa06d4d Thu, 17 Sep 2020 00:40:38 +0000 Air quality is currently marked as unhealthy across Missoula County Air quality is marked as unhealthy across Missoula County Wednesday afternoon with conditions expecting to stay the same through the night and into Thursday.Seeley Lake's air quality also turned worse Wednesday afternoon when breezes from the east stopped, which let the smoke move back in.Over the next couple of days, smoke will continue coming through from the southwest.Air quality specialists with the Missoula City-County Health Department say smoke from fires burning in the Idaho wilderness is moving into the Bitterroot Valley.It is important for everyone to reduce exposure to smoke. When air quality is unhealthy, smokers, children, the elderly, and those with heart or lung disease should limit their time spent outdoors. People with asthma should follow their asthma management plan and those experiencing symptoms of heart or lung disease associated with smoke exposure should contact their health care provider.Feeling effects from the smoke or having to stay inside can contribute to feelings of anxiety or depression. For people experiencing this distress, it is also recommended to check with your primary care providers. Another option is to call the Western Montana Mental Health Center at 532-9700. State of Montana will provide regular updates on COVID cases in schools https://www.ktvq.com/news/state-of-montana-will-provide-regular-updates-on-covid-cases-in-schools Montana News urn:uuid:3126ae42-bb4c-5ea4-8a51-144f6d24084f Thu, 17 Sep 2020 00:28:47 +0000 Gov. Steve Bullock announced Wednesday the State of Montana will be posting information online about positive COVID-19 cases in schools. Governor Steve Bullock announced Wednesday that the State of Montana will be posting information online about positive COVID-19 cases in schools.Data will be provided on K-12 and higher education schools in the state, including private institutions, on the Montana Department of Public Health & Human Services website each week.Bullock says it is critically important for the State to be transparent about cases in schools for the safety of families and educators. “Keeping safe and healthy during these times also means that parents and staff have access to information should there be cases of COVID-19 at their kid’s school,” said Bullock. “This is a system that protects student data in small schools while also providing a basic level of information and the transparency and the trust that parents in our community need.”According to the State, there have been 60 schools in Montana that have had a confirmed case of COVID-19 in either a student or staff member since the beginning of the school year. Bullock also noted that as of Wednesday there had been around 50 K-12 students that have tested positive for the virus during the school year out of the 147,000 students in the state.For schools that have more than 50 students, the school’s name, number of positive student and staff cases and the county the school is located in will be posted. For schools that have between 11 and 50 students, the number of cases won’t be distinguished between students and staff. Bullock says there will be no reporting on schools that have fewer than 10 students attending in order to protect individual privacy.Superintendent of Public Instruction Elsie Arntzen criticized the action of the governor on social media. Arntzen wrote: “Today’s decision by the Governor goes beyond displaying data at the county level as is currently being done for general COVID-19 case reporting. Montana’s many rural schools have few students and staff... Displaying data for these individual schools will increase the risk of exposing personally identifiable medical information. I again ask the Governor to reverse this decision and display aggregate data only at the county level.”For the last two months Arntzen and Bullock have been publicly trading verbal jabs over the reopening of schools during COVID and the role of the Governor’s office.The Superintendent has complained about a lack of communication from the Governor’s Office on the matter and being cut out of decision making regarding schools. The Governor has denied those claims, saying regular opportunities to meet with his staff were available.