Tennessee State News http://feed.informer.com/digests/H6OLWOEQA3/feeder Tennessee State News Respective post owners and feed distributors Sat, 29 Aug 2020 14:32:04 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ Suspect charged in deadly shooting at Nashville motel https://www.newschannel5.com/news/suspect-charged-in-deadly-shooting-at-nashville-motel News urn:uuid:f14f26d8-8e2d-9b92-3a6b-c3c0a9f650b8 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 16:39:23 +0000 A suspect has been charged with criminal homicide and attempted criminal homicide in a shooting outside a Nashville motel. A suspect has been charged with criminal homicide and attempted criminal homicide in connection with a shooting outside a Nashville motel. Metro police say Micheal Brigman is accused of shooting and killing 26-year-old Amanda Baucum late Tuesday. The call came in around 11 p.m. at a Super 8 motel on Brick Church Pike, located not far from Trinity Lane.Police said the victim and her boyfriend were found shot just outside of room 219 on the back side of the motel. Both were taken to area hospitals, where Baucum, was pronounced deceased. They said the man was in stable condition.Investigators later released a surveillance photo and said Brigman was identified as the suspect. According to police, Brigman said the shooting stemmed from a dispute over money. Nashville Zoo's tiger exhibit honored for design; zoo gets top award for second year in a row https://www.newschannel5.com/news/nashville-zoos-tiger-exhibit-honored-for-design-zoo-gets-top-award-for-second-year-in-a-row News urn:uuid:2a366202-eec4-f37f-a6c5-50d5f2632172 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 15:59:59 +0000 This marks only the third time in Association of Zoos and Aquariums history that a zoo has won the award two years in a row. For the second year in a row, the Nashville Zoo has received top honors for the Exhibit Design Award. This marks only the third time in Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) history that a zoo has won the award two years in a row. The zoo said Friday that its Tiger Crossroads exhibit received AZA's Exhibit Design Award. This award was also given to the zoo in 2019 for their Expedition Peru: Trek of the Andean Bear exhibit.The award was presented during the virtual AZA Annual Conference on Sept. 14-18. According to a release, the AZA Honors and Awards Committee was unanimous in their decision based on the “overall aesthetics and authenticity of the exhibit, the improvements to the original space both for the animals and guests, the extraordinary level of exhibit detail, the high level of educational content, and Nashville Zoo’s long term commitment to tiger conservation.”“This is, quite honestly, the highlight of my 30 plus years here at the Zoo,” said Nashville Zoo President and CEO Rick Schwartz. “For our Zoo to stand alongside two of the most respected and well-known zoos in the country is a huge accomplishment. Our staff, board, Zoo members, and donors should all be very proud of what their support has been able to achieve.”The news release says only two other zoos have won top honors in exhibit design for two years in a row. The first was in 1976 and 1977 at the Saint Louis Zoo. The Bronx Zoo became the second when it won tops honors in 1986 and 1987. Rutherford County Sheriff’s Office 1 of 5 across U.S. to receive new crime-fighting tool https://www.wkrn.com/news/rutherford-county-sheriffs-office-1-of-5-across-u-s-to-receive-new-crime-fighting-tool/ Tennessee News | WKRN News 2 urn:uuid:bf205d75-c5e3-6b13-ea8f-45ad399b07be Fri, 18 Sep 2020 15:43:33 +0000 RUTHERFORD COUNTY, Tenn. (WKRN) — The Rutherford County Sheriff&#8217;s Office reported at least 15 fatal drug overdoses this year. Now the department is one of five across the country with new crime fighting technology geared towards battling the opioid epidemic. It&#8217;s a device from Viken Detection, a Massachusetts based company. Jim Ryan is the CEO [&#8230;] <p>RUTHERFORD COUNTY, Tenn. (WKRN) — The Rutherford County Sheriff&#8217;s Office reported at least 15 fatal drug overdoses this year. Now the department is one of five across the country with new crime fighting technology geared towards battling the opioid epidemic. </p> <p>It&#8217;s a device from Viken Detection, a Massachusetts based company. Jim Ryan is the CEO and said they noticed how challenging it can be for law enforcement to safely search a vehicle for drugs or contraband. He told News 2 this device will make it easier. </p> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img loading="lazy" src="https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI.jpg?w=900" alt="" class="wp-image-391451" srcset="https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI.jpg 4712w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI.jpg?resize=300,200 300w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI.jpg?resize=768,512 768w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI.jpg?resize=1080,720 1080w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI.jpg?resize=1536,1024 1536w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI.jpg?resize=2048,1365 2048w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI.jpg?resize=876,492 876w" sizes="(max-width: 899px) 100vw, 876px" /><figcaption>Rutherford County Sheriff&#8217;s Office receives new tech for opioid crisis, Courtesy: Viken Detection</figcaption></figure> <p>&#8220;It&#8217;s a simple point and shoot device that I have in my hand here. It&#8217;s an eight pound instrument an officer can run along any part of the vehicle, press the button and an image appears on the screen to show what&#8217;s behind it. So typically, if there&#8217;s nothing in there, you&#8217;ll see a black screen. But when there are organics there&#8211; drugs, cash, explosives, this machine will pick up that anomaly in the vehicle. It will alert the officer there is something there that shouldn&#8217;t be there.&#8221;</p> <p>Ryan said the company started a Valor program to assist law enforcement fight the opioid crisis.</p> <p>&#8220;We got a lot of applications. We started out with five law enforcement departments. We went through a process with a third party to go through applications. We picked our first five and as it goes, we will now continue to do it and try to help with this epidemic across the country.&#8221; </p> <p>Rutherford County Deputy Evan Sharp said his department applied and received the device in July. </p> <p>&#8220;It&#8217;s a handheld X-ray device. It shoots up to three times the thickness of a car door. So, there&#8217;s nowhere inside the vehicle that you could put stuff that you won&#8217;t be able to see.&#8221; </p> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img loading="lazy" src="https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI-120.jpg?w=900" alt="" class="wp-image-391939" srcset="https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI-120.jpg 5616w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI-120.jpg?resize=300,200 300w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI-120.jpg?resize=768,512 768w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI-120.jpg?resize=1080,720 1080w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI-120.jpg?resize=1536,1024 1536w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI-120.jpg?resize=2048,1365 2048w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/HBI-120.jpg?resize=876,492 876w" sizes="(max-width: 899px) 100vw, 876px" /><figcaption>Rutherford County Sheriff&#8217;s Office receives new tech for opioid crisis, Courtesy: Viken Detection</figcaption></figure> <p>Sharp said having this device allows deputies to do a more thorough search on scene and detect contraband quicker. He said they&#8217;ve found drugs or contraband in areas of a vehicle such as car batteries, tires, door panels and any other hiding spot you can think of. Sharp said this technology will also create a safer environment for them. </p> <p>&#8220;It gives our deputies a better opportunity and prevents them from possibly being exposed to chemicals such as fentanyl and possibly be injured.&#8221; </p> <p>So far this year, there have been 75 overdoses across Rutherford County. Narcan has been used in 50 of those instances. Public Information Officer Lisa Marchesoni said Emergency Medical Services responded to 1,298 overdoses there in the last two years. </p> <p>Deputy Sharp hopes this new technology will help lower that number. </p> <p>&#8220;What we are looking to do is find the individuals that are supplying the narcotics into the county and local areas. If we can go out and use this device and get contraband, if that&#8217;s able to limit that number just by one&#8211; that&#8217;s a success for us.&#8221; </p> <p>Ryan said he&#8217;s happy to be a part of the fight against an crisis that impacts so many. </p> <p>&#8220;I think its hard to be in the U.S. and not be personally touched somehow with this crisis. When we thought about this idea, we are a small company, but we wanted to make a greater impact. We are under fifty people up here in Boston, but we are incredibly passionate about what we do and why we do it. Any way we can help take drugs off the streets, if that just saves one life every time we do that, or saves a family from incredibly grief, we are happy to be a part of that.&#8221; </p> <p>Sharp plans to teach several other deputies at RCSO how to use the device, and has a special warning for anyone thinking of bringing drugs into the area. </p> <p>&#8220;We have a lot of deputies who have very good training and they know what they&#8217;re doing. We just have to get it right once, so if they&#8217;re coming through Rutherford County, they need to be weary.&#8221; </p> <p><strong><a href="https://www.wkrn.com/special-reports/tennessees-opioid-crisis/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener" aria-label="Click here for complete coverage of Tennessee's Opioid Crisis. (opens in a new tab)">Click here for complete coverage of Tennessee&#8217;s Opioid Crisis. </a></strong></p> <aside class="promo-link"> <a href="https://www.wkrn.com/crime-tracker/" class="promo-link__link" > <img loading="lazy" class="wp-image-361238" style="width: 100px" src="https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/07/crimetracker-logo-sm.jpg" alt="News 2 CrimeTracker"> <span class="has-inline-color has-very-dark-gray-color">is </span><span class="has-inline-color has-luminous-vivid-amber-color">tracking crime</span><span class="has-inline-color has-very-dark-gray-color"> where you live.</span> CLICK HERE for more coverage </a> </aside> September 18 COVID-19 update: Metro reports 68 new cases in past 24 hours https://www.newschannel5.com/news/september-18-covid-19-update-metro-reports-68-new-cases-in-past-24-hours News urn:uuid:8794dc25-aca0-c597-7718-4e1cdbdb54c7 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 14:36:33 +0000 Right now, there are 1,046 active cases and 26,458 people have recovered. Metro reported 68 new cases of COVID-19 on Friday. No additional deaths were reported. Metro Public Health officials said today's update brings Davidson County's total number of cases to 27,761. Right now, there are 1,046 active cases and 26,458 people have recovered. There have been seven new probable cases in the past 24 hours.As of Friday, 246 people in Davidson County have died after a confirmed case of COVID-19. Including both confirmed and probable cases, 257 deaths have been attributed to the virus. New cases per 100,000 people: 11.62Seven-day percent positive of COVID-19 tests: 5.1Available Middle Tennessee hospital beds: 16 percentAvailable Middle Tennessee ICU beds: 19 percentThe MPHD COVID-19 Hotline received 34 calls on Thursday, September 17, 2020.Total number of cases: 27,761Cases reported in the past 24 hours: 68Cases by sexMale: 13,687Female: 13,783Unknown: 291Cases by ageUnknown570-101,35811-202,90421-308,16331-405,61541-503,87151-602,78061-701,72471-8079381+496Total27,761Inactive/Recovered26,458Deaths257Total active cases1,046On Thursday, Mayor John Cooper announced the city would enter Phase Three of it's reopening on Oct. 1. However, bars and limited service restaurants can increase their capacity starting today. Today is the deadline to submit MNPS family decision survey to decide virtual, in-person learning https://www.newschannel5.com/rebound/safely-back-to-school/today-is-the-deadline-to-submit-mnps-family-decision-survey-to-decide-virtual-in-person-learning News urn:uuid:44d90068-53c6-221b-3b9d-3fe39e1adfb8 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 13:26:48 +0000 Metro Nashville Public Schools parents have until the end of the day to decide on how their child will continue learning this year. Metro Nashville Public Schools parents have until the end of the day to decide on how their child will continue learning this year.MNPS Director Dr. Adrienne Battle extended the deadline for the district’s family decision survey until Friday. More information on that survey is available here.The survey asks families to make a decision on whether or not their child will be returning to in-person learning once the district decides to reopen classrooms. The decision will be made for the remainder of the year, with an option to update that decision prior to the start of the second semester in January.Earlier this week, MNPS officials announced they’re proposing a phased approach to returning students to the classroom, beginning in October for younger students and extending into 2021 for high school students.Read more: MNPS asks parents, students to choose between virtual or in-person learning NCAA approves Cade Mays’ waiver appeal for Tennessee https://www.wkrn.com/sports/ncaa-approves-cade-mays-waiver-appeal-for-tennessee/ Tennessee News | WKRN News 2 urn:uuid:30555812-40a8-882e-1a96-1dc3e0b8103f Fri, 18 Sep 2020 10:11:29 +0000 The NCAA notified No. 15 Tennessee on Thursday that offensive lineman Cade Mays’ appeal for a waiver to play immediately has been approved. <p>KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The NCAA notified No. 15 Tennessee on Thursday that offensive lineman Cade Mays’ appeal for a waiver to play immediately has been approved.</p> <p>Now it’s up to the Southeastern Conference and Commissioner Greg Sankey to allow Mays to transfer inside the league after the lineman started his career at Georgia.</p> <p>Tennessee coach Jeremy Pruitt said he hadn’t really had a chance to talk to Sankey much about this situation. But he said the commissioner has done a great job protecting players and putting athletes first.</p> <div class='s2nFriendlyFrame k k-xwOVWL72' data-type='float'></div><script type='text/javascript' src='https://embed.sendtonews.com/player4/embedcode.js?fk=xwOVWL72&#038;cid=9374&#038;offsety=140&#038;floatwidth=400&#038;floatposition=top-right' data-type='s2nScript'></script> <p>“I have a lot of confidence in the outcome,” Pruitt said.</p> <p>Mays is a native of Knoxville whose father, Kevin, was a team captain at Tennessee and an All-Southeastern Conference guard in 1994. Mays announced his decision to transfer in January, and the attorney for Mays’ parents accused Georgia of leaking news that the lineman’s parents had sued the university in December.</p> <p>The lawsuit filed in Georgia came about two years after Kevin Mays lost part of his little finger when it was caught in a folding chair at a dinner for recruits at Sanford Stadium.</p> <p>Pruitt said Tennessee always has known that SEC approval would be needed as well for Mays to play this season. The Vols open the season Sept. 26 at South Carolina, so a quick decision is needed for the lineman to be available.</p> <p>The Tennessee coach said he’s been on the other end of this situation and remembers when nobody was allowed to transfer within the SEC. He mentioned defensive back Maurice Smith, who left Alabama for Georgia in 2016 and was granted a waiver as a graduate transfer.</p> <p>So did current Tennessee center Brandon Kennedy, who left Alabama to join the Vols in 2018.</p> <p>“I think this would be a first,” Pruitt said.</p> UT-Knoxville pushes back start of spring semester, announces cancellation of spring break https://www.wkrn.com/news/tennessee-news/ut-knoxville-pushes-back-start-of-spring-semester-announces-cancellation-of-spring-break/ Tennessee News | WKRN News 2 urn:uuid:67484c62-3838-996a-8fb6-f2701b53fef4 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 09:02:47 +0000 The revised spring schedule does not include a spring break, which was originally scheduled to take place from March 15-19. Classes will be scheduled on those days. <p>KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (WATE) &#8211; The University of Tennessee-Knoxville announced changes to its spring semester schedule on Thursday.</p> <p>Spring 2021 classes will now begin Jan. 20, one week later than originally planned. </p> <p>The revised spring schedule does not include a spring break, which was originally scheduled to take place from March 15-19. Classes will be scheduled on those days. </p> <p>Spring recess will be Friday, April 2, and is a holiday with no classes scheduled.</p> <p>The semester dates are:</p> <ul><li>Jan. 20-April 20: Classes in session</li><li>April 2: Spring recess, no classes in session</li><li>April 21: Study day</li><li>April 22–23, 26–29: Finals</li></ul> <p>Plans are in development to celebrate spring 2020, summer 2020, fall 2020, and spring 2021 graduates. Event dates have not been set. </p> <p><a href="https://www.wate.com/news/top-stories/university-of-tennessee-announces-changes-to-the-fall-academic-calendar/">Ahead of the fall 2020 semester, university officials announced classes will be held on Labor Day and fall break</a> to allow students to leave campus for the semester after classes end on Tuesday, Nov. 24. Final exams will be held online after the Thanksgiving break.</p> <div class="wp-block-columns"> <div class="wp-block-column"> <figure class="wp-block-image size-large"><img loading="lazy" src="https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/05/SCHOOLS_MOVING_FORWARD_640x360.png?w=640" alt="" class="wp-image-320980" srcset="https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/05/SCHOOLS_MOVING_FORWARD_640x360.png?resize=640,360 640w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/05/SCHOOLS_MOVING_FORWARD_640x360.png?resize=160,90 160w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/05/SCHOOLS_MOVING_FORWARD_640x360.png?resize=300,169 300w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/05/SCHOOLS_MOVING_FORWARD_640x360.png?resize=320,180 320w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/05/SCHOOLS_MOVING_FORWARD_640x360.png?resize=256,144 256w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/05/SCHOOLS_MOVING_FORWARD_640x360.png?resize=512,288 512w" sizes="(max-width: 899px) 100vw, 640px" /></figure> </div> <div class="wp-block-column"> <p>News 2 digs deeper into how schools are planning to move forward safely for the new academic year. See how other districts around Middle Tennessee are handling everything from classroom concerns to the future of sports in our special series. <strong><a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://www.wkrn.com/tag/schools-moving-forward/" target="_blank">Click here to see more.</a></strong></p> </div> </div> MTSU prepares to welcome football fans to Floyd Stadium https://www.newschannel5.com/rebound/safely-back-to-school/mtsu-prepares-to-welcome-football-fans-to-floyd-stadium News urn:uuid:3d109636-48ec-ebed-6937-45599fcc2a46 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 06:08:21 +0000 Middle Tennessee State University will welcome football fans to Floyd Stadium for the team's home opener against Troy University. Middle Tennessee State University is welcoming True Blue fans back to Floyd stadium for the football team's first home game of the fall season Saturday. But, as with most things right now, the experience will be a lot different.According to the university, stadium capacity is being limited to 20-percent, or about 7,000 fans in the stands. No tailgating will be allowed outside the stadium on game day. Fans will need to practice social distancing and wear face masks, as well.Even the entertainment will be different, with the Band of Blue staying in the upper deck during the game, and even for their half-time performance. "So you get a sliver of what the college atmosphere is like, but it'll still be an empty field at halftime," said MTSU Director of Athletics, Chris Massaro.Massaro praised his staff, saying they've thought about everything down to the referees' whistles. "They're using electronic whistles instead of the mouth whistles," said Massaro.While a lot of work has gone into making sure fans feel safe in the stands amid the pandemic, Massaro said the focus really is on the student athletes. They are being tested three times a week to ensure that no one has COVID-19 and passes it along to other members of their team and the athletic staff."They can't be a normal college student," Massaro said. "We've tried to really cut down their socialization and they've done a good job of it thus far. It's a big sacrifice, but our student athletes have made it because bottom line is, they want to play their respective sports."MTSU will be watching local coronavirus infection rates to determine whether it's safe to keep hosting games.When MTSU's football team takes the field against Troy University on Saturday, Massaro hopes that fans will respect the rules and guidelines so these games can continue."We need everybody's cooperation for it to be successful," said Massaro. "I'm excited about it. I know our fan base is excited. To actually go and sit in Floyd stadium and watch a football game is a real treat."The Blue Raiders take on Troy University on Saturday at 3 p.m. Rutherford Co. aims to settle Candy Crush lawsuit https://www.newschannel5.com/news/rutherford-co-aims-to-settle-candy-crush-lawsuit News urn:uuid:20098015-6e36-5d90-6f87-c9c8f3903d06 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 04:12:04 +0000 A joint motion has been filed in an Operation Candy Crush lawsuit to extend a stay of discovery in hopes of coming to a settlement. A joint motion has been filed in an Operation Candy Crush lawsuit to extend a stay of discovery in hopes of coming to a settlement.Back in 2018, Rutherford County authorities busted several stores for allegedly selling illegal marijuana products.Turns out, the products being sold were legal. And according to court records, law enforcement officials ignored warnings from deputies that the products in question were legal.Even though the charges were dropped, the businesses struggled to survive and they sued the county. On Sept. 4, a judge agreed to extend a deadline at the request of lawyers representing both sides of the lawsuit to negotiate a settlement with 17 store owners by Nov. 9.Attorneys argued in the court filing that it would be more efficient and less costly to resolve the case through mediation.Read More:23 Rutherford Co. Stores Padlocked For Allegedly Selling Candy With CBDJudge Allows Businesses To Reopen After 'Operation Candy Crush'Charges Could Be Dropped In 'Operation Candy Crush'What's Legal And Illegal About CBD Oil In TennesseeCharges Dropped Against Stores Raided In 'Operation Candy Crush'Plea deal in ‘Operation Candy Crush’ could cost Rutherford County taxpayers Nolensville Fire Department fundraising for swift water rescue team after weekend flooding https://www.newschannel5.com/news/nolensville-fire-department-fundraising-for-swift-water-rescue-team-after-weekend-flooding News urn:uuid:aefbf883-c173-2707-b617-6afbab757be7 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 03:51:53 +0000 After recent storms caused flash flooding throughout Nolensville, fire crews say they need their own swift water rescue squads. The Nolensville Volunteer Fire Department is raising money to create a swift water rescue team just days after strong storms and flash flooding left parts of the area underwater. On Sunday, strong storms dumped inches of rain on Nolensville, creating areas of heavy flash flooding. "The historic school, the rec center was underwater, it was over all the roadways,' Nolensville Volunteer Fire Chief Adam Spencer said. "We had multiple water rescues going on at one time."But most of those rescues, as well as water rescues that happened during another flash flooding event two weeks ago, were actually performed by nearby agencies in places like Brentwood, Williamson County or Rutherford County. Spencer said that's because the Nolensville department doesn't have a swift water rescue team of their own. He said recent rounds of flooding have shown that Nolensville needs a team of its own. "The decision has been made that we need to start and form our own swift water rescue team," Spencer said. "With the rapid growth we're experiencing, and with there being nowhere for the stormwater to go, I see it happening again, and again, and again in the future, so this is something, it is absolutely a need."But the need comes with a cost, and the department is looking to raise something between $20 thousand to $25 thousand to pay for the team. The money would go toward gear, rafts, trailers and extensive training for crew members. The department is now asking for donations from the community to help pay for the costs of creating swift water rescue teams. "Every little bit helps, every single penny donated right now goes to this effort," Spencer said. You can donate at the Nolensville Volunteer Fire Department website. Protesters call for termination of the Millersville Police Chief and Assistant Chief https://www.newschannel5.com/news/protesters-call-for-termination-of-the-millersville-police-chief-and-assistant-chief News urn:uuid:ae501999-7000-cc1e-1806-5e130c97a923 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 03:34:52 +0000 A protest was held in Millersville, calling for the termination of the Millersville Police Chief and Assistant Chief after officers say they're being retaliated against. A protest was held in Millersville, calling for the termination of the Millersville Police Chief and Assistant Chief after officers say they're being retaliated against. The protesters gathered at the Millersville City Hall Thursday night. The group was made up of community members and "People's Plaza" protest members.A counter-protest formed across the street, creating some tense moments between the activists. But things calmed down as the night progressed and protesters on opposite sides of the issues began to have what seemed to be peaceful conversations.Assistant Chief Dustin Carr is currently being investigated by the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation for domestic assault. Officers say they're concerned that he's continued to work amid the investigation.The officers say they've been told to share with their superiors about what they told the TBI or risk being fired. One officer has already been let go, and two others think it'll happen soon for them. Memphis-area landlords sue Trump administration over eviction ban https://www.wkrn.com/news/tennessee-news/memphis-area-landlords-sue-trump-administration-over-eviction-ban/ Tennessee News | WKRN News 2 urn:uuid:7af791ab-9f3c-bea2-5b84-655cbeccd5d3 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 03:11:54 +0000 A group of West Tennessee landlords is suing the Trump administration over its order protecting tenants from eviction. <p>MEMPHIS, Tenn. (WREG) — A group of West Tennessee landlords is suing the Trump administration over its order protecting tenants from eviction.</p> <p>The landlords own more than 5,000 rental units in the Memphis area, and they say the <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://wreg.com/news/washington-dc-bureau/white-house-orders-evictions-halted-through-december/" target="_blank">government&#8217;s eviction ban</a> violates the Constitution.</p> <p>Washington has been protecting families from eviction since March and a new order from the CDC has evictions on hold until the end of the year.</p> <p>The landlords say they&#8217;ve had to bear the financial burden of those decisions, and they&#8217;re urging a judge to overturn the ban.</p> <p>The case names Attorney General William Barr, HUD Secretary Ben Carson and other members of the Trump team as defendants.</p> <div class="wp-block-file"><a href="https://wreg.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/09/TIGER-LILY-VS-HUD.pdf"><strong>Read the lawsuit: TIGER-LILY-VS-HUD</strong></a><a href="https://wreg.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/18/2020/09/TIGER-LILY-VS-HUD.pdf" class="wp-block-file__button" download>Download</a></div> <p>Locally, some tenants are saying times are really hard now. Ambria Ray lives at Hunter Oak Apartments in Whitehaven, and she is facing eviction due to be laid off from her job due to COVID-19.</p> <p>&#8220;A lot of people lost their jobs,&#8221; Ray said. &#8220;What are we supposed to do? We&#8217;re depending on unemployment and that can&#8217;t pay $550.&#8221;</p> <p>In order to prevent homelessness and stop the spread of COVID-19, the CDC has stepped in to stop evictions till the end of the year. While that may come as good news to tenants, some landlords in the Memphis area say it is unconstitutional.</p> <p>Joshua Kahane with Glankler Brown Attorneys is representing eight agencies and landlords who collectively own more than 5,000 units in Memphis, including Hunter Oak Apartments.</p> <p>The lawsuit reads the eviction ban violates their 5th Amendment right which states “no person shall…be deprived of life, liberty, or property without due process of law.”</p> <p>The landlords go on to say the CDC, the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the United States Department of Health and Human Services had &#8220;no authority to issue an eviction-moratorium for owners and managers in the western district of Tennessee.&#8221;</p> <p>As a result, they say the economic loss and damage they&#8217;ve received is &#8220;irreparable,&#8221; and they say they have a right to claim their units.</p> <p>Kahane said the following in a statement:</p> <p>&#8220;The CDC&#8217;s well-intended eviction moratorium appears to be a serious and unlawful infringement on the constitutionally protected rights of property owners, both large and small.&#8221;</p> <p>The lawsuits also states there is no evidence to support the claims evictions will result in homelessness or increase the spread of COVID-19.</p> Tennessee taxpayers to help pay for NASCAR's COVID-19 gamble at Bristol https://www.newschannel5.com/news/newschannel-5-investigates/tennessee-taxpayers-to-help-pay-for-nascars-covid-19-gamble-at-bristol News urn:uuid:3516c465-2c75-e581-79d2-a5b4e010b45e Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:11:02 +0000 Some 30,000 NASCAR fans were invited to Tennessee in the middle of a pandemic. Now a NewsChannel 5 investigation has discovered: it's a gamble that you paid for! Some 30,000 NASCAR fans were invited to Tennessee in the middle of a pandemic.Now a NewsChannel 5 investigation, conducted with our partners at the Newsy network, has discovered: it's a gamble that you paid for!That race, back in July, came as COVID-19 cases were continuing to spike here in the Volunteer State - and North Carolina officials had decided it wasn't safe to hold the race there.The post on Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee's Instagram celebrated "the future of safe, live sporting events." thanking NASCAR for choosing Tennessee.For Lee, it was a moment of accomplishment.A legendary NASCAR event, the All-Star Race, landed at Bristol Motor Speedway after North Carolina officials balked at allowing spectators out of fear it could become a super-spreader event for COVID-19.Bristol opened its gates for up to 30,000 fans -- about a fifth its normal capacity."NASCAR has been a great partner to us in that they've worked with us to develop what we believe will be a safe opportunity that can be a model for the country to watch," Lee said right before the race.But NewsChannel 5 Investigates discovered the Speedway wanted more than just spectators.The company also filed an application to use Tennessee tax dollars, under a 2018 law called the Event Tourism Act, to help with estimated costs of more than $2.3 million.Half of the state taxes collected from the race could go to help with those costs."It was one of those very unusual circumstances where the race was going to move from Charlotte," said Sen. Jon Lundberg, R-Bristol."Frankly, Bristol was in one of the top three or four places, but it was going to go somewhere else. And I think it literally gave us the ability to bring it here."Lundberg sponsored the legislation that sailed through the Tennessee General Assembly with no debate.NewsChannel 5 Investigates noted, "There was conversation about it would be for a Super Bowl type magnitude.""Yeah," Lundberg agreed. "The expectation was it was going to be a big, major event."There was also the expectation that the incentive would require an exhaustive process to review the potential economic impact of the event."These are not fly-by-night, these are not something you could put together in a few weeks," Lundberg told senators as the bill was presented."It would take a great deal of study and input and several months."But the Bristol Speedway application admitted that was not possible in this case.“Since this event is being held during challenging economic and health circumstances, there is no survey data that would provide a meaningful analysis," it noted.Lundberg argues the All-Star Race is still within the bounds of the law."Suddenly you have an opportunity to bring 25,000 people in a very short period of time, but those people are still going to hotels, eating in restaurants, filling up their cars with gas," he insisted."So the economic impact is real."But when someone at the state apparently balked, Speedway management threatened to take the race elsewhere, warning of that prospect in an email to the state finance commissioner.“Please let us know as soon as possible, so that we can begin the process of determining what incentives and opportunities might be offered by Texas or Georgia," wrote Jerry Caldwell, the Speedway's executive vice president and general manager.“I suspect both of these states would be delighted to land an event of this stature and be the first event in the country to welcome spectators back in large numbers.”Lee's team gave the deal final approval within days."If Texas or Atlanta had the same legislation in effect, I can’t tell you that we would have had that race," Lundberg said.NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked, "Is this corporate welfare?""No, no," the state senator answered. "I think it’s incentivizing."Since then, the governor has declared the event an unqualified success."I was in Bristol a few weeks ago for the NASCAR race where some 25,000 fans attended and saw that race -- and health officials reported weeks later that there were no cases associated with that," Lee told reporters in August.He even suggested it could be a model for University of Tennessee football.But the medical director for the health department in the area around Bristol says there’s just no way to know."We did not necessarily detect a large spike in cases," said Dr. David Kirschke, medical director for the Northeast Tennessee Regional Health Department."It's kind of buried in the whole increase of cases that we had going on at that time."Our team also talked to experts who say the protocols put in place by NASCAR may have missed warning signs about people who could have been ill. Tennessee taxpayers to help pay for NASCAR's COVID-19 gamble https://www.newschannel5.com/news/newschannel-5-investigates/tennessee-taxpayers-to-help-pay-for-nascars-covid-19-gamble-at-bristol News urn:uuid:013c3285-57ba-2f7c-933d-9b0e2a43cbdd Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:11:02 +0000 Some 30,000 NASCAR fans were invited to Tennessee in the middle of a pandemic. Now a NewsChannel 5 investigation has discovered: it's a gamble that you paid for! Some 30,000 NASCAR fans were invited to Tennessee in the middle of a pandemic.Now a NewsChannel 5 investigation, conducted with our partners at the Newsy network, has discovered: it's a gamble that you paid for!That race, back in July, came as COVID-19 cases were continuing to spike here in the Volunteer State - and North Carolina officials had decided it wasn't safe to hold the race there.The post on Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee's Instagram celebrated "the future of safe, live sporting events." thanking NASCAR for choosing Tennessee.For Lee, it was a moment of accomplishment.A legendary NASCAR event, the All-Star Race, landed at Bristol Motor Speedway after North Carolina officials balked at allowing spectators out of fear it could become a super-spreader event for COVID-19.Bristol opened its gates for up to 30,000 fans -- about a fifth its normal capacity."NASCAR has been a great partner to us in that they've worked with us to develop what we believe will be a safe opportunity that can be a model for the country to watch," Lee said right before the race.But NewsChannel 5 Investigates discovered the Speedway wanted more than just spectators.The company also filed an application to use Tennessee tax dollars, under a 2018 law called the Event Tourism Act, to help with estimated costs of more than $2.3 million.Half of the state taxes collected from the race could go to help with those costs."It was one of those very unusual circumstances where the race was going to move from Charlotte," said Sen. Jon Lundberg, R-Bristol."Frankly, Bristol was in one of the top three or four places, but it was going to go somewhere else. And I think it literally gave us the ability to bring it here."Lundberg sponsored the legislation that sailed through the Tennessee General Assembly with no debate.NewsChannel 5 Investigates noted, "There was conversation about it would be for a Super Bowl type magnitude.""Yeah," Lundberg agreed. "The expectation was it was going to be a big, major event."There was also the expectation that the incentive would require an exhaustive process to review the potential economic impact of the event."These are not fly-by-night, these are not something you could put together in a few weeks," Lundberg told senators as the bill was presented."It would take a great deal of study and input and several months."But the Bristol Speedway application admitted that was not possible in this case.“Since this event is being held during challenging economic and health circumstances, there is no survey data that would provide a meaningful analysis," it noted.Lundberg argues the All-Star Race is still within the bounds of the law."Suddenly you have an opportunity to bring 25,000 people in a very short period of time, but those people are still going to hotels, eating in restaurants, filling up their cars with gas," he insisted."So the economic impact is real."But when someone at the state apparently balked, Speedway management threatened to take the race elsewhere, warning of that prospect in an email to the state finance commissioner.“Please let us know as soon as possible, so that we can begin the process of determining what incentives and opportunities might be offered by Texas or Georgia," wrote Jerry Caldwell, the Speedway's executive vice president and general manager.“I suspect both of these states would be delighted to land an event of this stature and be the first event in the country to welcome spectators back in large numbers.”Lee's team gave the deal final approval within days."If Texas or Atlanta had the same legislation in effect, I can’t tell you that we would have had that race," Lundberg said.NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked, "Is this corporate welfare?""No, no," the state senator answered. "I think it’s incentivizing."Since then, the governor has declared the event an unqualified success."I was in Bristol a few weeks ago for the NASCAR race where some 25,000 fans attended and saw that race -- and health officials reported weeks later that there were no cases associated with that," Lee told reporters in August.He even suggested it could be a model for University of Tennessee football.But the medical director for the health department in the area around Bristol says there’s just no way to know.Watch Newsy investigation below:"We did not necessarily detect a large spike in cases," said Dr. David Kirschke, medical director for the Northeast Tennessee Regional Health Department."It's kind of buried in the whole increase of cases that we had going on at that time."Our team also talked to experts who say the protocols put in place by NASCAR may have missed warning signs about people who could have been ill. Tennessee tax dollars to help pay for NASCAR's COVID-19 gamble https://www.newschannel5.com/news/newschannel-5-investigates/tennessee-taxpayers-to-help-pay-for-nascars-covid-19-gamble-at-bristol News urn:uuid:5d92797c-c20e-7e4e-f8de-fe23d2becfdc Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:11:02 +0000 Some 30,000 NASCAR fans were invited to Tennessee in the middle of a pandemic. Now a NewsChannel 5 investigation has discovered: it's a gamble that you paid for! Some 30,000 NASCAR fans were invited to Tennessee in the middle of a pandemic.Now a NewsChannel 5 investigation, conducted with our partners at the Newsy network, has discovered: it's a gamble that your tax dollars paid for!That race, back in July, came as COVID-19 cases were continuing to spike here in the Volunteer State - and North Carolina officials had decided it wasn't safe to hold the race there.The post on Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee's Instagram celebrated "the future of safe, live sporting events." thanking NASCAR for choosing Tennessee.For Lee, it was a moment of accomplishment.A legendary NASCAR event, the All-Star Race, landed at Bristol Motor Speedway after North Carolina officials balked at allowing spectators out of fear it could become a super-spreader event for COVID-19.Bristol opened its gates for up to 30,000 fans -- about a fifth its normal capacity."NASCAR has been a great partner to us in that they've worked with us to develop what we believe will be a safe opportunity that can be a model for the country to watch," Lee said right before the race.But NewsChannel 5 Investigates discovered the Speedway wanted more than just spectators.The company also filed an application to use Tennessee tax dollars, under a 2018 law called the Event Tourism Act, to help with estimated costs of more than $2.3 million.Half of the state taxes collected from the race could go to help with those costs."It was one of those very unusual circumstances where the race was going to move from Charlotte," said Sen. Jon Lundberg, R-Bristol."Frankly, Bristol was in one of the top three or four places, but it was going to go somewhere else. And I think it literally gave us the ability to bring it here."Lundberg sponsored the legislation that sailed through the Tennessee General Assembly with no debate.NewsChannel 5 Investigates noted, "There was conversation about it would be for a Super Bowl type magnitude.""Yeah," Lundberg agreed. "The expectation was it was going to be a big, major event."There was also the expectation that the incentive would require an exhaustive process to review the potential economic impact of the event."These are not fly-by-night, these are not something you could put together in a few weeks," Lundberg told senators as the bill was presented."It would take a great deal of study and input and several months."But the Bristol Speedway application admitted that was not possible in this case.“Since this event is being held during challenging economic and health circumstances, there is no survey data that would provide a meaningful analysis," it noted.Lundberg argues the All-Star Race is still within the bounds of the law."Suddenly you have an opportunity to bring 25,000 people in a very short period of time, but those people are still going to hotels, eating in restaurants, filling up their cars with gas," he insisted."So the economic impact is real."But when someone at the state apparently balked, Speedway management threatened to take the race elsewhere, warning of that prospect in an email to the state finance commissioner.“Please let us know as soon as possible, so that we can begin the process of determining what incentives and opportunities might be offered by Texas or Georgia," wrote Jerry Caldwell, the Speedway's executive vice president and general manager.“I suspect both of these states would be delighted to land an event of this stature and be the first event in the country to welcome spectators back in large numbers.”Lee's team gave the deal final approval within days."If Texas or Atlanta had the same legislation in effect, I can’t tell you that we would have had that race," Lundberg said.NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked, "Is this corporate welfare?""No, no," the state senator answered. "I think it’s incentivizing."Since then, the governor has declared the event an unqualified success."I was in Bristol a few weeks ago for the NASCAR race where some 25,000 fans attended and saw that race -- and health officials reported weeks later that there were no cases associated with that," Lee told reporters in August.He even suggested it could be a model for University of Tennessee football.But the medical director for the health department in the area around Bristol says there’s just no way to know.Watch Newsy investigation below:"We did not necessarily detect a large spike in cases," said Dr. David Kirschke, medical director for the Northeast Tennessee Regional Health Department."It's kind of buried in the whole increase of cases that we had going on at that time."Our team also talked to experts who say the protocols put in place by NASCAR may have missed warning signs about people who could have been ill. Tennessee governor says he ignores his own mask advice if he personally 'feels safe' https://www.newschannel5.com/news/newschannel-5-investigates/tennessee-governor-says-he-ignores-his-own-mask-advice-if-he-personally-feels-safe News urn:uuid:40209a05-4ed1-c992-f4c8-71bf3f83d402 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 23:41:22 +0000 Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee said Thursday he does not always follow his own guidance to wear face masks and socially distance if he personally feels safe. Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee said Thursday he does not always follow his own guidance to wear face masks and socially distance if he personally feels safe.That attitude runs contrary to the governor's repeated insistence that Tennesseans should wear masks not only to protect themselves, but to protect others."There are circumstances where I don't wear a mask because I don't feel like I'm at risk in that situation," Lee said in response to questions from NewsChannel 5 Investigates."When I don't feel safe, I wear a mask."It's the same argument that Lee's own critics have made about why they do not feel the need to wear masks.Social media pictures recently emerged showing Lee crowded into the back of a boat with other Republican leaders during a pro-Trump boat parade.None of them were wearing masks or social distancing.Another pic discovered by NewsChannel 5 Investigates shows the maskless governor with his arm around a Nashville restaurant owner.Above their heads are signs admonishing customers of the need to wear masks and stay six feet apart.NewsChannel 5 Investigates asked Lee, "Do you have any regrets? Do you think you could do a better job of modeling what you say is good behavior?""You know, I think I do model that," the governor insisted."I think Tennesseans need to know and they hear me every day. They see me in masks every day. They watch what we say and what we do."NewsChannel 5 Investigates recently spotted Lee and his wife in middle of a crowd of 1,500 people at the White House during the Republican National Convention.Neither wore a mask and attendees were not six feet apart. Tennessee jobs coming back but still far below pre-COVID levels https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/tennessee-jobs-coming-back-but-still-far-below-pre-covid-levels/ Tennessee News | WKRN News 2 urn:uuid:42dd7aae-de2a-8b16-f0c7-54fc6247297a Thu, 17 Sep 2020 23:27:36 +0000 In many corners of Tennessee, there are literally signs that jobs are coming back, but they're not yet at pre-pandemic levels. <p>NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — In many corners of Tennessee, there are literally signs that jobs are coming back, but they&#8217;re not yet at pre-pandemic levels.</p> <p>As flocks of construction cranes flying over downtown Nashville signify thousands of continuing jobs in the building industry, they also symbolize future jobs later in places like Amazon&#8217;s huge downtown operation center and area facilities.</p> <p>The Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development says the tech giant will soon be hiring 2,500 additional people in the Nashville area on top of its already 12,000 jobs at other facilities around Tennessee, but beneath cranes, there are literally few signs the tourist areas are coming back.</p> <p>Sprinkled on the outside of places like some downtown boot stores and bars, there are &#8216;Help Wanted&#8217; placards as the service industry is allowed to re-open after being shut down to stop the spread of COVID.</p> <p>While tourism slowly climbs back for many parts of Tennessee, rural areas see a silver lining as urban dwellers escape to the country.</p> <p>&#8220;Rural areas have a quality of life, and our tourism has just gone through the roof as far as people want to stay at home and do mini-vacations,&#8221; said Lobelville Mayor Robby Moore of Perry County. &#8220;The Buffalo and Tennessee Rivers (tourism areas) are having record years as far as usage.&#8221;</p> <p>The Lobelville mayor has been documenting Help Wanted signs in his area, but one sector of critical importance is manufacturing.</p> <p>Some of those jobs are coming back, but many depend on the state&#8217;s huge automotive industry.</p> <p>Auto industry data indicates Middle Tennessee&#8217;s GM and Nissan plants continue to operate at about two-thirds of where they were before the pandemic shutdown. It means the auto parts suppliers that pop up in towns around the giant plants have cut back by two-thirds as well.</p> <p>All this comes as data from the Tennessee labor department indicated about 164,000 Tennesseans are still getting unemployment benefits with nearly 11,000 filings last week.</p> <p>Late Thursday, Tennessee&#8217;s latest overall unemployment numbers were released showing the rate for August at 8.5 percent. That&#8217;s down seven points from April, but still above last year&#8217;s August jobless rate of 3.4 percent.</p> <p class="has-text-align-center"><strong><em>Stay with News 2 for continuing coverage of the COVID-19 Pandemic.</em></strong></p> <div class="wp-block-columns"> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-cyan-blue-background-color" href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html">CDC </a></div> </div> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter is-style-fill"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-red-background-color" href="https://www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.html">TN Dept of Health</a></div> </div> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter is-style-fill"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-very-dark-gray-background-color" href="https://www.asafenashville.org/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Nashville</a></div> </div> </div> <h3 class="has-text-align-center">MORE COVERAGE</h3> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-red-background-color no-border-radius" href="https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/">More Headlines</a></div> Canceled conventions mean millions in lost revenue for Music City https://www.newschannel5.com/rebound/canceled-conventions-mean-millions-in-lost-revenue-for-music-city News urn:uuid:cbaf97bb-a9a2-b5cc-d7b6-7f1f5d1eb70a Thu, 17 Sep 2020 23:17:36 +0000 With 104 conventions canceled since March, the Music City Center has been left empty and without more than $425 million for Nashville and Davidson County. With 104 conventions canceled since March, the Music City Center has been left empty and without more than $425 million for Nashville and Davidson County.That’s nearly 400,000 attendees who never made it to Nashville, never had a chance to spend money in restaurants, bars or stay in hotels.“It’s a much deeper system of people impacted by what’s happened here, other than just the Music City Center or some of the hotels are sitting empty right now,” said Music City Center CEO Charles Starks.Service industry jobs, while they’re returning, they're nowhere near where they once were at the height of convention season. Starks says those are lost wages and tips that could take months to replace.In fact, the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce August report on COVID-19's impact on Metro's economy found that the hospitality and leisure sector may not return to pre-COVID-19 employment until mid-2022.If that wasn’t enough, the $1.8 million it takes to keep the lights on each month, makes it a little harder to see the bright side. Typically in any given month with conventions, MCC spends $3.6 million on operating expenses.Starks says over the past several years, they’ve saved money they’ve generated from “tax streams dedicated to us from the hotel taxes.”“With that surplus, we’ve been able to keep all of our staff on payroll,” he explained.What Starks knows and what we’re just now learning is that those same groups who had to cancel are planning to come back.“Every one of them have re-booked or are in the process of re-booking Nashville,” Starks said.It may take some time, Starks says, to return to the convention center we once knew. Some groups who plan on returning are booked out as far as 2029. And that shows Starks that people want to come back to Nashville. If not now, soon enough.Starks hopes to host smaller conventions depending on capacity limits, toward the end of 2020. Otherwise, they expect to host conventions as early as March.In October, Metro Nashville council meetings will be held at MCC on the first and second Tuesdays of the month.Back in April, the MCC was asked to be part of Tennessee’s emergency plan as COVID-19 cases began to surge. The facility was never utilized but remains part of emergency protocol. Election workers take on long hours to mail out ballots https://www.newschannel5.com/news/election-workers-take-on-long-hours-to-mail-out-ballots News urn:uuid:94f87461-1ca6-4cba-79a0-4f5410a92c6b Thu, 17 Sep 2020 22:50:40 +0000 Election employees worked long hours Thursday on the first day absentee ballots are sent to voters. Election employees worked long hours Thursday - the first day absentee ballots are sent to voters.Employees at the Davidson County Election Commission had to sort and send ballots to thousands of people who've requested to vote-by-mail. "The presidential election in 2016; we had 7,000 requests as of yesterday afternoon we had already had 17,851," said Election Administrator Jeff Roberts. "Things will pick up even more as we get closer to the date of the election."Roberts believes there will be 100,000 requests for absentee ballots in Davidson County.Over the next 47 days until the election, it will be a full-time job for many employees just processing those requests."Those come in the mail the same time the post office picks these up," said Roberts. "We have to open up all of that mail [and] find out if it's a request for an absentee ballot. Maybe it's just It's a new registration form. That takes about two hours just to open the mail."The additional ballots also cost the county more money. However, Roberts said the state gave some money from CARES to help offset the cost. Broadway bar owners disgruntled with Mayor’s COVID-19 response plan https://www.newschannel5.com/rebound/broadway-bar-owners-disgruntled-with-mayors-covid-19-response-plan News urn:uuid:6ac850b0-5e57-22c9-670b-3a66bda79e3e Thu, 17 Sep 2020 22:50:34 +0000 Several bar and limited service restaurant owners on Broadway are still angry with how Nashville officials have handled the COVID-19 response plan. Several bar and limited service restaurant owners on Broadway are still angry with how Nashville officials have handled the COVID-19 response plan.Tin Roof’s Bob Franklin said restrictions due to COVID-19 have drastically hurt his livelihood. “The night life economy is what makes Nashville go. It’s what we built this city on, and we’ve thrown out the musicians, the sound engineers, the bartenders, and the servers like they’re less than human, and we have to understand that there is a better way.”Much of the scrutiny around opening the bars was renewed earlier this week after a local reporter said emails from the Mayor's office showed they hid the numbers on COVID-19 cases traced back to Nashville bars from the public.On Thursday, Mayor John Cooper’s office released emails dating to July 29th, which said at the time there were approximately 80 cases connected to bars and restaurants. During a morning press conference, Cooper said this was a factor in the city’s decision to shut down bars temporarily before the July 4th holiday.“The industry in my opinion has been scapegoated," Franklin said. "No other industry has been treated like this.”John Rich, a country music star and the owner of Redneck Riviera, said it was his understanding that Broadway bars were linked to thousands of cases. “When you hear such a small amount of cases were traced back to Broadway, in reality when you put that across from the destruction that has happened with our businesses, with the people who work there, it’s one of the most egregious things I have ever seen,” Rich saidBenjamin Eagles, a senior adviser in the Mayor’s office, said COVID-19 cases have gone down, so he believes they made the right decision.“As for is a specific number sufficient to take public health action to save lives, I would defer to an expert on what is a sufficient number of cases, and number of lives lost, that we should tolerate," Eagles said.Eagles showed us a graph he says shows that right before July cases linked to bars skyrocketed.“The decision to ask businesses to turn away customers, or close their doors, is extremely difficult for everyone involved, and we know that people’s livelihoods are at stake,” Eagles said.For now, bar owners are going to try to salvage what they can. “We want to have a city when this is all done with... and do we want it to be Music City when it’s all done with? I do I love the city so I want it to last,” Franklin said.On Thursday, Mayor John Cooper announced that on Friday bars and limited service restaurants can allow half capacity and stay open until 11 p.m.But later in the afternoon, Tennessee Governor Bill Lee called for Nashville to open up further, while also denying a request from Mayor Cooper for more COVID-19 relief funds.The mayor statement on the number of cases of COVID-19 in bars is below in full:“A recent news story by FOX17 Nashville was published with limited information and without context, using screenshots of Metro emails to falsely accuse the Mayor’s office and the Metro Public Health Department of withholding public health data that had previously been shared with and published by another local news outlet, the Tennessee Lookout, on August 4th, 2020. Emails from the same thread emphasizing the need to publicly release as much COVID-19 data as possible, which were omitted from the FOX17 story, are attached.“On June 29th, following a nationwide spike in coronavirus cases, the Mayor’s office emailed Metro Public Health asking its staff to share the results of its contact tracing investigations to help identify the sources and spread of COVID-19 in Davidson County to help guide an appropriate policy response. Up to that point, Metro Public Health had typically tracked infections to broader categories of sources – such as workplace, community, household, and travel – but the Mayor’s office requested more specific sourcing, including bars, large gatherings, and weddings, as examples based on national trends.“Two days prior to these emails, the weekend before the July 4th holiday, the MPHD epidemiology team had contacted Dr. Alex Jahangir, Chair of the Metro Coronavirus Task Force, to alert him that, for the first time, clusters of cases had been linked to bars in Nashville. On July 3rd, Modified Phase Two of the “Roadmap for Reopening Nashville” took effect, temporarily closing bars and other businesses and venues with a high risk of COVID-19 spread. Four weeks after this public health decision was made, Dr. Deborah Birx, coordinator of the White House Coronavirus Task Force, visited Nashville to warn the entire state of Tennessee that bars in hotspots should be immediately closed because of their potential to facilitate the spread the coronavirus. Thankfully, Nashville had already taken this step.“Nashville has made significant progress with our COVID-19 response as a result of these timely, data-driven public health decisions taken earlier this summer. Nashville’s 7-day percent positive rate peaked at 17.1 percent on July 9th. It is 5.1 percent today. Our 7-day rate of new cases peaked at 64.7 per 100,000 residents on July 13th, which is now 15.6 per 100,000 residents as of this morning. These metrics have allowed for incremental, important adjustments to our local economy that are helping more Nashvillians quickly and safely get back to work.“The Mayor’s office and the Metro Public Health Department remain committed as always to providing timely and transparent information that helps inform our local media and all Nashvillians in the fight against COVID-19. And we’re grateful to all the residents and businesses owners in Davidson County for their hard work and dedication to our ongoing COVID-19 response.”Three images of emails were also provided. Those can be seen below: Gov. Lee says it's time to lift Metro COVID-19 restrictions; 'We need Nashville to open up' https://www.newschannel5.com/news/gov-lee-says-its-time-to-lift-metro-covid-19-restrictions-we-need-nashville-to-open-up News urn:uuid:6514d200-3388-efec-75af-c827b040b487 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 22:20:33 +0000 Governor Bill Lee says it's time for COVID-19 restrictions to be lifted in Nashville. He made the comments during his press briefing Thursday while addressing Nashville Mayor John Cooper's request for more funding from the state to aid in the city's response to the pandemic. Governor Bill Lee says it's time for COVID-19 restrictions to be lifted in Nashville. He made the comments during his press briefing Thursday while addressing Nashville Mayor John Cooper's request for more funding from the state to aid in the city's response to the pandemic.The governor denied the request saying, "We will partner with and work with the mayor but the current request...I’m not going fund the current request as requested.""The reality is that Metro Nashville has received, of the coronavirus relief funds, $121 million set aside specifically through the federal government for Metro Nashville. They were one of the few counties that actually received designated funding from the federal government. There are 95 counties. Providing funding for Davidson County additionally, beyond the millions of dollars they currently have, means taking away funding from the other 94 other counties and that's something that, for me to consider that the strategy that I’m investing in, aligns with the state’s strategy and Metro Nashville’s does not," Lee explained.That strategy has included a mask mandate and a multi-phase reopening plan which has been tough on local businesses since the shutdown. Downtown businesses, which rely on tourism, have been hit especially hard."We need Nashville to open up. We need conventions to be here. We need to operate safely, but we need our economy moving forward there's a great cost to Tennessee when we restrict businesses and close down our economy," said Lee.Governor Lee spoke about the toll the pandemic has taken on Nashville's economy, which in turn hurts the state as a whole. He said it has not been effective and compared it to the state's strategy, which he said has been successful."Metro Nashville is the least rapidly recovering economy of all metro regions in the United States as of right now; that means in my view, that our strategy in that particular place - from an economic standpoint - is not an effective one. And that includes restrictions on businesses and their ability to operate, to employee, to generate revenue for our state. And to the degree that we can lift those restrictions as soon as possible, that's the strategy that I’ve taken and that’s the strategy that I think we should take all across the state," said Lee.When asked if he would consider making an order to roll back the Metro restrictions or remove local government’s authority to issue Coronavirus restrictions he said he would focus on ongoing discussions with Mayor Cooper in hopes of working together."I'm certainly not going to invest further into what I think is not a good strategy…I think that he and I will be talking about what we can do together and how we can work together to make Nashville’s economy and all of Tennessee's economy to move more rapidly in the right direction."Cooper announced earlier in the day the city will move forward to its Phase Three of reopening beginning October 1. However, bars and limited-service restaurants can increase their capacity as early as Friday. Gov. Lee rejects Metro Mayor Cooper's request for $82.6M additional coronavirus relief funding https://www.newschannel5.com/news/gov-lee-rejects-metro-mayor-coopers-request-for-82-6m-additional-coronavirus-relief-funding News urn:uuid:16156988-3c26-0c17-4f98-2ee25ca21101 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 21:19:08 +0000 Gov. Bill Lee has rejected a request from Metro Nashville Mayor John Cooper for an additional $82.6 million in coronavirus relief funding for the county. Gov. Bill Lee has rejected a request from Metro Nashville Mayor John Cooper for an additional $82.6 million in coronavirus relief funding for the county.On September 8, the mayor sent a letter to the governor requesting the funds, citing intense revenue crashes in the hospitality and entertainment industries. Cooper said Nashville’s hotel and short-term rental occupancy tax revenues have dropped by 80%. The air travel and bar and restaurant industries have seen a similar drop in tax revenue.“Tennessee’s economy relies heavily on Nashville, and Nashville’s economy relies heavily on the hospitality and entertainment industry, which has been crushed by COVID-19,” Cooper’s letter read.Cooper said the county would use $35 million to support tourism-related businesses, including music venues, restaurants and hotels. Another $33 million would be put toward small businesses and the arts while $14 million would go to funding a “social safety net” for behavioral health, workforce development and child care opportunities.Thursday morning, the governor replied to Cooper’s request, stating he is concerned about many of the spending decisions in Metro Nashville.Lee’s letter stated that of the $93 million the county has received in relief funding, $5.7 million has been budgeted for relief to businesses.“This concern is heightened by the ongoing challenges ahead for Nashville business owners who have already endured some of the most restrictive limitations on commercial activity, as well as a recently enacted property tax increase,” Lee’s letter read.During a press conference on Thursday, Lee later clarified that he will not fund the current request, but expects to have discussions on Nashville’s economy with Cooper in the future.“I respectfully request that you reprioritize your Coronavirus Relief Fund budget to relief our shared commitment to economic recovery and allocated the full remainder of your unbudgeted $27.3 million toward economic relief for businesses,” Lee said.Lee said Metro’s approach to reopening businesses has not been consistent with the state’s approach."That's something that for me to consider, I have to believe that the strategy that I am investing in is one that is consistent and aligned with the state's strategy," Lee said. "Metro Nashville's is not." I-65 South in Nashville closed at Trinity Lane due to a crash https://www.newschannel5.com/news/i-65-south-in-nashville-closed-at-trinity-lane-due-to-a-crash News urn:uuid:e405dc5c-bef5-3ebd-782a-4b8013a432a0 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 21:07:07 +0000 Interstate 65 South has been closed at mile marker 87 in Nashville due to a serious crash.It happened around 1:45 p.m. at near Trinity Lane. The Tennessee Department of Transportation expects the scene to be cleared by 7 p.m.Officials asked drivers to take alternate routes as crews respond to the crash. Southbound traffic was diverted to I-24W at MM 88. State easing COVID-19 restrictions on long-term care facilities https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/state-easing-covid-19-restrictions-on-long-term-care-facilities/ Tennessee News | WKRN News 2 urn:uuid:5c5b76c3-a57a-98c2-a0e7-dca85fb43321 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 19:54:28 +0000 Tennessee Department of Health and Governor Bill Lee's Unified Command Group are announcing new initiatives to ease COVID-19 restrictions on long-term care facilities. <p>NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — Tennessee Department of Health and Governor Bill Lee&#8217;s Unified Command Group are announcing new initiatives to ease COVID-19 restrictions on long-term care facilities.</p> <p>According to TDH, the efforts include expanding options for visitation, relaxing restrictions for resident interactions, and the formation of a &#8216;Long-Term Care Task Force.&#8217;</p> <p>“The health and safety of vulnerable Tennesseans, especially our long-term care residents,&nbsp;remains our top priority, and our comprehensive and persistent efforts to protect this&nbsp;population from COVID-19 have saved lives,” said Tennessee Health Commissioner Dr. Lisa Piercey, “It’s time to reunite residents and their families in a safe and disciplined&nbsp;manner so we can better balance the physical and emotional needs of older Tennesseans.&#8221;</p> <p>Beginning October 1, facilities that have gone at least 14 days with no new COVID-19 cases among residents or staff will immediately be allowed to offer outdoor or limited indoor visitation with residents. The visits will require maintaining strict precautions including wearing masks, physical distancing, environmental disinfection, and possibly testing of visitors.</p> <p>If a facility reports no new cases for 28 days, it will be allowed to offer an essential caregiver program to allow for designated individuals to assist with daily living activities including feeding, bathing, and dressing. However, ife a facility has new COVID-19 cases among residents or staff, the expanded visitation allowances will be suspended until the facility is infection-free for at least 14 days.</p> <p>The eased restrictions will also allow for social activities and visits from non-healthcare personnel such as barbers and beauticians. These activities will only be allowed for residents who do not have COVID-19 in facilities that have had no new cases for 14 days. The use of masks, physical distancing, and capacity limits will be required.</p> <p>The new &#8216;Tennessee Long-Term Care Task Force&#8217; will develop and implement new policies to address immediate and future issues impacting the facilities and residents during the COVID-19 pandemic. TDH said the first objective will be to monitor the safety and effectiveness of the expanded visitation and activity guidelines and refine them as necessary.</p> <p>For more information, <a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://www.tn.gov/health/news/2020/9/17/tennessee-launches-new-initiatives-for-long-term-care-facility-residents.html" target="_blank">click here</a> to read more at the TDH website.</p> <p class="has-text-align-center"><strong><em>Stay with News 2 for continuing coverage of the COVID-19 Pandemic.</em></strong></p> <div class="wp-block-columns"> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-cyan-blue-background-color" href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html">CDC </a></div> </div> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter is-style-fill"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-red-background-color" href="https://www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.html">TN Dept of Health</a></div> </div> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter is-style-fill"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-very-dark-gray-background-color" href="https://www.asafenashville.org/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Nashville</a></div> </div> </div> <h3 class="has-text-align-center">MORE COVERAGE</h3> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-red-background-color no-border-radius" href="https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/">More Headlines</a></div> <h2 class="has-text-align-center">COVID-19 in Tennessee</h2> <p class="has-text-align-center has-small-font-size"><em>(This reflects <a rel="noreferrer noopener" aria-label="what the TDH is reporting each day at 2 p.m. CST (opens in a new tab)" href="https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/covid-19-cases-in-tennessee-why-are-agencies-reporting-different-totals/" target="_blank">what the TDH is reporting each day at 2 p.m. CST</a> )</em></p> <div class="ns-block-custom-html"> <div class="tableauPlaceholder" id="viz1588270739499" style="position: relative"><noscript><a href="#"><img loading="lazy" alt=" " src="https://public.tableau.com/static/images/Te/TennesseeCOVID-19CasesbyCounty/TNCounties/1_rss.png" style="border: none"></a></noscript><object class="tableauViz" style="display:none;"><param name="host_url" value="https%3A%2F%2Fpublic.tableau.com%2F"> <param name="embed_code_version" value="3"> <param name="site_root" value=""><param name="name" value="TennesseeCOVID-19CasesbyCounty/TNCounties"><param name="tabs" value="no"><param name="toolbar" value="yes"><param name="static_image" value="https://public.tableau.com/static/images/Te/TennesseeCOVID-19CasesbyCounty/TNCounties/1.png"> <param name="animate_transition" value="yes"><param name="display_static_image" value="yes"><param name="display_spinner" value="yes"><param name="display_overlay" value="yes"><param name="display_count" value="yes"></object></div> <script type="text/javascript"> var divElement = document.getElementById('viz1588270739499'); 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var vizElement = divElement.getElementsByTagName('object')[0]; vizElement.style.width='100%';vizElement.style.height=(divElement.offsetWidth*0.75)+'px'; var scriptElement = document.createElement('script'); scriptElement.src = 'https://public.tableau.com/javascripts/api/viz_v1.js'; vizElement.parentNode.insertBefore(scriptElement, vizElement); </script> </div> Tennessee reports 1,053 new COVID-19 cases, 13 deaths on Sept. 17 https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/tennessee-reports-1053-new-covid-19-cases-13-deaths-on-sept-17/ Tennessee News | WKRN News 2 urn:uuid:9de9a40f-f43c-2704-fbe0-93460e92d24a Thu, 17 Sep 2020 19:26:37 +0000 The Tennessee Department of Health also reports an increase of 1,505 inactive/recovered cases. <p>NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – The Tennessee Department of Health <a href="https://twitter.com/TNDeptofHealth/status/1306669256784982016" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">has confirmed additional cases and deaths related to COVID-19 across the state on Thursday, September 17</a>.</p> <p>The health department reported 1,053 new cases, bringing the state to 178,140 total cases, a 0.6% day-to-day increase since Wednesday. Of the total cases, 172,453 are confirmed and 5,687 are probable.</p> <p>Tennessee’s seven-day new cases average decreased to 1,415 additional cases per day.</p> <p>Of the 178,140 cases, 90,573 are female (51%), 85,837 are male (48%), and 1,730 are pending (1%).</p> <p>TDH also confirmed 13 additional deaths, bringing Tennessee up to 2,164 total deaths.</p> <p>Out of the confirmed positive cases, 161,707 are listed as inactive/recovered, an increase of 1,505 since Wednesday.</p> <p>The number of total hospitalizations now sits at 7,979. There are 823 people currently hospitalized.</p> <p>Tennessee has processed 2,559,192 tests with 2,381,052 negative results. The percentage for positive cases remained around 7%. Thursday’s update added 21,469 tests to the state’s total. </p> <h2><strong>TDH’s COVID-19 Reporting Format</strong></h2> <p>On September 3, the Tennessee Department of Health announced&nbsp;<a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/tennessee-dept-of-health-announces-updated-covid-19-reporting-format/" target="_blank">changes to the format for sharing data on COVID-19, updating how some metrics are calculated</a>, reflecting evolving knowledge of the pandemic.</p> <p><a rel="noreferrer noopener" href="https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/tennessee-reports-1715-new-covid-19-cases-18-deaths-on-sept-3/" target="_blank">The new format</a>&nbsp;reflects a change in how active cases are calculated.</p> <p>Under the new format, TDH case count reports will include figures for “Inactive/Recovered” cases and will no longer include data for “Recovered” cases. “Inactive/Recovered” cases will include people who are 14 days or more beyond their illness onset date (or, for asymptomatic cases, their specimen collection date). This will more closely align with what is now understood about the infectious period of COVID-19, as recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show most patients with COVID-19 are no longer infectious after 10 days. Previously, TDH considered a case recovered after a 21-day period.</p> <p class="has-text-align-center"><strong><em>Stay with News 2 for continuing coverage of the COVID-19 Pandemic.</em></strong></p> <div class="wp-block-columns"> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-cyan-blue-background-color" href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html">CDC </a></div> </div> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter is-style-fill"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-red-background-color" href="https://www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.html">TN Dept of Health</a></div> </div> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter is-style-fill"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-very-dark-gray-background-color" href="https://www.asafenashville.org/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Nashville</a></div> </div> </div> <h3 class="has-text-align-center">MORE COVERAGE</h3> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-red-background-color no-border-radius" href="https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/">More Headlines</a></div> <div class="ns-block-custom-html"> <div class="tableauPlaceholder" id="viz1588205037303" style="position: relative"><noscript><a href="#"><img loading="lazy" alt=" " src="https://public.tableau.com/static/images/TD/TDHTNCases-TotalNew/PostiveCasesBreakdown/1_rss.png" style="border: none"></a></noscript><object class="tableauViz" style="display:none;"><param name="host_url" value="https%3A%2F%2Fpublic.tableau.com%2F"> <param name="embed_code_version" value="3"> <param name="site_root" value=""><param name="name" value="TDHTNCases-TotalNew/PostiveCasesBreakdown"><param name="tabs" value="no"><param name="toolbar" value="yes"><param name="static_image" value="https://public.tableau.com/static/images/TD/TDHTNCases-TotalNew/PostiveCasesBreakdown/1.png"> <param name="animate_transition" value="yes"><param name="display_static_image" value="yes"><param name="display_spinner" value="yes"><param name="display_overlay" value="yes"><param name="display_count" value="yes"></object></div> <script type="text/javascript"> var divElement = document.getElementById('viz1588205037303'); var vizElement = divElement.getElementsByTagName('object')[0]; vizElement.style.width='100%';vizElement.style.height=(divElement.offsetWidth*0.75)+'px'; var scriptElement = document.createElement('script'); scriptElement.src = 'https://public.tableau.com/javascripts/api/viz_v1.js'; vizElement.parentNode.insertBefore(scriptElement, vizElement); </script> </div> <div class="ns-block-custom-html"> <div class="tableauPlaceholder" id="viz1588271214977" style="position: relative"><noscript><a href="#"><img loading="lazy" alt=" " src="https://public.tableau.com/static/images/TD/TDHTNCases-TotalNew/TNNewCases-Bar/1_rss.png" style="border: none"></a></noscript><object class="tableauViz" style="display:none;"><param name="host_url" value="https%3A%2F%2Fpublic.tableau.com%2F"> <param name="embed_code_version" value="3"> <param name="site_root" value=""><param name="name" value="TDHTNCases-TotalNew/TNNewCases-Bar"><param name="tabs" value="no"><param name="toolbar" value="yes"><param name="static_image" value="https://public.tableau.com/static/images/TD/TDHTNCases-TotalNew/TNNewCases-Bar/1.png"> <param name="animate_transition" value="yes"><param name="display_static_image" value="yes"><param name="display_spinner" value="yes"><param name="display_overlay" value="yes"><param name="display_count" value="yes"></object></div> <script type="text/javascript"> var divElement = document.getElementById('viz1588271214977'); var vizElement = divElement.getElementsByTagName('object')[0]; vizElement.style.width='100%';vizElement.style.height=(divElement.offsetWidth*0.75)+'px'; var scriptElement = document.createElement('script'); scriptElement.src = 'https://public.tableau.com/javascripts/api/viz_v1.js'; vizElement.parentNode.insertBefore(scriptElement, vizElement); </script> </div> Tennessee to ease COVID-19 restrictions on nursing homes, long-term care facilities https://www.newschannel5.com/news/tennessee-to-ease-covid-19-restrictions-on-nursing-homes-long-term-care-facilities News urn:uuid:8ada8ad0-448f-279a-b89c-a0d18baf671e Thu, 17 Sep 2020 19:00:41 +0000 Tennessee regulators, citing a decline in COVID-19 cases, will relax restrictions on nursing homes and other long-term care facilities that had kept thousands of residents in virtual seclusion for much of the pandemic. Tennessee regulators, citing a decline in COVID-19 cases, will relax restrictions on nursing homes and other long-term care facilities that had kept thousands of residents in virtual seclusion for much of the pandemic.The new Tennessee Department of Health protocols, which take effect Oct. 1, will be based on the transmission rate of the coronavirus within each facility, rather than the community as a whole.“The health and safety of vulnerable Tennesseans, especially our long-term care residents, remains our top priority, and our comprehensive and persistent efforts to protect this population from COVID-19 have saved lives,” Tennessee Health Commissioner Lisa Piercey said in a written statement.“It’s time to reunite residents and their families in a safe and disciplined manner so we can better balance the physical and emotional needs of older Tennesseans.”Facilities that have had no new COVID-19 cases among residents and staff for 14 days may permit outdoor visitation and limited indoor visitation in common areas able to accommodate social distancing.Those visits will be limited to no more than 45 minutes with up to two adult visitors. Visitors must be screened before entry into the visitation area. Residents and visitors will be required to wear face coverings and stay at least six feet apart.Residents' rooms may only be used for visitation when the resident is unable to leave the room and the visitor has a negative COVID-19 test.After 28 days, long-term care facilities will be allowed to implement an Essential Caregiver program where select visitors may assist with bathing, feeding, clothing and other personal needs.In addition, the state's new protocols will relax restrictions on communal dining and other activities within each facility after 14 days with no new COVID-19 cases.Barbers and beauticians will be allowed to return to work at 50% capacity, with face masks and other safety protocols.Two residents may share a table in the dining areas where tables are 6 feet apart and capacity is limited to 50% (unless that would be less than 10 people). Group activities, as well as therapeutic and rehabilitation services, may resume at 50% capacity.State officials say they are prepared to roll back those new protocols if there is a dramatic rise in the spread of COVID-19 SmileDirectClub to open $34M manufacturing plant in Columbia, adding 600 new jobs https://www.newschannel5.com/news/smiledirectclub-to-open-34m-manufacturing-plant-in-columbia-adding-600-new-jobs News urn:uuid:feae6cab-7a7d-fb5b-a93b-bc540d5411de Thu, 17 Sep 2020 18:16:09 +0000 SmileDirectClub will invest $34 million into a new manufacturing facility in Columbia, bringing 600 new jobs to the area. SmileDirectClub will invest $34 million into a new manufacturing facility in Columbia, bringing 600 new jobs to the area. The new plant will allow the oral care company to expand its manufacturing capabilities for its clear aligners. This will be SmileDirectClub's third expansion in Tennessee in the last three years. "SmileDirectClub is grateful for the continued support of Governor Lee, Commissioner Rolfe, Senator Hensley, Representative Cepicky and the partnership with the Tennessee Valley Authority and Maury County," said Dan Baker, global head of supply chain at SmileDirectClub. "In these unprecedented times, having a second facility located in Maury County allows our team the ability to safely travel between our manufacturing locations, and provides us the additional manufacturing capacity and strong talent pool we need as we continue our global expansion. We are looking forward to further expanding our presence in Tennessee."Previously, the company invested $217 million into its Nashville headquarters and created more than 2,000 jobs across Middle Tennessee. "Even during these challenging times, Maury County continues to serve as an engine of economic growth for the State of Tennessee. I would like to offer SmileDirectClub a warm welcome to the community and to thank TNECD, TVA, and our regional economic development partners for making this exciting announcement possible.," said Maury County Mayor Andy Ogles. CVS to open 11 more drive-thru COVID-19 testing sites across Tennessee on Friday https://www.newschannel5.com/news/cvs-to-open-11-more-drive-thru-covid-19-testing-sites-across-tennessee-on-friday News urn:uuid:bb6f762b-b479-4f61-5a76-f987518b9a14 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 17:53:15 +0000 With the expansion, CVS will be offering COVID-19 tests at 43 locations across the state. CVS Health is opening 11 more COVID-19 testing sites in Tennessee on Friday. The company recently expanded its eligibility for testing to children as young as 12 years old. Those seeking tests must register in advance to schedule an appointment on CVS's website. A parent or legal guardian must complete the online registration for those between 12 and 15 years old and be present when they are tested.With the expansion, CVS will be offering COVID-19 tests at 43 locations across the state. Below are the new sites opening on Friday: Arlington: US Highway 64, Arlington, TN 38002Athens: 928 Decatur Pike, Athens, TN 37303 Cookeville: 1078 East 10th Street, Cookeville, TN 38501 Franklin: 9101 Carothers Parkway, Franklin, TN 37064Gallatin: 549 West Main Street, Gallatin, TN 37066Greeneville: 506 Ashville Highway, Greeneville, TN 37743Knoxville: 4325 Asheville Highway, Knoxville, TN 37914Lawrenceburg: 246 E. Gaines Street, Lawrenceburg, TN 38464Memphis: 6620 Winchester Road, Memphis, TN 38115Murfreesboro: 607 SE Broad Street, Murfreesboro, TN 37130 Shelbyville: 825 North Main Street, Shelbyville, TN 37160 Metro Nashville Public Schools high school sports return next week https://www.newschannel5.com/rebound/safely-back-to-school/metro-nashville-public-schools-high-school-sports-return-next-week News urn:uuid:3c747b5c-326c-40fb-98e8-c55d015c70c3 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 16:15:32 +0000 Metro Nashville Public Schools will be returning to high school football and girl's soccer next week, Director of Schools Dr. Adrienne Battle announced on Thursday. Metro Nashville Public Schools will be returning to high school football and girl's soccer next week, Director of Schools Dr. Adrienne Battle announced on Thursday. “We are ready for sports that make the fall so enjoyable," Dr. Battle said during Mayor John Cooper's weekly press conference. Last Friday, the district announced football teams could resume contact practices. Days later, it was announced that MNPS will be phasing in students back to the classroom after fall break, starting with pre-K through second-grade students. After Labor Day, students with exceptional needs were allowed to return to special day schools and traditional schools. Starting Wednesday, September 23, girl's soccer will resume play and starting Friday, September 25, football games will resume. However, Dr. Battle said the district is not yet ready to let fans attend high school games. Cheerleaders and marching bands will be allowed at games to bring a bit of game-time atmosphere. Dr. Battle said the district is working to provide live streams for home football games so that fans can still watch live. Additionally, Dr. Battle said high school golf is already underway, as it has easily accommodated to social distancing measures. Cross country and volleyball athletes have already begun practicing and will start their seasons soon.Dr. Battle said high school students can participate in extra-curricular activities that are in-person, regardless if they take classes in-person or virtually. The district will continue to monitor COVID-19 cases in the area and continue with recommended safety guidelines to slow the spread of the virus. “It is important to know that we will accept our teams to practice all safety measures, observe social distancing, and we will comply with all guidance related to isolation and quarantining due to positive cases and close contacts," Dr. Battle said. "Which could result in cancelation of games or seasons." Nashville moving to Phase 3 on Oct. 1; bars can increase capacity starting Friday https://www.newschannel5.com/rebound/nashville-to-begin-phase-3-on-oct-1-bars-can-increase-capacity-starting-friday News urn:uuid:866914fe-43c1-8ff0-4331-d081caf494e7 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 15:01:10 +0000 Nashville Mayor John Cooper says the city will reenter its Phase Three of reopening beginning October 1. However, bars and restaurants can increase their capacity starting Friday. Nashville Mayor John Cooper says the city will reenter its Phase Three of reopening beginning October 1. However, bars and limited service restaurants can increase their capacity starting Friday.Cooper made the announcement on Thursday during Metro’s weekly COVID-19 update. Nashville returned to its modified Phase Two on July 3. Starting Friday, bars and restaurants can resume service at 50% capacity – that’s up to 50 people inside and 50 people outside. Businesses can also remain open until 11 p.m.Cooper also announced Tennessee Titans fans would be allowed to attend the Steelers game at Nissan Stadium on October 4 at 10% capacity. This is a breaking story. Check back for updates. Metro to give COVID-19 update, expected to announce fans return to Nissan Stadium https://www.newschannel5.com/news/metro-to-give-covid-19-update-expected-to-announce-fans-return-to-nissan-stadium News urn:uuid:0135db22-0518-beeb-c495-c3a99b051a78 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 14:20:03 +0000 The city is expected to announce that it will allow a limited number of fans at Tennessee Titans games. Metro Nashville Public Health officials will give their weekly COVID-19 update on Thursday. The city is expected to announce that it will allow a limited number of fans at Tennessee Titans games. Watch live below: Earlier this month, Mayor John Cooper announced that the team would play its home opener against Jacksonville this Sunday without fans due to the pandemic. Nashville remains in its modified Phase Two plan of reopening. Currently, weddings, funerals and other ceremonial events at venues can be held at one-third capacity – up to a max of 125 people, with face masks and social distancing in use. September 17 COVID-19 update: Metro reports 130 new cases, one additional death https://www.newschannel5.com/news/metro-to-give-covid-19-update-expected-to-announce-fans-return-to-nissan-stadium News urn:uuid:acc5be22-ccad-4adb-77ae-f8730b6f92a9 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 14:20:03 +0000 Metro Nashville Public Health officials reported 130 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday. One additional death was also reported. Metro Nashville Public Health officials reported 130 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday. One additional death was also reported. Today's update brings Davidson County's total number of cases to 27,693. Right now, there are 1,177 active cases. Health officials said an additional confirmed death has been reported in the past 24 hours, a 75-year-old man with underlying health conditions.As of today, 246 people in Davidson County have died after a confirmed case of COVID-19. Including both confirmed and probable cases, 257 deaths have been attributed to the virus. So far, 26,259 individuals have recovered. More data from Metro health: New cases per 100,000 people: 15.65Seven-day percent positive of COVID-19 tests: 5.1Available Middle Tennessee hospital beds: 16 percentAvailable Middle Tennessee ICU beds: 20 percentThe MPHD COVID-19 Hotline received 23 calls on Wednesday, September 16, 2020.Total number of cases: 27,693Cases reported in the past 24 hours: 130Cases by sexMale: 13,653Female: 13,747Unknown: 293Cases by ageUnknown540-101,35511-202,89321-308,15331-405,59341-503,86651-602,77961-701,71571-8079381+492Total27,693Inactive/Recovered26,259Deaths257Total active cases1,177 During today's COVID-19 update, Mayor John Cooper announced the city would reenter its Phase Three of reopening on October `1. Bars and limited service restaurants can increase capacity to 50% starting Friday. Metro also announced that Titans fans will be able to attend the Steelers game at Nissan Stadium on Oct. 4 at 10% capacity. That's fewer than 7,000 of the stadium's 69,143 maximum capacity. September 17 COVID-19 update: 1,053 new cases, 13 additional deaths in Tennessee https://www.newschannel5.com/news/metro-to-give-covid-19-update-expected-to-announce-fans-return-to-nissan-stadium News urn:uuid:22d71ea5-d9e7-7bef-0a7f-269a1fbd5eeb Thu, 17 Sep 2020 14:20:03 +0000 Metro Nashville Public Health officials reported 130 new cases of COVID-19 on Thursday. One additional death was also reported. The Tennessee Department of Health reported 1,053 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday, bringing the total of cases ever reported in the state to 178,140.Of the total number of cases, 14,269 remain active and 161,707 Tennesseans are now considered recovered from the virus. Thirteen additional coronavirus-related deaths were reported on Thursday. TDH has attributed 2,164 deaths to COVID-19. Statewide there are 823 people currently hospitalized for COVID-19, an increase of nine people in the last 24 hours. Metro Nashville Public Health officials reported 130 new cases of COVID-19 and one additional death.Today's update brings Davidson County's total number of cases to 27,693. Right now, there are 1,177 active cases. Health officials said an additional confirmed death has been reported in the past 24 hours, a 75-year-old man with underlying health conditions.As of today, 246 people in Davidson County have died after a confirmed case of COVID-19. Including both confirmed and probable cases, 257 deaths have been attributed to the virus. So far, 26,259 individuals have recovered. More data from Metro health: New cases per 100,000 people: 15.65Seven-day percent positive of COVID-19 tests: 5.1Available Middle Tennessee hospital beds: 16 percentAvailable Middle Tennessee ICU beds: 20 percentThe MPHD COVID-19 Hotline received 23 calls on Wednesday, September 16, 2020.Total number of cases: 27,693Cases reported in the past 24 hours: 130Cases by sexMale: 13,653Female: 13,747Unknown: 293Cases by ageUnknown540-101,35511-202,89321-308,15331-405,59341-503,86651-602,77961-701,71571-8079381+492Total27,693Inactive/Recovered26,259Deaths257Total active cases1,177 During today's COVID-19 update, Mayor John Cooper announced the city would reenter its Phase Three of reopening on October 1. Bars and limited-service restaurants can increase capacity to 50% starting Friday. Metro also announced that Titans fans will be able to attend the Steelers game at Nissan Stadium on Oct. 4 at 10% capacity. That's fewer than 7,000 of the stadium's 69,143 maximum capacity. Driver crashes into pole after Clarksville shooting https://www.newschannel5.com/news/driver-crashes-into-pole-after-clarksville-shooting News urn:uuid:b6658a45-b459-0711-cd9e-e42d5bac8fac Thu, 17 Sep 2020 14:07:45 +0000 Clarksville police say they’re investigating a shooting that injured at least one person. Clarksville police say they’re investigating a shooting that injured at least one person.Officers responded to a shots fired call around 9:20 p.m. Wednesday in the the area of College Street and Poston Street.Police say they found a silver Dodge Charger that had crashed into a utility pole with one person inside with a gunshot wound. That person was taken to an area hospital, where their condition is unknown at this time.According to investigators, the suspect vehicle is believed to be a black Dodge Challenger.Anyone with information should contact Detective Jackson, 931-648-0656, ext. 5319, Tipsline 931-645-8477, or go online and submit a tip anonymously at P3tips.com/591. It's a tie! Carrie Underwood, Thomas Rhett both win top prize at ACMs https://www.newschannel5.com/entertainment/its-a-tie-carrie-underwood-thomas-rhett-both-win-top-prize-at-acms News urn:uuid:e0c6a4fd-93f4-27ac-a40b-729de484722a Thu, 17 Sep 2020 13:28:59 +0000 In a surprise twist that fit an unexpected year of firsts, Carrie Underwood and Thomas Rhett tied for entertainer of the year at the Academy of Country Music Awards. NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — In a surprise twist that fit an unexpected year of firsts, Carrie Underwood and Thomas Rhett tied for entertainer of the year at the Academy of Country Music Awards. “Keith, what is happening right now?” Rhett asked, astounded, before thanking his family. Underwood appeared right after him remarking, “2020, man?” before adding, “I am more than happy to share this with Thomas Rhett.”Underwood has won the prize twice before, while Rhett is a first-time winner in the category. Luke Combs walked away a winner, too, by picking up album of the year and male artist of the year.Country group Old Dominion won song of the year and group of the year, and band members Matthew Ramsey, Trevor Rosen and Brad Tursi earned additional individual awards as songwriters for “One Man Band.” Mark Humphrey/AP Thomas Rhett accepts the entertainer of the year award in a tie with Carrie Underwood during the 55th annual Academy of Country Music Awards at the Grand Ole Opry House on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey) Taylor Swift made a subdued return to the ACM stage with an acoustic performance, her first time back at the awards show in 7 years.The show had been delayed and moved from Las Vegas to Nashville due to the pandemic and was held in empty venues. For a full list of winners, click here. More than 10,000 new unemployment claims filed last week in Tennessee, down from previous weeks https://www.newschannel5.com/rebound/more-than-10-000-new-unemployment-claims-filed-last-week-in-tennessee-down-from-previous-weeks News urn:uuid:ea8ca723-b325-33fd-39be-5f93a0e02ea3 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 13:14:33 +0000 More than 10,000 new unemployment claims were filed last week in Tennessee, a slightly lower number than in previous weeks. More than 10,000 new unemployment claims were filed last week in Tennessee, a slightly lower number than in previous weeks.The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce development released the latest numbers Thursday, saying 10,771 new claims were filed during the week ending on September 12.The number of continued claims rose to 163, 791. Click here to file an unemployment claim in Tennessee. The department also released the following data: WEEKWEEK ENDING DATENEW CLAIMSCONTINUED CLAIMS10March 142,70216,34211March 2139,09616,09812March 2894,49234,57013April 4116,141112,43814April 1174,772199,91015April 1868,968267,05316April 2543,792324,54317May 237,319321,57118May 929,308325,09519May 1628,692314,48720May 2326,041310,12621May 3022,784302,26022June 621,417292,23423June 1319,925280,59324June 2021,155266,59625June 2722,256262,22426July 425,843256,64527July 1122,431251,92428July 1825,794243,40529July 2519,461242,39730August 111,690224,09331August 810,036208,81032August 1513,806204,72633August 2210,998191,20434August 2912,035184,78135September 511,706176,38836September 1210,771163,791New Claims Since March 15840,626The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell last week to 860,000, a historically high figure that reflects economic damage from the coronavirus outbreak.Before the pandemic hit the economy, the number signing up for jobless aid had never exceeded 700,000 in a week, even in the depths of the 2007-2009 Great Recession. The Labor Department also said Thursday that 12.6 million are collecting traditional unemployment benefits, compared with 1.7 million a year ago. Proposed Charter Amendment Would be a Self-Inflicted Disaster for Nashville https://tntribune.com/proposed-charter-amendment-would-be-a-self-inflicted-disaster-for-nashville/ Local – The Tennessee Tribune urn:uuid:ac4a1728-0217-ad58-2548-fbb97f1afbf0 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 12:53:29 +0000 <p>NASHVILLE, TN — An array of Nashville leaders stand united to oppose Nashville from being gutted by an upcoming charter amendment proposed by an entity calling itself “4GoodGovernment.” The amendment would create a $332 million <a class="mh-excerpt-more" href="https://tntribune.com/proposed-charter-amendment-would-be-a-self-inflicted-disaster-for-nashville/" title="Proposed Charter Amendment Would be a Self-Inflicted Disaster for Nashville">[...]</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/proposed-charter-amendment-would-be-a-self-inflicted-disaster-for-nashville/">Proposed Charter Amendment Would be a Self-Inflicted Disaster for Nashville</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> <p>NASHVILLE, TN — An array of Nashville leaders stand united to oppose Nashville from being gutted by an upcoming charter amendment proposed by an entity calling itself “4GoodGovernment.” The amendment would create a $332 million deficit for this fiscal year, threaten Metro’s credit rating, constrain the city’s ability to set property taxes to pay for services, and result in a suspension of capital projects. The proposed amendment would result in dramatic cuts to essential services such as emergency response, schools, trash collection, and road repair throughout Nashville.</p> <p>Retroactive application will eliminate city services, reduce property values, and render schools “unrecognizable.”</p> <p>If passed, midway through the fiscal year, the amendment would retroactively reverse the property tax increase passed by 32 of 40 Council Members. The FY21 budget provided for a continuity of city services during the</p> <figure id="attachment_19029" aria-describedby="caption-attachment-19029" style="width: 300px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img class="size-medium wp-image-19029" src="https://tntribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/JohnCooper_0003_DM.5cbf37023a717-300x200.jpg" alt="" width="300" height="200" srcset="https://tntribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/JohnCooper_0003_DM.5cbf37023a717-300x200.jpg 300w, https://tntribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/JohnCooper_0003_DM.5cbf37023a717-150x100.jpg 150w, https://tntribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/JohnCooper_0003_DM.5cbf37023a717-768x512.jpg 768w, https://tntribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/JohnCooper_0003_DM.5cbf37023a717.jpg 960w" sizes="(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px" /><figcaption id="caption-attachment-19029" class="wp-caption-text">Mayor John Cooper</figcaption></figure> <p>pandemic and began to restore Metro’s dangerously thin cash reserves. This proposed charter amendment comes at a time when Nashville’s financial position was already destabilized by a $216 million decline in sales tax and other activity taxes this fiscal year, in line with state forecasts. With this amendment, Nashville would be left unable to make up for the lost revenue.</p> <p>The proposed amendment would immediately move the budget out of balance and create a $332 million shortfall for the current fiscal year. As a result, Metro would be compelled to take immediate corrective actions to comply with state law and the Metro Charter’s balanced budget requirement. Few parts of Metro Government, including emergency services and schools, could be spared significant reductions or eliminations, and nearly all capital projects would be required to be halted.</p> <p>The proposal would immediately and directly hurt Nashville residents. “It will negatively impact property values and drastically reduce city services for all Nashvillians,” said Kristy Hairston, board of directors president for the Greater Nashville Realtors.</p> <p>Dr. Adrienne Battle, irector of MNPS, is also alarmed by the proposal and said the resulting cuts would “render the school district unrecognizable to students and families.”</p> <p>Neighborhood infrastructure and Nashville’s credit rating will be devastated</p> <p>In addition to requiring a referendum for raising property taxes beyond two percent, the proposed amendment would also require a referendum for the issuance of bonds for projects exceeding $15 million, with vague exceptions for construction of “educational classrooms”, public libraries, public healthcare buildings, police and fire stations, and “Charter-protected facilities.” This aspect of the Charter amendment would cripple Nashville’s ability to make neighborhood infrastructure investments, such as building community centers, repairing roads, adding affordable housing, building new schools, and improving our park system, without a costly referendum.</p> <p>Financial rating agencies would likely downgrade Metro’s financial outlook and outstanding bonds if the charter amendment is even placed on the ballot. This may result in increased borrowing costs and limit Metro’s ability to complete significant transactions and refinancing. A credit rating downgrade would make every city project more expensive for taxpayers.</p> <p>Special election will cost $800,000, prompted by a tax levy that restores Nashville’s traditional low rates</p> <p>The Davidson County Election Commission has verified that a sufficient number of signatures were collected to place the amendment on a special election ballot on December 5, 2020. According to the Election Commission, the special election will cost Nashville taxpayers approximately $800,000.</p> <p>Even with this year’s increase, Nashville still has a lower property tax rate than Knoxville, Memphis, Chattanooga and other peer cities. Nashville’s current rate is in line with historic traditional levels; the tax rate of $4.22 remains below Nashville’s 25-year average of $4.30. Nevertheless, the proposed Charter amendment would require county-wide voter referendums for any property tax increase over two percent – a limitation that would prevent keeping pace with inflation and result in violations of state law during appraisal years.</p> <p>Passage of the Charter amendment would result in massive cuts to city services</p> <p>At mid-year, a $332 million spending reduction could affect 35-58% of the six-month remaining Metro Government operating budget. If a potential 35% cut were spread evenly across Metro operations, the following impacts could occur:</p> <p><b>Public Works:</b></p> <p>• Trash collection service reduced to twice monthly, with complete elimination of recycling collections.</p> <p><b>Fire:</b></p> <p>• 35% cuts to the NFD Operating Budget, resulting in cuts of approximately 557 positions, including 12 ambulances, 31 fire companies, and 17 fire inspectors.</p> <p>• Dramatic increases in response time delays.</p> <p><b>Police:</b></p> <p>• Reductions in force of one-third of MNPD officers (450-480 officers) through layoffs and a hiring freeze;</p> <p>• Closure of four of MNPD’s eight precincts due to officer shortages;</p> <p>•<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>Dramatic increases in response time delays.</p> <p><b> Other Departments</b></p> <p>• Partial to complete closure of parks, recreation centers, and libraries.</p> <p>• Severe reductions in services for the Hospital Authority, Metro Transit Authority, and the Sports Authority.</p> <p>• Significant delays and bottlenecks for permits, licenses, and inspections.</p> <p>{Metro Government is undertaking further work to review potential impacts}</p> <p><b>Effect on Metro<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></b><b>Nashville Public Schools</b></p> <p>At mid-year, a $332 million spending reduction could impact up to 25% or more of the six-month remaining MNPS operating budget. Budget cuts to every single school in the district would be required. MNPS would likely be compelled to significantly reduce education resources, including:</p> <p>• Increased class sizes;</p> <p>• Transportation service adjustments resulting in longer bus ride times;</p> <p>• Reductions in social work, counseling, community connections, and other services for families in need;</p> <p>• Reductions of supplemental services for students in robotics, career connections, college preparation, and other advanced academics;</p> <p>•<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>Elimination of Social and Emotional learning (SEL) initiatives;</p> <p>• Reduced technical assistance and professional development for teachers and schools; and</p> <p>• Elimination of stipends for extra duties such as coaching and other extracurricular activities.</p> <p><b>Reactions to proposed charter amendment</b></p> <p>“This would cripple our city and gut essential city services. After two natural disasters this year, we don’t need a self-inflicted one. This would severely weaken Nashville at a time when we need to build Nashville stronger.”<br /> <strong><i>Mayor John Cooper</i></strong></p> <p>“Cutting 25% of the MNPS budget would, unfortunately, render the school district unrecognizable to students and families. We owe our students an exemplary education, and it takes resources to hire the teachers and staff needed to serve students academically and socially emotionally.”<br /> <strong><i>Dr. Adrienne Battle, </i><i>Director of Metro </i><i>Public Schools</i></strong></p> <p>“Greater Nashville Realtors remains committed to a vibrant and financially strong Nashville. Based on our independent study of Metro’s finances earlier this year, the city must make changes to become more financially stable, but this proposal is not the answer. This change would only harm the well-being of this city and its residents. It will negatively impact property values and drastically reduce city services for all Nashvillians.”<br /> <strong><i>Kristy Hairston, Board of Directors President, Greater Nashville Realtors</i></strong></p> <p>“At first glance, the implications for the people of Nashville and Metro’s fiscal stability are significant and will alter the current positive trajectory of our city.”<br /> <strong><i>Ralph Schulz, President and CEO, Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce</i></strong></p> <p>&#8220;The aftermath of the Nashville tornado and ensuing pandemic has created a time for our city to come together not pull apart. A property tax cap would be another disaster especially in the African-American community, but this time it would be self-inflicted. Nashville already has the lowest property tax of any other large city in our state so let us all pull together and give our city and ourselves the funding we desperately need to survive and thrive.”<br /> <strong><i>Pastor Chris<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>Jackson, President, </i><i>Interdenominational </i></strong><i><strong>Ministers Fellowship</strong> </i></p> <p>“No council member was excited about raising property taxes, but the new tax rate is still below the 25-year average and below the rate in FY2017. 32 council members, including me, recognized the need to vote for an increase because we understood that the stability of Nashville depends on being able to pay our bills, so that we can continue to provide needed services to residents.”<br /> <strong><i>Councilwoman Kyonzte Toombs, Budget and </i><i>Finance Chair, District 2</i></strong></p> <p><span class="Apple-converted-space"> &#8220;</span>I voted against the property tax rate increase, but mandating a 2% cap is just as fiscally irresponsible as the rampant spending and poor fiscal policy that got us to this point in the first place. The city wouldn’t be able to provide basic services; essential services like public safety and schools would suffer. It would essentially cause a government shutdown which, believe me, no one wants.  In the long term, a 2% cap wouldn’t even allow us to keep up with inflation. We absolutely need fiscal responsibility, but a 2% cap is just not practical or sustainable.”<br /> <em><strong>Courtney Johnston, Metro Councilwoman, District 26</strong></em></p> <p>“Gutting city services, slashing schools and eliminating first responders during a pandemic is a terrible idea and would hurt working families in Nashville.”<br /> <strong><i>Vonda McDaniel, President, Central Labor Council</i></strong></p> <p>“This proposal is just another dangerous far-right attempt to destroy the progress that we’ve made in Nashville. It would prevent Nashville from being able to pay our bills, invest in our schools, and maintain neighborhood infrastructure.”<br /> <strong><i>Anthony Davis, former Councilman and owner of East Nashville Beer Works</i></strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/proposed-charter-amendment-would-be-a-self-inflicted-disaster-for-nashville/">Proposed Charter Amendment Would be a Self-Inflicted Disaster for Nashville</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> Meharry Doctors: Vaccine Rush Unreasonable https://tntribune.com/meharry-doctors-vaccine-rush-unreasonable/ Local – The Tennessee Tribune urn:uuid:c7ac9e5a-0565-f08a-bfd2-307b53cf507c Thu, 17 Sep 2020 12:49:09 +0000 <p>By Clint Confehr NASHVILLE, TN — As a Meharry Medical College doctor embarks on a public awareness campaign about COVID-19 vaccines, state leaders have said they’ll be ready to inoculate medical professionals on the Sunday <a class="mh-excerpt-more" href="https://tntribune.com/meharry-doctors-vaccine-rush-unreasonable/" title="Meharry Doctors: Vaccine Rush Unreasonable">[...]</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/meharry-doctors-vaccine-rush-unreasonable/">Meharry Doctors: Vaccine Rush Unreasonable</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> <p><b><i>By Clint Confehr</i></b></p> <p>NASHVILLE, TN — As a Meharry Medical College doctor embarks on a public awareness campaign about COVID-19 vaccines, state leaders have said they’ll be ready to inoculate medical professionals on the Sunday before Election Day.</p> <p>Two top medical scientists at the medical college have said separately that having a vaccine against COVID-19 by Nov. 1 is impractical and impracticable. One said it’s irresponsible and he wants people to be willing to be vaccinated against the novel coronavirus, but only after it’s been through Phase III Trials and approved by the FDA as effective and safe.</p> <p>“I’ve talked in the pulpit at churches, in barber shops, on military bases and to health providers and morticians,” said Dr. Donald J. Alcendor, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at the Center for AIDS Health Disparities Research at Meharry’s School of Medicine. He’s spoken about AIDS/HIV for 14 years.</p> <p>Now, Alcendor will “disseminate information to communities who are hesitant” about a vaccine against COVID-19, he said. His on-line video presentations will be live so he can respond to questions. To schedule a program with Alcendor, contact him at dalcendor@mmc.edu.</p> <p>Meharry President/CEO Dr. James Hildreth, an infectious disease expert on Metro’s coronavirus task force, is quoted by The (Columbia) Daily Herald as telling Yahoo Finance that having inoculations against COVID-19 by November is “scientifically infeasible” and “ambitious.” Alcendor said it’s too optimistic.</p> <p>The U.S. Centers of Disease Control (CDC) told states to be ready Nov. 1 to receive and use a COVID-19 vaccine. Gov. Bill Lee and state Health Commissioner Dr. Lisa Piercey said being inoculated is a personal choice. Piercey said any vaccine sent wouldn’t have completed traditional clinical trials that can take years to justify Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authorization. Americans are asking if the White House has a political motive for early approval.</p> <p>Alcendor is “very concerned about FDA oversight when it comes to testing,” he said, “and I’m concerned about CDC oversight and policy when it comes to testing.” He speaks with authority having been on FDA’s Advisory Board for Antivirules. “I just don’t think they should become part of a political process, they were never intended to be.</p> <p>“These are special times,” he continued, “but the idea of giving emergency use authorization to a vaccine that has not completed Phase III Clinical Trials is something that I think is unwarranted.”</p> <p>Meharry Medical College is conducting two of five clinical trials on vaccines to inoculate people against COVID-19. Search tntribune.com for Meharry Testing Two COVID-19-Vaccines. To volunteer, call (615) 327-6820, or write to rsingh@mmc.edu. “You cannot get the virus from the vaccine,” said Dr. Vladimir Berthaud, principal investigator for those two-year studies.</p> <p>President Trump has famously advocated hydroxychloroquine (arthritis medicine also used for malaria) as a coronavirus treatment.</p> <p>“It was very clear that it was not beneficial to COVID- 19 patients,” Alcendor said. “In certain situations it put them at risk of death. I’m glad they revoked … authorization for the use of that medication.</p> <p>“Then the Administration went out and found people with questionable credentials making strange claims about the glorious effects of hydroxychloroquine.”</p> <p>“The pressure on the CDC and the FDA is something that I’ve never seen,” Alcendor said.</p> <p>His <i>Journal of Clinical Medicine </i>report, “Racial Disparities-Associated with COVID-19 Mortality among Minority Populations in the US,” is available online.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/meharry-doctors-vaccine-rush-unreasonable/">Meharry Doctors: Vaccine Rush Unreasonable</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> Music City Spending CARES Act Money Quickly https://tntribune.com/music-city-spending-cares-act-money-quickly/ Local – The Tennessee Tribune urn:uuid:1a4da295-ea28-06a8-e767-927ffc5d8ab9 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 12:48:01 +0000 <p>By Peter White NASHVILLE, TN — The state of Tennessee received $2.648 billion from the CARES Act. Stimulus relief funding is not just a big bag of cash. It has to be used in certain <a class="mh-excerpt-more" href="https://tntribune.com/music-city-spending-cares-act-money-quickly/" title="Music City Spending CARES Act Money Quickly">[...]</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/music-city-spending-cares-act-money-quickly/">Music City Spending CARES Act Money Quickly</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> <p><b><i>By Peter White</i></b></p> <p>NASHVILLE, TN — The state of Tennessee received $2.648 billion from the CARES Act. Stimulus relief funding is not just a big bag of cash. It has to be used in certain ways for certain things. COVID-19 relief funds must be spent by the end of the year. They cannot be banked or used to pay for things already in city and state budgets.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>Cities with at least half a million residents received some CARES Act money directly and they decided how to spend it. Nashville received $121 million and Memphis received $113 million.</p> <p>In a statement last week, the mayor’s office said Nashville has spent or earmarked $93.8 million. Here is a list of Coronavirus Relief Fund expenditures:</p> <p>• Metro’s emergency COVID-19 response (estimated costs through 12/30/20): $48.8 million</p> <p>• Remote learning support for MNPS students and teachers: $24 million</p> <p>• Rent, mortgage, and utility assistance for Davidson County residents: $10 million</p> <p>• Small business grants and technical support: $5.7 million</p> <p>• Essential Metro services conducted through non-profit organizations: $2.8 million</p> <p>• Funding to reduce food insecurity: $2.5 million</p> <p>• Total funds spent or allocated to date: $93.8 million</p> <p>“We are spending $3.5M (3.7%) for small business, and $0.2M (0.2%) for a Latino agency to also help with small business,” said Katie Lentile, spokesperson for the mayor’s office. That money is included in the $93.8 million.</p> <p>Lentile said Pathways Lending, a community development financial institution (CDFI), is disbursing $2.2 million of CARES Act funding: $200,000 for technical support to small businesses impacted by COVID-19 and $2 million in grants for live music venues.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>The live music grants are similar to the $82,500 provided to record producers, film and video producers, and theater owners in Memphis. The TN Department of Finance &amp; Administration also steered about $2 million to limited service restaurants in Memphis.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>A lot of stimulus funding related to COVID-19 comes from the CARES Act. The state of Tennessee and local governments have played a crucial role getting aid to people who missed out. For example, a lot of small businesses applied but didn’t get loans in both rounds of the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP). (See Minority Businesses Are Getting More Paycheck Protection Loans, Tennessee Tribune, June 4, 2020)<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>Governor Lee’s Financial Stimulus Accountability Group operates on the state level very much like how Metro’s nine-member stimulus oversight committee decides how to spend CARES Act money in Nashville. Both groups try to get assistance to groups, industries, and individuals who didn’t get any earlier this year.</p> <p>Lee established the Financial Accountability Group April 16 to help plan a statewide response to COVID-19. In August, the Department of Human Services organized the Tennessee Community CARES Program. The idea was to provide money for non-profit activities and reimburse NGOs for past response and recovery expenses.</p> <p>The program identified need in four regions and large NGOs like the United Way were selected in each region as grant administrators. They in turn reached out to their networks of smaller NGOs to select grantees. By September 1, $150 million in federal funds had been awarded in seven program categories.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>Although the state and local stimulus groups are similar and both direct recovery funds, the Nashville committee suggests and then the Metro Council approves the distribution of relief funds in Davidson County.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>The Mayor’s office provided a list of federal relief fund distributions by the Financial Oversight Committee and approved by the Metro Council:</p> <p>1. $10 million to the United Way of Greater Nashville, to be disbursed to certain partner agencies for rent, mortgage, and utility relief. Call 2-1-1 to find an agency providing these funds.</p> <p>2. $2.5 million to Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee to provide more food to those impacted by COVID-19.</p> <p>3. $600,000 provided to the Nashville Business Incubation Center for technical support of small businesses impacted by COVID-19.</p> <p>4. $600,000 provided to the Nashville Entrepreneur Center for technical support of small businesses impacted by COVID-19.</p> <p>5. $200,000 provided to Conexión Américas for technical support and grants for small businesses impacted by COVID-19.</p> <p>6. $100,000 provided to the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce for technical support of small businesses impacted by COVID-19.</p> <p>7. $200,000 provided to Pathway Lending for technical support of small businesses impacted by COVID-19.</p> <p>8. $2 million in grant funds for live music venues. The fund will be administered by Pathway Lending. The funds can cover a maximum of 2 months of operating expenses, excluding payroll, to stay in business during the COVID-19 pandemic, with a maximum grant of $100,000 each. Eligible grant recipients shall be limited to live music venues that meet the following criteria:</p> <p>a. Must be independent, Nashville-owned and primarily used for live music entertainment;</p> <p>b. Require concert tickets, admissions, and/or cover charges for entry at least 50% of the time the facility is open to the public;</p> <p>c. Venues with other ancillary services, such as alcohol, food, or merchandise, must be subsidiary or dependent upon live music performances; and</p> <p>d. Annual receipts for the 12-month period ended February 29, 2020 cannot exceed $5 million.</p> <p>9. $2 million in grant funds for small businesses. All small businesses that receive grants must meet the following criteria:</p> <p>a. In existence for 12 months from the date of application;</p> <p>b. Minimum annual gross receipts of $35,000 as evidenced by tax returns filed with the state;</p> <p>c. Maximum annual gross receipts of $1 million as evidence by tax returns filed with the State;</p> <p>d. Eligible grant recipients that have been convicted of a citation, warrant, or administrative penalty for violation of a Metro emergency COVID-19 public health order may be deemed by the Committee to be ineligible to receive funds;</p> <p>e. Small businesses with annual gross receipts over $250,000 and a maximum of $1 million may receive a grant not to exceed $10,000. Microbusinesses with annual gross receipts over $35,000 and a maximum of $250,000 may receive a grant not to exceed $5,000; and</p> <p>f. Any eligible grant recipient that receives a grant under the concurrently submitted live music venues resolution proposed by the Committee is ineligible to receive a grant under this program.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/music-city-spending-cares-act-money-quickly/">Music City Spending CARES Act Money Quickly</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> 10K+ new unemployment claims filed last week in Tennessee https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/10k-new-unemployment-claims-filed-last-week-in-tennessee-3/ Tennessee News | WKRN News 2 urn:uuid:b3c435d1-f21b-d0b1-abf6-f754af657d07 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 12:31:54 +0000 More than 840,00 new unemployment claims have been filed in Tennessee since mid-March, according to data released Thursday morning by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce. <p>NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) — More than 840,00 new unemployment claims have been filed in Tennessee since mid-March, according to data released Thursday morning by the Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce.</p> <p>The department reported the number of new claims for the week ending Sept. 12 was 10,771, down more than 900 from the previous week, when 11,706 new claims were filed. The numbers were still up significantly from the week ending March 14, when the pandemic began and approximately 2,702 new claims were made.</p> <div class="wp-block-image"><figure class="aligncenter size-large"><img loading="lazy" src="https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/unemp-1.jpg" alt="" class="wp-image-392401" srcset="https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/unemp-1.jpg?resize=487,391 487w, https://www.wkrn.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/73/2020/09/unemp-1.jpg?resize=300,241 300w" sizes="(max-width: 899px) 100vw, 487px" /></figure></div> <p>The number of continued unemployment claims in Tennessee was 163,791 for the week ending Sept. 12, which is down by about 12,500 from the previous week.</p> <p class="has-text-align-center"><strong><em>Stay with News 2 for continuing coverage of the COVID-19 Pandemic.</em></strong></p> <div class="wp-block-columns"> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-cyan-blue-background-color" href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html">CDC </a></div> </div> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter is-style-fill"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-red-background-color" href="https://www.tn.gov/health/cedep/ncov.html">TN Dept of Health</a></div> </div> <div class="wp-block-column"> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter is-style-fill"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-very-dark-gray-background-color" href="https://www.asafenashville.org/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Nashville</a></div> </div> </div> <h3 class="has-text-align-center">MORE COVERAGE</h3> <div class="wp-block-button aligncenter"><a class="wp-block-button__link has-background has-vivid-red-background-color no-border-radius" href="https://www.wkrn.com/community/health/coronavirus/">More Headlines</a></div> UofM Named Finalist for 2020 APLU Innovation & Economic Prosperity Universities Awards https://tntribune.com/uofm-named-finalist-for-2020-aplu-innovation-economic-prosperity-universities-awards/ Local – The Tennessee Tribune urn:uuid:23d990d1-2611-3f2e-f5a5-6af20a13df67 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 12:16:11 +0000 <p>MEMPHIS, TN — The University of Memphis has been named one of six finalists for the 2020 Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) for its eighth annual Innovation & Economic Prosperity (IEP) University Awards. <a class="mh-excerpt-more" href="https://tntribune.com/uofm-named-finalist-for-2020-aplu-innovation-economic-prosperity-universities-awards/" title="UofM Named Finalist for 2020 APLU Innovation & Economic Prosperity Universities Awards">[...]</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/uofm-named-finalist-for-2020-aplu-innovation-economic-prosperity-universities-awards/">UofM Named Finalist for 2020 APLU Innovation & Economic Prosperity Universities Awards</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> <p>MEMPHIS, TN — The University of Memphis has been named one of six finalists for the 2020 Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) for its eighth annual Innovation &amp; Economic Prosperity (IEP) University Awards.</p> <p>The winners will be announced during the association’s virtual annual meeting. The finalists – California State University, Northridge; Iowa State University; University of Memphis; Mississippi State University; University of Pittsburgh; and Purdue University – are competing for four different awards that recognize exemplary and innovative case studies of economic engagement impact.</p> <p>The University of Memphis and Iowa State University are finalists for the IEP Innovation award, recognizing exemplary initiatives spurring innovation, entrepreneurship and technology-based economic development.</p> <p>California State University, Northridge and Purdue University are finalists for the IEP Talent award, recognizing exemplary initiatives in education and workforce development.</p> <p>Mississippi State University and the University of Pittsburgh are finalists for the IEP Place award for exemplary initiatives resulting in social, cultural or community development.</p> <p>All six universities are finalists for the IEP Economic Engagement Connections award, which is the top-prize in the awards competition, recognizing overall excellence and leveraging across all three award categories.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>“This national recognition demonstrates (UofM) President (M. David) Rudd’s commitment to balancing two critical imperatives: advancing basic research for the betterment of our society and supporting regional economic prosperity through innovative applied initiatives,” said Dr. Jasbir Dhaliwal, UofM executive vice president for research and innovation. “Kudos to all members of our innovation teams based at the FedEx Institute of Technology and led by Cody Behles and Mary Ann Dawson for their great work leading up to this recognition.”</p> <p>The UofM has worked to promote innovation in the Memphis region with a multi-faceted approach to economic development that encourages novel engagements with our faculty, students and community. Through the establishment of corporations, the launching of a research park that emphasizes helping young companies based in Memphis and programs to build the deep science entrepreneurship in the city, the UofM is promoting economic development that embraces innovation, talent and place. The University’s motto of “Driven by Doing” is present throughout the projects that comprise their application and status as a finalist in the innovation category. Innovative partnerships with industry represented throughout their case studies have helped to fill gaps in the landscape, positively impact the lives of hundreds of students and has brought millions in investment to campus and the City.</p> <p>As defined by APLU’s Economic Engagement Framework – a series of tools and publications that helps institutions better know, measure and communicate their work in economic engagement – universities collaborate with their public and private sector partners in their states and regions to promote economic growth, competitiveness and opportunity through a variety of efforts across the aforementioned categories.</p> <p>“We applaud this year’s Innovation and Economic Prosperity University Awards finalists for their exceptional contributions to regional economic engagement,” said APLU President Peter McPherson. “As the country looks to recover from one of the steepest economic downturns on record, universities will have to play a central role in helping drive innovation, spark growth and foster broadly shared prosperity. The IEP Award finalists are in a strong position to do exactly that.”</p> <p>To be eligible for an IEP award, an institution must first earn the Innovation and Economic Prosperity University (IEP) designation from APLU, which recognizes institutional commitment to regional economic development.</p> <p>To earn the IEP designation, universities conduct a rigorous self-study of their economic engagement activities that includes input from external stakeholders. As part of the self-study, each institution identifies areas for growth and improvement within its economic engagement enterprise and developed an improvement plan. This work demonstrates a commitment to continuous learning and improvement in this kind of engagement vital to universities and their regional partners.</p> <p>Sixty-six institutions have been named IEP Universities designees since the program was launched in 2012.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/uofm-named-finalist-for-2020-aplu-innovation-economic-prosperity-universities-awards/">UofM Named Finalist for 2020 APLU Innovation &#038; Economic Prosperity Universities Awards</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> MDHA to Open Waiting List for Elderly Project-Based Voucher Location https://tntribune.com/mdha-to-open-waiting-list-for-elderly-project-based-voucher-location-2/ Local – The Tennessee Tribune urn:uuid:b792ee6f-383c-383a-ae3c-100e33514f6e Thu, 17 Sep 2020 12:05:36 +0000 <p>NASHVILLE, TN — The Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency (MDHA) will accept online-only applications for an elderly Project-Based Voucher (PBV) location on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at noon Sept. 22, 2020.  In order to <a class="mh-excerpt-more" href="https://tntribune.com/mdha-to-open-waiting-list-for-elderly-project-based-voucher-location-2/" title="MDHA to Open Waiting List for Elderly Project-Based Voucher Location">[...]</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/mdha-to-open-waiting-list-for-elderly-project-based-voucher-location-2/">MDHA to Open Waiting List for Elderly Project-Based Voucher Location</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> <p>NASHVILLE, TN — The Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency (MDHA) will accept online-only applications for an elderly Project-Based Voucher (PBV) location on a first-come, first-served basis beginning at noon Sept. 22, 2020.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>In order to qualify for elderly housing, the head of household or spouse must be at least 62 years old.</p> <p>Similar to the Tenant-Based Voucher Program, the PBV Program provides low- and moderate-income households with monthly rental assistance. However, PBV assistance is tied to particular units rather than to the family. Eligible families only receive assistance while living in the PBV unit. MDHA selects families from the PBV waiting list and refers them to the owner of the PBV unit to fill their vacancies.</p> <p>Applications for the elderly waiting list will be available online only at www.nashville-mdha.org (click on the button that says Apply for Affordable Housing) beginning at noon Sept. 22, 2020, and can be submitted online 24 hours a day during the waiting list period. The application is simple and takes less than five minutes to complete.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>Applicants will need to register a new username and password and have a valid email address. Once an application is submitted, applicants will receive an email confirming that the application was submitted successfully. Within 30 days, applicants will receive a follow-up email confirming whether the application has been accepted and placed on the waiting list, or it has been rejected.</p> <p>Applicants must meet all eligibility requirements for the PBV location in order to be placed on the waiting list.</p> <p>• 26th &amp; Clarksville Phase 3: Brand new one-bedroom units will be available this fall at 2125 26th Ave. N. in Nashville. In order to qualify for the PBV units at this property, the head of household or spouse must be at least 62 years old and have an adjusted income at or below 50 percent of the area median income (AMI). More information and any special eligibility requirements will be available on MDHA’s website and the online application portal.</p> <p>The Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency (MDHA) does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, color, national origin, religion, disability or any other legally protected status in admission to, access to, or operations of its programs, services, or activities. For assistance with language interpretation or other accommodation or service, call 615-782-3960. For other accommodation or service such as TDD, call 615-252-8599.</p> <p>Established in 1938, MDHA provides affordable housing opportunities to more than 13,000 families primarily through Project-Based Rental Assistance and Section 8 vouchers. It also manages federally-funded community development and homeless assistance programs on behalf of the Metropolitan Government of Nashville. To foster urban growth, MDHA oversees 12 redevelopment districts that guide development through design and land-use zoning controls. Additional information about MDHA can be found on www.nashville-mdha.org, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/mdha-to-open-waiting-list-for-elderly-project-based-voucher-location-2/">MDHA to Open Waiting List for Elderly Project-Based Voucher Location</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> TPAC Screening John Lewis Documentary https://tntribune.com/tpac-screening-john-lewis-documentary/ Local – The Tennessee Tribune urn:uuid:3114216a-1ff7-511f-580e-28525719f2e8 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 11:41:39 +0000 <p>By Tribune Staff NASHVILLE, TN — Tennessee Performing Arts Center (TPAC) is inviting audiences both in Nashville and across Middle Tennessee to join in a nationwide watch of the new documentary, “John Lewis: Good Trouble” <a class="mh-excerpt-more" href="https://tntribune.com/tpac-screening-john-lewis-documentary/" title="TPAC Screening John Lewis Documentary">[...]</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/tpac-screening-john-lewis-documentary/">TPAC Screening John Lewis Documentary</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> <p><b><i>By Tribune Staff</i></b></p> <p>NASHVILLE, TN — Tennessee Performing Arts Center (TPAC) is inviting audiences both in Nashville and across Middle Tennessee to join in a nationwide watch of the new documentary, “John Lewis: Good Trouble” on Sept. 21 at 6 p.m. CDT. The film examines the impact of Rep. John Lewis’s life and work. They are collaborating with more than 60 arts and cultural institutions. TPAC is providing audiences with digital access to the film from Magnolia Pictures. There will also be an opportunity to take part in a live virtual conversation about Rep. Lewis’s remarkable legacy.</p> <p>“John Lewis: Good Trouble” celebrates his 60-plus years of activism and legislative action on civil rights, voting rights, gun control, health-care reform and immigration through rare archival footage and exclusive interviews with the late Congressman. Lewis, who attended both Fisk University and American Baptist, was a Freedom Rider, former SNCC president and later a Congressman as well as a Presidential Medal of Freedom honoree. He served the cause of social justice for decades, both as an elected representative and as a groundbreaking activist whose fervent belief in getting into “good trouble, necessary trouble” for the cause of racial equality changed our country in very positive fashion.<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <p>Contact TPAC to unlock digital access to “John Lewis: Good Trouble” directly from Magnolia Pictures. The film’s rental fee, $12, includes a $5 donation to TPAC. After unlocking, you’ll have 30 days to start watching. Once you begin, you’ll have 72 hours to finish watching.</p> <p>TPAC can also provide the address where you can click to register for the free virtual conversation via Zoom.</p> <p>Special access to the documentary includes two extra features. There’s film of an interview Rep. Lewis gave to Oprah Winfrey shortly before his death. There’s also<span class="Apple-converted-space">  </span>a one-hour panel, recorded in July, between the documentary’s director, Dawn Porter, and two of Rep. Lewis’s fellow original Freedom Riders, Dr. Bernard Lafayette and Dr. Rip Patton.</p> <p>After screening the film, audiences are invited to register for a live, interactive online panel discussion about Rep. Lewis’s history and impact on the social justice struggles of today. Panelists include Porter; Newark Mayor Ras J. Baraka; Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and Director of the Institutional Antiracism and Accountability Project and Lonnie G. Bunch III, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, who worked to establish the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. U.S. Sen. Cory Booker from New Jersey will provide opening remarks. The online conversation and coordinated effort is produced by the New Jersey Performing Arts Center (NJPAC) of Newark, New Jersey.</p> <p>“We’re so proud to join NJPAC and dozens of arts organizations across the country in making available this important documentary on Rep. John Lewis and his life-long work to dismantle racism and promote social justice,” Jennifer Turner, TPAC President and CEO, said in a press release. “Lewis’s long legacy of activism began in Nashville, and I hope people here and throughout Middle Tennessee will be inspired by his example to continue the fight for equality and social change in their own lives.”</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/tpac-screening-john-lewis-documentary/">TPAC Screening John Lewis Documentary</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> Cancer survivor drives ride-hail to provide lunches for Nashville's homeless https://www.newschannel5.com/news/cancer-survivor-drives-ride-hail-to-provide-lunches-for-nashvilles-homeless News urn:uuid:25c9b683-e57c-32f9-13be-672d9780017c Thu, 17 Sep 2020 11:16:15 +0000 A Nashville ride-hailing driver is using the money she earns to make meals for the homeless. A Nashville ride-hailing driver is using the money she earns to make meals for the homeless. Kerry Wiles is a full-time scientist at the Cooperative Human Tissue Network at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.When Wiles was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2018, she made a bucket list that included driving for Uber and Lyft."I thought 'I'm going to make a bucket list of everything I've wondered about' and this was on it," said Wiles.Within a couple days, Wiles knew she liked the gig."What I found is I really like talking to the people. I like meeting them and sharing my favorite spots in Nashville," she said.But Wiles also discovered quickly that Nashville's homeless population is sizable and growing."As I was driving around I would notice the same people in the same spots and I noticed a lot of new homeless," she said.A week into it, Wiles began making meals for the homeless."If I have a rider with me, they're kind of amazed," she said.Wiles uses the fares and tips she receives to pay for the lunches. She hands them out during her shifts."If you leave a tip I match it... everything I need to make the lunches is basically subsidized by my tips and rides," she said.Wiles has her route down to a science now. On Saturdays and Sundays, she typically hands out more than 100 lunches.This summer, a customer started to help after hearing about what she does."It's the best thing in the world," said Ryan Caldwells. "It's a humbling experience. When I was a bellhop, I would see people freezing and under bridges and it just didn't sit well in my soul.""We started talking about his goals and dreams and he said he wanted to work with the homeless. I love having his help. He's energetic and an amazing 24-year-old kid," Wiles said.Recently, the duo started writing down the shoe sizes of people in the homeless community to get them boots for the colder months.NewsChannel5's Hannah McDonald: "How do you fit this all into your week?""What's important you fit into your week. You just have to determine what's important. When you stop and evaluate life, there are a lot of things that become important to you whether that's the legacy you leave behind or the ability to inspire someone else," said Wiles.Learn more about Homeless Helpers Lunches on Facebook. Taylor Swift styled her own make-up and hair for ACM Awards 2020 https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/taylor-swift-acm-awards-2020-make-hair-red-carpet-betty-b465236.html The Independent - Tennessee urn:uuid:b7aa44d0-a28b-0e8d-fab7-9ae2c67ecd01 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 10:56:13 +0000 &lt;p&gt;The star performed &lsquo;Betty&rsquo;, a track from her 2020 album Folklore&lt;/p&gt; Carrie Underwood, Thomas Rhett tie for top prize at ACMs https://www.newschannel5.com/news/carrie-underwood-thomas-rhett-tie-for-top-prize-at-acms News urn:uuid:f89aac7d-6616-511d-c7e5-7994842b759e Thu, 17 Sep 2020 04:06:33 +0000 In a surprise twist that fit an unexpected year of firsts, Carrie Underwood and Thomas Rhett tied for entertainer of the year at the Academy of Country Music Awards, the first time the top prize has ever been split between two artists. In a surprise twist that fit an unexpected year of firsts, Carrie Underwood and Thomas Rhett tied for entertainer of the year at the Academy of Country Music Awards, the first time the top prize has ever been split between two artists.Underwood and Rhett seemed equally surprised after host Keith Urban announced the tie at the awards show held at the Grand Ole Opry House in Nashville, Tennessee, on Wednesday.“Keith, what is happening right now?” Rhett asked, astounded, before thanking his family. Underwood appeared right after him remarking, “2020, right?” before adding, “I am more than happy to share this with Thomas Rhett.”The show on CBS had been delayed for months because of the pandemic, was moved from Las Vegas to Nashville for the first time and held without audiences in empty venues. There was a lot of anticipation for the show, which featured Taylor Swift making her first appearance at the ACMs in seven years.Underwood's win is her third total in that category and Rhett's first win. Coincidentally, a woman hasn't won that award since 2011 when Swift last won it.Swift’s acoustic performance of “betty” from her new album “Folklore,” was simple with just a couple of stage floodlights and a harmonica player for accompaniment, but her smile glowed as she strummed and sang the heartbreak song.Luke Combs, who had also been nominated for entertainer of the year, still went home a winner by picking up album of the year and male artist of the year. Amassing tremendous streaming numbers in his first couple years, Combs thanked fans for their support from the Bluebird Cafe.“This is a lot to process right now, I just can’t believe this,” Combs said. “I just want to thank everybody in my life, my team, my beautiful wife and the fans. You guys have done everything for me. ”Country group Old Dominion won song of the year and group of the year, as they acknowledged how the empty seats in front of them reminded them of people who they had lost.The awards show aired from empty venues in Nashville with no fans and no applause, even when winners got up live to accept their awards. Matthew Ramsey, lead singer of Old Dominion, said the empty venue and quiet made him think of friends and family they had lost.“I can feel them all,” Ramsey said on the stage of the Opry House as he accepted the award for song of the year for “One Man Band.” “They are so proud, and it’s such an honor to receive this in their presence.”Host Keith Urban noted all the changes this year for the show and for the country in general, saying 2020 has been an “unpredictable and unsettling year.” After noting wildfires on the West Coast, hurricanes in the South, Urban said the country is battling two pandemics: COVID-19 and social injustice.“Far too many lives have been lost to both,” he said. “But the examples set by essential workers, our first responders, along with the voices crying out for equality in all walks of life, have echoed around the world and right here in our country community.”Maren Morris, who was a leading nominee, won two awards, including female artist of the year and music event of the year.“This is so weird talking to no one, but I have so many people to thank. This is an award that I never expected to win,” said the new mother, who thanked her husband and baby boy, Hayes, before blurting out “Oh my God, I have to pee!”Blake Shelton and Gwen Stefani, who weren't in Nashville, were in a green screen room that turned into a virtual replica of the Bluebird for their duet “Happy Anywhere.” Shelton won single of the year for his song, “God's Country.”Miranda Lambert performed a stripped-down version of her No. 1 song “Bluebird,” at the Bluebird Cafe in a blue fringed shirt and a sparkly belt. Lambert’s vocals seemed to fill up the space in the tiny songwriters' club surrounded by tables and chairs, but no fans.Underwood sang a tribute to iconic female Opry members, including Patsy Cline, Reba McEntire, Martina McBride, Barbara Mandrell, Loretta Lynn and Dolly Parton. She effortlessly breezed through snippets of classics like “Crazy,” “You Ain’t Woman Enough,” “Why’d You Come in Here Lookin’ Like That,” and “Fancy.”“They are some of my heroes and I am so honored to stand alongside them as a fellow member of the Opry,” said Underwood, who sang her heart out to a venue that flickered with lights where people should have been.The eligibility period for this year’s show was calendar year 2019 and voting ended before the pandemic hit. Facing North: Jefferson Street Documentary Premieres Sept. 21 on NPT and Online https://tntribune.com/facing-north-jefferson-street-documentary-premieres-sept-21-on-npt-and-online/ Local – The Tennessee Tribune urn:uuid:5548fe97-21ed-7408-5a45-f771b9734f26 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 03:56:17 +0000 <p>NASHVILLE, Tennessee – Nashville Public Television’s (NPT’s) Facing North: Jefferson Street, Nashville documentary premieres on-air and online Monday, Sept. 21, at 8 p.m. with an encore broadcast Friday, Sept. 25, at 7 p.m. Jefferson Street is <a class="mh-excerpt-more" href="https://tntribune.com/facing-north-jefferson-street-documentary-premieres-sept-21-on-npt-and-online/" title="Facing North: Jefferson Street Documentary Premieres Sept. 21 on NPT and Online">[...]</a></p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/facing-north-jefferson-street-documentary-premieres-sept-21-on-npt-and-online/">Facing North: Jefferson Street Documentary Premieres Sept. 21 on NPT and Online</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> <p>NASHVILLE, Tennessee – Nashville Public Television’s (NPT&#8217;s) <strong>Facing North: Jefferson Street, Nashville</strong> documentary premieres on-air and online Monday, Sept. 21, at 8 p.m. with an encore broadcast Friday, Sept. 25, at 7 p.m.</p> <p>Jefferson Street is a fabled area of Nashville, known as the cultural center of the city’s African American community. Once a haven for former slaves, it is home to three iconic HBCUs – Fisk University, Meharry Medical College and Tennessee State University – that educated doctors, lawyers and civic leaders.</p> <p>NPT’s Facing North: Jefferson Street, Nashville premieres on-air and will be available to stream at <a href="https://video.wnpt.org/show/facing-north-jefferson-street-nashville/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=https://video.wnpt.org/show/facing-north-jefferson-street-nashville/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1600396698886000&amp;usg=AFQjCNF0jjcb7b9_5zHlrBGSYVJhXtB81w">video.wnpt.org/show/facing-north-jefferson-street-nashville</a>.</p> <p>The story of the North Nashville community is told by longtime residents and historians, as well as through archival and family photographs and film clips.</p> <p>“Jefferson Street represented a cross section of what the American dream would have looked like for many African Americans coming out of slavery,” Tennessee State University’s Dr. Learotha Williams Jr. says in Facing North: Jefferson Street, Nashville.</p> <p><a href="https://video.wnpt.org/video/facing-north-jefferson-street-nashville-trailer-npt/">Watch the Trailer</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com/facing-north-jefferson-street-documentary-premieres-sept-21-on-npt-and-online/">Facing North: Jefferson Street Documentary Premieres Sept. 21 on NPT and Online</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://tntribune.com">The Tennessee Tribune</a>.</p> Nashville public library could close several of its 21 locations if property tax repeal is passed https://www.newschannel5.com/news/local-news/nashville-public-library-could-close-several-of-its-21-locations-if-property-tax-repeal-is-passed News urn:uuid:02b7279e-926a-4fc0-b6f0-5247b3f77e1d Thu, 17 Sep 2020 03:35:20 +0000 A charter amendment, which would repeal the city's recent 34% property tax hike, could be up for a vote in December. It could mean major cuts to city services including the public library. A charter amendment, which would repeal the city's recent 34% property tax hike, could be up for a vote in December, but it could mean major cuts to city services including the public library.Kent Oliver, director of the Nashville Public Library says several of the city's 21 public library locations would have to close if the property tax is repealed."As the head of your library, I can tell you this would be catastrophic for the Nashville Public Library," said OliverBut he says the proposal could do more harm than good."There will be fewer programs, fewer staff in order to provide service; it’ll just really hit us very hard," said Oliver.The referendum, proposed by the group 4GoodGovernment, would cap tax increases in Davidson County at two percent effectively repealing the 34 percent property tax hike passed by Metro council members. If it makes it on the ballot for a special election in December, city officials including the mayor are worried about what it would mean for finances and essential services.Read More: Metro fire, police officials estimate hundreds of jobs lost if property tax referendum passes"We are as essential as any department can be and really trying to meet the goals of this administration," said Oliver.Oliver says the library could face a 35% reduction or a 5 or $5.5 million dollar deficit in just six months. This could close several of the 21 metro library locations."We’re looking at how many locations could remain open right now, our preliminary numbers we would only be able to have two or three locations remain open," said Oliver.He explained that it would impact literacy programs and children and adult education."It’s a very challenging feeling, a very frustrating feeling because we know people want our services and we know the library is very loved in the community."The Metro Election will decide Friday if the referendum will go on ballot for a December 5th special election. Graduation rates fall in Tennessee for the first time since 2013 https://www.newschannel5.com/news/graduation-rates-fall-in-tennessee-for-the-first-time-since-2013 News urn:uuid:a1d21d41-8f52-22f6-3275-622e88bc8ffe Thu, 17 Sep 2020 02:44:03 +0000 Graduation rates fell for the first time in seven years in Tennessee in 2020. Graduation rates dipped in 2020 in Tennessee - the first drop the state has seen in seven years.While the total decrease is .1%, from 89.7% to 89.6%, some worry the decrease is the sign of a deeper problem.J.C. Bowman with Professional Educators of Tennessee said the numbers are alarming because COVID-19 shouldn't have impacted graduation. Bowman noted the state put in place many exemptions for students in March and April. "There was no ACT requirements, no end of course exams [and] there was no TNReady exams," said Bowman. "So... why would those numbers drop?"With issues across the state with online learning and other changes in school procedures, Bowman worries the graduation rate may drop more in 2021."I think it would've been a more significant decrease," he said. "That's why I'm really concerned about it. I think that, other people who have looked at the data are starting to say wait a minute, are we starting to regress here in Tennessee with our graduation data?"Data from the Department of Education shows a steady increase since 2013, with only one year where the rate stayed stagnant.A spokesperson for TDOE said they're aware of the decrease and are working to identify the causes. Though, they contest that COVID had nothing to do with it. They said key infrastructure to help students prepare for graduation was impacted by coronavirus shutdowns between March and August."This year, in those critical months, there were significant COVID-19 disruptions that may have impacted how students received essential supports, just like they may have impacted the dip in post-secondary enrollment," said the spokesperson. "Any dips in graduation rate, even small declines and especially for our most vulnerable students, are highly concerning and the department will continue to work in partnership with districts and look at data and outcomes for students to inform strategies for recovering learning loss and setting students on a path to success."Some minority groups saw the largest decrease in graduation rates. Black students saw a decrease of .5% in graduation. Students who are learning English also saw a decrease of 3.3%. "School districts right now are struggling to stay open and I think eventually the end objective is getting our eye on kids and see where they're at and bridging the gaps in instructional abilities," said Bowman.He said he hopes he doesn't see the rate continue downwards. Police arrest two teens following police chase in Nashville https://www.newschannel5.com/news/police-arrest-two-teens-following-police-chase-in-nashville News urn:uuid:2f9fe721-d7b2-7ec5-0e07-598e0610f404 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 02:19:16 +0000 Metro Nashville Police officials say a 17 and 16-year-old led them on a chase from Old Hickory Boulevard to Interstate 40 in a stolen vehicle. A high-speed police chase in Nashville ended with police arrested two teens.Metro Nashville Police officials say a 17 and 16-year-old led them on a chase from Old Hickory Boulevard to Interstate 40 in a stolen vehicle.Officers spotted the stolen Subaru Outback on the 5700 block of Old Hickory Boulevard, and that's when the 17-year-old driver sped away, according to a MNPD press release.Officers deployed spike strips as the Subaru got on I-40 West, causing the teen to stop the vehicle. Police say he and his 16-year-old passenger ran into a wooded area where they were taken into custody.The 17-year-old admitted to being the driver and possessing a handgun found by officers. He was charged in Juvenile Court with theft of a motor vehicle, evading arrest, juvenile handgun possession, and driving without a license. His passenger was charged with theft of a motor vehicle and evading arrest.The owner of the stolen Subaru found his vehicle missing Tuesday at 5 a.m. It had been left unlocked with a key fob inside at a Maxwell Avenue home.