Chicago.durableroofing SM Feed http://feed.informer.com/digests/HWC6D9OVSY/feeder Chicago.durableroofing SM Feed Respective post owners and feed distributors Tue, 01 Aug 2017 13:00:17 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ Plant Shutdowns https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/plant-shutdowns-1 Latest blog entries urn:uuid:35fe21fe-cb6c-8fc0-f030-16a685adea2a Tue, 29 Sep 2020 18:45:33 +0000 <p>Do you have a scheduled plant shutdown coming up over the holidays? This can be a great time to address your flooring needs! A plant shutdown is the ideal time to improve the safety and aesthetics of your floors. Here’s how QuestMark can help you make the most out of your upcoming plant shutdown.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/tiD8f_oRDTs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Snow Monitoring https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/snow-monitoring Latest blog entries urn:uuid:3abf7b3c-bc20-a0fb-a45a-7271649a4fdf Fri, 25 Sep 2020 17:14:31 +0000 <p>The summer is winding down and the holidays will be here before we know it. This also means the snow will be rolling in sooner than later. This year, be proactive when it comes to the snow load on your roof. Here’s everything you need to know about staying ahead of the game with our Snow Monitoring Program.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/APv28-HMULs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> 2021 Budget Season https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/2021-budget-season Latest blog entries urn:uuid:b4735bac-17f6-b9c7-ed02-f1bc4dcbf319 Thu, 24 Sep 2020 18:43:36 +0000 <p>Time flies! Budgeting season is here. Getting your 2021 roofing budget prepared now can help you properly allocate your capital and operating expense spend so you can get the best return on your investment. Develop an accurate budget for your 2021 needs by understanding the current condition of your roof.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/rxKbDdMzxvc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> National Safety Stand-Down: Fall Arrest Systems - How to Prevent Roof Falls https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/national-safety-stand-down-fall-arrest-systems-how-to-prevent-roof-falls Latest blog entries urn:uuid:1e8f75f3-fcf8-7e49-f4bf-4c54450753bf Fri, 18 Sep 2020 12:16:25 +0000 <p>Fall protection is a major safety focus for CentiMark on all roofing projects. The first step in preventing falls is to inspect and identify the potential hazards on every job. Personal fall protection can be placed into two different categories, fall arrest and fall restraint. Any personal fall arrest/restraint system is only as good as the equipment and the properly trained user.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/YdB7t7YkZvU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> National Safety Stand-Down: Skylights - How to Prevent Roof Falls https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/national-safety-stand-down-skylights-how-to-prevent-roof-falls Latest blog entries urn:uuid:04fa3488-a406-6888-c5a3-834c07e5169f Thu, 17 Sep 2020 17:35:59 +0000 <p>Skylights are an often overlooked hazard in both the construction and general industry sectors. Many times individuals only relate to a leading edge as a “fall hazard”; but, the fact remains that each year there continues to be falls through unprotected skylights. Whether we are discussing roofing safety, the safety of our maintenance workers or anyone else that may access our roofs, we need to make sure all hazards are addressed.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/o1zVWmCHOhU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> National Safety Stand-Down: Warning Lines - How to Prevent Roof Falls https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/national-safety-stand-down-warning-lines-how-to-prevent-roof-falls Latest blog entries urn:uuid:21b95eba-c6c3-c5b3-c811-e6cb8fb8aa59 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 17:58:54 +0000 <p>Warning lines are one of the oldest forms of fall protection mandated by OSHA for low slope roof projects. The basics of the system are that warning lines must be made of rope, wire or chain. The flags must be visible, present every six feet, 34 to 39-inches from roof level and erected at a minimum of six feet from the fall hazard. Most workers generally think about warning lines and safety monitors as a means of fall protection for the unprotected edge; but warning lines can be used to establish a barrier for multiple rooftop fall hazards. The warning line system continues to be a versatile tool in the roofing industry even with the increasing use of temporary guardrails and engineered systems.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/39ZdFU-BOBY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> National Safety Stand-Down: Ladders - How to Prevent Roof Falls https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/national-safety-stand-down-ladders-how-to-prevent-roof-falls Latest blog entries urn:uuid:38ca7c05-450c-ce04-b005-5cc612dc178f Tue, 15 Sep 2020 17:10:47 +0000 <p>Using ladders is a common and necessary tool in the construction industry. Crew members climb ladders many times in a day, exposing workers to falls with each step taken. Falls can be fatal and are one of the leading causes of injuries and death in the construction industry. Some workers may climb ladders many times each day and can become very comfortable doing so. Climbing can become as easy to some workers as walking up steps to the average person. This comfort can lead to complacency.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/23bcjN7aR_A" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> National Safety Stand-Down: Safety Plans and OSHA Hierarchy of Control https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/national-safety-stand-down-safety-plans-and-osha-hierarchy-of-control Latest blog entries urn:uuid:5dcf17aa-e4b3-e381-ddac-5c062d8ab9e4 Mon, 14 Sep 2020 17:55:18 +0000 <h3>Safety Plans</h3> <p>In the construction industry, falls are the leading cause of death. Roof falls are costly and have a large impact on a company. It is crucial that a company has a solid plan for eliminating roof falls.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/M-DsAJ9oY0w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Top 3 Ways To Improve The Energy Efficiency Of Your Roof https://allroofingsolutionsde.com/improve-roof-energy-efficiency/ All Roofing Solutions urn:uuid:54b8da45-c062-23cf-6378-7a4265a760b7 Fri, 11 Sep 2020 20:14:31 +0000 <p>When weather extremes hit, whether in summer or winter months, increased energy costs are inevitable. Extended use of heating and cooling systems easily equate to more dollar signs for a homeowner. While there are many ways to reduce energy costs in your home, focusing on more energy-efficient roofing is often one of the most effective, [&#8230;]</p> <p>The post <a href="https://allroofingsolutionsde.com/improve-roof-energy-efficiency/" target="_blank">Top 3 Ways To Improve The Energy Efficiency Of Your Roof</a> first appeared on <a href="https://allroofingsolutionsde.com/" target="_blank">All Roofing Solutions</a>.</p> CentiMark Participating in Safety Stand-Down Next Week, Sept. 14-18th https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/centimark-participating-in-safety-stand-down-next-week-sept-14-18th Latest blog entries urn:uuid:16272e6e-ff72-046c-f7ab-2cac101fa247 Fri, 11 Sep 2020 18:44:32 +0000 <p>OSHA (Occupational Safety &amp; Health Administration) is asking all construction contractors to participate in this year’s National Safety Stand-Down. The purpose of the National Safety Stand-Down is to prevent roof falls in construction. The National Safety Stand-Down raises fall hazard awareness in an effort to reduce fall fatalities and injuries. Fatalities caused by falls from elevation continue to be a leading cause of death for construction employees.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/TDJz4mU8Llo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> CentiMark Associate Feature - Josh K https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/centimark-associate-feature-josh-k Latest blog entries urn:uuid:c2ebfa3e-169b-a685-f162-2c3c40ed43c6 Thu, 10 Sep 2020 17:59:30 +0000 <p>Our field supervisors play a critical role in making sure that our roofing projects are completed safely and properly. This week for our Associate Spotlight, we are interviewing Josh K, a Field Supervisor out of our Jessup, MD office. Josh’s father worked with CentiMark before him, and now Josh has been with us since 1995!</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/FP1hI7TyNHc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Hurricane Laura Help from Our Houston Office's Kirk & Brittany Franco https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/hurricane-laura-help-from-our-houston-office-s-kirk-brittany-franco Latest blog entries urn:uuid:d0707858-2abe-335f-93a9-c46182ebdc18 Wed, 02 Sep 2020 12:52:07 +0000 <p>Kirk Franco, Senior Project Manager, Houston, TX, woke up on Saturday morning and knew he had to help the people in the Lake Charles area of western Louisiana who had devastating losses from Hurricane Laura. The Houston area was spared this time by Mother Nature. Kirk and his wife Brittany decided to drive to Sulphur, LA on Sunday morning to feed people in need.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/EBBpUf4CWac" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> National Roofing Week - Associate Training https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/national-roofing-week-2020-associate-training Latest blog entries urn:uuid:92235a87-0938-719d-a82e-ebb064211a40 Thu, 27 Aug 2020 13:02:28 +0000 <h3>Training, Training and More Training</h3> <p>The best way to reinforce our commitment to safety training at CentiMark is to highlight our Houston, TX; San Antonio, TX and Baton Rouge, LA offices (pictured above). Together, these crews have worked 11 years and 1.4 million manhours without a workplace injury. That’s a direct result of rigorous and consistent training. Additionally, CentiMark had 48 offices that worked without a workplace injury in 2019.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/pQncIysVxes" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> National Roofing Week - Associate Appreciation https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/national-roofing-week-2020-associate-appreciation Latest blog entries urn:uuid:68abefbd-e085-f39c-3985-d3c377d00751 Wed, 26 Aug 2020 12:26:02 +0000 <p>CentiMark appreciates our associates. Our 3,500 associates are the key to our business success. We have 220 associates with 20+ years of tenure.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/Qj-xvDy2lmY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> National Roofing Week - Giving Day/Charitable Projects - CentiMark's Food Bank Donations https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/national-roofing-week-giving-day-charitable-projects-centimark-s-food-bank-donations Latest blog entries urn:uuid:ce0176bf-843c-e2cb-516e-37b9a40c5337 Tue, 25 Aug 2020 13:50:59 +0000 <p>Typically, the NRCA’s National Roofing Week is held in June. When the event was rescheduled to August due to COVID-19, CentiMark knew that we couldn’t wait until then to help the community with food insecurity. In April and May 2020, CentiMark responded quickly with financial donations to help the food insecurity needs for food banks in the 85 communities where CentiMark, QuestMark and CentiMark Ltd associates live and work.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/dOmcD5cE0x4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> National Roofing Week - Signature Projects: CentiMark Corporate Headquarters Re-Roofing Project https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/national-roofing-week-signature-projects-centimark-corporate-headquarters-re-roofing-project Latest blog entries urn:uuid:3ae9ee0a-38fc-8566-bc8f-7f1c199914ed Mon, 24 Aug 2020 12:30:29 +0000 <p>While CentiMark has hundreds of signature roofing projects each year, our favorite one is the re-roofing of the 25 year old EPDM roof on our Corporate Headquarters in Canonsburg, PA.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/5a9O0jN0o8o" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> CentiMark Promotes Commercial Roofing During NRCA’s National Roofing Week, August 23-29, 2020 https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/centimark-promotes-commercial-roofing-during-nrca-s-national-roofing-week-august-23-29-2020 Latest blog entries urn:uuid:fcdc4195-97e2-5422-6962-d87bdc8f258c Fri, 21 Aug 2020 17:21:24 +0000 <p>To raise awareness of the importance of roofs to every home and business, stress the value of professional roofing contractors and share the good deeds of the industry, CentiMark joins the NRCA (National Roofing Contractors Association) in promoting National Roofing Week, August 23-29, 2020.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/uVQbJOUJKiA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Find even more of the info you want, at the all-new Roof Views! https://blog.gaf.com/find-even-more-of-the-info-you-want-at-the-all-new-roof-views/ GAF Blog urn:uuid:5494a070-586f-dc29-6fd9-7e0285f5fa43 Wed, 19 Aug 2020 14:45:16 +0000 <p>The GAF Pro Blog is proud to invite you to visit the NEW GAF blog destination, GAF Roof Views! Our...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/find-even-more-of-the-info-you-want-at-the-all-new-roof-views/">Find even more of the info you want, at the all-new Roof Views!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> <div class="pf-content"> <p>The GAF Pro Blog is proud to invite you to visit the NEW GAF blog destination, <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="http://gaf.com/blog" target="_blank">GAF Roof Views</a>! </p> <p>Our new blog leverages state-of-the-art data technology — along with a team of accomplished industry writers — to make sure you can find the information you need, when and where you need it. </p> <p>All of the content you count on from the GAF Pro Blog will soon be available at GAF Roof Views, along with fresh discussions about our customers, contractors, communities, products, and programs. </p> <p>See you there!</p> </div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/find-even-more-of-the-info-you-want-at-the-all-new-roof-views/">Find even more of the info you want, at the all-new Roof Views!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> CentiMark Named #1 Roofing Contractor for 10th Consecutive Year https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/centimark-named-1-roofing-contractor-for-10th-consecutive-year Latest blog entries urn:uuid:34175643-a6e2-289f-ba4c-db394c7f251f Thu, 13 Aug 2020 12:33:19 +0000 <p>CentiMark has been named the number one roofing contractor in Roofing Contractor’s online list of Top 100 roofing contractors in North America for the tenth consecutive year – based on revenue of $723 million.</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/U_CYQZOWcjo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> CentiMark Associate Feature - Miguel G https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/centimark-associate-feature-miguel-g Latest blog entries urn:uuid:7858c539-3434-046c-fe34-4655829fd340 Wed, 12 Aug 2020 13:29:58 +0000 <p>We’re excited to highlight Miguel G. Miguel has been with CentiMark for over 11 years and started as a Safety Specialist. He is now the Diversity &amp; Inclusion Manager for the Western Group out of our Houston TX office. Hear more from Miguel on his experience here at CentiMark...</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/hCEQETh1Lec" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> CentiMark Associate Feature: Summer S. https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/centimark-associate-feature-summer-s Latest blog entries urn:uuid:0a0c3cb3-3c98-8740-a136-361078650898 Wed, 05 Aug 2020 12:17:53 +0000 <p>Meet Summer S! Another one of our fabulous women in roofing here at CentiMark. As a Field Supervisor, Summer goes above and beyond in making sure that she gets the job done right. We are excited to highlight her in our next associate spotlight. Take a look at what she has to say about her experience working in a male-dominated industry...</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/Kw01HsxNryc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Retrofit Single Ply Roof Systems: Physical Testing https://blog.gaf.com/retrofit-single-ply-roof-systems-physical-testing/ GAF Blog urn:uuid:fad30ffb-1b41-b97a-10f7-3fbc49ada60c Mon, 03 Aug 2020 12:56:54 +0000 <p>In part 1, Retrofit Single Ply Roof Systems: An Assessment of Wind Resistance, we provided information about the following: Four...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/retrofit-single-ply-roof-systems-physical-testing/">Retrofit Single Ply Roof Systems: Physical Testing</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> <div class="pf-content"> <p>In part 1, <a href="https://blog.gaf.com/retrofit-single-ply-roof-systems/">Retrofit Single Ply Roof Systems: An Assessment of Wind Resistance</a>, we provided information about the following:</p> <ul><li>Four (4) methods to re-cover a metal panel roof</li><li>The many options for attaching a single-ply system to a metal panel roof</li><li>An example calculation for wind uplift design pressures and appropriate fastener patterns that provide the necessary resistance capacity</li><li>Industry concerns about wind uplift when not attaching the retrofit single-ply system into every purlin&nbsp;&nbsp;</li></ul> <p>In this blog, we will discuss and analyze the four full-scale physical tests that were performed to determine their wind-uplift capacity.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Physical Testing</strong></p> <p>There have been no publically available validation studies or data supporting any particular approach to the installation of retrofit single-ply roof systems (RSPRS). Non-validated attachment methods could result in failures during wind events.&nbsp; Therefore, the objective of GAF’s physical testing program was to determine the wind-uplift resistance of RSPRS fastened directly into purlins.&nbsp; A variety of fastening patterns and fastener densities were tested in order to provide a better understanding of the effect of wind loads on these systems.&nbsp; The physical testing was performed at the Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering Department of the Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla, MO (MS&amp;T).</p> <p><em>Test Roof Construction</em></p> <p>Four full-scale test roofs were constructed and tested in a 10 ft. wide x 20 ft. long chamber.&nbsp; The test roofs were installed by Missouri Builder Services, Jefferson City, MO, with oversight by GAF.&nbsp; After the test roofs were constructed, the MS&amp;T research team instrumented the assemblies for data collection.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/YUIEaNEtiotFT_eUaa5ug12EdR9iDWo7BZw5Xx9iFrfcgVi_p9X2J-KkhHD5fJX1ZFPJUWViVbXTWuKU4vrpxS6Q9iXZHq1yfz9Jhlx81_oVFr3aAkif1NaXtBnUaTB1qaKJv60" alt="IMG_0986"/></figure> <p>The four test roofs consisted of 24 in. wide, 24-gauge structural metal roof panels attached to 16-gauge Z-purlins with concealed expansion clips and purlin screws.&nbsp; The purlins were connected to and supported by horizontal steel channels; the purlin/channel construction was supported by four vertical steel columns.&nbsp; To complete the test specimen, flute fill polyisocyanurate insulation, flat stock polyisocyanurate insulation, and a mechanically attached 60 mil TPO membrane were installed.&nbsp; Prior to membrane installation, the insulation was mechanically attached with minimal fasteners to prevent shifting during the testing.&nbsp; The cross-section shows a graphical representation of the completed RSPRS over the structural metal panel roof system.</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/JW87uns-fkCwVZ5Xhv-rVLxynIe0L4kzQqa_R4k6FxDXkcMgibJG3_Hb8QqndanaP5N8Z8wP3UgOGl_S_MD2KLG5gg_g8IQOah3DGPWAuzYygCekb36zJi_JmUvAwf7_2mS8SVY" alt="image (6)"/></figure> <p>For Tests #1, #2, and #3, purlin fasteners and 2 3/8 in. barbed fastener plates were used to secure the membrane, simulating a “strapped” installation.&nbsp; The fasteners and plates were not stripped in.&nbsp; For Test #4, purlin fasteners and 3 in. specially-coated induction weld fastener plates were used.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The purlins in all tests were attached to C-channels.&nbsp; This did not allow for data collection at a purlin-to-mainframe connection.&nbsp; When an RSPRS is mechanically attached to every other purlin, the load path is altered significantly.&nbsp; This raises a question about the effect on the wind-uplift capacity of the existing metal building when the load path is altered.&nbsp; More information on that topic can be found <a href="https://www.gaf.com/en-us/document-library/documents/documents/architectsandspecifiersdocuments/Assessing_Retrofit_SinglePly_Roofs_over_Metal_Panels.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">here</a>.&nbsp; Therefore, it is recommended to engage a structural engineer when altering the load path of an existing structure.</p> <p><em>Results and Discussion</em></p> <p>The table shows the ultimate loads achieved, tributary area and load per fastener, as well as fastening method.&nbsp; The term “ultimate load” refers to the point of failure of the roof system during physical testing.</p> <figure class="wp-block-table"><table><tbody><tr><td><strong>Test Roof #</strong></td><td><strong>Ultimate Load</strong><strong><sup>a</sup></strong><strong>, psf</strong></td><td><strong>Fastening Pattern</strong></td><td><strong>Tributary Area per Fastener, sf</strong></td><td><strong>Load per Fastener, lbs</strong></td><td><strong>Fastening Method</strong></td></tr><tr><td>1</td><td>162.7</td><td>5 ft. o.c. x 12 in.</td><td>5</td><td>813.5 (800)</td><td>Above Membrane</td></tr><tr><td>2</td><td>119.5</td><td>5 ft. o.c. x 24 in.</td><td>10</td><td>1195 (1160)</td><td>Above Membrane</td></tr><tr><td>3</td><td>61.9</td><td>5 ft. o.c. x 36 in. staggered</td><td>15</td><td>928.5 (890)</td><td>Above Membrane</td></tr><tr><td>4</td><td>64.8</td><td>5 ft. o.c. x 24 in. staggered</td><td>10</td><td>648 (593)</td><td>Induction Welded</td></tr></tbody></table></figure> <p>Test #1</p> <p>The fastening pattern for Test #1 was 5 ft. o.c. fastener rows and 12 in. fastener spacing within the row.&nbsp; Test #1 failed when the membrane ruptured simultaneously at seven fastener locations in the center purlin.&nbsp; The system successfully completed 160.1 psf and then failed as the pressure was being increased to 174.5 psf.&nbsp; The membrane pulled over the five center fastener plate locations in an essentially circular pattern along the outer edges of the fastener plates.&nbsp; The outer two failure locations resulted in L-shaped tearing of the membrane, which was attributed to the boundary conditions of the test chamber.&nbsp; The fastener plates were deformed upward.&nbsp; There were many locations of permanent upward membrane deformation.&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/y284edgGb47PeQwGhDWAtxBcnefzevyD7ZZ7cOFGd85kEFofgbyha3aZDaqT6CVoX9QQyZi45TJ1-2HnrdJKuQU6WAWA8e9uqJZfhyS-mah3xrchuix-O8gjAcMvj-B4OqYruzk" alt=""/><figcaption>Photo of the outcome of Test #1.</figcaption></figure> <p></p> <p>The permanent upward membrane deformation was evident along the edges of the rows of fasteners, as can be seen in the upper row of fasteners in the photo.&nbsp; There was very little permanent upward membrane deformation at the centerline between fasteners within a row.&nbsp; This pattern of deformation leads to the belief that the load within the membrane is being transferred from fastener row to fastener row, and not significantly from fastener to fastener within a row.</p> <p>Test #2</p> <p>The fastening pattern for Test #2 was 5 ft. o.c. fastener rows and 24 in. fastener spacing within the row.&nbsp; Test #2 failed when the membrane ruptured simultaneously at the three central fastener locations in the northern quarter-point row of fasteners.&nbsp; The system successfully completed 116.9 psf and then failed as the pressure was being increased to 124.1 psf.&nbsp; The membrane pulled over the three center fastener plate locations within the row.&nbsp; The center rupture was circular at the fastener plate.&nbsp; The outer two ruptures were “D” shaped; the straight-line edges were attributed to the boundary conditions of the test chamber.</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/w8l73t72tu8HWPzJJWxx6ULHlws9Waor5rowuiKt7Y9E5bSZpJdK7Rcplt9Ky7pT0s6xqgNea3PdyYdO35TFbNVSUZFG1zTUNQWm5JPyfTHam7l_HUdq2cWEVzTfF41k_sQwjZc" alt="IMG_0890"/><figcaption>Photo of the membrane rupture at the center fastener plate location for Test #2.</figcaption></figure> <p></p> <p>The tributary area for each fastener for Test #2 was double that of Test #1.&nbsp; This led to the hypothesis that the ultimate load for Test #2 would be one-half of that from Test #1, or 81.4 psf.&nbsp; However, the ultimate load was 119.5 psf, which is approximately 73% of that from Test #1.&nbsp; This is believed to indicate that the membrane transitioned from one-way loading to a more efficient two-way loading.&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/kVwO6lbmLwthuGnjRNqFDjcBoYvCD-VlmbJAM0hzQiLy2ocdlJ8N6aOVZ9DbhDvb4L1_kigKr_5DnscKRY0rIo5OIeRjKKJMjHhhKFgjUG8Rl43tE8N-6ciV2BxysWAS0q8tQVc" alt="One-way and Two-way loading_2019 08 20"/></figure> <p>The load was not only distributed across the 5 ft. purlin-to-purlin span (as was the case in Test #1), but was also distributed between fasteners within a row.  The uplift loads were pulling on the fastener and fastener plates from all sides (two-way loading) instead of just two sides (one-way loading). During the test, the membrane deflected up approximately 4 in. between fasteners within a row.  The loads were more equally distributed within the membrane and around the fastener plate, and therefore, the load per fastener increased from 813.5 lbs. (Test #1) to 1195 lbs. (Test #2).</p> <p>The membrane resisted the uplift loads in two generalized directions: between fastener rows and between fasteners within a row, which aligns with the machine direction (MD) and cross-machine direction (XMD) reinforcement yarns within the membrane, respectively.&nbsp; The membrane had permanent upward deformation between rows and between fasteners within a row because of this two-directional loading.&nbsp; The permanent upward membrane deformation was circular around fasteners.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/EoCMuN3cNW4I_IUxsr3K-lt1dEyOW8DSreP1qlT3j38L2uovxZb15y7kClldnv9EbBjunxGE2gbvCHxlVPrtqbH3vbcvOVDtblYXkOPBS7OfNARjs4hwdEhKzysZp9MrAAKeb9g" alt=""/></figure> <p>Test #3</p> <p>The fastening pattern for Test #3 was 5 ft. o.c. fastener rows and 36 in. fastener spacing within the row; fasteners were staggered row to row.&nbsp; Test #3 failed when the membrane ruptured at a single fastener location in the southern quarter-point row of fasteners.&nbsp; The system successfully completed 59.3 psf and then failed as the pressure was being increased to 66.5 psf.&nbsp; The membrane pulled over the center-most fastener plate within the row (at the red circle).</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/Ic_5Aud2gynyYA_Fj1t8TWcqYp3i492V6ubu7V4ylfzglqzXIIuHkm32QupOPw7bJ-ppGV53Y--yrBDXnRVfzpLFeDBoRVxveK23Ftk6caMGWJ8aArqhxWALka4q95ZgdhbBPIg" alt=""/></figure> <p>The photo shows a close up of the failure location for Test #3.&nbsp; The failure was “D” shaped, similar to failure locations in Test #2.&nbsp; The flat edge was on the boundary edge of the test roofs; the rounded edge is towards the center of the test roof.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/A3MAiwpWcwVaIeqXG4cPct4Gcspc_tYP8GcwMefY_MBrI4xsMcst54NJ14H6Fr1IEPwyUW0Jcem2_bsJNrgJilZoyl2cgjLNsdPO7y8Uly9rdYNqzG7NYv5s4BsTFxLBilTZqnw" alt=""/></figure> <p>Similar to Test #2, there was circular upward permanent membrane deformation at fastener locations for Test #3 as shown in Figure 10.&nbsp; This shows that the membrane is being loaded in the MD and XMD.&nbsp; This is due to the relatively wide spacing of the fasteners (2 ft. and 3 ft.) relative to Test #1, which had 1 ft. spacing of fasteners within a row.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The tributary area for each fastener for Test #3 was 50% greater than Test #2.&nbsp; This led to the hypothesis that the ultimate load would be 2/3 of Test #2, or about 79.7 psf.&nbsp; However, the ultimate load was 61.9 psf which is approximately 52% of that from Test #2.</p> <p>Comparing Test #3 to Test #1, traditional assumptions based on tributary area would lead to an expected ultimate load for Test #3 to be 1/3 of Test #1.&nbsp; The ultimate load from Test #1 was 162.7 psf, so the expected ultimate load for Test #3 was 54.2 psf.&nbsp; The actual ultimate load for Test #3 was 61.9 psf which is approximately 38% of that from Test #1.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>While two-direction membrane loading appears to increase the expected ultimate load of a roof system relative to the traditional linear expectation of failure load, it appears there is a limit to this increase.&nbsp; For this series of tests, the limit seems to be 5 ft. o.c. for fastener rows with 24 in. fastener spacing within each row.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Test #4</p> <p>The fastening pattern for Test #4 was 5 ft. o.c. fastener rows and 24 in. fastener spacing within the row; fasteners were staggered row to row and induction welded.&nbsp; Test #4 failed in two locations—a fastener plate pulled over the fastener head and the membrane separated at the reinforcement layer at the adjacent welded fastener plate.&nbsp; The system successfully completed 59.3 psf and then failed as the pressure was being increased to 66.5 psf.&nbsp; The failures occurred in the southern quarter-point row of fasteners.&nbsp; The photo shows the 2 failure locations for Test #4.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-mlOQrH0k_fMv0IXQPzL-FZmWAPc7luvH_pzOwiyMr5hldx3fJR_J2wW2_UtJMagIFjPa4PMkwYv7I6HlHn5ldKQHiufcG45adybmxzjn1BD6ssl_5IdwYBo49uviXot7cI2pW8" alt=""/></figure> <p>Test #4 used induction welded fasteners, which means the fastener plates were under the membrane.&nbsp; Therefore, the membrane was cut in order to evaluate each failure.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Based on audible observation at the time of failure, the two failures occurred “simultaneously.”&nbsp; It was difficult to determine from visual examination which occurred first: the fastener plate pulling over the fastener head or the delamination of the membrane at the fastener plate.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Test #4 and Test #2 have the same tributary area per fastener location—10 square feet.&nbsp; However, Test #2 achieved a 119.5 psf ultimate load and Test #4 achieved a 64.8 psf ultimate load.&nbsp; All components were identical for both test roofs except for the fastener/plate combination and that Test #4’s fasteners were staggered row-to-row.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The above-membrane fastener (e.g., an in-seam fastener) is 2 3/8 in. in diameter.&nbsp; An induction welded fastener plate is 3 in. in diameter and is constructed such that a raised ‘ring’ surface adheres to the membrane, not the entire fastener plate.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/DOKMQdIDHlqn059bL8kbuUkA204SMRjnWfsLsb-06lKc26SCsW664D16T8JrvCxfHJxNl9YMWk9E4D0P1l7Tye5M-B3LypMW1PNxRtNP0INPgyYOjzLqtaD6hVQ8ZlOniKevHrE" alt=""/></figure> <p>The area of a standard 2 3/8 in. above-membrane fastener plate is approximately 4.4 square inches.&nbsp; The area of the attachment surface for an induction welded fastener plate is approximately 3.3 square inches.&nbsp; Therefore, an induction welded fastener plate has approximately 75% of the surface area of a traditional mechanically attached fastener plate to restrain the membrane.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Individual fastener load for Test #2 (with the same tributary area as Test # 4) was 1195 lbs.&nbsp; Direct extrapolation to the induction welded fastener plate (at 75%) leads to the predicted value of the fastener load for Test #4 to be 896 lbs.&nbsp; This prediction assumes the reinforcement is the weak link, but the test clearly shows the cap-to-core connection to be the weak link, and therefore, it makes sense that the failure load per fastener for Test #4 was less than 896 lbs.&nbsp; In fact, it was 648 lbs per fastener.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The analysis of these two different types of fastening methods and failure modes supports the result that Test #4 has lower wind uplift resistance than Test #2 even though the tributary area for each fastener is the same for Tests #2 and #4.</p> <p><strong>Conclusions and Recommendations</strong></p> <p>Review and analysis of the four full-scale physical tests of retrofit single-ply roof systems installed over structural metal panel roof systems resulted in a number of conclusions.&nbsp; They are as follows:</p> <ul><li>Uplift resistance of RSPRS and individual fastener loads in an RSPRS are based on the membrane’s reinforcement strength and one-directional versus two-directional loading of reinforcement.&nbsp;&nbsp;</li><li>Reducing the overall fastener density increases the tributary area for each fastener.&nbsp; As expected, the ultimate load is reduced with larger tributary areas.&nbsp;&nbsp;</li><li>Two-directional membrane loading increases the expected ultimate load of a roof system relative to linear extrapolation based on fastener tributary area.&nbsp; However, it appears there is a limit to this expected increase.&nbsp; For this series of tests, the ultimate load exceeded expectations for the Test #2 fastening pattern, but the ultimate load was more in line with traditional linearly extrapolated expectations for the Test #3 fastening pattern.&nbsp;&nbsp;<ul><li>This work emphasizes the limitations of extrapolation and validates the use of physical testing to determine uplift resistance of roof systems.</li></ul></li><li>Permanent deformation of the membrane was observed in all four physical tests at the end of testing and was not seen to be a water-tightness issue. The test procedure performed did not determine what pressure during the test cycling the membrane deformation began. This observation may provide an explanation for “wrinkles” observed in mechanically attached membranes that have experienced high wind events.</li></ul> <p>For additional information about this topic,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.gaf.com/en-us/document-library/documents/documents/publishedarticlesdocuments/Physical_Testing_for_Wind_Resistance_of_Retrofit_SinglePly_Roof_Systems_Over_Structural_Metal_Panel_Roof_Systems.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">here</a>&nbsp;is the GAF paper that was presented at the 2020 <a href="https://rci-online.org/">IIBEC</a> Convention and Trade Show, and <a href="https://continuingeducation.bnpmedia.com/courses/gaf/retrofit-single-ply-roof-systems-over-metal-panel-roofs-web-live/">here</a> is a webinar presented in early 2020.</p> </div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/retrofit-single-ply-roof-systems-physical-testing/">Retrofit Single Ply Roof Systems: Physical Testing</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> CentiMark Associate Feature - Sean W. https://www.centimark.com/centimark-blog/entry/centimark-associate-feature-sean-w Latest blog entries urn:uuid:18d9252f-dfa2-67fd-4208-783948eada4c Wed, 29 Jul 2020 13:24:31 +0000 <p>Meet Sean W - Branch Manager at our Boise, Idaho office! Sean has been with us for over eight years, starting with us as a roofing laborer, advancing to a foreman and now as a branch manager. Read what Sean has to say about being a branch manager at CentiMark…</p><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/centimark/wNwa/~4/xXkXAaY3dyI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Residential Roof Options: Pros & Cons of Shingle Roofing https://allroofingsolutionsde.com/residential-roof-options-pros-cons-of-shingle-roofing/ All Roofing Solutions urn:uuid:0e161475-24fc-8f63-8c0c-7faaeed811e6 Mon, 20 Jul 2020 06:20:00 +0000 Asphalt shingles are the most common material used in residential roofing today. There are many reasons behind the popularity of shingle roofing, from ease of installation to low material cost. While considering asphalt shingles for your next roofing replacement project, you should be aware of all the advantages and disadvantages of choosing this particular roofing [&#8230;] Has The Wide Range of Single-Ply Attachment Options Got you Stuck? https://blog.gaf.com/has-the-wide-range-of-single-ply-attachment-options-got-you-stuck/ GAF Blog urn:uuid:cbb49906-ac72-cd88-dbcd-330f99d2381d Mon, 06 Jul 2020 20:20:11 +0000 <p>Examining attachment options There are more adhesives and application methods for single-ply roof assemblies available today than ever before. This...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/has-the-wide-range-of-single-ply-attachment-options-got-you-stuck/">Has The Wide Range of Single-Ply Attachment Options Got you Stuck?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> <div class="pf-content"> <h3><strong>Examining attachment options</strong></h3> <p>There are more adhesives and application methods for single-ply roof assemblies available today than ever before. This article looks at the various options and discusses the increasing number of advantages to using adhered systems, including:</p> <ul><li>Potential for lower installation costs with newer adhesives and application methods, along with long-term energy efficiency improvements.</li><li>More uniform distribution of wind uplift resistance across the roof deck.</li><li>Substantially reduced (or eliminated) billowing of single-ply membranes, minimizing condensation risks from air intrusion in colder climates.</li><li>Better aesthetics v. mechanically attached roofs.</li><li>Improved impact resistance when fasteners are buried lower in the assembly and upper layers are adhered.</li></ul> <p>The attachment of thermoplastic single-ply membranes such as TPO and PVC used to involve just a few clear choices. By fastening along the weld area with screws and plates, the membrane was regarded as being mechanically attached. The alternative was to use a solvent-based adhesive to coat the substrate and the underside of the membrane, after which the membrane would be pressed down onto the substrate. The result was known as an adhered system.</p> <p>As concerns grew about the solvent content of adhesives and their impact on regional ozone pollution, both water-based and low volatile organic content (VOC, i.e. solvents that increase ozone) adhesives became available. But, attachment choices were still regarded simply as being mechanically attached or adhered, with the latter requiring some minimal decision regarding the acceptable VOC content.</p> <p>However, there’s been a proliferation of attachment options more recently, including inductively heated fastener plates, low rise foams, sprayed adhesives, and so on. And, taking low rise foams as an example, there have been variations in application methods, such as ribbon versus splatter pattern. Some of these adhesive systems were intended for insulation attachment, but their use has often been expanded to include fleece-back membranes.</p> <p>The proliferation of single-ply attachment methods can be baffling, but the general terms mechanically attached and adhered are also adding to the overall confusion. While a purely mechanically attached system is easy to comprehend, many roof assemblies have some layers adhered and some mechanically attached. For example, it is not unusual to mechanically attach the first insulation layer and then adhere all subsequent insulation layers and the membrane. Or, the first two layers of insulation could be mechanically attached and a cover board and membrane both adhered above the insulation. In this article, the terms mechanically attached and adhered are used to describe how individual components are attached.</p> <p>The criteria that can be used to select the appropriate attachment method for a commercial roofing project are described and discussed here. There isn’t a best approach that will apply to all situations. Rather, each attachment method has pros and cons and the final decision must be made by the specifier with knowledge of the specific building type, use, time of year of the installation, and location.</p> <h3><strong>Mechanical Attachment of All Layers</strong></h3> <p>For thermoplastic single-ply membranes, this is frequently regarded as the value option. Screw and plate fasteners are used to attach one long side of the membrane, and they are in turn covered by the overlapping adjacent sheet. The weld essentially protects the screws and plates by sealing them inside the system, minimizing risk of fastener corrosion. The following diagram and schematic show the essential features of this type of assembly.</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/uu75sgZ8HPm3ZHd0v99_zrXOAlBLo7WgdOkSi2hykLUDcILjnNbFRYQQ251qvSPNJrsOU5SdSxPJnImyd01OC8IE2iXu2NP6tZ1ztl6kKyWtzVT_4RoyblCP-Li69Lv9laWjChMX" alt=""/></figure> <p>This photograph shows how this appears in practice during installation:</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/eY95pfIohV2CanvAcqgNi0u4jGAZhJs3braXqh2yubzwEdjb3LtOMIgQzsWiX-ssDoDBiGEqm-u-N92E0DtM6jG8YJ76UEYE9wdRf0d_1DuoO01povO_0m2djhlYI35kRugnR4wy" alt="C:\Users\ttaylor\Pictures\GAF\tpo install 2.jpeg"/></figure> <h3><strong>Mechanical Attachment of Single-Ply Membranes</strong></h3> <p>Wind loads are handled differently by mechanically attached single-ply membranes as compared to adhered membranes. During wind events, mechanically attached membranes are lifted up as indicated in the following schematic:</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/TClXAwkZ8w33jBbm8vu5bCAP4udwBfYkO0C0idPILw77RXc5polTcREgZwXycEo5mK_lFPkvNTmPZLceBZoGupeLItP2i7MICjRPMb2Gii8d21W1p43pXwE7Z_jEhR53glKPdk0x" alt=""/></figure> <p>The wind uplift forces create a low pressure zone above the roof membrane that acts to lift it up. Air from within the building flows up through the gaps in the insulation and offers little resistance to the uplift forces. As a result, the membrane billows up, and the forces are directed to the fastening points as shown below during a wind uplift test.</p> <div class="wp-block-image"><figure class="aligncenter"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/HO-BFNALs0JGQc5ALTBpGggKcQWDNvIdyrQd27XX13g5oOy6HmUPR1BHKbs01Im8Hv8rZzUfH7LRXjMQ7jUcW3bUbVLwmEcWrlWXi8jFkvrkfaBM_i4l-fpdsVBYNlmdC1BYz3Kk" alt="RhinoBond Induction Fastening Systems"/></figure></div> <p>This results in large stresses at the fasteners and these are experienced repeatedly over the years in high wind areas. Partly as a result of this, membrane manufacturers typically provide shorter warranties or guarantees for mechanically attached membranes.&nbsp;</p> <p>The membrane itself experiences three forces at each of those fasteners:</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ykCCtqgidoBh2FuA3S6ihdUmNVOduGda36Uuofu_sVERWax9OYfYy2exE78vzesN6vWInpZQHTw1i2R4ef0OxDCv_8vz0MVYyBNuSGgEtDEinjgQwSiQDhQC2jGKn0RW8nIVpzs-" alt=""/></figure> <p>Single-ply membranes are tested for resistance to these forces as part of conforming to the ASTM specifications. It’s important to note that the insulation fasteners do not contribute to any wind uplift resistance. They are in place simply to keep the insulation boards flat and in-place during installation. In fact, there is little to be gained by having adhered insulation boards combined with mechanically attached membrane.</p> <p>Key features of systems with mechanically attached membrane and insulation are:</p> <ul><li>Low initial cost – the total material cost&nbsp; is typically the lowest of any of the attachment methods.</li><li>Efficient labor – mechanically attached systems are fast to install and may require fewer installation man-hours than adhered systems</li><li>Wind load resistance is provided by the membrane fasteners only – this gives rise to billowing of the membrane during wind events and stresses the membrane around each fastener plate.</li><li>Fasteners that are immediately beneath a single-ply membrane, such as membrane and insulation fasteners, tend to result in punctures when struck by ice-balls. For <a href="http://blog.gaf.com/how-single-ply-systems-withstand-ice-ball-impacts/">ice-ball impact resistance</a>, consider systems with adhered upper layers of insulation and/or coverboard, and membrane.</li><li>Fastener densities are high – for a 125,000 square foot roof, typically over 50,000 fasteners are used, leading to <a href="http://blog.gaf.com/r-value-optimization-a-case-study/">significant thermal bridging</a>.</li></ul> <h3><strong>Adhered Membrane</strong></h3> <p>Solvent-based liquid adhesives were the original means of adhering membranes to insulation. Due to environmental concerns, low VOC and water-based types were introduced later. The solvent and low-VOC types of adhesives are essentially rolled or broomed out over the insulation and membrane underside, allowed to dry down or flash-off before the membrane is then applied to the insulation. The following picture shows a typical installation in progress.</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/l-JfC1eCct13FfFwFZVK7yER_9-Lp28Ss_hgxCjCUqGFg49rFWXrKo3FbtTDe0LK7Uc6XQClbX29hzPgRvGBNJG-T0aiNB3hrmeQkgZtQKCOl1FOZdCYPZYfqsZPV2paT5m8c--9" alt="C:\Users\ttaylor\Pictures\GAF\Fully Adhered TPO.jpg"/></figure> <p>Water-based adhesives are similar, but require the use of fleece-backed membranes. Fleece-backed membranes promote adhesion to water-based adhesives and improve adhesive drying.</p> <p>While adhered applications are often considered labor intensive, recent innovations like spray applied formulations can lower the overall man-hours required. The following picture shows the use of a spray-applied adhesive, such as <a href="https://www.gaf.com/en-us/products/everguard-tpo-quick-spray-adhesive">EverGuard<sup>®</sup>&nbsp;TPO Quick Spray Adhesive</a>:</p> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/everguard_tpo_quick_spray_adhesive_1000x1000_2.jpg?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-6371" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/everguard_tpo_quick_spray_adhesive_1000x1000_2.jpg?w=634&amp;ssl=1 634w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/everguard_tpo_quick_spray_adhesive_1000x1000_2.jpg?resize=300%2C186&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/everguard_tpo_quick_spray_adhesive_1000x1000_2.jpg?resize=335%2C208&amp;ssl=1 335w" sizes="(max-width: 634px) 100vw, 634px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure> <p>Adhered membranes resist wind uplift forces differently than mechanically fastened membranes. The following schematic shows that membrane billowing doesn’t occur:</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/IPBdQd6WeMr9DX9JjAVKnbikoaVQ1BnOPhLk3ko5WwHdC95mKN9-K3HC5VRcpAxB3HOR4bnnQG19KRDVdAcJwdByWu-qb1pdz_EAEYKUMF7OkVBibHyYILYPqgyYYC8fkn_A2l0H" alt=""/></figure> <p>The wind uplift forces are primarily resisted in a more uniform fashion by the adhered membrane and top layer(s), and the buried insulation fasteners. The membrane, membrane adhesive, and adhered upper layer(s) of insulation act in a more monolithic way to resist uplift forces. Also, the fasteners are distributed more evenly across the rooftop versus mechanically attached systems.</p> <p>Key features of systems with adhered membrane are:</p> <ul><li>Wind load resistance is uniformly distributed across the roof deck. When combined with an adhered second layer of insulation and adhered cover board, the roof membrane and assembly are more interconnected.</li><li>Membrane billowing during wind events is eliminated and as a result, condensation risks from air intrusion are lowered.</li><li>Overall fastener usage is lower and therefore thermal bridging is reduced. Systems with an adhered membrane generally have<a href="http://blog.gaf.com/r-value-optimization-a-case-study/"> improved energy efficiency</a>, which is further improved by adhering the upper layers of insulation and cover board where used.</li><li>Aesthetics – adhered membranes, especially those installed over adhered cover board or insulation, tend to appear flatter and smoother versus mechanically attached or membrane adhered over mechanically attached cover boards or insulation.</li><li>Material costs and labor rates vary widely depending on the type of adhesive and will be discussed later in this article. When hidden costs associated with thermal bridging are taken into account, adhered systems can be competitive (read more here about <a href="http://blog.gaf.com/r-value-optimization-a-case-study/">R-Value Optimization Case Study</a>.</li></ul> <h3><strong>Adhered Insulation</strong></h3> <p>While single-ply membranes can be adhered to mechanically attached insulation, it is more typical to also adhere the upper layers of insulation. Low rise foam can be used for both insulation and cover board installation. These adhesives are two-part systems and the resultant foam is a type of polyurethane. The original method of application was as a ribbon or beads typically 12” apart and the following picture shows a typical installation in progress using one of <a href="https://www.gaf.com/en-us/roofing-products/commercial-roofing-products/lrf-adhesives-fasteners/low-rise-foams?Action=GetGrid">GAF’s low rise foams</a>.</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ZWVpzjsZ1zRdW2okRkEElGL5J8ZYcE3gUZ5b6VexKk2VghSN6b-DhEQ13uy5EQkEYHNOwuYptZvurmJNd_ixlmdQZCgspF71Q7anc1lfLm-oCqWFs_uCKQl6uXOwxq4meH6tVvMa" alt=""/></figure> <p>When the insulation boards are applied, the rising foam spreads out and bites into the insulation facers to maximize adhesion. The ribbon pattern is effective to adhere insulation boards down and can be used to adhere membranes to the insulation.&nbsp; While the ribbon application method appears to be slow, as with other adhesives there have been innovations to speed up application and reduce the man-hours required. When adhering just the membrane,&nbsp; a spatter pattern can also be used, which helps prevent the ribbon pattern from translating through and becoming visible from above the finished roof installation.&nbsp; The following picture shows a splatter pattern approach, which is basically a coarse spray:</p> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/spatter-1.png?w=960&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-6376" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/spatter-1.png?w=700&amp;ssl=1 700w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/spatter-1.png?resize=300%2C132&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/spatter-1.png?resize=335%2C148&amp;ssl=1 335w" sizes="(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure> <p>Key features of systems with adhered insulation are:</p> <ul><li>Airflow up through the assembly is limited and the risk of condensation from air intrusion in cold climates is low. Similarly, membrane billowing is minimized due to the restricted airflow up through adhered insulation layers.</li><li>Thermal bridging is minimized when only the first layer of insulation is mechanically attached.&nbsp;</li><li>Wind load resistance is uniformly distributed across the roof deck. A system with adhered membrane and insulation can act as a monolithic system with excellent wind uplift resistance.</li><li>When combined with an adhered membrane, the finished roof appearance is aesthetically pleasing. When applied in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions, the membrane should&nbsp; be flat with no insulation fasteners to telegraph through and mar the appearance. Also when the structural roof deck below is “exposed” to the interior finished space for aesthetic reasons, a combined adhered insulation and membrane roof system does not have fastener tips protruding to the interior space in a regular (or sometimes haphazard) pattern.</li></ul> <p><strong>Adhesive Choice</strong></p> <p>With the proliferation of adhesive types and application methods, the choice can at first appear confusing. In terms of performance, generally, all of the adhesives and application methods result in robust systems that meet required wind uplift requirements. The main criteria for basing decisions include :</p> <ul><li>Environmental requirements – traditional adhesives emit solvents and other VOCs during drying and curing. These emissions are regulated at a local level and it’s important to stay in compliance with those regulations. In general, where such emissions are most tightly regulated and where reroofing over sensitive occupancies, water-based adhesives and low rise foams are the better choices. However, the formulations of other adhesives are improving and it’s recommended that design professionals and contractors consult with manufacturer’s representative to determine the best choices for their area.</li><li>Material and labor costs – the various adhesives each have different costs associated with the material itself, the application rate (i.e. the number of square feet covered by an adhesive), labor requirements, and, in some cases, the investment needed for application tools. The latter can range from simple carts to hold adhesive boxes to spray and pumping equipment. The table shown later in this article provides a rough guide as to the relative costs, but for specifics, it is best to consult with the manufacturer’s representative. Many of the more recent approaches, such as spray-applied adhesive and splatter pattern low rise foam were designed to enable fast application rates with low labor.</li><li>Application temperature – traditional adhesives generally required application temperature to be at least 40°F and rising. This is due to a combination of the time required to dry or flash off the solvent and the viscosity of the adhesive. At low temperatures, most adhesives become too viscous and won’t flow sufficiently to apply and roll out. Some of the newer systems, such as <a href="https://www.gaf.com/en-us/products/gaf-tpo-lrf-adhesive-m-low-temp">GAF’s Low Rise Foam M Low Temp</a>, can be used at temperatures below freezing.</li></ul> <h3><strong>Induction Welded</strong></h3> <p>Induction welded fastening is a type of mechanical attachment for a roof system with the predominant type being the <a href="https://www.gaf.ca/roofing/commercial/products/roof_insulation_and_fastening_systems/rhinobond">Drill-Tec<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/72x72/2122.png" alt="™" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> RhinoBond®</a> system.<strong> </strong>By definition, this is a mechanical attachment method but it can have many of the features of adhered systems.&nbsp; The technique fastens TPO and PVC thermoplastic membranes to the substrate below using a microprocessor controlled induction welding machine. The thermoplastic roof membrane is welded directly to specially coated fastening plates used to attach the insulation. The picture below shows such a system being used:</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/1fOytpj3jgS4F17fiHOSVsQPMM5KHu3Om5ZajKmFlFw-gR8q7KgInTjmnAKUmv7N_YcTo2H9mtf1CGhXwLeRkdhdkDDw8Cxa4b-lwvvegB9scZN__logecqUoJ2Gs232nvx3iIeE" alt="C:\Documents and Settings\JJensen\My Documents\My Pictures\rhino 1.JPG"/></figure> <p>The induction machine is placed above each plate and activated for approximately 10 seconds. As the machine is moved to the next position, a weighted magnet is placed over the plate and acts to squeeze the membrane down onto the hot plate, causing it to weld to that plate’s surface coating.&nbsp;</p> <p>For true mechanical attachment of single-ply membranes, the insulation boards are simply secured with five fasteners per 4 x 8 ft. board to keep them flat. When using a <a href="https://www.gaf.ca/roofing/commercial/products/roof_insulation_and_fastening_systems/rhinobond">Drill-Tec<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/72x72/2122.png" alt="™" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> RhinoBond®</a>&nbsp; system, the insulation fasteners resist wind uplift forces as shown in this picture during a test of wind uplift resistance:</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/Td8gUU5-vkLuyC2nGrJhVBgJExTcjr1ZKxXS-HrvF6I0WuCSWqzXGz_gSz1XTSMxYkWssmRWmJxzQkbj7a3Ict78cNFVlUJ2mgpp12p67AIrbsk8MJdrycn-gRo_52ttO-rDJjrZ" alt="Thinking outside the seam | Professional Roofing magazine"/></figure> <p>This means that more insulation fasteners must be used, but no in-seam fasteners are used. For a typical big-box store requiring 120 psf wind uplift resistance, 8, 15, and 20 fasteners per 4 x 8 ft. board are required for the field, perimeter, and corner areas respectively.</p> <p>Key features of systems with induction welded membrane attachment are:</p> <ul><li>Performance is more similar to adhered systems in terms of the distribution of loads across the rooftop.</li><li>Thermal bridging is reduced compared to traditional mechanically attached membrane systems. (more here on <a href="https://blog.gaf.com/r-value-optimization-a-case-study/">roof system r-value optimization</a>)</li><li>There are no application temperature restrictions and so this approach can be used in place of adhesive attachment regardless of how cold it might be.</li><li>Especially when combined with a 12-foot wide membrane such as supplied by <a href="https://www.gaf.com/en-us/roofing-products/commercial-roofing-products/tpo-roofing-systems?Action=GetGrid">GAF</a>, a <a href="https://www.gaf.ca/roofing/commercial/products/roof_insulation_and_fastening_systems/rhinobond">Drill-Tec<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/72x72/2122.png" alt="™" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> RhinoBond®</a>&nbsp; system can improve cost competitiveness due to the speed of installation, compared to 10-foot wide traditional mechanically attached membrane systems.</li></ul> <h3><strong>In Summary</strong></h3> <p>Adhered single-ply membrane and insulation have many advantages over mechanically attached systems. These include wind uplift performance, lowered condensation risk from air intrusion, reduced thermal bridging, and aesthetics. W Raising Roofs for Healthcare Heroes with Josh Shupe and Black Diamond Roofing https://blog.gaf.com/roof-raisers-roofs-for-healthcare-heroes-with-josh-shupe-and-black-diamond-roofing/ GAF Blog urn:uuid:b25457f2-d618-41f4-e7a0-9e66b7a642fe Fri, 19 Jun 2020 13:18:18 +0000 <p>Right now, while millions of us have more time on our hands than we’d like, a small, valiant, and immensely...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/roof-raisers-roofs-for-healthcare-heroes-with-josh-shupe-and-black-diamond-roofing/">Raising Roofs for Healthcare Heroes with Josh Shupe and Black Diamond Roofing</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> <div class="pf-content"> <p>Right now, while millions of us have more time on our hands than we’d like, a small, valiant, and immensely talented army of healthcare workers has nearly no downtime at all. “A lot of folks who are quarantined right now have time to think about home improvement projects and things like that,” said GAF Master Elite<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/72x72/2122.png" alt="™" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> Contractor Josh Shupe, owner of <a href="https://www.blackdiamondroofingwa.com/">Black Diamond Roofing</a> and Construction of Richland, WA. “Healthcare workers don’t. They’re on the front lines. They’re working 18 hour shifts. Some of them aren&#8217;t even getting any family time at all.”</p> <p>Inspired by these front-line responders, Josh decided to partner with GAF and <a href="https://macarthurco.com/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">MacArthur Company</a> to give a free roof to a deserving healthcare worker in his Washington State community. “There are people out there that really need a new roof,” he said, “but they can’t focus on that right now because they’re on the front lines trying to fight through this thing. So we wanted to step up and partner with you guys to kind of take that burden off of people&#8217;s shoulders a little bit.”&nbsp;</p> <p>Josh announced the roof giveaway on March 27, and had received more than 130 nominations by May 1, when he announced the recipient. Veronica Huerta of Benton City will receive a complete new roof, including materials, labor and a GAF Golden Pledge Limited Warranty. Veronica is a mother of four who works as a nurses’ assistant and obstetrics technician at two local hospitals.&nbsp;</p> <p>For their commitment to the healthcare workers in their community, GAF is proud to recognize Black Diamond Roofing and Construction as Roof Raisers — leaders who are raising the game in roofing and elevating the trade.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Inspired by Acts of Kindness</strong></p> <p>Josh credits his brother, Jake Shupe, with the inspiration for the roof giveaway. Jake, who owns the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/BarracudaCoffeeCompany/">Barracuda Coffee Company</a> in Richland, invited customers to help fuel health workers through their long hours by sponsoring cups of coffee.&nbsp;</p> <p>It’s really no wonder both brothers found inspiration to help during this crisis; they both come from a family tradition of community service. When Josh and Jake were children, their parents coordinated mission trips, mostly to Central America, to help build homes in regions struck by natural disasters. To help raise money for the mission trips, Mr. Shupe Sr. would install roofs in exchange for donations. That’s where Josh learned how to roof, and how to take positive action for change.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>The Journey to GAF Master Elite®&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>When Josh started his own company, Black Diamond Roofing and Construction Inc., he was committed to installing a particular manufacturer’s product. Through the years, GAF Territory Manager Kory Kelly consistently reached out with an open invitation to start using GAF products and contractor programs. But it’s hard to give up a brand you started installing with your dad at age 12.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Then, one day, Josh was invited to do roof inspections for some local realtors and he discovered something that changed his mind. He saw that his preferred brand was not holding up as well as he would hope on the roofs that he inspected. It was an eye-opener for the young perfectionist. “It really just started sounding alarm bells to me,” he said, “because I pride myself on quality. I reached out to Kory Kelly and said, ‘Hey, I&#8217;d be interested in talking to you guys.’ That was late 2014, early 2015.” Josh became a Master Elite® Contractor in December 2019.&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/black-diamond-installation-1.jpg?resize=960%2C429&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-6346" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/black-diamond-installation-1.jpg?resize=1024%2C458&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/black-diamond-installation-1.jpg?resize=300%2C134&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/black-diamond-installation-1.jpg?resize=768%2C343&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/black-diamond-installation-1.jpg?resize=335%2C150&amp;ssl=1 335w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/black-diamond-installation-1.jpg?resize=1050%2C469&amp;ssl=1 1050w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/black-diamond-installation-1.jpg?w=1271&amp;ssl=1 1271w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption>The Black Diamond Roofing crew at work, installing a GAF Grand Sequoia roof in 2019.</figcaption></figure> <p>“When I hear your guys&#8217; motto, ‘We protect what matters most,’ the first thing that comes to my mind is family,” said Josh. “When you put a roof on, you&#8217;re protecting what&#8217;s inside and what&#8217;s inside your home is what matters most, and that&#8217;s your family. That’s kind of what we do as a company. We tell people that we want to work on their home as if it were our mother&#8217;s home or our grandma&#8217;s home. And so that&#8217;s why we choose GAF. We love the quality. We love what you guys stand for. And we&#8217;ve had a great experience with it. We know that when we put on a roof by GAF, we know that it will protect people&#8217;s families.”</p> <p>“I am fortunate to work with a handful of contractors, such as Black Diamond Roofing, who give back to their communities,” said Territory Manager Kory Kelly. “When Josh and I discussed his Healthcare worker roof giveaway, it was not a difficult decision to have GAF jump on board. These are unprecedented times and we all need to do our part in helping each other out.”</p> <p><strong>Coping with COVID-19</strong></p> <p>Josh observed that, at the time of our interview, construction to “prevent spoilation and avoid damage or unsafe conditions<a href="https://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/covid-19-update-washington-governor-55573/"><sup>1</sup></a>” was permitted in the state of Washington. “Nobody is changing their roof because they don’t like the color,” said Josh. “They’re doing it because it’s a structural necessity.” As a result, Black Diamond has been able to continue to protect the homes of many of his customers. “We’re operating at about 70 to 80 percent,” he said.&nbsp;</p> <p>To help protect his customers and crew, Josh and company have been using many of the distancing best practices listed in the <a href="https://www.gaf.com/en-us/coronavirus-response/contractor">GAF COVID-19 Response</a> contractor advisory.&nbsp;</p> <p>“We’re big on <a href="https://www.eagleview.com/">EagleView</a> and Hover (<a href="https://gaf.hover.to/">GAF e360</a>). That’s pretty contactless. We can field the call, get their name, address and phone number and order the report. We e-mail quotes, and if somebody does want to see us face to face, there&#8217;s FaceTime. If somebody wants to look at colors, we can do a video call and show them our showroom here. We also provide links in the estimates and the quotes. Yeah. It&#8217;s been pretty seamless.”</p> <p>But while Black Diamond is making much needed adjustments in order to thrive in this period, there are many aspects of the business that they miss. “You know, we are ‘people persons.’ We love to be around people,” he said. “And so that&#8217;s kind of a bummer about all this — not having contact with our customers. So, we realized we&#8217;ve got to do what we’ve got to do, but when you just look forward to things? Getting back to normal so we can be around people again.”</p> <p>“What matters most to me right now,” Josh continued, “is people’s health. That&#8217;s why we decided to honor somebody in the healthcare field. I wanted to step up, partner with you guys, and take a burden off someone’s shoulders.</p> <p>“I wanted to say to someone who needs a roof but is focused on saving lives — I want to say, ‘don’t worry about this.’”</p> <p><em>Contractors enrolled in GAF certification programs are not employees or agents of GAF, and GAF does not control or otherwise supervise these independent businesses. Contractors may have agreed that they will use GAF roofing products, and may receive benefits, such as loyalty rewards points and discounts on marketing tools from GAF for participating in the program.</em></p> </div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/roof-raisers-roofs-for-healthcare-heroes-with-josh-shupe-and-black-diamond-roofing/">Raising Roofs for Healthcare Heroes with Josh Shupe and Black Diamond Roofing</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> GAF Transforms HQ into Free Farmers Market in Partnership with Interfaith Food Pantry https://blog.gaf.com/gaf-transforms-hq-into-free-farmers-market-in-partnership-with-interfaith-food-pantry/ GAF Blog urn:uuid:9443b02f-79ee-f5b3-256c-204001d4cd74 Thu, 18 Jun 2020 13:23:30 +0000 <p>Hundreds of Morris County, NJ residents regained access to fresh produce last Friday, thanks to a new partnership with GAF...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/gaf-transforms-hq-into-free-farmers-market-in-partnership-with-interfaith-food-pantry/">GAF Transforms HQ into Free Farmers Market in Partnership with Interfaith Food Pantry</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> <div class="pf-content"> <p></p> <p>Hundreds of Morris County, NJ residents regained access to fresh produce last Friday, thanks to a new partnership with GAF and the Interfaith Food Pantry (IFP).</p> <p>More than 10,000 Morris County households, primarily consisting of low-income working families and seniors living on fixed incomes, rely on IFP for assistance.</p> <p>Instances of diet-related health issues such as hypertension and diabetes are much higher among low-income individuals, so IFP offers free farmers markets with fresh produce to promote healthier eating among its clients.</p> <p>Unfortunately due to the risks posed by COVID-19, IFP had to suspend its farmers market due to a lack of space that could accommodate social distancing.</p> <p>&#8220;Finding a new and creative way to reopen our free farmers market will help fight hunger and improve the health and well-being of thousands of people across Morris County,&#8221; said Carolyn Lake, Executive Director of the Interfaith Food Pantry.</p> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0149.jpg?resize=960%2C640&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-6321" srcset="https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0149-scaled.jpg?resize=1024%2C683&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0149-scaled.jpg?resize=300%2C200&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0149-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C512&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0149-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1024&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0149-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1365&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0149-scaled.jpg?resize=335%2C223&amp;ssl=1 335w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0149-scaled.jpg?resize=1050%2C700&amp;ssl=1 1050w, https://i1.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0149-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption>GAF supports Interfaith Food Pantry’s drive-through farmer’s market, Friday, June 12, 2020 in Parsippany, N.J. (Jason DeCrow/AP Images for GAF)</figcaption></figure> <h3>Helping Neighbors</h3> <p>Upon hearing about the IFP farmers market, North America&#8217;s largest roofing company sprung into action.</p> <p>In just a few weeks, over fifty GAF volunteers and the team at IFP helped transform GAF&#8217;s world headquarters into a community assembly line where volunteers placed groceries and fresh produce directly into the trunks of IFP clients’ vehicles.</p> <p>Volunteers were able to maintain safe social distancing with IFP clients, while distributing more than a dozen different kinds of fresh produce as cars passed by.</p> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0383.jpg?resize=960%2C640&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-6322" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0383-scaled.jpg?resize=1024%2C683&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0383-scaled.jpg?resize=300%2C200&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0383-scaled.jpg?resize=768%2C512&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0383-scaled.jpg?resize=1536%2C1024&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0383-scaled.jpg?resize=2048%2C1365&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0383-scaled.jpg?resize=335%2C223&amp;ssl=1 335w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0383-scaled.jpg?resize=1050%2C700&amp;ssl=1 1050w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/gaf_0383-scaled.jpg?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" data-recalc-dims="1" /><figcaption>Safe social distancing was a key to the success of the Interfaith Food Pantry’s drive-through farmer’s market at GAF HQ in Parsippany, N.J. (Jason DeCrow/AP Images for GAF)</figcaption></figure> <p>&#8220;We’re happy we could help put our space to good use and support our neighbors through the Interfaith Food Pantry of Morris County,&#8221; said GAF President Jim Schnepper. &#8220;Fighting hunger continues to be a challenging issue affecting many homes across the U.S., especially amid the ongoing pandemic. We’re glad we could help re-establish this service to provide fresh produce to people in need of healthy food options.&#8221;</p> <h3>Supporting our Community</h3> <p>Today, the IFP is enrolling more than 200 clients each month, a 300% increase from 50 new clients per month on average.</p> <p>To help meet this growing need for fresh food in Morris County, the Free IFP Farmers Market will continue every second and fourth Friday at GAF through September.</p> <p>To learn more about how you can join GAF in support of IFP programs or to volunteer/donate, please:</p> <ul><li>Visit <a href="http://www.mcifp.org">www.mcifp.org</a></li><li>Call (973) 538-8049</li><li>Email <a href="mailto:interfaithfoodpantry@mcifp.org">interfaithfoodpantry@mcifp.org</a></li></ul> <p>&#8220;Thank you to all of our supporters and to GAF for helping provide a safe environment that helps restore a sense of normalcy for our clients,&#8221; Lake said.</p> </div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/gaf-transforms-hq-into-free-farmers-market-in-partnership-with-interfaith-food-pantry/">GAF Transforms HQ into Free Farmers Market in Partnership with Interfaith Food Pantry</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> Leaky Skylight Diagnosis & Repair Tips https://allroofingsolutionsde.com/leaky-skylight-diagnosis-repair-tips/ All Roofing Solutions urn:uuid:d440b440-62e1-c614-3a53-9b35cfcf23e8 Thu, 18 Jun 2020 02:22:00 +0000 While beautiful and functional, skylights are prone to leaking. In fact, skylight leak repairs are among the most common roof leak repairs seen in residential roofing. A leaky skylight isn’t just an eyesore; it may be an indication of more serious, hidden damage. If you notice a leak around your skylight, you’ll want to diagnose [&#8230;] Proven Performance: GAF releases aged TPO study https://blog.gaf.com/proven-performance-gaf-releases-aged-tpo-study/ GAF Blog urn:uuid:445be869-ec1b-021c-58fd-645408737b30 Wed, 17 Jun 2020 17:44:46 +0000 <p>Introduced as a roofing membrane in the 1960s, and first marketed in the U.S. as a commercial roof membrane in...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/proven-performance-gaf-releases-aged-tpo-study/">Proven Performance: GAF releases aged TPO study</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> <div class="pf-content"> <p>Introduced as a roofing membrane in the 1960s, and first marketed in the U.S. as a commercial roof membrane in the early 1990s, thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO) has, within the last two decades, become the fastest growing commercial roof membrane on the market. TPO now represents nearly 50 percent of the installed low-slope roofing in the United States.&nbsp;</p> <p>Analyzed extensively in laboratories and under accelerated weathering conditions, TPO has demonstrated good heat aging performance as well as UV stability. However, in part because the TPO market has experienced most of its growth in the last 20 years, it’s been difficult to properly assess historical, in-the-field TPO performance.&nbsp;</p> <p>Until now.&nbsp;</p> <p>Today, many TPO roofs in the United States have been in service for over 20 years. So in order to assess performance and the ability to repair aged TPO roof membranes, GAF acquired samples from 20 aged roofs located throughout the United States, installed over office buildings, manufacturing facilities, retail outlets, libraries, automotive repair shops, warehouses, and a grocery store. These 20 samples represent the start of an ongoing study, with more samples to be collected.&nbsp;</p> <p>These samples were analyzed, focusing on known failure modes including erosion of the cap (thickness over scrim) down to the scrim and surface cracking, as well as concerns surrounding the ability to repair TPO membranes as they age.</p> <p>A GAF team that includes Director of Building and Roofing Science Jennifer Keegan, AAIA, and Building and Roofing Science Architect&nbsp;Jim Kirby, AIA, presented the results of these findings in <strong>Proven Performance &#8211; Aged TPO Field Study</strong>, prepared for the 2020 IIBEC Convention. The study and report are just the beginning of an ongoing effort by GAF to assess the performance and ability to repair aged TPO roof membranes.</p> <p><strong>Study Overview</strong></p> <p>For in-depth details, methodology and findings of the Proven Performance study, we advise readers to<a href="http://us.gaf.com/ProTPO-DL" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"> download the entire report.</a> The following is a high-level summary:  </p> <p><strong>Sample Selection</strong>:&nbsp;</p> <ul><li>Membrane samples were collected from roofs around the United States that were at least 12 years in service and could offer a general sense of typical performance in various locations. Access and availability of the owner were a governing factor.&nbsp;</li><li>The oldest sample reviewed to date was installed in 2001.&nbsp;</li><li>All samples were from the same manufacturer and were predominantly 45 and 60-mil smooth-back membranes. All samples were taken from mechanically attached, induction welded, and adhered roofs. (i.e. no self-adhered samples)</li><li>When possible, two samples were taken from each roof. Each was 2-foot by 3-foot and captured a field-welded seam.&nbsp;</li><li>The large samples were cut into smaller pieces to evaluate membrane thickness, thickness over scrim, brittleness, heat aging and weather resistance, ply adhesion of existing welds, and ply adhesion of repair welds.&nbsp;</li></ul> <p><strong>Test Program and Results Overview</strong></p> <p>The testing program was built around ASTM D6878-19, with modifications as needed for aged samples. The artificial aging tests were replaced with field aging for a minimum of 12 years. All tests were conducted in a commercial test laboratory and all data gathered was used in the analysis.</p> <p>Overall, the aged TPO membrane roofs in this study are performing well and, in most instances, meeting the current ASTM D6878-19 requirements for newly manufactured membranes.&nbsp;</p> <ul><li>Even after 12 or more years of aging, both the 45 and 60-mil membrane samples exceeded current thickness requirements for newly manufactured TPO membranes.&nbsp;</li><li>Both the 45 and 60-mil membranes analyzed in this study are still in compliance with these newly-manufactured membrane requirements, with the thickness over scrim averaging over 40-percent of the actual aged membrane thickness.</li><li>All of the samples, both the 45 and 60-mil membranes, exhibited no signs of cracking when bent over the mandrel and viewed at 7X magnification.</li><li>All of the 60-mil samples tested to date still meet cold temperature flexibility requirements after 12 or more years of aging. The 45-mil samples showed signs of cracking at -40°F. While this is still good performance and aged membranes cannot be expected to perform at the same level as new membranes, the data supports the use of thicker membranes for longer term performance.</li><li>Ply adhesion values of the aged TPO membrane were 15-percent above the average ply adhesion value from the SRI study on new TPO membranes. As expected, the aged welds appear to be performing well and are of adequate strength.</li><li>Ply adhesion values of new repair membrane to the aged TPO membrane are above the average ply adhesion value for new TPO membranes. This provides some validity to the integrity of properly executed repairs to aged TPO membranes.</li></ul> <p><strong>For more information about the </strong><strong><em>Proven Performance — Aged TPO Field Study</em></strong><strong>:</strong></p> <ul><li><a href="https://continuingeducation.bnpmedia.com/courses/gaf/performance-analysis-of-aged-tpo-membranes-web-live/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><strong>Register here</strong></a><strong> to Attend the Live Webinar on July 14&nbsp;</strong></li></ul> <ul><li><strong>Download the Report: <a href="http://us.gaf.com/ProTPO-DL" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">gaf.com/tpostudy</a></strong></li></ul> <p></p> </div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/proven-performance-gaf-releases-aged-tpo-study/">Proven Performance: GAF releases aged TPO study</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> Value Engineering Part 2: Retaining Performance https://blog.gaf.com/value-engineering-part-2-retaining-performance/ GAF Blog urn:uuid:92a29c6a-c5a1-292b-d6ca-6723ba51f4d6 Mon, 08 Jun 2020 19:59:35 +0000 <p>In the first Value Engineering post about the attributes of high performing roof designs, value engineering is defined as “a...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/value-engineering-part-2-retaining-performance/">Value Engineering Part 2: Retaining Performance</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> <div class="pf-content"> <p>In the first <a href="https://blog.gaf.com/value-engineering-optimizing-performance-or-reducing-costs/">Value Engineering post</a> about the attributes of high performing roof designs,<em> value engineering</em> is defined as “a concept that states there are less expensive ways to get equivalent performance,” and the post described the performance attributes that make for a long-lasting, high-performing roof system.&nbsp; These performance attributes include:</p> <ul><li>Energy efficiency (reflectivity, thermal resistance, and air leakage)</li><li>Impact resistance</li><li>Wind resistance</li><li>Condensation prevention</li><li>High heat (and UV) resistance</li><li>Positive drainage</li><li>Wear resistance</li></ul> <p>These performance attributes manifest themselves in certain aspects of the overall design of the roof system.&nbsp; What type of membrane, membrane thickness, cover board or no cover board, adhered or mechanically attached cover board, insulation layout (including tapered), insulation attachment method(s), vapor retarder / air barrier or not, and attachment to the roof deck are some of the questions that drive the performance of a roof system.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <h4><em>And the roof design is…</em></h4> <p>After considering all of the above performance attributes, your design strategies for a long-lasting, high performing, and durable roof include:</p> <ul><li>Adhered reflective roof membrane with high heat-resistance</li><li>Adhered HD polyiso coverboard</li><li>2+ layers of adhered insulation, staggered and offset, with tapered insulation and crickets and saddles</li><li>Air barrier (over a substrate board) at the deck level&nbsp;</li><li>Third-party-tested edge metal details&nbsp;</li><li>Walkway pads</li></ul> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/ptR_mJG3Xou1fLPb7el0HPBtjvf0J8OO6ORuySm3FQ4NJnDO-z_Mbnct95uPk0P4Q_fma_c2xmM2cMJEGAfM123DH1ANgfAeRRo1Pa4r70XCINMCAuNpnTfhXBecHqeu2gKWJ2Rt" alt=""/></figure> <h4><em>Energy Efficiency – reflectivity and thermal resistance</em></h4> <p>The attachment method is integral to a roof system’s energy efficiency.&nbsp; Consider, for example, a roof that is designed to have the first layer of insulation fastened to the deck and the remainder of the components above are to be adhered.&nbsp; There is a cost for fasteners as well as adhesives.&nbsp; One way to “value engineer” this roof is to use fasteners through the entire system thereby removing the cost of the adhesive and labor to install the adhesive.&nbsp; While eliminating the adhesive is a cost reduction strategy, it is possible that longer fasteners will be needed.&nbsp; Sometimes something that is eliminated creates the need for a greater cost elsewhere.&nbsp; This is often not mentioned or discussed, so ask the question!&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Value engineering the removal of the adhesive also, unfortunately, can result in a roof system with a 15 to 30% reduction in R-Value relative to the as-designed roof system.&nbsp; If the roof was designed to have an R-30, the actual R-value as installed would be about R-21 to R-25!&nbsp; It’s been shown (read this <a href="https://blog.gaf.com/r-value-optimization-a-case-study/">blog</a> about optimizing R-value) that over the life of a roof, roof systems that use adhered membranes and an adhered top layer of insulation can offset the cost of adhesives when the initial cost of ‘lost’ insulation performance and the additional annual cost for increased heating and cooling are factored into the analysis.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>One of the key issues with value engineering of a roof system is that proponents of the reduction of costs are generally only looking at the initial cost to install a roof.&nbsp; However, the operational costs, the energy efficiency, the wind resistance, are commonly compromised.&nbsp; Operational costs, which are tied directly to a roof system’s energy efficiency, are often much higher over the life of a roof.&nbsp; (Read this <a href="https://blog.gaf.com/r-value-optimization-a-case-study/">blog</a> about analyzing long-term costs.)&nbsp; Also, roof systems with different wind-resistance ratings may need to be selected after value engineering revises the attachment method.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Also, is the mechanical system design and whole-building energy-use analysis predicated on a roof system R-value of 30?&nbsp; Determining the effect on mechanical unit sizing and cost, including differences in whole building energy use may show that the savings from value engineering the roof will have a negative effect on annualized energy use and the ability of the HVAC system to maintain occupant comfort.&nbsp; Whole building energy simulation modeling, such as EnergyPlus<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/72x72/2122.png" alt="™" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> (EnergyPlus.net), can be used.&nbsp; EnergyPlus<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/72x72/2122.png" alt="™" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" /> is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s&nbsp; Building Technologies Office, and managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/4t6Y-Fm4mJ8IJtnnqkToJAtzhxanfnC_DmKYCyHVWkKtL2EN04Jb1K_navHwc-p2isP4SZSI7C7UWzdzw-aTkEFIi-qaUiVHPS4EyPEcAZCEVLI8CA_wrvzvntFeSzN_nO52tRK8" alt=""/></figure> <p><em>Each “dot” is a fastener and plate; fasteners and plates are thermal bridges that reduce the R-value of the insulation layer.</em></p> <h4><em>Impact Resistance</em></h4> <p>Using any type of coverboard will improve the impact-resistance of a roof system because of the toughness of coverboards in general.&nbsp; However, a key issue with impact resistance is the location of the plate and fastener relative to the roof membrane.&nbsp; If a coverboard is mechanically attached (so the plates and fastener head are immediately beneath the membrane), impacts at fastener heads and plates have been <a href="https://blog.gaf.com/how-single-ply-systems-withstand-ice-ball-impacts/">shown</a> to result in damage to the membrane.&nbsp; Adhered coverboards remove this concern, but do require the use of some type of adhesive.&nbsp; It’s not just the use of a coverboard, but the installation method that matters.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><img width="624" height="191" alt="ice.impact" src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/1OboawJuMwaScIEi0fl1uv91VSS3dzpPKqX7fUQS06ulqbBuqrn0DaAzyd5W5XHmrcMUtjo0hCvJikkxrbK6yskGeuOsT1IXqAyCjRHFF-Veqmbx2c0gQLkDVo3VYYLyQk9dj7Nw"></p> <p><em>Ice-ball impact above fasteners always punctures the membrane. Left to right: increasing damage from hairline crack to complete puncture.</em></p> <p>Impacts come from hail as well as rooftop use by occupants and anyone performing work on rooftop mechanical units or to rising walls, for example.&nbsp; Reducing membrane thickness, changing from a fleece-back membrane to a smooth-back membrane, as well as changing to a more commodity-type membrane versus one that is shown to have a long service life are value engineering choices that can reduce cost, yet also reduce the impact resistance.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <h4><em>Wind Resistance</em></h4> <p>Designers make wind-design decisions that are intended to reduce risk (e.g., choosing Partially Enclosed versus Enclosed, selecting Exposure Category C instead of Exposure Category B).&nbsp; If a designer and owner have determined to reduce the potential risk of high-wind-event damage by increasing the design wind loads and subsequently the capacity of a roof system, that high capacity could be value engineered out.&nbsp; Coordinating wind design assumptions and documenting owner expectations and decisions can be critical pieces of information that alleviate the reduction of wind load capacity based on cost.&nbsp; Owners have their reasons; value engineering should not undermine owner expectations.&nbsp; By including design wind pressures for each roof zone as well as providing design loads for edge metal, and parapets and coping, minimum performance requirements are established in the construction documents.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>For more on wind design, read our blog <a href="https://blog.gaf.com/wind-design-and-the-new-asce-7-16/">here</a>.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <h4><em>Condensation prevention</em></h4> <p>Roofs that include air barriers above the deck and below insulation provide the best protection against the development of condensation in a roof system.&nbsp; Your roof design took into consideration the interior and exterior design temperatures and <a href="https://blog.gaf.com/preventing-condensation-by-calculating-temperature-gradients/">calculations</a> were performed to determine potential dew point locations, which resulted in the correct placement of the air barrier.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/HyKSB9n2U8POYdEvqAKjXqs8Jde9ME-9IBjBcrhhLRDYKY3qo3dDbA-yPoGi0DumhMXkESK6U-H0yUUie4mPc_8HGDc5uDlZFc5OO9XOO8FoQ6HFPXrH-pEgIfP0XcXty21qmnkW" alt=""/></figure> <p><em>This roof design is “above code.”&nbsp; While the energy code allows the roof membrane to be the air barrier, air can still move up into the roof system.&nbsp; This is called air intrusion and can bring moisture into the roof system, potentially causing condensation <a href="https://blog.gaf.com/designing-for-moisture-durability-energy-efficiency/">issues</a>.&nbsp;&nbsp;</em></p> <p>Placing the air barrier layer on the top surface of a rigid board fastened to the roof deck is one option.&nbsp; However, with “first layer fastened and the upper layers (insulation, cover board, membrane) adhered” systems, there is an opportunity to include a vapor retarder / air barrier between the insulation layers without fasteners penetrating the vapor / air barrier layer.&nbsp; Reducing air intrusion and the potential for condensation is achieved using both designs; this is a real value engineering opportunity!&nbsp; The costs for materials and labor for each design can be determined, and the least expensive design that provides condensation control can be implemented, instead of eliminating the properly located air barrier.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>While removing the air barrier and the associated adhesives and components reduces costs, changing to a roof system that uses only mechanical attachment also negatively affects the potential for condensation and thermal performance of the roof system.&nbsp; For example, consider a high-humidity building, such as a natatorium—the use of an air barrier at the deck level reduces air intrusion into the roof system from the interior and the moisture that air carries.&nbsp; This reduces the potential for condensation and damage to the roof system.</p> <h4><em>High Heat (and UV) Resistance</em></h4> <p>Heat and UV are two environmental factors that affect roof membrane service life.&nbsp; Understanding this and that storms are increasing in severity and frequency, in addition to recognizing temperatures are rising (ASHRAE’s climate zone maps are moving northward), your roof design includes a membrane that has been shown to have a long service life.&nbsp; It’s likely the specification includes GAF’s TPO Everguard Extreme® membrane due to its <a href="https://www.gaf.com/en-us/for-professionals/resources/tpo-results">ability</a> to withstand high heat conditions.</p> <p>It’s possible that a high-performing roof membrane will be value engineered down to one of reduced initial cost.&nbsp; The rationale will be that it still keeps water out!&nbsp; But to what long-term cost?&nbsp; You designed a roof to meet your client’s expectations for a long service life.&nbsp; By considering annualized costs, not simply initial cost, it may be shown that a longer service life roof is actually a better long-term value for the owner.&nbsp; A key strategy is to use annualized costs when pushing back against value engineering.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <h4><em>Positive Drainage</em></h4> <p>Most roof systems are not guaranteed or warranted against ponding water.&nbsp; The combination of UV and water is one mechanism that advances the deterioration of many roof membrane materials.&nbsp; And because water needs to be removed from a roof quickly and efficiently, your roof design includes properly sized drains and scuppers, a tapered insulation layout to efficiently move water to drains and scuppers, and crickets and saddles to prevent localized ponding.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/cVkUNlNvO3OVbCk64KJPceQwgC8KBmjA7kv5RKxde9_LGxOJJ05PNzKvEGW0iqBxV_CHw_R7m4gXDIT6B3KLbKS8474bQ04JTDKRZPBd5IMGEJwUt1OybVHO4C9jhV6tohDga4Rh" alt=""/></figure> <p><em>Example of a tapered layout, courtesy GAF Tapered Design Group</em></p> <p>When asked to reduce the cost of the tapered insulation, one possible answer is to install more drains that are closer together.&nbsp; This can reduce the build-up of tapered insulation, and the associated cost.&nbsp; Perhaps the use of lightweight insulating concrete is less costly?&nbsp; Perhaps the use of a TPO membrane, which does not have ponding water limitations in the guarantee/warranty, makes sense?&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <h4><em>Wear Resistance</em></h4> <p>Thicker membranes, granulated surfaces, and walkway pads are helpful in preventing unwanted wear to roofing membranes.&nbsp; You’ve coordinated expectations with the owner, your client, that rooftop protection against wear and tear is important during the operation phase of the building.&nbsp; Reducing the thickness of a membrane reduces its potential wear resistance, as well as its impact resistance (as previously noted in this blog).&nbsp; As with many things, none of these issues are stand-alone issues.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Perform a cost comparison of a granule-surface modified bitumen membrane and a smooth surface system with a high-solids coating system to see if there are less expensive systems that still meet wear-resistance requirements.&nbsp; Don’t just look at initial costs; consider maintenance costs over the life of the roof that affect annualized costs.&nbsp; A relatively small number of walkway pads, strategically placed around rooftop units and systems that will require regular maintenance (e.g., HVAC units and solar arrays), can be an effective and economic solution.</p> <h4><em>Product substitutions</em></h4> <p>Not all products with the same intended function (and described with the same terminology) are created equal.&nbsp; A vapor retarder is a good example.&nbsp; A self-adhered vapor retarder with a perm rating of 0.03 has a desired performance and was included for a specific reason – to effectively block the diffusion of moisture into the roof assembly.&nbsp; Substituting a less expensive vapor retarder with different properties (e.g., a higher perm rating) and physical characteristics (30 mil asphaltic vs. a 6 mil poly), won’t be installed in the same fashion—even though they are both vapor retarders.&nbsp; The least expensive material may be the most costly to install properly.</p> <h4><em>Details</em></h4> <p>Details matter.&nbsp; Without a doubt, the ability for a roof to keep water out is most challenging at the details—penetrations, perimeters, and locations where there is an interruption, end, or change of direction.&nbsp; You designed a two-part counterflashing for ease of maintenance and future reroofing; a single-piece counterflashing is less expensive initially.&nbsp; When it’s time to reroof, will the facade material (e.g., masonry, stucco, EIFS) need to be removed and repaired in order to install new counterflashing?&nbsp; Again, you’ve established with the owner that future efforts for maintenance and reroofing are important.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>There are ways to value engineer roofing details, especially when it comes to air barrier and vapor retarder constructability.&nbsp; A good example is an overhang.&nbsp; It seems logical to design an air barrier to enclose the overhang (the blue lines in the graphic), but there are many potential dis-continuities (the red lines in the graphic).&nbsp; The air barrier can be inboard of the eave; the wall air barrier could be tied to the underside of the roof deck, and the above deck air barrier (whether at deck level or the roof membrane) is tied to the top of the roof deck making a continuous air barrier system.&nbsp; There likely are labor savings associated with this value-engineered design revision.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/Kbim-CstMsFpb6dfLLd-v_GSIHvH8w2Db_oZ0GI4ScSy7zvx298Iyuj_4QvHT-oS-TSnbDnkk8RHk2e_90zil1MZwGkkcxogjMelDvHhjwILNkjnsDPir36AP8DBGYowe4vruJaH" alt="Screen shot 2013-01-20 at 11.33.52 AM.png"/></figure> <h4><em>Weather</em></h4> <p>A change of seasons is often the impetus for changing from an adhered system to one that strictly uses mechanical attachment.&nbsp; While this may not be value engineering, a change of seasons can mean daily temperatures are below manufacturer recommended minimums for adhesive materials.&nbsp; However, manufacturers have (and are developing) lower temperature adhesives.&nbsp; Regardless of why a roof system design eliminates adhesives in favor of fasteners, there are energy efficiency and an impact-resistance trade offs.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <h4><em>Owner expectations</em></h4> <p>Much of the prevention of value engineering is having a clear understanding of the owner’s performance requirements and expectations.&nbsp; Getting ‘buy-in’ from an owner for high-performance roof systems is key.&nbsp; During the design phase, explaining the importance of design decisions and aligning them with the owner’s performance requirements should be documented.&nbsp; Documented design decisions that are made in conjunction with the owner provide a defense when “it costs too much” is used as the basis for value engineering.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>The <em>Whole Building Design Guide</em>, from the National Institute of Building Sciences, includes detailed information about value engineering during the design and construction phases of a project.&nbsp; You can find this resource <a href="https://www.wbdg.org/resources/value-engineering">here</a>.</p> </div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/value-engineering-part-2-retaining-performance/">Value Engineering Part 2: Retaining Performance</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> Check out our own Jason Joplin in an interview with @breakingweather to learn more about why the upcoming season is the perfect time to repair your roof. https://bit.ly/2yG3V0h  https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1266028969838641153 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:6cb5898b-0f54-b93d-09d0-72fa7a5b1c7d Thu, 28 May 2020 15:30:02 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Check out our own Jason Joplin in an interview with <a class="twitter-atreply pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/breakingweather">@<b>breakingweather</b></a> to learn more about why the upcoming season is the perfect time to repair your roof. <a href="https://bit.ly/2yG3V0h">https://bit.ly/2yG3V0h&nbsp;</a></p> Storm season is upon us, and we have contractor tools and resources to help you get your customers through the storm. Learn more: https://bit.ly/ContractorStorm pic.twitter.com/0M40pepIxF https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1265674132458475520 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:2e990c23-c69d-c2d9-c724-910036a64ad0 Wed, 27 May 2020 16:00:02 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Storm season is upon us, and we have contractor tools and resources to help you get your customers through the storm. Learn more: <a href="https://bit.ly/ContractorStorm">https://bit.ly/ContractorStorm&nbsp;</a> <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/0M40pepIxF">pic.twitter.com/0M40pepIxF</a></a></p> <img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EZCT6bPWoAAJGB9.jpg" width="250" /> In this episode of our Roofing It Right - Top 10 Mistakes Series, Dave and Wally provide guidance on the importance of base attachments and provide solutions for how to fix missing ones. Watch the full video: http://bit.ly/RIRBaseAttach pic.twitter.com/T https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1265296645794803712 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:915450fc-d76e-2cfd-1e4b-b3138aebb219 Tue, 26 May 2020 15:00:03 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">In this episode of our Roofing It Right - Top 10 Mistakes Series, Dave and Wally provide guidance on the importance of base attachments and provide solutions for how to fix missing ones. Watch the full video: <a href="http://bit.ly/RIRBaseAttach">http://bit.ly/RIRBaseAttach&nbsp;</a> <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/TDVTKduich">pic.twitter.com/TDVTKduich</a></a></p> <img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EY88l8xWAAciRVf.jpg" width="250" /> Today, we remember the military heroes who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country and our freedom. #MemorialDaypic.twitter.com/bf4u0Bt6fH https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1264919155880407041 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:45259ca7-28d5-bdda-4678-409c23c9b257 Mon, 25 May 2020 14:00:02 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Today, we remember the military heroes who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country and our freedom. <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MemorialDay?src=hash">#<b>MemorialDay</b></a> <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/bf4u0Bt6fH">pic.twitter.com/bf4u0Bt6fH</a></a></p> <img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EY3lRLBX0AEAedE.jpg" width="250" /> You have goals - and we’re here to help you achieve them. Create a My GAF Account to gain access to our exclusive programs, tools, and resources. Sign up today: https://bit.ly/36lGTZ0 pic.twitter.com/HoaRZsBW45 https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1263877294923419650 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:bb648028-151a-141f-cc7e-c03d25f16889 Fri, 22 May 2020 17:00:03 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">You have goals - and we&rsquo;re here to help you achieve them. Create a My GAF Account to gain access to our exclusive programs, tools, and resources. Sign up today: <a href="https://bit.ly/36lGTZ0">https://bit.ly/36lGTZ0&nbsp;</a> <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/HoaRZsBW45">pic.twitter.com/HoaRZsBW45</a></a></p> <img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EYoxs61XgAIUcs9.jpg" width="250" /> Timberline® HDZ™ Charcoal EverGuard® TPO Timberline® HDZ™ Pewter Grey with DecoTech® Solar Timberline HD® Shakewood https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1263469903945883650 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:21a1a218-a4c0-1aad-aa5e-bc3503298898 Thu, 21 May 2020 14:01:13 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en"><img alt="&#x25B6;&#xFE0F;" aria-label="Emoji: Right-pointing triangle" class="Emoji Emoji--forText" draggable="false" src="https://abs.twimg.com/emoji/v2/72x72/25b6.png" title="Right-pointing triangle"></img> Timberline&reg; HDZ&trade; Charcoal <img alt="&#x25B6;&#xFE0F;" aria-label="Emoji: Right-pointing triangle" class="Emoji Emoji--forText" draggable="false" src="https://abs.twimg.com/emoji/v2/72x72/25b6.png" title="Right-pointing triangle"></img> EverGuard&reg; TPO <img alt="&#x25B6;&#xFE0F;" aria-label="Emoji: Right-pointing triangle" class="Emoji Emoji--forText" draggable="false" src="https://abs.twimg.com/emoji/v2/72x72/25b6.png" title="Right-pointing triangle"></img> Timberline&reg; HDZ&trade; Pewter Grey with DecoTech&reg; Solar <img alt="&#x25B6;&#xFE0F;" aria-label="Emoji: Right-pointing triangle" class="Emoji Emoji--forText" draggable="false" src="https://abs.twimg.com/emoji/v2/72x72/25b6.png" title="Right-pointing triangle"></img> Timberline HD&reg; Shakewood</p> Check out these amazing roof shots! Tag us in your best photos and use #MyGAFRoof for a chance to be featured.pic.twitter.com/ss7zdeJocL https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1263469902578495494 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:fa26d90f-f38c-d1d7-7756-035e8e6e0ca0 Thu, 21 May 2020 14:01:13 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Check out these amazing roof shots! Tag us in your best photos and use <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/MyGAFRoof?src=hash">#<b>MyGAFRoof</b></a> for a chance to be featured. <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/ss7zdeJocL">pic.twitter.com/ss7zdeJocL</a></a></p> <img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EYi_IZlWsAQDU6D.jpg" width="250" /> Congratulations to a deserving nurse and her family who were surprised by Ultimate Roofing as the winners of a new #TimberlineHDZ roof giveaway!pic.twitter.com/ENB8ztFXFT https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1262759946690555904 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:11a60ab1-13f3-cce1-f9c0-855b2ca05dcd Tue, 19 May 2020 15:00:06 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Congratulations to a deserving nurse and her family who were surprised by Ultimate Roofing as the winners of a new <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TimberlineHDZ?src=hash">#<b>TimberlineHDZ</b></a> roof giveaway! <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/ENB8ztFXFT">pic.twitter.com/ENB8ztFXFT</a></a></p> <img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EYY5d_HU8Ak5dfu.jpg" width="250" /> Join our CARE team LIVE on Facebook this Wednesday at 4pm EST with guest speaker Jobe Carbajal of @JobeRoofing. You don’t want to miss this! Learn more: https://bit.ly/3dPd4Tk pic.twitter.com/rI3KsAfuDu https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1262412666787725314 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:e3902384-f6d7-102a-6ba4-d51786df0071 Mon, 18 May 2020 16:00:08 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Join our CARE team LIVE on Facebook this Wednesday at 4pm EST with guest speaker Jobe Carbajal of <a class="twitter-atreply pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/JobeRoofing">@<b>JobeRoofing</b></a>. You don&rsquo;t want to miss this! Learn more: <a href="https://bit.ly/3dPd4Tk">https://bit.ly/3dPd4Tk&nbsp;</a> <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/rI3KsAfuDu">pic.twitter.com/rI3KsAfuDu</a></a></p> The combination of #TimberlineHDZ shingles and GAF Energy DecoTech® solar panels look phenomenal on the @thisoldhouse Cape Ann Project House! https://bit.ly/2Za30Qy  https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1261672760864014338 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:803522bb-8381-ba2b-d9f7-de8af84ebb26 Sat, 16 May 2020 15:00:01 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">The combination of <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TimberlineHDZ?src=hash">#<b>TimberlineHDZ</b></a> shingles and GAF Energy DecoTech&reg; solar panels look phenomenal on the <a class="twitter-atreply pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/ThisOldHouse">@<b>thisoldhouse</b></a> Cape Ann Project House! <a href="https://bit.ly/2Za30Qy">https://bit.ly/2Za30Qy&nbsp;</a></p> We're here for you and we will get through this together. #WeProtectWhatMattersMostpic.twitter.com/8TZVRTiSdf https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1260646003520110593 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:1f1ee6d8-75ce-a471-ec4c-633dac227f8b Wed, 13 May 2020 19:00:03 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">We're here for you and we will get through this together. <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/WeProtectWhatMattersMost?src=hash">#<b>WeProtectWhatMattersMost</b></a> <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/8TZVRTiSdf">pic.twitter.com/8TZVRTiSdf</a></a></p> <img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EX6225BXsAEsR3-.jpg" width="250" /> Thanks to @CraftmarkHomes for choosing reliable roofing shingles from GAF, featured in @royfurchgott's story about #ecofriendly townhomes in Clarksburg, MD, via @washingtonpost https://wapo.st/2yNZmkw  https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1260228695773646848 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:e9c14a24-b6b1-722d-b83b-8d7bde0a961b Tue, 12 May 2020 15:21:49 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Thanks to <a class="twitter-atreply pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/CraftmarkHomes">@<b>CraftmarkHomes</b></a> for choosing reliable roofing shingles from GAF, featured in <a class="twitter-atreply pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/royfurchgott">@<b>royfurchgott</b></a>'s story about <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ecofriendly?src=hash">#<b>ecofriendly</b></a> townhomes in Clarksburg, MD, via <a class="twitter-atreply pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/washingtonpost">@<b>washingtonpost</b></a> <a href="https://wapo.st/2yNZmkw">https://wapo.st/2yNZmkw&nbsp;</a></p> These tips can help you keep your cash flow healthy during the pandemic. https://bit.ly/2zltROU  https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1260208108581896192 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:5215491a-b108-784e-ab82-b2c708f066c9 Tue, 12 May 2020 14:00:01 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">These tips can help you keep your cash flow healthy during the pandemic. <a href="https://bit.ly/2zltROU">https://bit.ly/2zltROU&nbsp;</a></p> In our next Roofing It Right episode, Wally shows us how to use a robot welder for commercial TPO roofing jobs, including the power requirements and adjusting the temperature, pressure and machine speed. Watch the full video: https://bit.ly/3dvdduZ pic.t https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1259875925363167232 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:72297bb9-853d-78a1-0312-4e5721104195 Mon, 11 May 2020 16:00:02 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">In our next Roofing It Right episode, Wally shows us how to use a robot welder for commercial TPO roofing jobs, including the power requirements and adjusting the temperature, pressure and machine speed. Watch the full video: <a href="https://bit.ly/3dvdduZ">https://bit.ly/3dvdduZ&nbsp;</a> <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/jaAQL79IaB">pic.twitter.com/jaAQL79IaB</a></a></p> <img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EXv6edcXYAMLl-a.jpg" width="250" /> In our #GAFHometown in NJ, @MorrisHabitat4 has persevered during this crisis, creating places for deserving families to call home and protect what matters most with a new GAF roof. #CommunityMatters #WeProtectWhatMattersMostpic.twitter.com/ARwR2UpFxQ https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1259136189619200001 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:2da77ece-b110-c0e9-7660-76279b7a8a11 Sat, 09 May 2020 15:00:35 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">In our <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/GAFHometown?src=hash">#<b>GAFHometown</b></a> in NJ, <a class="twitter-atreply pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/MorrisHabitat4">@<b>MorrisHabitat4</b></a> has persevered during this crisis, creating places for deserving families to call home and protect what matters most with a new GAF roof. <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/CommunityMatters?src=hash">#<b>CommunityMatters</b></a> <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/WeProtectWhatMattersMost?src=hash">#<b>WeProtectWhatMattersMost</b></a> <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/ARwR2UpFxQ">pic.twitter.com/ARwR2UpFxQ</a></a></p> Tips for Managing Cash Flow During the Pandemic https://blog.gaf.com/tips-for-managing-cash-flow-during-the-pandemic/ GAF Blog urn:uuid:885e4269-7c91-2662-4d1a-b7bdf3a3df46 Fri, 08 May 2020 19:28:54 +0000 <p>Managing cash flow can be hard enough during normal business operations; managing it during a pandemic can bring extra challenges....</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/tips-for-managing-cash-flow-during-the-pandemic/">Tips for Managing Cash Flow During the Pandemic</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> <div class="pf-content"> <p>Managing cash flow can be hard enough during normal business operations; managing it during a pandemic can bring extra challenges. While roofing has been deemed an essential business in just about every state, that doesn&#8217;t necessarily mean that business will continue as usual.</p> <p>Fortunately, there are some tips that you can follow to help you stay on top of managing your cash flow.</p> <h3>Tips for Improving Your Cash Flow</h3> <p>Between savvy business practices, technological pivoting, and potential government aid programs, there are a number of ways you can keep your cash flow healthy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Here are some actions you can take to try to keep a little more cash coming into your business.</p> <h4>Try to Receive Payment Earlier</h4> <p>Consider offering an incentive to customers who are willing to pay quicker or pay more upfront. You can also help your cash flow and your customers during this time by offering special financing opportunities. For example, through GAF <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://payzerware.com/lp/smartmoney/" target="_blank">SmartMoney</a>, homeowners can access different financing options.</p> <p>Financing can be a win-win for both the contractor and the property owner because it allows the customer to pay in small, affordable installments, but the contractor can receive full payment from the financing company shortly after the job is done.</p> <h4>Categorize Your Payables</h4> <p>Ranking and categorizing payables is one of the first steps to take when managing cash flow. Roofing Technology Think Tank (RT3) board member Ken Kelly said in a <a href="https://rt3thinktank.com/webinar-recording-virtualizing-your-roofing-business-in-light-of-coronavirus/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">recent webinar</a> that his company, Kelly Roofing, uses three categories to prioritize payables. First is the must-pay category, which is for priority payables like payroll. The second category is for strategic partners, companies who are very important to their business and should be paid quickly whenever possible. Everyone else falls into the third group.</p> <p>Kelly Roofing prioritizes payment in that order. You may want to make as many of your payments on time as possible, but if cash flow is challenging, prioritizing in this way can help you stretch your budget a little further.</p> <h4>Renegotiate with Vendors</h4> <p>Now is a good time to reach out to your vendors and suppliers to try to renegotiate the terms for your payments. Many companies are offering assistance, and delaying payments or locking in better terms could be an option to help manage your cash flow. Keep in mind, though, that other companies may also be in similar circumstances.</p> <h4>Review Your Contracts</h4> <p><a href="https://trentcotney.com/the-key-contract-provisions-needed-to-combat-coronavirus/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Cotney Construction Law</a> suggests contractors review their contracts for terms, such as price acceleration and force majeure provisions, that may be helpful to your business during the pandemic. You can find some useful information on the company&#8217;s website but always speak with a legal professional for advice.</p> <h4>Contact Your Insurance Agent</h4> <p>Your insurance agent can tell you if your business operations coverage excludes pandemics. They can also work with you to navigate all of your coverage and help determine if you can make a claim under any of your policies.</p> <h3>Using Government Relief to Stabilize Cash Flow</h3> <p>While still in their early stages, the government has recently passed or bolstered legislation meant to ease the financial strain on small businesses during the pandemic. Here&#8217;s how you can take advantage of this aid.</p> <h4>Apply for Relief under The Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act</h4> <p>On March 27, 2020, the <a href="https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/748" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">CARES Act</a> was passed to help small businesses get economic relief during the pandemic. The National Roofing Contractor&#8217;s Association put together a helpful summary of the <a href="https://files.nrca.net/files/PDF/Resources/HR-748-CARES-Act-0420.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">provisions that are applicable to small businesses</a>.</p> <p>Under the CARES Act, businesses with fewer than 500 employees can apply for assistance from the <a target="_blank" href="https://www.sba.gov/funding-programs/loans/coronavirus-relief-options/paycheck-protection-program" rel="noreferrer noopener">Payroll Protection Program (PPP) </a>as long as they were operational as of February 15, 2020. The loan amount is determined by the company&#8217;s average monthly payroll and can be for as much as 250%, up to $100,000 per employee. The assistance can be used for expenses associated with payroll, rent, utilities, employee leave, insurance premiums, and more. When certain conditions are met, a portion of the loan will be forgiven by the Small Business Administration.</p> <h4>Look into Other Small Business Resources</h4> <p>The <a href="https://www.sba.gov/page/coronavirus-covid-19-small-business-guidance-loan-resources" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Small Business Administration</a> provides comprehensive guidance on resources available to business owners during this unprecedented time. Contractors should check frequently for updates. The NRCA is also hosting <a href="https://forms.nrca.net/Form/Launch/8d91ec2e-d477-48a4-ac14-4b4b86eb7a7e" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Telephone Town Hall meetings</a> where you can ask specific questions about how COVID-19 is impacting the roofing industry.</p> <p>Managing cash flow might be difficult in the months ahead, but a combination of some practical money-saving steps and government relief could help you get through this difficult time.</p> <h6><em>The information contained in this article was authored by a third party and is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute financial, accounting, tax or legal advice. GAF does not guarantee the accuracy, reliability, and completeness of the information. In no event shall GAF be held responsible or liable for errors or omissions in the content or for the results, damages or losses caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the content.</em></h6> </div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/tips-for-managing-cash-flow-during-the-pandemic/">Tips for Managing Cash Flow During the Pandemic</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> Find out why it pays to offer roof financing to homeowners right now: https://bit.ly/3b5ivf3  https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1258818951573909504 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:e8082fce-78de-cbbc-d739-0c01895e3be3 Fri, 08 May 2020 18:00:00 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Find out why it pays to offer roof financing to homeowners right now: <a href="https://bit.ly/3b5ivf3">https://bit.ly/3b5ivf3&nbsp;</a></p> Listen as Benjamin Fisher, CEO of The Big Fish Contracting Company, discusses the ways his business has adapted to service their customers during the pandemic.pic.twitter.com/SYPf7blSvR https://twitter.com/gafroofing/status/1258396203273854977 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:a4d85db5-05e5-50a6-9fe6-6a8e8faf9661 Thu, 07 May 2020 14:00:09 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Listen as Benjamin Fisher, CEO of The Big Fish Contracting Company, discusses the ways his business has adapted to service their customers during the pandemic. <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/SYPf7blSvR">pic.twitter.com/SYPf7blSvR</a></a></p> Today is #NationalNursesDay & we would like to say a special #ThankYouNurses for your bravery, dedication & hard work in supporting our communities. Follow this link to nominate a Health Care Hero for a Free Roof from us & @gafroofing. https://bit.ly/3e https://twitter.com/AmosExteriors/status/1258091250395287552 Twitter Search / gafroofing urn:uuid:23201d9e-02e5-852d-73fa-2d5823727444 Wed, 06 May 2020 17:48:22 +0000 <p class="TweetTextSize TweetTextSize--normal js-tweet-text tweet-text" lang="en">Today is <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NationalNursesDay?src=hash">#<b>NationalNursesDay</b></a> &amp; we would like to say a special <a class="twitter-hashtag pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/ThankYouNurses?src=hash">#<b>ThankYouNurses</b></a> for your bravery, dedication &amp; hard work in supporting our communities. Follow this link to nominate a Health Care Hero for a Free Roof from us &amp; <a class="twitter-atreply pretty-link js-nav" dir="ltr" href="https://twitter.com/gafroofing">@<b>gafroofing</b></a>. <a href="https://bit.ly/3eQr3cA">https://bit.ly/3eQr3cA&nbsp;</a> <a class="twitter-timeline-link u-hidden" dir="ltr" href="https://pic.twitter.com/6LM7S0z13J">pic.twitter.com/6LM7S0z13J</a></a></p> <img src="https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EXWjK82UEAIymjO.jpg" width="250" /> Designing for Moisture Durability & Energy Efficiency https://blog.gaf.com/designing-for-moisture-durability-energy-efficiency/ GAF Blog urn:uuid:693efeff-0cf0-1053-fa10-fc0d6e0112bf Wed, 06 May 2020 17:29:02 +0000 <p>There can be a perception in the market that a “green building” is a better building, and that the risks...</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/designing-for-moisture-durability-energy-efficiency/">Designing for Moisture Durability &#038; Energy Efficiency</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p> <div class="pf-content"> <p>There can be a perception in the market that a “green building” is a better building, and that the risks associated with “building differently” are inherently covered by the green certifications driving the industry forward from a sustainability standpoint. Both better buildings and risk mitigation can be accomplished by green buildings, and this article will discuss some of the key principles to accomplish this for building enclosures and roof assemblies.&nbsp;</p> <p>Moisture durability of enclosure systems focuses on the interaction of the materials, assemblies, and their design configurations in the building. The goal of managing moisture durability is to establish performance expectations, allow enclosures to perform as intended, continue to perform through the project lifecycle, and be serviced or maintained in a way that minimizes risk of damage to the enclosure and performance of other critical building systems. This discussion is going to focus on the moisture durability aspects of buildings and how they relate to energy performance and lifecycle expectations. While other aspects of resilience are also important, these aspects target risks that are not necessarily related to climate change, but are related to the design of enclosure and roof assemblies directly. </p> <p><strong>Moisture Durability in Context</strong></p> <p>The American Institute of Architects defines <a href="https://aiau.aia.org/aia-resilience-and-adaptation-online-certificate-program" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">resilience</a> as “mitigating risk for hazards, shocks, and stresses and adapting to changing conditions”.  Resilience goes beyond the minimum code requirements to address issues that influence long-term performance (more here about <a href="http://blog.gaf.com/sustainable-and-resilience-are-they-related-the-same-or-opposites/">Sustainability and Resilience</a> ). The “hazards, shocks, and stressors” can come from external sources as well as from the design decisions of the built environment. Some are rare extreme events such as tornadoes and wildfires, and some are common and persistent adverse events, like moisture risks in the building enclosure.  This perspective of moisture durability as a risk fits within many existing terms and goals that stem from Sustainability, Resilience, Adaptability, and Mitigation initiatives; moisture durability fits within these goals and is not separate from them. </p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/PR-qP7mqxIM-dXqhgj3Gef9egddEwB7hHWH3P1oU9LdnAgL_8k4Xl8VrTZQr3WPQVRwUuM7_sB_dDRGbdDZ7SE_KCJqwozTpgvTnKguZBaujMzbyUNamHzjNpElordDTzNGYVMZM" alt=""/></figure> <p><em>Moisture durability and energy efficiency are part of resilient design</em></p> <p><strong>Energy Efficiency is a Moving Target</strong></p> <p>The minimum or baseline energy efficiency performance expectation has been improving over time. The cost-effective and validated energy saving of one of the underlying national energy standards has increased in each of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2016 (ASHRAE 90.1) 3-year publications. The ASHRAE 90.1 &#8211; 2019 version has also recently been published, and was validated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as an additional 5% of savings over the previous 2016 version.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Compounding the energy savings, green building rating systems generally require additional savings beyond the baseline and provide points for exceeding the baseline. In addition, the energy performance requirements within green certification systems are also improving. For example, the same energy savings that would have contributed 10 points to the LEED v3 rating system, is roughly equivalent to the starting energy savings required in LEED v4.1, which is currently in the pilot phase.&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img src="https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?fit=960%2C545&amp;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-6269" srcset="https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?w=4956&amp;ssl=1 4956w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?resize=300%2C170&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?resize=1024%2C581&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?resize=768%2C435&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?resize=1536%2C871&amp;ssl=1 1536w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?resize=2048%2C1161&amp;ssl=1 2048w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?resize=335%2C190&amp;ssl=1 335w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?resize=1050%2C595&amp;ssl=1 1050w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?w=1920&amp;ssl=1 1920w, https://i2.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/efficiency-requirements.png?w=2880&amp;ssl=1 2880w" sizes="(max-width: 960px) 100vw, 960px" /></figure> <p><em>Increasing efficiency requirements are compounded by green rating systems</em>. </p> <p>Not every local jurisdiction is adopting the same base codes and standards, which leads to additional confusion in the design and construction industry.</p> <p><strong>Interactive Complexity and Tight Coupling&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>The book <em><a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normal_Accidents" target="_blank">Normal Accidents</a></em> by Charles Perrow explains how significant technological advancement can lead to failures. Perrow describes two main components of “normal accidents.” The first component being “interactive complexity” as a function of the number and degree of system interrelationships; when this factor is high <em>surprises are expected</em>. The second component is “tight coupling,” the degree at which initial failures can concatenate rapidly to bring down other parts of the system; the more highly-linked <em>surprises are not easily isolated and resolved</em>. If a system has only one of the two components then it is still a risk, but is more easily managed. When “interactive complexity” and “tight coupling” are combined, accidents could be considered “normal” or expected according to Perrow. </p> <p>As more materials and additional requirements are added to enclosures, it is important to recognize when materials and assemblies need to change in order to achieve higher energy performance. In a broad sense, as energy efficiency is improved in building enclosures, moisture risks can increase from decreased heat flow across the assemblies. The changes in enclosures can manifest as generally lower exterior surface temperatures (during heating months) as the exterior is less dependent on the interior space conditioning. As we improve energy efficiency, we may also be increasing moisture risks in building enclosures. And the increased risk may be <em>more complex </em>than the historical designs and <em>more tightly coupled</em> to the building’s HVAC operations, structural elements, and occupant-use conditions.&nbsp;</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/2nyB18xfCYPXzXDQi6JC8LD9xVdOwgfxzQN6RZLwO5iSNda6aMztUpklBA5BJuuBE4X02vttVQRpbDF4vFpTE3WFABamwWDr3pnLoeTBIYI420rpCblV20kyzCS6njquIxEAG_pk" alt=""/></figure> <p><em>Energy efficiency improvements can lead to increased moisture risks in a building enclosure</em></p> <p><strong>Moisture Management in Green Building Rating Systems</strong></p> <p>It is tempting to assume that the building enclosure will work perfectly and water won’t get where it doesn’t belong. Such a belief can lead to a lack of risk mitigation from a very likely hazard (water) throughout the useful life of the building. A more realistic mindset is: <em>moisture intrusion cannot be completely avoided, it must be managed</em>. Enclosures should be designed to manage incidental water with minimal long-term impact. The key is for the enclosure design to have a greater capacity for drying than its risk of wetting. </p> <p>This moisture durability assessment looks at six primary categories for an enclosure. Roughly working across the project life-cycle, they are shown in the figure below:</p> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Rl_DnmDQ46lDndu0sJ5pErm-0sCS2ov-BfYDJwMMH1S6LthI4Orc6XB1s-xMpP2PgjvwqMzkB3rk09oZvkGcpo1fD2lr0JDBzzbvnDxNXkULaH1ezFRMq7ijzLO_a92oror6J1hm" alt=""/></figure> <p><em>Moisture durability elements and assessment project life-cycle details</em><em></em></p> <p>For the moisture durability assessment, the four most common green building rating systems available for new construction projects are compared against the six categories shown in the previous figure. The green building rating systems reviewed are:&nbsp;</p> <ul><li>Leadership in Energy &amp; Environmental Design (LEED<sup>®</sup>), version 4.1 </li><li>Green Globes<sup>®</sup>, version 2019 </li><li>Living Building Challenge (LBC<img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/72x72/2122.png" alt="™" class="wp-smiley" style="height: 1em; max-height: 1em;" />), version 4.0</li><li>2018 International Green Construction Code (IgCC<sup>®</sup>)</li></ul> <figure class="wp-block-image"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/s5G-FXpW-scFNep3q5frf4nHFxVeB-Kh6DXxkfC-2DWn2OZ9NGnWlLTJgNS70GSuUL1GCljkRFlkoAHyMx4hQmKYZDtzBYfIKHQGd2UAdaNI5FHGk1Bfr3pAHZRpe01xL6EYO-8G" alt=""/></figure> <p><em></em><em>Green building rating systems moisture durability summary&nbsp;</em></p> <p>This graphic summarizes each of the six individual detailed assessments reviewed across the project life-cycle phases. There is quite a range of results across the&nbsp; green building rating systems assessed.&nbsp;</p> <div class="wp-block-group"><div class="wp-block-group__inner-container"> <div class="wp-block-image"><figure class="alignright size-medium"><img src="https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/webinar-registerart.jpg?resize=300%2C188&#038;ssl=1" alt="" class="wp-image-5717" srcset="https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/webinar-registerart.jpg?resize=300%2C188&amp;ssl=1 300w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/webinar-registerart.jpg?resize=768%2C481&amp;ssl=1 768w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/webinar-registerart.jpg?resize=1024%2C641&amp;ssl=1 1024w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/webinar-registerart.jpg?resize=335%2C210&amp;ssl=1 335w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/webinar-registerart.jpg?resize=1050%2C657&amp;ssl=1 1050w, https://i0.wp.com/blog.gaf.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/webinar-registerart.jpg?w=1500&amp;ssl=1 1500w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" data-recalc-dims="1" /></figure></div> <p><em>For more information on designing for moisture durability considerations with green building certifications and individual credit assessments, register for the Continuing Education Center webinar, </em><a href="https://continuingeducation.bnpmedia.com/courses/gaf/addressing-moisture-durability-and-energy-performance-in-roof-assemblies-web-live/"><em>Addressing Moisture Durability and Energy Performance in Roof Assemblies: A Critical Review of Multiple Voluntary Green Building Certifications</em></a><em>, sponsored by GAF and presented by Benjamin Meyer, AIA, LEED AP and James R. Kirby, AIA.</em> </p> <p></p> </div></div> <p><strong>Key Takeaways</strong></p> <p>When designing for moisture durability and energy efficiency in enclosures and roof systems, consider all project phases. This includes utilizing the building enclosure commissioning process to more formally ensure the relevant moisture durability risks are being assessed by an enclosure professional. It is important to recognize that overlooking one of the project phases may result in unmanaged risk for the long term building performance. Some of the systems have direct coverage of individual elements of moisture risk mitigation, but the certification frameworks may not be sufficient to rely on to provide comprehensive moisture durability mitigation. This is especially important knowing all four rating systems have mandatory energy efficiency improvements beyond code-minimum requirements, but none of the four have a complete set of mandatory credits to accommodate the increased moisture risk associated with the added enclosure complexity.</p> <p>Check back for follow-up articles on moisture durability, including notable highlights from the green building rating system detailed assessment and an example applying the elements of moisture durability to a roof system.&nbsp;</p> <p></p> </div><p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com/designing-for-moisture-durability-energy-efficiency/">Designing for Moisture Durability &#038; Energy Efficiency</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://blog.gaf.com">GAF Blog</a>.</p>