BREAKING NEWS: Science (2) http://feed.informer.com/digests/FY5FRZN5AD/feeder BREAKING NEWS: Science (2) Respective post owners and feed distributors Tue, 15 Jul 2014 00:03:07 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ We Asked the 2020 Democrats About Climate Change (Yes, All of Them). Here Are Their Ideas. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/18/us/politics/climate-change-democrats.html?partner=rss&emc=rss NYT > Science urn:uuid:0cd0eea4-3229-47a2-66e6-c19efae69927 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 04:14:55 +0000 The New York Times sent a climate policy survey to the 18 declared candidates. They all want to stick to the Paris Agreement. Beyond that, they diverge. El Al Airline Warns of Measles After Flight Attendant Falls Into Coma https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/18/travel/el-al-measles-flight-attendant.html?partner=rss&emc=rss NYT > Science urn:uuid:a734ae25-1f88-b47f-e230-a590d01997ed Fri, 19 Apr 2019 03:26:03 +0000 The woman was hospitalized after contracting the disease, and passengers on a flight from J.F.K. to Tel Aviv are told to watch for symptoms. Rabbit Bone Dated to First Century A.D. Found in England https://www.archaeology.org/7596-190418-england-roman-rabbit Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine urn:uuid:97cbf9b9-027b-4405-37e5-0c675ee9cf6f Fri, 19 Apr 2019 02:03:55 +0000 <p><img src="https://www.archaeology.org/images/News/1904/England-Roman-rabbit.jpg" alt="England Roman rabbit" width="355" height="508" class="caption" style="float: left;" title=" " longdesc="(© Judith Dobie, Historic England)" />WEST SUSSEX, ENGLAND—<em><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/apr/18/ben-fur-romans-brought-rabbits-to-britain-experts-discover" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Guardian</a></em> reports that zooarchaeologist Fay Worley of Historic England spotted a small fragment of a rabbit’s tibia bone in a box of artifacts that were unearthed in 1964 at Fishbourne Palace in southeast England. This was the site of a Roman villa whose wealthy inhabitants are known to have kept a varied menagerie. Worley said the bone, dated to the first century A.D., bears no butchery marks and appears to have been part of the earliest known rabbit in England. Further analysis suggests the rabbit was kept in confinement, she added, and may have been an exotic pet. Rabbits are native to Spain and Portugal, and it had been previously thought they were first introduced to Britain in the eleventh century by the Normans. To read about another recent discovery dating to the Roman period in England, go to <a href="https://www.archaeology.org/issues/332-1903/trenches/7389-trenches-england-roman-cemetery">Foreign Funeral Rites</a>.”</p> 13,500-Year-Old Burial Unearthed in China https://www.archaeology.org/7595-190418-china-prehistoric-burial Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine urn:uuid:99627068-e84a-6336-79da-e4a44c30473b Fri, 19 Apr 2019 01:26:11 +0000 <p>GUANGZHOU, CHINA—<a href="http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-04/16/c_137982200.htm" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Xinhua</em></a> reports that a 13,500-year-old tomb at the site of the Qingtang ruins in southeastern China has yielded the remains of a young woman who died between the ages of 13 and 18 and was buried, without her head, in a squatting position. Liu Suoqiang of the Guangdong Institute of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology said the woman was deliberately put in a squatting posture. “It points to the emergence of the concepts of life and death and of primitive religious beliefs,” Liu explained. Researchers are also trying to determine whether the woman’s head was missing due to natural causes, or whether it was removed. Burials containing remains arranged in a squatting posture have been found in other prehistoric tombs in southern China and Southeast Asia, though the symbolism of the posture is unclear. A bone pin was also found in the young woman's grave. For more on archaeology in China, go to&nbsp;“<a href="https://www.archaeology.org/issues/291-1803/trenches/6353-trenches-china-liangzhu-infrastructure">Early Signs of Empire</a>.”</p> Urine Salts in Soil May Mark Advent of Herding https://www.archaeology.org/7594-190418-turkey-herding-urine Archaeological News from Archaeology Magazine - Archaeology Magazine urn:uuid:748b5e95-6f7e-4b2b-522e-6091f958ca73 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 01:04:47 +0000 <p><img src="https://www.archaeology.org/images/News/1904/Turkey-herding-urine.jpg" alt="Turkey herding urine" width="355" height="228" class="caption" style="float: left;" title=" " longdesc="(Güneş Duru)" />NEW YORK, NEW YORK—According to a report in <em><a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/04/10000-year-old-urine-holds-clues-domestication/587260/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Atlantic</a></em>, Jordan Abell of Columbia University and his colleagues were able to detect a possible shift from hunting and gathering to herding at the site of Aşıklı Höyük, in Turkey’s central Anatolia region. Because the area is dry, Abell hypothesized that the sodium, nitrate, and chlorine salts contained in the urine of people and animals would not have been washed away from the soil by rain. The scientists analyzed soil samples from trash heaps, bricks, and hearths from different layers of the site, and found that between 10,000 and 9,700 years ago, the salt concentrations rose dramatically. This possible increase in urine output corresponds with archaeological evidence suggesting that the hunter-gatherers began to keep sheep and goats, but it appears that the shift toward herding may have occurred more rapidly than had been previously thought. Over a period of about 1,000 years, the researchers estimate that on average, some 1,800 people and animals lived at the settlement. That’s many more individuals than archaeologists estimate the housing for people at the site would have accommodated, suggesting that the number of goats or sheep living there had increased. The team members are now looking for a way to distinguish between human and animal urine salts as their research continues. For more on archaeology in Turkey dating to the Neolithic period, go to&nbsp;“<a href="https://www.archaeology.org/issues/281-1801/features/6165-turkey-neolithic-skull-cult">Skull Cult at Göbekli Tepe</a>.”</p> First Female Candidate for Astronaut Dies https://www.newser.com/story/274095/first-female-candidate-for-astronaut-dies.html Science &amp; Health from Newser urn:uuid:29e2930e-fa4b-6584-8f5d-0ff26bde28c4 Fri, 19 Apr 2019 00:37:00 +0000 <img src='http://img1-azrcdn.newser.com/image/1233488-0-20190418200658.jpeg?width=45&height=45&crop=Y' border='0' />America's first female astronaut candidate, pilot Jerrie Cobb, who pushed for equality in space but never reached its heights, has died. Cobb died in Florida at age 88 on March 18 after a brief illness, the AP reports. In 1961, Cobb became the first woman to pass astronaut testing. Altogether,... This Genetic Mutation Makes People Feel Full — All the Time https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/18/health/genetics-weight-obesity.html?partner=rss&emc=rss NYT > Science urn:uuid:a63d5585-ea21-8631-8757-c55acdc92622 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 23:55:16 +0000 Two new studies confirm that weight control is often the result of genetics, not willpower. Award-winning Tauranga resident being made Fellow of Royal Society of London https://www.nzherald.co.nz/science/news/article.cfm?c_id=82&objectid=12223746&ref=rss nzherald.co.nz - Science urn:uuid:9a2cfd4d-cb35-31a4-400d-82fc6c56f8fe Thu, 18 Apr 2019 23:48:22 +0000 An award-winning Tauranga mathematician, whose research into rotating black holes was recently proven, is to be made a Fellow of the Royal Society of London. The first image ever captured of a black hole was publicly released on... Norwich Cathedral peregrine falcons: A photographer's passion https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-47949748 BBC News - Science &amp; Environment urn:uuid:a7ff8fc7-ad2c-f617-cc32-ca3f13fc4d87 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 23:28:32 +0000 Chris Skipper has been photographing urban peregrines nesting at Norwich Cathedral for nearly a decade. 8 'Bubble Boy' Infants Cured, Thanks to HIV https://www.newser.com/story/274080/8-bubble-boy-infants-cured-thanks-to-hiv.html Science &amp; Health from Newser urn:uuid:529ddcba-0c38-929c-61c1-244cfc808b42 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 22:32:16 +0000 <img src='http://img2-azrcdn.newser.com/image/1233399-0-20190418175043.jpeg?width=45&height=45&crop=Y' border='0' />Eight for eight. That's the record scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital are thrilled about after using gene therapy to cure eight baby boys of the rare disorder commonly known as "bubble boy" disease, reports the BBC . What's more, the researchers used HIV to do it, notes the AP... Kentucky’s Senator McConnell Supports Bill to Raise Minimum Age to Buy Tobacco to 21 https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/18/health/mcconnell-tobacco-vaping-21.html?partner=rss&emc=rss NYT > Science urn:uuid:b54d935c-1085-ba84-3040-8cf9bfd3f4aa Thu, 18 Apr 2019 22:13:11 +0000 Seeking re-election to a seventh term, the senator cited the rise in teenage vaping as a reason to curtail sales of tobacco and other products. Mama Bear: Melissa Travis on Parenting, Education, and the Reasons 2019 Conference https://evolutionnews.org/2019/04/mama-bear-melissa-travis-on-parenting-education-and-the-reasons-2019-conference/ Evolution News &amp; Views urn:uuid:6ad9d500-0e9a-5df8-108c-402442ffe7a5 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 20:56:39 +0000 <p>Professor Travis has made it her mission to help parents — especially mothers — navigate tough questions about origins and beliefs. </p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://evolutionnews.org/2019/04/mama-bear-melissa-travis-on-parenting-education-and-the-reasons-2019-conference/">Mama Bear: Melissa Travis on Parenting, Education, and the Reasons 2019 Conference</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://evolutionnews.org">Evolution News</a>.</p> <p><img class="alignnone wp-image-16986 size-full" src="https://evolutionnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Houston-Facebook-Travis.jpg" alt="Melissa Cain Travis" width="1200" height="630" srcset="https://evolutionnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Houston-Facebook-Travis.jpg 1200w, https://evolutionnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Houston-Facebook-Travis-300x158.jpg 300w, https://evolutionnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Houston-Facebook-Travis-768x403.jpg 768w, https://evolutionnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Houston-Facebook-Travis-1024x538.jpg 1024w, https://evolutionnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Houston-Facebook-Travis-770x404.jpg 770w, https://evolutionnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Houston-Facebook-Travis-417x219.jpg 417w, https://evolutionnews.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Houston-Facebook-Travis-64x34.jpg 64w" sizes="(max-width: 1200px) 100vw, 1200px" /></p> <p>In a modern culture where so much attention is focused on public education and educators, it’s worth remembering the mantra that home is the first school, and parents are the first teachers. As a mother of two boys, Professor Melissa Cain Travis has made it her mission to help parents — especially mothers — navigate tough questions about origins and beliefs. As she remarked in my recent interview with her on <a href="https://www.discovery.org/multimedia/audio/2019/04/melissa-cain-travis-previews-reasons-2019-new-conversations-on-science-and-faith/"><i>ID the Future</i></a>:</p> <blockquote><p>I can’t emphasize enough how important it is to equip our children well with this kind of knowledge, so that when they are set free into the world of corporate America or the secular university, they’ll have the tools with which to counter some of the arguments that they hear.</p></blockquote> <p>Travis, who teaches philosophy at <a href="https://hbu.edu/contact/melissa-travis/">Houston Baptist University</a>, talked about the need for “a non-intimidating introduction” to conversations relating science and faith. Besides authoring <a href="https://www.discovery.org/store/product/science-and-the-mind-of-the-maker/"><i>Science and the Mind of the Maker</i></a> for a more general audience, she has written <a href="https://hcchristian.wordpress.com/2014/04/06/the-young-defenders-series-using-story-and-art-to-teach-apologetics-to-children/">children’s books</a> about faith questions and is affliated with the spirited online community <a href="https://mamabearapologetics.com/about/about-mama-bear/">Mama Bear Apologetics</a>. Their motto: “Rise up ladies. Rise up Mama Bears. The battle of ideas is real, and it is not taking prisoners.”</p> <h2>Equipping Parents to Talk About Worldviews</h2> <p>Travis is also taking many opportunities to connect with parents at events and conferences, including <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/reasons-2019-new-conversations-on-science-and-faith-tickets-55413616619?aff=scnhouston">Reasons 2019</a>, hosted by Discovery Institute, coming up next month in the Houston area. Melissa recalls:</p> <blockquote><p>I have heard many, many, <strong>many</strong> times from parents who have attended conferences like Reasons. They talk about how that experience has better equipped them to have really great worldview conversations with their kids.</p></blockquote> <p>Travis’s presentation at <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/reasons-2019-new-conversations-on-science-and-faith-tickets-55413616619?aff=scnhouston">Reasons 2019</a> will provide important context for the conference theme: New Conversations on Science and Faith. Also speaking at the conference are biologist Michael Behe, science historian Michael Keas, and chemist Marcos Eberlin who leads the intelligent design movement in Brazil. <b>The conference runs May 3-4 at Faith Bible Church in The Woodlands, TX. Register now through May 1 at </b><a href="https://www.discovery.org/e/5877/"><b>discovery.org/events</b></a>.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://evolutionnews.org/2019/04/mama-bear-melissa-travis-on-parenting-education-and-the-reasons-2019-conference/">Mama Bear: Melissa Travis on Parenting, Education, and the Reasons 2019 Conference</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://evolutionnews.org">Evolution News</a>.</p> Richards: False Prophecies of a Robotic Future Are Based on a False Darwinian Premise https://evolutionnews.org/2019/04/richards-false-prophecies-of-a-robotic-future-are-based-on-a-false-darwinian-premise/ Evolution News &amp; Views urn:uuid:2f202bfd-68ca-732d-48f9-c433b50a38bb Thu, 18 Apr 2019 20:41:10 +0000 <p>The rejoinder to this way of thinking, which Jay Richards expresses with wonderful concision, is that humans possess a unique capacity forever setting us apart from machines.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://evolutionnews.org/2019/04/richards-false-prophecies-of-a-robotic-future-are-based-on-a-false-darwinian-premise/">Richards: False Prophecies of a Robotic Future Are Based on a False Darwinian Premise</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://evolutionnews.org">Evolution News</a>.</p> <p>We’ve just posted some excellent comments by Discovery Institute Senior Fellow Jay Richards who spoke at the launch of Discovery’s <a href="https://centerforintelligence.org">Bradley Center on Natural and Artificial Intelligence</a> in Dallas. Watch it here:</p> <div class="video embed"><iframe width="1300" height="731" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BgD_bbZxEbg?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe></div> <p>As Dr. Richards observes, what he calls the Officially Smart People have been seeding the media conversation with a pair of contradictory prophecies about the rise of robots. One is ridiculously dystopian, the other absurdly utopian. In both, robots replace almost all human workers. In both cases, the scenario of total robotic replacement stems from a Darwinian premise that humans are nothing more than evolved “meat machines.” Richards:<span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></p> <blockquote><p>If that’s true, if we’re just machines, we’re produced by this blind Darwinian process and we become conscious and create things, then there’s no reason to assume that machines we designed to do thinking won’t do that better than we can and ultimately replace us without remainder. So that everything about us can ultimately be replaced mentally and then eventually physically through robotics.</p></blockquote> <p>The key phrase there is “without remainder.” The rejoinder to this way of thinking, which Jay Richards expresses with wonderful concision, is that humans possess a unique capacity forever setting us apart from machines. It’s the capacity for “creative freedom.” In this quick video, Jay illuminates just what that means. That is George Gilder and Robert Marks with him on the stage.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://evolutionnews.org/2019/04/richards-false-prophecies-of-a-robotic-future-are-based-on-a-false-darwinian-premise/">Richards: False Prophecies of a Robotic Future Are Based on a False Darwinian Premise</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://evolutionnews.org">Evolution News</a>.</p> When zapped with a laser, magnets behave like fluids https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2019/04/18/When-zapped-with-a-laser-magnets-behave-like-fluids/1561555602278/ Science News - UPI.com urn:uuid:7a1e6405-d477-1165-9a66-966aa7c7c40a Thu, 18 Apr 2019 20:31:03 +0000 <img src="https://cdnph.upi.com/ph/st/th/1561555602278/2019/i/15556074104162/v1.5/When-zapped-with-a-laser-magnets-behave-like-fluids.jpg"> Scientists have managed to figure out how a magnet manages to recover after being demagnetized by a brief laser blast. Scientists recover liquid blood from 42,000-year-old foal https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2019/04/18/Scientists-recover-liquid-blood-from-42000-year-old-foal/7931555608444/ Science News - UPI.com urn:uuid:5311a74e-4576-dafc-00f7-2f3ca15237f1 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 20:24:18 +0000 <img src="https://cdnph.upi.com/ph/st/th/7931555608444/2019/i/15556148377154/v1.5/Scientists-recover-liquid-blood-from-42000-year-old-foal.jpg"> An international team of scientists has extracted liquid blood and urine from a 42,000-year-old foal recovered Siberian permafrost. ‘Partly Alive’: Scientists Revive Cells in Brains From Dead Pigs https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/17/science/brain-dead-pigs.html?partner=rss&emc=rss NYT > Science urn:uuid:25fc7b29-f154-2155-df77-643ec08cba0f Thu, 18 Apr 2019 20:19:29 +0000 In a study that upends assumptions about brain death, researchers brought some cells back to life — or something like it. New York City Passes Historic Climate Legislation https://www.huffpost.com/entry/nyc-green-new-deal_n_5cb8761ee4b096f7d2dcfc40 Science on HuffingtonPost.com urn:uuid:03266942-e349-4ef5-c85a-b26be706f50d Thu, 18 Apr 2019 19:32:34 +0000 The Climate Mobilization Act lays the groundwork for New York City's own Green New Deal. The Climate Mobilization Act lays the groundwork for New York City's own Green New Deal. A quake every 3 minutes: California shaken by 10 times more temblors than previously known http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-small-earthquake-discovery-20190418-story.html Science - Los Angeles Times urn:uuid:108cab17-a824-5774-7da1-2f2f432ece29 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 18:20:00 +0000 <p>California has experienced 10 times more earthquakes than previously known, according to groundbreaking new research that has helped scientists better understand the region’s seismology.</p> <p>Scientists documented 1.8 million earthquakes in Southern California over the last decade — with 90% of them...</p> Extinction Rebellion: Climate protests 'diverting' London police https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-47974244 BBC News - Science &amp; Environment urn:uuid:c797f36a-746b-8dee-2aa3-91e6d0932900 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 18:18:47 +0000 Police rest days are cancelled as more than 1,000 officers are deployed in London. Tiny Earthquakes Happen Every Few Minutes In Southern California, Study Finds https://www.npr.org/2019/04/18/714621123/tiny-earthquakes-happen-every-few-minutes-in-southern-california-study-finds?utm_medium=RSS&utm_campaign=science NPR Topics: Health &amp;amp; Science urn:uuid:0a4091f9-6f94-56b8-0575-99bf7cba8b1c Thu, 18 Apr 2019 18:01:25 +0000 A new catalog of Southern California earthquakes is 10 times larger than its predecessor list. The details of frequent, small quakes help scientists study what triggers large, destructive ones. <img src='https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2019/04/18/ap_19016104913493_wide-6d1084457b07b37b4bfbf739e10477345b45293a.jpg?s=600' alt='The 1994 Northridge earthquake in Southern California, which killed dozens of people and caused this overpass to collapse, had a magnitude of 6.7. Scientists say improvements in quake detection reveal that hundreds of small quakes occur every day in the region.'/><p>A new catalog of Southern California earthquakes is 10 times larger than its predecessor list. The details of frequent, small quakes help scientists study what triggers large, destructive ones.</p><p>(Image credit: Douglas C. Pizac/AP)</p><img src='https://media.npr.org/include/images/tracking/npr-rss-pixel.png?story=714621123' /> Discovering microearthquakes http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/116358106-132.html Science - Los Angeles Times urn:uuid:2c1f5106-9316-70da-d6d1-52f41ee20736 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 18:00:00 +0000 <p>An animation of an earthquake swarm around the town of Cahuilla, Calif., in 2016 and 2017 shows how seismic activity gradually moved westward and became shallower, probably triggered by the movement of groundwater.</p> Doubling up piezoelectric performance http://www.physnews.com/materials-news/cluster1885306740/ Physics News urn:uuid:e7c91a8c-5ab6-746b-9792-852c49fae9bf Thu, 18 Apr 2019 17:47:28 +0000 Frank Gibson: Women have been involved in astronomy for a long time https://www.nzherald.co.nz/science/news/article.cfm?c_id=82&objectid=12222444&ref=rss nzherald.co.nz - Science urn:uuid:8d0f60b8-d679-21b4-1eec-5016a70a78e0 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 17:00:00 +0000 What aspect of Powehi appeals to you the most? Are you interested in the Kumulipo – the Hawaiian creation chant that is the origin of the name which translates to English as "the adorned fathomless dark creation". Are you impressed... Does A Year In Space Make You Older Or Younger? https://www.huffpost.com/entry/space-travel-make-you-older-younger_b_5cafe676e4b08a456a576d62 Science on HuffingtonPost.com urn:uuid:debaeb1f-197d-12eb-178d-2851b6e26df3 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 16:24:30 +0000 By Susan Bailey Daily life aboard the International Space Station moves fast. Really fast. Traveling at approximately 17,000 By Susan Bailey Daily life aboard the International Space Station moves fast. Really fast. Traveling at approximately 17,000 The Trumpeter Swan returns from the brink of extinction https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/trumpeter-swan-extinction-ontario-canada-north-america-a8867176.html - Science RSS Feed urn:uuid:fb12d234-5bca-5ec3-9597-f50f9706b024 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 16:07:16 +0000 The trumpeter swan was on the brink of extinction 50 years ago. But restoration efforts in Ontario have helped the species make a comeback throughout Canada and the United States, writes Karen Weintraub Physicists aim to catch slow-decaying dark particle inside LHC https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2019/04/18/Physicists-aim-to-catch-slow-decaying-dark-particle-inside-LHC/8601555598763/ Science News - UPI.com urn:uuid:5145a88a-2c18-7d80-4e82-56029ae5d505 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 15:59:55 +0000 <img src="https://cdnph.upi.com/ph/st/th/8601555598763/2019/i/15556007346464/v1.5/Physicists-aim-to-catch-slow-decaying-dark-particle-inside-LHC.jpg"> Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider have developed a new strategy for tracking down dark matter. Dr. Richard Green, 82, Dies; Challenged Psychiatry’s View of Homosexuality https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/17/obituaries/dr-richard-green-dead.html?partner=rss&emc=rss NYT > Science urn:uuid:8cd23cff-5cf2-c763-332c-f9e223d3f578 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 15:33:20 +0000 At a time when being gay was classified as a mental disorder, Dr. Green defied the advice of his colleagues and took a professional risk by arguing otherwise. Fighters in Crusades had families with locals and recruited offspring to cause, study shows https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/archaeology/crusades-genes-white-europeans-population-dna-lebanon-a8876411.html - Science RSS Feed urn:uuid:233c785c-7cdb-0efb-98db-a79ab2ca527b Thu, 18 Apr 2019 15:32:01 +0000 Research reveals medieval campaign lasting two centuries had little genetic impact on local population Astronauts might need to wear swimming goggles to avoid vision issues in spaceflight, study says https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/astronauts-swimming-goggles-vision-international-space-station-nasa-houston-a8876736.html - Science RSS Feed urn:uuid:c4b05db7-c200-d71d-ffda-45bc3246b644 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 15:23:07 +0000 Study could have 'important potential implications for future manned missions to the Moon, near-Earth asteroids, or Mars', expert says CEBAF turns on the charm http://www.physnews.com/physics-news/cluster1885237545/ Physics News urn:uuid:f0d3b469-51b1-fd69-97f4-7645fb05b95b Thu, 18 Apr 2019 15:16:34 +0000 The world's most advanced particle accelerator for investigating the quark structure of the atom's nucleus has just charmed physicists with a new capability. The production of charm quarks in ... Critic’s Pick: Celestial Visions on the Met Roof https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/18/arts/design/met-roof-garden-alicja-kwade.html?partner=rss&emc=rss NYT > Science urn:uuid:78967067-ff0b-55d2-3e5e-f6ee35a1a418 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 14:52:50 +0000 High above Manhattan, Alicja Kwade’s planetary sculpture captures the music of the spheres. Researchers use 3-D printer to print glass http://www.physnews.com/materials-news/cluster1885196028/ Physics News urn:uuid:05f772c7-977b-222c-0821-d61118d4ed77 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 14:46:54 +0000 For the first time, researchers have successfully 3-D printed chalcogenide glass, a unique material used to make optical components that operate at mid-infrared wavelengths. The ability to 3-D ... Researcher uses network science to understand how materials work http://www.physnews.com/materials-news/cluster1885192074/ Physics News urn:uuid:6d5f2d50-afd3-5d79-7bd2-c54d2dc656f6 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 14:46:40 +0000 Network science is how mathematicians and software designers construct complicated social networks like Facebook. But a group of Florida State University researchers has found that these equations ... Back on Earth, China's Mars simulation base greets first visitors https://www.reuters.com/article/us-space-exploration-china-mars/back-on-earth-chinas-mars-simulation-base-greets-first-visitors-idUSKCN1RT11S?feedType=RSS&feedName=scienceNews Reuters: Science News urn:uuid:351021ef-28f1-4d52-cc95-ac755de26353 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 14:41:17 +0000 About 100 excited Chinese teenagers completed a five-hour tour of a space colony against a desolate backdrop not unlike the desert planet of Tatooine, the home world of Luke Skywalker.<div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.reuters.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?a=GHbeyA2qD6M:OqjrKU0bFL4:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.reuters.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?a=GHbeyA2qD6M:OqjrKU0bFL4:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?i=GHbeyA2qD6M:OqjrKU0bFL4:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.reuters.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?a=GHbeyA2qD6M:OqjrKU0bFL4:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?i=GHbeyA2qD6M:OqjrKU0bFL4:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/reuters/scienceNews/~4/GHbeyA2qD6M" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Hoard of more than 550 rare gold and silver 14th century coins are worth an estimated £150,000 http://www.physnews.com/nano-physics-news/cluster1885176258/ Physics News urn:uuid:a02eaf5c-5b26-c700-b190-b355a3572501 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 14:17:02 +0000 A gold and silver coins hoard was found by four treasure hunters with a metal detector in a field in Buckinghamshire and includes 12 rare full gold coins from the time of the Black Death. Pink Moon: Stunning April full moon will actually appear orange https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/pink-moon-april-2019-orange-full-when-time-a8875936.html - Science RSS Feed urn:uuid:61fd78ea-218e-6716-ba84-8e6b63576249 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 13:33:00 +0000 Something known as Rayleigh scattering will mean Earth's satellite will appear a different colour Media coverage of violent events is found to fuel a cycle of stress http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-mass-shootings-media-coverage-ptsd-20190418-story.html Science - Los Angeles Times urn:uuid:0d237aa9-4694-f45c-498a-d4bce319bd2e Thu, 18 Apr 2019 13:30:00 +0000 <p>In an era of round-the-clock news cycles and ever-present social media apps, violent events that occur thousands of miles away can feel as though they strike increasingly close to home. So perhaps it should come as no surprise that wall-to-wall media coverage of mayhem can induce post-traumatic...</p> Ancient urine details hunting-to-herding transition 10,000 years ago https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2019/04/18/Ancient-urine-details-hunting-to-herding-transition-10000-years-ago/8791555590710/ Science News - UPI.com urn:uuid:3a62f547-06e5-ebf1-96ed-89943a3ec8a5 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 13:20:38 +0000 <img src="https://cdnph.upi.com/ph/st/th/8791555590710/2019/i/15555926621312/v1.5/Ancient-urine-details-hunting-to-herding-transition-10000-years-ago.jpg"> Urine salts helped archaeologists track the adoption of herding among settlers in ancient Turkey. Kathryn Mariner’s Contingent Kinship http://www.anthropology-news.org/index.php/2019/04/18/kathryn-mariners-contingent-kinship/ Anthropology-News urn:uuid:1d311fb6-e1e4-f4cb-d860-7fc700f6b9a3 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 13:00:31 +0000 In adoption, the child is an imagined future that is produced not only through the investment and circulation of money, but also through practices of observation, waiting, and worry, involving tremendous investments of time and affective energy too. Adoptive kinship is thus highly speculative, in more ways than one. My hope is that within the contemporary climate of neoliberalism, a multivalent concept like intimate speculation can help us think through various social formations beyond adoption. <p>This month, the Association for Black Anthropologists presents an interview with <a href="http://www.sas.rochester.edu/ant/people/faculty/mariner_kathryn/index.html">Kathryn Mariner</a>, assistant professor of anthropology and visual and cultural studies at the University of Rochester.</p> <p><img src="http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Mariner_Headshot2019.jpg" alt="A close-up photograph of the author, Dr. Kathryn Mariner, gazing into the camera. She is wearing a black jacket, and golden earrings." class="alignright wp-image-85061" width="371" height="495" srcset="http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Mariner_Headshot2019.jpg 3072w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Mariner_Headshot2019-215x287.jpg 215w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Mariner_Headshot2019-150x200.jpg 150w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Mariner_Headshot2019-768x1024.jpg 768w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Mariner_Headshot2019-240x320.jpg 240w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Mariner_Headshot2019-720x960.jpg 720w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Mariner_Headshot2019-1x1.jpg 1w" sizes="(max-width: 371px) 100vw, 371px" /></p> <p>Her forthcoming book, <em><a href="https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520299566/contingent-kinship">Contingent Kinship: The Flows and Futures of Adoption in the United States</a></em>, examines the making of kin and futures through the lens of transracial adoption. Based upon ethnographic research with First Steps, an adoption agency specializing in transracial adoption in Chicago, Mariner examines the role of agency workers in negotiating relationships between expectant mothers and prospective adopters.</p> <p><strong>Many of us begin our work from a central curiosity or frustration with discourse about a subject. What are those seeds in this work, and what brought you to this project?</strong></p> <p>I came to this project with an abiding interest in race and kinship for reasons which will become clear and are elaborated further in the book. When I started the project, I was intensely curious about the adoption process itself—the nuts and bolts of how social workers brokered these exchanges—how it worked, and what “working” even meant in this context. I had read many accounts of the post-adoption experiences of adoptees and adoptive families, but I wanted to get at their conditions of possibility. I think a major contribution of the book is its attention to the various ways the adoption process can fail. Indeed, I found that the adoptive family is only one possible outcome of the adoption process. Another of my central curiosities with transracial adoption has always been the ways in which popular discourse erases so much of the nuance, and in particular, the structural conditions that make adoptive families possible in the United States. Domestic transracial adoption—often celebrated as progressive or even humanitarian, “the best of a bad situation”—tends to get cleaved off from its own structural conditions of possibility (residential segregation, poverty, dispossession, the devaluation of Black and other forms of marginalized motherhood). I hope my book helps elucidate the reverberations and traces of these enduring historical patterns in the contemporary engineering of kinship, and serves to inspire imaginings of other, better futures.</p> <p><strong><em>Contin</em></strong><strong><em>gent Kinship</em> begins with a discussion of your own positionality with respect to adoption—as ethnographer and trained social worker—in your field site. How did you navigate these roles, and what are some of the moments that crystallized this conflict? </strong></p> <p><i> </i>One of the things that has drawn me to anthropology is its robust tradition of reflective critique. Locating ourselves with respect to our sites and subjects is such a crucial skill and tool for social analysis. In addition to being an ethnographer trained in clinical social work, I am also a transracial adoptee, so my positionality was often front-and-center throughout my fieldwork—allowing me to connect more deeply with my interlocutors at certain times, and creating uncomfortable distance and misunderstanding at others.[pquote]One of the things that has drawn me to anthropology is its robust tradition of reflective critique. [/pquote] My way of navigating this in the book was to consider a question posed to me by my series editor, Kevin Lewis O’Neill: “When are <em>you </em>evidence?” The question was initially a way to think through the writerly issue of using the first person, but it really helped me fold issues of positionality into the analysis itself, rather than simply relegating it to something like a “positionality statement” or similar mechanism in the discussion of methods. In this way, I could think of my refusal to participate in expectant mother recruitment at one point in my fieldwork as evidence of the politics of invisibility I describe in relation to the figure of the “birth mother.” I could think of one expectant mother’s curiosity about my experience growing up as evidence of the temporal logics of imagined future kinship. I could think more critically about the ways in which my interviewing encounters with prospective adopters sometimes reproduced certain aspects of home study surveillance. I think my position as an adoptee complicated the research in perhaps more interesting ways than my position as a “social worker,” since I completed my social work degree in the midst of my fieldwork and went right back into my anthropology PhD program, without formally practicing social work beyond my graduate training. In that sense, during fieldwork, “ethnographer” was my primary professional identity, although it was one highly inflected by social-work-y ways of thinking and my association with the adoption agency as institution, if that makes sense. As a result, I tend to think of social work as a kind of field language that shaped the way I moved through ethnographic spaces in a variety of ways.</p> <p><strong><img src="http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/8-18-Mariner_Contingent_comp.jpg" alt="A book cover for the book Contingent Kinship which depicts the text &quot;Contingent Kinship: The Flows and Futures of Adoption in the United States&quot; against a backdrop of red and pink flowers with thin petals." class="alignleft wp-image-85062" width="367" height="550" srcset="http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/8-18-Mariner_Contingent_comp.jpg 900w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/8-18-Mariner_Contingent_comp-200x300.jpg 200w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/8-18-Mariner_Contingent_comp-133x200.jpg 133w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/8-18-Mariner_Contingent_comp-768x1152.jpg 768w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/8-18-Mariner_Contingent_comp-213x320.jpg 213w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/8-18-Mariner_Contingent_comp-720x1080.jpg 720w, http://www.anthropology-news.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/8-18-Mariner_Contingent_comp-1x1.jpg 1w" sizes="(max-width: 367px) 100vw, 367px" /></strong><strong>You develop the concept of “intimate speculation” with respect to the relationships between actors in cases of adoption. Can you share what you mean by this?</strong></p> <p>To go back to this movement of attention from outcomes to process, in the book, intimate speculation is way to describe the temporally-inflected aspects of the adoption process—so it is a shift in thinking away from the adoptive family as adoption’s logical outcome. This move doesn’t so much ignore outcomes, as it opens up all kinds of other possibilities for what an outcome might be. The concept of intimate speculation describes the construction of adoptive kinship as at once anticipatory, economic, and visual—three frames for thinking through speculation more broadly. I chart how, for example, the anxieties felt by prospective adopters, the brokerage activities of social workers, and the erasure of expectant mothers are all deeply imbricated in the production of the adoptable child as a potent and highly contingent imagined future.</p> <p><strong>I’m struck by how language associated with the economic and financial markets—risk, investment, futures—permeates the adoption landscape. How can we think through adoption as an enterprise that is economic but not, as you say, “all about the money”? </strong></p> <p><i> </i>This goes back to intimate speculation as a frame for thinking both through and beyond the economic. [pquote]The concept of intimate speculation describes the construction of adoptive kinship as at once anticipatory, economic, and visual—three frames for thinking through speculation more broadly.[/pquote] In adoption, the child is an imagined future that is produced not only through the investment and circulation of money, but also through practices of observation, waiting, and worry, involving tremendous investments of time and affective energy too. Adoptive kinship is thus highly speculative, in more ways than one. My hope is that within the contemporary climate of neoliberalism, a multivalent concept like intimate speculation can help us think through various social formations beyond adoption—such as home ownership, higher education, and immigration, all areas where understanding the temporal resonances of intimacy and economy are crucial. The work of Viviana Zelizer and the Gens collective (Laura Bear, Karen Ho, Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing, and Sylvia Yangisako), among other scholars grappling with these intersections, has been really influential for me in this respect.</p> <p><strong>Much like birth, bringing a book into the world is a complex endeavor. What have you learned about ethnography, and what advice might you give to scholars doing this for the first time? </strong><strong></strong></p> <p>Baby steps, no pun intended! In all seriousness, it is vital to remember that a book—most academic writing projects, really, at least in my experience—is a marathon, not a sprint. This book took ten years. I found it really helpful to set goals at various scales, and also to simply trust the process. Also, and apropos of this, I think I have learned that the book is not my “baby,” but rather the crystallization of perhaps a decade of thought frozen at a particular moment in time. As in, it isn’t really finished; it just ends in what I hope is an interesting place. Books can be distressing to write, as we know, because life “in the field” goes on happily (or unhappily, as the case may be) after we leave. And we keep growing and developing as ethnographers too. I am starting a new project now on urban racial segregation, and it is exciting to refine my ethnographic technique this time around, as I am sure I will continue to do with each subsequent project. It is a great comfort to me that I will hopefully get to write another book after this one—indeed, I hope Contingent Kinship is the “worst” book I ever write (in the sense that ongoing improvement is the goal). Lastly, it is important to remember that although writing can be isolating at times, we do not write books alone—so many people helped usher this book into the world, not least of whom are those in whose lives its insights are rooted. So while in a sense it is “my” book, it belongs to them as well. They are its condition of possibility, and for that I am grateful.</p> <p><strong>Kathryn Mariner </strong>is assistant professor of anthropology and visual and cultural studies at the University of Rochester. Her book, <em><a href="https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520299566/contingent-kinship">Contingent Kinship: The Flows and Futures of Adoption in the United States</a> </em>is forthcoming in 2019.<strong><br /> </strong></p> <p>This interview was brought to you by <strong>Michelle Munyikwa</strong> and <strong>Amelia Herbert</strong>, Contributing Editors for the Association of Black Anthropologists. If you&#8217;d like to contribute to this column, please reach out to us at <a href="mailto:munyikwa@sas.upenn.edu">munyikwa@sas.upenn.edu</a> and <a href="mailto:ash2189@tc.columbia.edu">ash2189@tc.columbia.edu</a>.</p> <p>Cite as: Mariner, Kathryn. 2019. “Kathryn Mariner&#8217;s Contingent Kinship.” <em>Anthropology News</em> website, April 18, 2019. DOI: 10.1111/AN.1144</p> Climate change: Sir David Attenborough warns of 'catastrophe' https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-47976184 BBC News - Science &amp; Environment urn:uuid:dd90f6fc-b490-c6c2-9932-109b823661ff Thu, 18 Apr 2019 12:42:27 +0000 Veteran naturalist's BBC programme on climate change is his strongest warning yet on threat of rising temperatures. Light and peptides: New method diversifies natural building blocks of life http://www.physnews.com/bio-medicine-news/cluster1885111017/ Physics News urn:uuid:79bedf81-e7e7-352d-d62b-f35a5e4e5365 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 12:16:49 +0000 Discovering new biological targets is a critical part of our ongoing battle against diseases. Over the years, scientists have made impressive progress towards the understanding of biological ... 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Scientists measure what makes viper fangs so sharp https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2019/04/18/Scientists-measure-what-makes-viper-fangs-so-sharp/2051555556040/ Science News - UPI.com urn:uuid:8a4dab1c-a1ac-ead2-3af4-ae1332aed108 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 12:10:51 +0000 <img src="https://cdnph.upi.com/ph/st/th/2051555556040/2019/i/15555573961733/v1.5/Scientists-measure-what-makes-viper-fangs-so-sharp.jpg"> In an effort to figure out which physical characteristics best correlate with puncturing performance, scientists chose to study the sharpness of viper fangs. Fossils of massive &apos;lion&apos; larger than a polar bear discovered in Kenya https://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/lion-fossils-megafauna-kenya-ohio-university-polar-bear-a8875731.html - Science RSS Feed urn:uuid:dc187d33-3fb4-37e1-2037-a30e11e7d13e Thu, 18 Apr 2019 12:06:26 +0000 Once apex predator across Africa, species weighed over a tonne and half and ate elephant-like creatures Fossil hunter tries to sell baby T-Rex skeleton on eBay for £2.25m, enraging scientists https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/fossil-t-rex-skeleton-dinosaur-ebay-auction-bid-science-a8876061.html - Science RSS Feed urn:uuid:c6c60a02-c332-34b1-735a-0eceef565965 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 11:37:30 +0000 Alan Detrich, who has chased dinosaur remains for 30 years, was voted one of People magazine's 'Top Bachelors' in 2001 Out of a drawer and into your nightmares comes a vicious ancient beast https://www.reuters.com/article/us-science-mammal/out-of-a-drawer-and-into-your-nightmares-comes-a-vicious-ancient-beast-idUSKCN1RU18A?feedType=RSS&feedName=scienceNews Reuters: Science News urn:uuid:f6683266-e740-0116-ea05-9c564d75c788 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 11:10:48 +0000 When Ohio University integrative biologist Nancy Stevens peered into a drawer in the wooden cabinets on the top floor of a Nairobi museum in 2010, she saw a chunk of rock containing massive teeth and knew she had come across something important.<div class="feedflare"> <a href="http://feeds.reuters.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?a=ahCBP0FUzNc:x2r5n2-wH2E:yIl2AUoC8zA"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?d=yIl2AUoC8zA" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.reuters.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?a=ahCBP0FUzNc:x2r5n2-wH2E:F7zBnMyn0Lo"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?i=ahCBP0FUzNc:x2r5n2-wH2E:F7zBnMyn0Lo" border="0"></img></a> <a href="http://feeds.reuters.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?a=ahCBP0FUzNc:x2r5n2-wH2E:V_sGLiPBpWU"><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~ff/reuters/scienceNews?i=ahCBP0FUzNc:x2r5n2-wH2E:V_sGLiPBpWU" border="0"></img></a> </div><img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/reuters/scienceNews/~4/ahCBP0FUzNc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/> Imperial Irrigation District sues to block Colorado River drought plan http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-imperial-sues-mwd-colorado-drought-plan-20190418-story.html Science - Los Angeles Times urn:uuid:b989a2f8-6671-d53f-32e1-00737e900cab Thu, 18 Apr 2019 10:00:00 +0000 <p>Just as a long-negotiated agreement for how California and six other Western states will deal with drought on the Colorado River was about to cross the finish line, the river’s biggest user put up a roadblock.</p> <p>The Imperial Irrigation District in southeast California filed a lawsuit Tuesday asking...</p> 'Giant lion' fossil found in Kenya museum drawer https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-47976205 BBC News - Science &amp; Environment urn:uuid:71280bc3-a4a8-5eaa-b5ef-227e0d01adf1 Thu, 18 Apr 2019 09:42:47 +0000 The bones of the huge creature belong to a new species which roamed east Africa 20 million years ago. ‘I Want What My Male Colleague Has, and That Will Cost a Few Million Dollars’ https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/18/magazine/salk-institute-discrimination-science.html?partner=rss&emc=rss NYT > Science urn:uuid:aa64d164-eb97-719d-311a-eca7a7557b7b Thu, 18 Apr 2019 09:00:02 +0000 Women at the Salk Institute say they faced a culture of marginalization and hostility. The numbers from other elite scientific institutions suggest they’re not alone.