Ohio State News http://feed.informer.com/digests/9WEYG6SN7W/feeder Ohio State News Respective post owners and feed distributors Wed, 19 Aug 2020 18:41:29 +0000 Feed Informer http://feed.informer.com/ Students hold second protest in response to public safety notice https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/students-hold-second-protest-in-response-to-public-safety-notice/ The Lantern urn:uuid:dd534faf-0922-97db-3ee1-9766bb66f517 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:13:47 +0000 More than 100 demonstrators gathered outside of Bricker Hall Thursday to protest the university’s handling of a public safety notice for the second time in two weeks.  The protesters met at 1:30 p.m. at Bricker Hall, home to University President Kristina M. Johnson’s office, and began marching around 1:45 p.m. The demonstrators moved to the [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183801" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183801" id="longdesc-return-183801" class="size-full wp-image-183801" tabindex="-1" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465.jpg" alt="Destiny Brown, a fourth-year in political science, addresses the demonstration outside Bricker Hall" width="1920" height="1280" longdesc="http://www.thelantern.com?longdesc=183801&amp;referrer=183840" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183801" class="wp-caption-text">Destiny Brown, a fourth-year in political science, addresses the demonstration outside Bricker Hall Thursday. Credit: Max Garrison | Assistant Campus Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">More than 100 demonstrators gathered outside of Bricker Hall Thursday to protest the university’s handling of a public safety notice for the second time in two weeks. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The protesters met at 1:30 p.m. at Bricker Hall, home to University President Kristina M. Johnson’s office, and began marching around 1:45 p.m. The demonstrators moved to the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Chemistry Building, where Johnson was visiting engineering students, according to her Twitter account.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is the second protest in response to a Sept. 3 public safety notice about a pair of aggravated assaults on white students by a Black man and woman near campus that were classified under federal law as hate crimes. The demonstrators said the notice and the subsequent handling of the situation was rushed and endangered Black students. </span></p> <p><iframe title="Students hold second protest in response to public safety notice" width="750" height="422" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HLMjWKASmbc?feature=oembed" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I want to make it abundantly clear,” Amanya Paige, a second-year in strategic communication and sociology and vice chair of systems and operations of the Black Caucus, said through a megaphone. “We are upset, we are out here protesting because a target was put on our backs because of the public safety notice.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Destiny Brown, a fourth-year in political science, said the protest was not organized by an individual or organization, but rather the larger Black community at Ohio State. Brown is also the director of governmental relations for the Undergraduate Student Government and was a key speaker at both the initial Sept. 8 protest and Thursday’s protest.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After the Sept. 8 protest, demonstrators emailed demands to Kristina M. Johnson, Senior Vice President of Administration and Planning Jay Kasey and Director of Public Safety Monica Moll.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The demands include calls for Kristina M. Johnson to produce an action plan to address racial injustice in public safety and for Ohio State to send out a university-wide email addressing its errors in the handling of the public safety notice and its aftermath.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">University spokesperson Ben Johnson said in an email Wednesday that all three officials received the demands and that no email appeared to request a meeting with them.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State Chief of Police Kimberly Spears-McNatt and Moll have </span><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/university-police-chief-director-of-public-safety-address-safety-notice-controversy-ahead-of-thursday-protest/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">addressed</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> the notice and said that the mistake was an “oversight” and that they remain committed to the safety of all students. Moll sent a follow-up email to the public safety notice Sept. 4 that provided additional information about the incidents.</span></p> <div id="attachment_183809" style="width: 540px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183809" class="wp-image-183809 size-medium" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-530x353.jpg" alt="Demonstrators write and draw messages with chalk on the sidewalk outside the CBEC building Thursday." width="530" height="353" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-1440x960.jpg 1440w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576.jpg 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 530px) 100vw, 530px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183809" class="wp-caption-text">Demonstrators write and draw messages with chalk on the sidewalk outside the chemical and biomolecular engineering and chemistry building Thursday. Credit: Max Garrison | Assistant Campus Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brown said an official from the Department of Public Safety requested a meeting with her, but she declined.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is the meeting, this is the table,” Brown said of Thursday’s protest. “You are called to the table. This is the community talking to you.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The protesters left chalk messages on the sidewalk outside of the CBEC building and moved back to Bricker Hall, where they left more messages. They then moved onto Annie and John Glenn Avenue and began to block traffic.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The protesters marched through campus before heading south on Neil Avenue.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Speakers reminded the protesters to maintain social distancing, use hand sanitizer and hydrate throughout the demonstration. COVID-19-related restrictions do not apply to gatherings for the purpose of expressing First Amendment speech, Kristina M. Johnson said in a universitywide email Aug. 11.</span></p> Letter from the editor: The Lantern’s coverage of protests and their participants https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/letter-from-the-editor-the-lanterns-coverage-of-protests-and-their-participants/ The Lantern urn:uuid:3af0bc33-eae1-4b43-68d4-8d457dbb26db Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:12:27 +0000 Dear readers:  We are living through momentous times, as our country wrestles with racial injustice amid a pandemic. Ohio State students joined the nation in protest for the Black Lives Matter Movement earlier this summer, and in recent days and weeks their protests have come to Bricker Hall.  Students there gathered in support of Black [&#8230;] <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dear readers: </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We are living through momentous times, as our country wrestles with racial injustice amid a pandemic. Ohio State students joined the nation in protest for the Black Lives Matter Movement earlier this summer, and in recent days and weeks their protests have come to Bricker Hall. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Students there gathered in support of Black Buckeyes and to ask the university to take action that would make Black students feel supported and safe in light of the university’s handling of the Sept. 3 public safety notice. The Lantern has covered these protests to document history and publish truth.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Society of Professional Journalists’ Code of Ethics states that the mission of journalists is to “boldly tell the story of the diversity and magnitude of the human experience. Seek sources whose voices we seldom hear.” That is what we strive to do as the independent student voice of Ohio State.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">To be clear, The Lantern fully and completely supports our Black students. This is not a two-sided issue; Black students and Black lives matter, here and everywhere. It is not — and never has been — the intention of our news organization to make anyone feel less than heard.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Lantern has been asked to blur the faces of protesters. We understand protesters’ safety concerns in making such requests, but demonstrators are in a public space, and as such are subject to being recorded. Altering images also runs counter to journalistic ethics, because it brings into question the authenticity of our images. By granting anonymity in this form, it might lead other groups, anywhere, with any message to request the same. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Speakers have directly addressed Lantern reporters during protests asking for their names and photos to be excluded from our coverage. A person, however, who chooses to speak at a protest does so in public which means legally and ethically they may be recorded by journalists and others. Some of the speakers at protests have also been public officials who hold office in Ohio State’s Undergraduate Student Government. The very role of journalists, operating as the Fourth Estate, is to report upon government officials doing the people’s business.   </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A public official asking reporters to exclude their face and name at a public protest is a form of censorship of the free and independent press, and a violation of the First Amendment of the U.S.  Constitution. We would not blur the faces of administrators, mayors or police officers, nor would we blur the faces of those representing the student body.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We cover protests by any group, because it is news that happens on our campus. It is our charge and responsibility to cover movements that involve and impact the lives of students. We will report them accurately and fairly, and will uphold the same standard for every group that assembles on our campus.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We want the message of these groups to be heard, and we want Ohio State students, faculty, staff and alumni to look back at The Lantern archives 100 years from now and understand what these times were like. That has been the mission of The Lantern since its inception, and it will be our mission every day moving forward.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sincerely,</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sam Raudins</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Editor-in-chief</span></p> Football: Big Ten implements strict health guidelines for a smooth return to play https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/football-big-ten-implements-strict-health-guidelines-for-a-smooth-return-to-play/ The Lantern urn:uuid:b9469093-027f-5769-e444-62612b25881d Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:11:52 +0000 It’ll be a game of red light, green light for Big Ten teams this season.  The Big Ten’s decision Wednesday to reinstate the football season, starting Oct. 23, comes with strict health and safety guidelines, including a color code to represent infection rates in order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Among the most [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_172378" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_5897.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-172378" class="wp-image-172378 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_5897.jpg" alt="Ohio State football players run onto the field to warm up before the road game against Nebraska." width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_5897.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_5897-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_5897-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_5897-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_5897-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_5897-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_5897-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-172378" class="wp-caption-text">The Buckeyes run onto the field for practice before the game against Nebraska at Memorial Stadium on Sept. 28. Ohio State won 48-7. Credit: Amal Saeed | Former Photo Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’ll be a game of red light, green light for Big Ten teams this season. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Big Ten’s decision Wednesday to reinstate the football season, starting Oct. 23, comes with strict health and safety guidelines, including a color code to represent infection rates in order to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Among the most influential of the protocols is the introduction of rapid antigen testing, which aims to create a clean and safe playing field for student-athletes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The strategy, to be honest, is one where we’re trying to rapidly identify anyone that may have the virus and immediately remove them from their population, whether that be practice or competition,” James Borchers, Ohio State Department of Athletics head team physician, said Wednesday in a press conference. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The strategy requires all student-athletes, coaches and trainers to test six days a week — the exception being on days after games — and that results must be completed and recorded prior to the start of any games or practices. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Big Ten will begin its daily testing campaign by Sept. 30. Borchers said that teams will continue with their current testing protocols until the Big Ten is able to provide the tests. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That gives us over a three-week runway for this testing process,” Borchers said. “We know that, in discussions with our medical staffs, many of our institutions are going to obviously continue to follow their current testing recommendations.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This daily antigen testing strategy played a key factor in overturning the initial postponement decision, Ohio State President Kristina M. Johnson said Wednesday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I think what put it over the top, and really the work over the last month, again, by the medical committee chaired by Dr. Borchers and (Penn State) athletic director Sandy Barbour, is the following, so it’s really the testing protocol,” Johnson said in a conference call. “You can guarantee a clean playing field and I think that’s our guiding principle.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Among the other guidelines in place is a color-coded model that will indicate if it’s safe for a team to continue to practice and compete. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The color-coded model includes green, orange and red color denominations. A chief infection officer at each university will monitor data that comes from the team positivity rate based on the number of positive tests divided by total tests administered and population positivity rate, derived from the number of positive individuals out of the total at-risk population. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A team will receive a green team positivity designation if the positive test rate out of the total number of tests administered throughout a seven-day rolling average is below 2 percent, an orange designation if it is between 2 and 5 percent and a red determination if it exceeds 5 percent.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The population positivity rate thresholds are slightly higher, with a green designation of below 3.5 percent positive rate from individuals in the at-risk population based on a seven-day rolling average, orange between 3.5 and 7.5 percent and red exceeding 7.5 percent.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“For our population positivity rate, that’s the team population positivity rate,” Borchers said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Teams will be allowed to continue normal practice and competition if they receive one green designation and a second designation of either green or orange. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Two orange rates or an orange paired with a red will force a team to proceed with caution, enhance COVID-19 protocols and consider the ability to continue with competition. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A double-red designation will force a team to stop practices and competition for at least seven days before a reassessment can occur. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On a Thursday appearance on the “Ryan Day Show” on 97.1 The Fan, Borchers said the idea behind the data-driven approach is to provide transparency. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s yet to be determined, I think, how the Big Ten conference will look at that data weekly and provide reports, but the intention is certainly to be transparent and forward-facing about what each team’s situation is and to try and make certain that everyone understands what the safety parameters are about having competition in that week,” Borchers said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Among the chief concerns of Big Ten presidents and chancellors when they decided to postpone the season was the link between COVID-19 and the heart condition myocarditis. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“When the decision was made Aug. 11 to postpone, there were concerns from the presidents and chancellors group about what they had been hearing about the potential for myocarditis,” Borchers said. “We presented a plan that out of an abundance of caution and safety, that would be how we would start with that evaluation knowing that we’ll continue to investigate it, study it and understand the best way forward.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Myocarditis is the inflammation of the middle wall of the heart, which could lead to an irregular heartbeat and a reduction in the heart’s ability to pump blood. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Big Ten is requiring all student-athletes to undergo a cardiac evaluation following a positive coronavirus test. Student-athletes will then need to receive clearance from a cardiologist to return to team activities. The earliest a player can return to action following a positive test is 21 days. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Along with the medical protocols, all 14 Big Ten universities will establish a cardiac registry in order to further evaluate the link between COVID-19 and myocarditis in young athletes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With the strict guidelines in place, Borchers said that the Big Ten is ready for a return to play. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I think for the Big Ten conference and what the questions were that we were asked to look at, we’ve charted a path forward to allow us to begin getting back to competition,” Borchers said.</span></p> Swimming and Diving: Ohio State looks to former Big Ten swimmers to act as volunteer coaches https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/swimming-and-diving-ohio-state-looks-to-former-big-ten-swimmers-to-act-as-volunteer-coaches/ The Lantern urn:uuid:e5d8ab01-1fa6-fe72-d1f9-3371a90930d4 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:11:44 +0000 In order to help performances in the pool, the Buckeyes have turned to help from their former rivals.  On Sept. 4, Bill Dorenkott, director of swimming and diving at Ohio State, announced that former Iowa swimmer Kyle Patnode and former Wisconsin swimmer Mike Sullivan would join the coaching staff as volunteer assistants for this upcoming [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183796" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183796" class="wp-image-183796 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554.jpg" alt="Kyle Patnode swimming in a pool" width="1920" height="1240" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554-530x342.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554-1024x661.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554-557x360.jpg 557w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554-768x496.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554-1536x992.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554-1080x698.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1554-1440x930.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183796" class="wp-caption-text">Kyle Patnode swimming at the University of Iowa. Credit: Courtesy of Ohio State Athletics</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In order to help performances in the pool, the Buckeyes have turned to help from their former rivals. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On Sept. 4, Bill Dorenkott, director of swimming and diving at Ohio State, announced that former Iowa swimmer Kyle Patnode and former Wisconsin swimmer Mike Sullivan would join the coaching staff as volunteer assistants for this upcoming season.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dorenkott said he is impressed by Patnode and Sullivan’s desire to become coaches, and his goal is to enhance their skill sets.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I think it says a lot about someone that they are willing to step into a position that by definition is a volunteer position. Kyle and Mike are high-character guys and they have an ability to connect with young people,” Dorenkott said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Patnode was a four-year letterwinner at Iowa and served as captain his senior year in 2017. He swam the 50-meter, 100-meter, and 200-meter backstroke and butterfly, the 50-meter and 100-meter freestyle, and the 200-meter individual medley.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Being a part of the Big Ten has been really special, not only for me but for my teammates and my coaches. I know that it’s important to be a part of this conference because it’s the best in the country,” Patnode said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sullivan swam for Wisconsin from 2015-19 and was also a four-year letterwinner. He swam a wide range of freestyle distances as well as the 100-meter and 200-meter butterfly and the 200-meter backstroke.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He said he thinks his recent experience in the Big Ten will help him relate to the athletes.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’ll be easy for me to see where they are coming from with school and swimming and balancing it all, and I can help out with some wisdom I’ve learned over the years,” Sullivan said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Patnode did his graduate studies at the University of Oakland, where he was also a graduate assistant for their swim team.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He said that all age groups have their pros and cons, but he is blessed to have gotten to work with and learn from a variety of them.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“You’re always a student of the sport, so it’s been cool to be part of that learning experience and share that with the student athletes. Whether it’s an 8-year-old learning how to blow bubbles or a college Division I athlete who needs work on their underwaters, it’s been really cool working through that,” Patnode said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Patnode worked closely with Pete Hovland, head coach of Oakland University men’s and women’s swimming and diving program, and said he learned a lot from him and his staff.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I have a great amount of respect for him and what his program has taught me. It’s been awesome learning from that and I am excited to take it further,” Patnode said.</span></p> <div id="attachment_183797" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183797" class="wp-image-183797 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555.jpg" alt="Mike Sullivan swimming in a pool" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555-1440x960.jpg 1440w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1555-original.jpg 2000w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183797" class="wp-caption-text">Mike Sullivan swimming at the University of Wisconsin. Credit: Courtesy of Ohio State Athletics</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Sullivan started coaching immediately after his college swimming career. He coached the Badger Aquatic Club, a club team in Madison, Wisconsin, with mostly high school swimmers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It made me fall in love with it, outside of swimming. I knew I liked swimming, I knew I liked the technical pieces of it,” Sullivan said. “Being able to get to know and the interesting, funny young people who are just getting into the world. I can see a lot of myself in them. That’s what hooked me.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Patnode and Sullivan have already been working with the team. The coaching staff has been meeting three times a week, and the student-athletes have also been meeting with their zone coach once a week, all over Zoom.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dorenkott’s main focus is helping his athletes gain the skills needed to navigate this situation, he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Victories for us are not necessarily beating other teams, victories for us are masking up or being socially distant or avoiding large gatherings or going through COVID testings with no positives,” Dorenkott said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The team got a “victory” at their first COVID-19 test. Out of the 87 student-athletes tested, not a single result was positive.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If you think I’m unbelievably proud of that, you’re right I am. That speaks a little bit to culture, our coaches and to our student athletes,” Dorenkott said. “That to me, what we’ve been doing, if we can’t be in there competing, we are going to find ways to have successes.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The culture was a huge draw for both Patnode and Sullivan wanting to join the coaching staff. However, Sullivan said the team’s athletic success wasn’t what stood out most about Ohio State to the new coaches.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What stood out more is that you could see that they’re doing that the right way,” Sullivan said. “Everyone on the team seems like a person who could contribute and has brought a lot to the team in a way that is fun and they’re having a good time at meets, but also really developing as swimmers.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Patnode said he agrees that the relationships built in the swimming community at Ohio State make the program stand out.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s a nice added benefit that you get to work with excellent athletes, but you get to work with excellent people,” Patnode said.</span></p> Movie Review: ‘The Devil All the Time’ is a dark tale set deep in the Buckeye state https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/movie-review-the-devil-all-the-time-is-a-dark-tale-set-deep-in-the-buckeye-state/ The Lantern urn:uuid:57ef3849-72ae-c392-3d8a-98dc37f81b32 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 02:10:51 +0000 Fresh off the heels of international Spider-Man stardom, Tom Holland and a troop of blockbuster regulars bring us a grim new thriller set a little too close to home in “The Devil All the Time.” Directed by Antonio Campos, “The Devil All the Time” is a tale about a twisted dark web of corrupt, violent [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183800" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183800" class="size-full wp-image-183800" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT.jpg" alt="Tom Holland driving a car and looking out the window" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/ENTER-DEVIL-ALL-TIME-MOVIE-REVIEW-1-MCT-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183800" class="wp-caption-text">&#8220;The  Devil All the Time&#8221; released on Netflix Sept. 16. Credit: Courtesy of TNS</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Fresh off the heels of international Spider-Man stardom, Tom Holland and a troop of blockbuster regulars bring us a grim new thriller set a little too close to home in “The Devil All the Time.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Directed by Antonio Campos, “The Devil All the Time” is a tale about a twisted dark web of corrupt, violent and evil characters that spans from the islands of the South Pacific to the Catskill Mountains of West Virginia. The film released Wednesday on Netflix. At the center of this grim drama of ghouls and foul deeds lies a young man named Arvin Russell (Holland) who tries to protect his family from sinister forces at work in and around the very real backwoods town of Knockemstiff, Ohio.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The film is set between 1945 and 1965 and is based on the 2011 novel of the same title by Knockemstiff native Donald Ray Pollock. The dark narrative follows Russell’s tragic life and how it intersects with all manner of wicked folk — ranging from corrupt cops to deranged preachers — while exploring themes of guilt, loss, trauma and evil.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The film is acted brilliantly by a veteran cast including Robert Pattinson as Rev. Preston Teagardin, Sebastian Stan as Sheriff Lee Bodecker and Jason Clarke as Carl Henderson, to name a few. This formidable crew of actors is topped off by an endearing lead performance by Holland. Playing a tortured young man in the throes of evil and brutality, he convincingly sold the emotional investment to me and made me empathize with his battle against the cruel world he lives in.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Every performer carries their weight in what could be considered a masterclass of character acting. The creative and at times heart-wrenching performances of every actor on the screen is by far the film’s greatest strength.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The film is also cinematographically gorgeous, with a score of beautiful shots that highlight the woody backroads and vibrant scenery of little-explored but captivating Ohio and West Virginia woodlands.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The time period and setting is richly explored and is almost its own character, highlighted by the music, accents and set pieces of a county town forgotten by the rest of a bustling post-war America.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This film is not for the faint of heart. It is an unrelenting flood of gruesome violence and disturbing imagery. From the start of the film, the events are laced with tragedy and misanthropy, almost to the point of gratuity. This had a wearying and almost exhausting effect on me, as there is almost no break from misfortune and calamity.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The film falters in that it offers no shortage of evil acts but shows little desire to explore why they are done. The film is unflinching in its portrayal of the depths of human evil, but delves little into the psyche and motivation of the ghoulish players featured throughout. This left me feeling unsatisfied, especially after a hefty runtime of 2 hours and 38 minutes.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Overall, the film certainly leaves an impression. Soaked in darkly memorable and religiously motivated imagery, the new film “The Devil All the Time” is filled to the brim with unforgettable performances, haunting narratives and stunning shots and locales.  Despite its sometimes excessive use of violence, Netflix’s newest thriller does not disappoint and is certainly worthy of a stream as cool autumn winds rise and Halloween approaches.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rating: 4.1/5</span></p> Students hold second protest in response to public safety notice https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/students-hold-second-protest-in-response-to-public-safety-notice/ The Lantern urn:uuid:b96b6184-664d-bc6c-2761-a185df3d9d04 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 01:34:47 +0000 More than 100 demonstrators gathered outside of Bricker Hall Thursday to protest the university’s handling of a public safety notice for the second time in two weeks.  The protesters met at 1:30 p.m. at Bricker Hall, home to University President Kristina M. Johnson’s office, and began marching around 1:45 p.m. The demonstrators moved to the [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183801" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183801" id="longdesc-return-183801" class="size-full wp-image-183801" tabindex="-1" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465.jpg" alt="Destiny Brown, a fourth-year in political science, addresses the demonstration outside Bricker Hall" width="1920" height="1280" longdesc="http://www.thelantern.com?longdesc=183801&amp;referrer=183840" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0465-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183801" class="wp-caption-text">Destiny Brown, a fourth-year in political science, addresses the demonstration outside Bricker Hall Thursday. Credit: Max Garrison | Assistant Campus Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">More than 100 demonstrators gathered outside of Bricker Hall Thursday to protest the university’s handling of a public safety notice for the second time in two weeks. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The protesters met at 1:30 p.m. at Bricker Hall, home to University President Kristina M. Johnson’s office, and began marching around 1:45 p.m. The demonstrators moved to the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Chemistry Building, where Johnson was visiting engineering students, according to her Twitter account.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is the second protest in response to a Sept. 3 public safety notice about a pair of aggravated assaults on white students by a Black man and woman near campus that were classified under federal law as hate crimes. The demonstrators said the notice and the subsequent handling of the situation was rushed and endangered Black students. </span></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HLMjWKASmbc" width="100%" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I want to make it abundantly clear,” Amanya Paige, a second-year in strategic communication and sociology and vice chair of systems and operations of the Black Caucus, said through a megaphone. “We are upset, we are out here protesting because a target was put on our backs because of the public safety notice.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Destiny Brown, a fourth-year in political science, said the protest was not organized by an individual or organization, but rather the larger Black community at Ohio State. Brown is also the director of governmental relations for the Undergraduate Student Government and was a key speaker at both the initial Sept. 8 protest and Thursday’s protest.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After the Sept. 8 protest, demonstrators emailed demands to Kristina M. Johnson, Senior Vice President of Administration and Planning Jay Kasey and Director of Public Safety Monica Moll.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The demands include calls for Kristina M. Johnson to produce an action plan to address racial injustice in public safety and for Ohio State to send out a university-wide email addressing its errors in the handling of the public safety notice and its aftermath.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">University spokesperson Ben Johnson said in an email Wednesday that all three officials received the demands and that no email appeared to request a meeting with them.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State Chief of Police Kimberly Spears-McNatt and Moll have </span><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/university-police-chief-director-of-public-safety-address-safety-notice-controversy-ahead-of-thursday-protest/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">addressed</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> the notice and said that the mistake was an “oversight” and that they remain committed to the safety of all students. Moll sent a follow-up email to the public safety notice Sept. 4 that provided additional information about the incidents.</span></p> <div id="attachment_183809" style="width: 540px" class="wp-caption alignright"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183809" class="wp-image-183809 size-medium" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-530x353.jpg" alt="Demonstrators write and draw messages with chalk on the sidewalk outside the CBEC building Thursday." width="530" height="353" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576-1440x960.jpg 1440w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_0576.jpg 1920w" sizes="(max-width: 530px) 100vw, 530px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183809" class="wp-caption-text">Demonstrators write and draw messages with chalk on the sidewalk outside the chemical and biomolecular engineering and chemistry building Thursday. Credit: Max Garrison | Assistant Campus Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brown said an official from the Department of Public Safety requested a meeting with her, but she declined.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is the meeting, this is the table,” Brown said of Thursday’s protest. “You are called to the table. This is the community talking to you.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The protesters left chalk messages on the sidewalk outside of the CBEC building and moved back to Bricker Hall, where they left more messages. They then moved onto Annie and John Glenn Avenue and began to block traffic.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The protesters marched through campus before heading south on Neil Avenue.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Speakers reminded the protesters to maintain social distancing, use hand sanitizer and hydrate throughout the demonstration. COVID-19-related restrictions do not apply to gatherings for the purpose of expressing First Amendment speech, Kristina M. Johnson said in a universitywide email Aug. 11.</span></p> Wait a minute: Stars Wade, Davis decide to return to Ohio St https://www.news5cleveland.com/sports/college-sports/osu/wait-a-minute-stars-wade-davis-decide-to-return-to-ohio-st Ohio State urn:uuid:c189fe4f-0bd2-c811-f012-020c39f14341 Fri, 18 Sep 2020 00:03:44 +0000 Two of Ohio State’s biggest stars, cornerback Shaun Wade and guard Wyatt Davis, are opting back in for the 2020 football season. Two of Ohio State’s biggest stars, cornerback Shaun Wade and guard Wyatt Davis, are opting back in for the 2020 football season.The preseason All-Americans had decided to leave school to prepare for the NFL draft when it looked as if there would be no football season for the Big Ten. Both are expected to be first-round picks.They changed their minds after the conference announced on Wednesday that teams would play an nine-game season starting Oct. 23-24.The news is huge for Ohio State, which behind quarterback and Heisman Trophy finalist Justin Fields has the talent to again compete for a spot in the College Football Playoff.Wade, who had opted out on Monday, announced on ESPN on Thursday that he would return.“It was a long day yesterday being with family and friends and taking that time to talk to them and really making the right decision for myself, but I’m going to come back and be a Buckeye and really go strive for this national championship,” Wade said.“Back in January, I didn’t go to the draft and my goal was to come back, be a captain, get my degree,” he said. “They then canceled football, now it’s back, so since it’s back we got a chance to win a national championship. That’s been my goal since day one.”Wade said he had an agent but did not sign a contract.Wade last play resulted in his ejection for targeting in the playoff semifinal loss to Clemson in January.“I can’t go out like that,” he said.Davis had announced his decision on Twitter Wednesday.“I want Buckeye Nation to know that I want to play this season for Ohio State and I am working now to make that a reality,” he said.Davis will anchor an offensive line that includes center Josh Myers and left tackle Thayer Munford, both also NFL prospects. Ohio State gains approval for on-campus natural gas plant https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/ohio-state-gains-approval-for-on-campus-natural-gas-plant/ The Lantern urn:uuid:5993842b-7c32-e3ad-f1d2-83a488d53807 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 23:17:59 +0000 The Ohio Power Siting Board approved the construction, operation and maintenance of a natural-gas power plant on West Campus Thursday. The $278-million plant will produce thermal energy and electricity for Ohio State’s main campus, according to the project application. The power plant faced opposition from the Sierra Club, an environmental advocacy group that filed a [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_151522" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/02/IMG_0334-10hq028.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-151522" class="size-full wp-image-151522" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/02/IMG_0334-10hq028.jpg" alt="photo of the mccracken power plant on ohio state's campus" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/02/IMG_0334-10hq028.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/02/IMG_0334-10hq028-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/02/IMG_0334-10hq028-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/02/IMG_0334-10hq028-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/02/IMG_0334-10hq028-1024x683.jpg 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-151522" class="wp-caption-text">Construction of a natural-gas power plant on West Campus was approved Thursday by the Ohio Power Siting Board. Credit: Lantern Stock Photo</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Ohio Power Siting Board approved the construction, operation and maintenance of a natural-gas power plant on West Campus Thursday.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The $278-million plant will produce thermal energy and electricity for Ohio State’s main campus, according to the project application. The power plant faced opposition from the Sierra Club, an environmental advocacy group that filed a petition in March to intervene in the case, along with several Ohio State students, faculty and staff.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">University spokesperson Dan Hedman said the plant will cut carbon emissions by more than 30 percent in its first year of operation while providing energy-efficient electricity, heating and cooling to Ohio State’s campus.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We are pleased with the Ohio Power Siting Board’s decision,” Hedman said. “This is positive news, as the Combined Heat and Power Plant will support the campus core and is expected to cut carbon emissions.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The power plant will produce thermal energy powered by natural gas, which requires the use of fracking, a process of drilling into the earth to extract natural gas, according to Ohio State’s plant proposal application. Opponents of the power plant raised concerns about its potential environmental impact.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Becca Pollard, statewide organizer for the Sierra Club, said the plant’s construction will increase levels of air pollution on Ohio State’s campus and the surrounding region.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is alarming, especially during a global respiratory pandemic,” Pollard said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Ohio Power Siting Board held two public hearings June 30 and July 15, at which several Ohio State students, faculty and staff testified. In the first hearing, 20 individuals testified in opposition to the plant and two testified in support. In the second hearing, 32 individuals testified in opposition to the plant and nine testified in support, according to the meeting agenda. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the meeting agenda, Ohio State selected a 1.18-acre parcel of university-owned land on West Campus for the plant’s location due to its proximity to existing energy infrastructure and State Route 315, while also at a distance from most students and other campus facilities. The university’s application proposal says the construction site would not impact any streams, wetlands, lakes, reservoirs or floodplains.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The proposed plant will include a main building standing 60 feet tall, cooling towers extending 27 feet off the roof and two 125-foot steel stacks, according to the Ohio Power Siting Board website. The university said the plant will serve as the main source of electricity and heating for the Columbus campus.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Sierra Club and Ohio State</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">have 30 days to file a request for a reconsideration of the board’s decision if either party is not happy with all or part of the board’s decision, Matt Butler, spokesperson for the Ohio Siting Power Board, said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although disappointed in the board’s decision, Pollard said she hopes students can successfully urge University President Kristina M. Johnson by signing a </span><a href="https://addup.sierraclub.org/campaigns/tell-president-johnson-no-gas-plant-on-osus-campus"><span style="font-weight: 400;">petition created by the Sierra Club</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> to halt the plans for the construction of the plant.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The fight is not over. Right now we are supporting students in their effort to push OSU to make the right decision,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pollard could not speak to the Sierra Club’s future legal strategies for this case, but the organization might have an update in the near future, she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Moving forward, Hedman said the university will work toward finalizing a timeline for the project and will provide details once they become available.</span></p> Pass/no pass resolutions pass University Senate https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/pass-no-pass-resolutions-pass-university-senate/ The Lantern urn:uuid:e863f8de-bf6c-fd55-315c-75a45cdb21cd Thu, 17 Sep 2020 23:04:36 +0000 The University Senate approved two resolutions Thursday to allow students to take their general education courses for pass/no pass credit for the academic year and to allow colleges to make decisions on pass/no pass major courses while also extending the deadlines to do so. The first resolution, proposed by the Council of Enrollment and Student [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183055" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183055" class="size-full wp-image-183055" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946.jpg" alt="Statue of William Oxley Thompson in front of Thompson Library with mask on" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/08/IMG_0946-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183055" class="wp-caption-text">The University Senate passed two resolutions Thursday allowing students to take general education courses for pass/no pass credit and extending the deadlines to do so. Individual colleges will be able to decide whether to allow major and minor courses to be taken for pass/no pass credit. Credit: Sarah Szilagy | Campus Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The University Senate approved two resolutions Thursday to allow students to take their general education courses for pass/no pass credit for the academic year and to allow colleges to make decisions on pass/no pass major courses while also extending the deadlines to do so.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The first resolution, proposed by the Council of Enrollment and Student Progress, is similar to the resolution passed in the spring that enabled students to take courses for pass/no pass credit as opposed to on a GPA scale. Undergraduate Student Government leaders advocated for the new resolution because COVID-19 continues to impact students’ mental and physical health and their education.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Pass/no pass is inherently about how it is supporting a student in the moment, alleviating some of that pressure to maintain a GPA, while you are actively experiencing that semester,” Roaya Higazi, USG president and fourth-year in city and regional planning, said in the meeting.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On the pass/no pass scale, a course grade of D or higher will count for credit but will not factor into students’ GPAs. As the resolution stands, students can take general education and elective courses for pass/no pass, but individual colleges will have to opt in to the system for major and minor courses.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The second resolution extends the deadlines for withdrawal and opting into the pass/no pass system to Nov. 20 for 14-week courses, Oct. 2 for courses taking place in the first seven weeks of fall semester and Nov. 20 for courses taking place in the second seven weeks of fall semester, according to the email. Previous deadlines were Oct. 30, Sept. 25 and Nov. 13, respectively.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The passage of the resolutions comes after discussion at a Council of Enrollment and Student Progress meeting Tuesday about what type of pass/no pass scale the university will use. Although student senators and members of USG advocated for the current system, some parties — including academic advisers and university administration — pushed for a trimodal system of pass/low pass/no pass.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Under the trimodal system, a pass would be a C-minus or higher, a low pass would be any grade within the D range and a no pass would be below a D. Both the pass and low pass options would earn credit and would not factor into students’ GPAs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Those opposed to the trimodal system, including Higazi, said it unfairly singled out students who received D’s in their courses. The trimodal system was not discussed at the University Senate meeting.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Next steps — including whether the resolutions need to be approved by the Board of Trustees — have not yet been determined, a spokesperson for the Office of Academic Affairs said.</span></p> Football: Shaun Wade announces intention to return to Ohio State https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/football-shaun-wade-announces-intention-to-return-to-ohio-state/ The Lantern urn:uuid:69995ef5-9e03-8a99-8b95-6230f7bdb1ad Thu, 17 Sep 2020 22:36:15 +0000 The Buckeyes are now two-for-two in retaining formerly opted-out players.  Redshirt junior cornerback Shaun Wade announced that he would be returning to Ohio State for the 2020 season in an appearance on ESPN Thursday. Wade, who initially opted out Monday, did not sign with an agent. “Back in January, I didn’t go to the draft [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_160272" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/IMG_7304-1zbk5yn.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-160272" class="size-full wp-image-160272" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/IMG_7304-1zbk5yn.jpg" alt="Ohio State cornerback Shaun Wade chases down an Indiana receiver with the ball" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/IMG_7304-1zbk5yn.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/IMG_7304-1zbk5yn-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/IMG_7304-1zbk5yn-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/IMG_7304-1zbk5yn-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/IMG_7304-1zbk5yn-1024x683.jpg 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-160272" class="wp-caption-text">Ohio State then-freshman cornerback Shaun Wade (24) runs downfield towards Indiana senior wide receiver J-Shun Harris II during the first quarter of the game on Oct. 6. Ohio State won 49-26. Credit: Amal Saeed | Former Photo Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Buckeyes are now two-for-two in retaining formerly opted-out players. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Redshirt junior cornerback Shaun Wade announced that he would be returning to Ohio State for the 2020 season in an appearance on ESPN Thursday. Wade, who initially opted out Monday, did not sign with an agent.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Back in January, I didn’t go to the draft and my goal was to come back and be a captain and get my degree,” Wade said. “Then they canceled football, now it’s back, so since it’s back we have a chance to win the national championship and that’s been my goal since day one.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wade’s decision comes just a day after the Big Ten announced that it will reinstate its season starting Oct. 23. Redshirt junior guard Wyatt Davis announced his intentions to rejoin the team Wednesday on Twitter. </span></p> Podcast: The top five greatest single-game performances in Buckeye history https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/podcast-the-top-five-greatest-single-game-performances-in-buckeye-history/ The Lantern urn:uuid:687557cf-255f-ce5c-b494-d1a98e9ca152 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 21:50:48 +0000  The Lantern Sports podcast welcomed Ohio State football historian Jack Park to discuss his top five greatest single-game performances in Buckeye history. Park provides extensive insight and a flash to the past to recall the most legendary performances in Ohio State’s 130 years of football. And with the Big Ten season starting back up, [&#8230;] <p><iframe src="https://anchor.fm/the-lantern5/embed/episodes/Podcast-The-top-five-greatest-single-game-performances-in-Buckeye-history-ejq08d" width="100%" height="102px" frameborder="0" scrolling="no"><span data-mce-type="bookmark" style="display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;" class="mce_SELRES_start"></span></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Lantern Sports podcast welcomed Ohio State football historian Jack Park to discuss his top five greatest single-game performances in Buckeye history.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Park provides extensive insight and a flash to the past to recall the most legendary performances in Ohio State’s 130 years of football.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">And with the Big Ten season starting back up, more legendary performances may be in store in 2020. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You can follow Park’s work and find his books on his website: </span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.jackpark.com/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">jackpark.com</span></a></span><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">For more coverage of Ohio State football and its history, follow us on </span><a href="https://twitter.com/TheLantern?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Twitter</span></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, </span><a href="https://www.instagram.com/thelanternosu/?hl=en"><span style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Instagram</span></span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, </span><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/TheLanternOSU/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Facebook</span></a></span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and our website.</span></p> Gov. DeWine Explains Why Mask Mandate Isn't Being Enforced At Political Rallies https://www.statenews.org/post/gov-dewine-explains-why-mask-mandate-isnt-being-enforced-political-rallies urn:uuid:cb4eca08-6c77-13fb-81fa-5030cbffb96d Thu, 17 Sep 2020 20:22:59 +0000 Pictures of people at political rallies in Ohio recently have shown most of them unmasked, in large crowds. The state’s mask mandate has gone unenforced at those events. DeWine: No Mask Mandate At Political Rallies, But Wear One Anyway https://www.statenews.org/post/dewine-no-mask-mandate-political-rallies-wear-one-anyway urn:uuid:14f7d6c3-19b3-111d-d510-c15613fc45ac Thu, 17 Sep 2020 20:22:59 +0000 Pictures of people at political rallies in Ohio recently have shown most of them unmasked, in large crowds. The state’s mask mandate has gone unenforced at those events. LIVE: DeWine's Thursday briefing on COVID-19 in Ohio https://www.wcpo.com/news/government/state-government/ohio-state-government-news/live-dewines-thursday-briefing-on-covid-19-in-ohio Ohio State Government News urn:uuid:47fe1f03-7817-aba3-27c9-c11e323f7f84 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 17:55:06 +0000 Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine is delivering an update on the COVID-19 pandemic in his state, including the most recent case numbers released by schools and a look at the most-affected counties since last week. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine is delivering an update on the COVID-19 pandemic in his state, including the most recent case numbers released by schools and a look at the most-affected counties since last week. DeWine unveils first school-based COVID-19 database https://www.wcpo.com/news/government/state-government/ohio-state-government-news/live-dewines-thursday-briefing-on-covid-19-in-ohio Ohio State Government News urn:uuid:0fddb9fb-b438-b37d-152f-e41788378df1 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 17:55:06 +0000 By Thursday, the database of 2,760 schools and districts listed 157 known student cases and 122 among school staff. Fourteen of those cases — 12 students, two staff — were listed in Hamilton County. Gov. Mike DeWine on Thursday unveiled the Ohio Department of Health’s first round of COVID-19 data showing how many cases are tied to each of the state’s individual school districts.The new case-tracking system, which anyone can access online, relies on schools’ self-reporting. Not every school had submitted numbers by the time DeWine premiered it to the public.But by Thursday, the database of 2,760 schools and districts listed 157 known student cases and 122 among school staff. Fourteen of those cases — 12 students, two staff — were listed in Hamilton County.The Ohio Department of Health also created an accompanying “children’s dashboard,” listing the number of patients under 18 who had been diagnosed in each county since the pandemic began. Children comprise about 7% of all COVID-19 cases in Ohio, according to Thursday’s numbers; about 9,040 have become sick since, 223 have been hospitalized and at least one has died.Franklin, Hamilton, Cuyahoga and Montgomery are the only counties in the state to record more than 500 patients under the age of 18, per ODH.DeWine also debuted the latest version of the health department’s statewide heat map, which colors each Ohio county yellow (low-risk), orange, red or purple (high-risk) depending on the prevalence of COVID-19 cases inside.Butler County remains the only Cincinnati-area community considered high-risk — largely, DeWine said, due to the high-but-declining number of cases emerging from off-campus gatherings at Miami University.With Labor Day finished, DeWine said his administration has begun to consider possible precautions for the next major autumn holiday on Ohio’s calendar: Halloween.Although his administration does not currently plan to issue any order restricting Halloween events or trick-or-treating, DeWine encouraged Ohioans to follow social distancing guidelines, meet only in small groups and wear masks at all times if they plan to celebrate. Which Ohio nursing homes have had COVID-19 deaths? State government refuses to tell https://www.wcpo.com/news/local-news/i-team/which-ohio-nursing-homes-have-had-covid-19-deaths-state-government-refuses-to-tell Ohio State Government News urn:uuid:35568ae9-e62b-2cf5-981c-20019f9b9a67 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 09:00:19 +0000 The WCPO I-Team and its Cleveland sister station WEWS teamed up for a joint investigation into why Ohio refuses to disclose which nursing homes have COVID deaths. Donald Gazaway was a father of four, a U.S. Army vet, a Bible study teacher and the always-smiling younger brother to Joy Gazaway.His death certificate says he died of COVID-19 on April 19 at Pleasant Ridge Care Center, where he had recently gone for rehabilitation from a stroke. He was 60.“We fully anticipated that he would be coming home. He did not,” said Gazaway, who delayed her brother’s memorial service until late summer because of the pandemic.Now Gazaway is on a mission to make sure her brother, who she called "Toby", isn’t forgotten.“This is the silent aspect of the pandemic," she said. "These people are dying, and nothing is said."The WCPO I-Team and its Cleveland sister station WEWS teamed up for a joint investigation into why Ohio refuses to make public which nursing homes have COVID-19 deaths. In an exclusive interview with WEWS on Tuesday, Gov. Mike DeWine said he will revisit the issue with Ohio Department of Health attorneys. In the past, he said, those attorneys have told him that COVID-19 fatality rates at nursing homes are considered private under state law.“I’ve questioned this before, and I’m going back to the lawyers to say, 'Look, do you really think this is a violation of current federal law and current state law?' And we’ll get back to you on this," he said.Other states such as Kentucky, Indiana, Michigan, Tennessee, Pennsylvania and West Virginia disclose facility-level COVID-19 death information to the public.“Deaths might be of value,” DeWine said. “I’m not saying it’s not of value. Just because someone else is reporting something does not necessarily mean that it’s right.”The Ohio Department of Health updates its list of COVID-19 cases at long-term care facilities every week. It also lists the number of deaths in such facilities by county. To Gazaway, that’s not enough.“Fortunately, the governor has put the statistics on the website, but they don’t tell the whole story,” Gazaway said. “Families can’t go on that site and see how many fatalities, how many people died while they were staying in a particular facility.”The Ohio Department of Health’s website shows Pleasant Ridge Care Center had 41 resident cases of COVID-10 and seven staff cases, but no active cases as of last week.“My brother was one of those 41, and he died,” Gazaway said. “It might make a big difference, if you’re going to select a nursing home, to have that piece of information.”Harold Sosna, owner of Pleasant Ridge Care Center, offered more context about what happened at his nursing home early in the pandemic.“The staff was heroic while battling a significant and sudden outbreak despite very limited PPE,” according to a statement from Sosna. “Multiple patients got very sick in a very short period of time. Many had been there for a while, and their deaths were heartbreaking and overwhelming to a very caring group of dedicated caregivers.”Gazaway’s brother died at the start of the pandemic, so she said she’s willing to give nursing homes and state health officials the benefit of the doubt about their response to COVID-19 early on. But now, more than six months into the pandemic, she doesn’t understand why more information isn’t available.“There’s no reason, no justification why that information isn’t available,” she said.A spokesperson for Ohio Department of Health declined to release facility-level COVID-10 deaths, citing privacy concerns.“A person could be too identifiable and that information is ‘protected health information,’ as defined in … the Ohio Revised Code,” a health department spokesperson responded to WCPO.Nursing home and long-term care residents account for 65% of all COVID-19 deaths in Ohio, or nearly 2,800 deaths, according to state health data. Earlier in the summer, their share was even higher: 70%.WCPO in August filed a complaint in the Ohio Court of Claims to obtain that facility COVID death information. It joins the AARP and other media organizations from across the state that have been demanding the data for months.“I do appreciate what WCPO has done and tried to push this issue because we need to have that information,” Gazaway said.Elaine Ryan, vice president for state advocacy at the AARP, said Ohio should be more transparent.“Only in knowing what’s going on in those facilities can you make the best judgment on behalf of your loved ones,” Ryan said.COVID-19 death rates are crucial information for families to have before choosing a nursing home for loved ones, especially for short rehabilitation stays after surgery, she said.“Unfortunately, what we’ve learned is a grim truth — that deaths are a lagging indicator of what’s actually occurring,” Ryan said. “We need to know where the outbreaks are and also how quickly we can take action to be able to save more lives.”The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) is now requiring nursing homes to report COVID deaths, but that information can be difficult to find and may be inaccurate because facilities were not required to report deaths before mid-May.A WCPO review of that database showed that Gazaway’s death was not included. It lists the number of COVID-19 deaths at Pleasant Ridge Care Center, where he died, at zero.That database reveals one of the highest COVID-19 death rates at long-term care facilities in Southwest Ohio occurred at Mercy Franciscan at West Park, where 13 resident deaths were recorded.A June 18 infection control survey done at Mercy Franciscan by CMS revealed an even higher death total.“Review of facility documents revealed the facility had an outbreak of COVID-19 with 75 total residents testing positive, 16 resident deaths, 26 facility and 4 agency staff testing positive,” according to the survey.In a statement to WCPO, Nanette Bentley, a spokesperson for Bon Secours Mercy Health wrote: “Mercy Health confirms we have residents who have tested positive for and who have died from COVID-19 at West Park Senior Living. We follow guidance provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Ohio Department of Health to minimize exposure to other residents and associates and have also tested every resident and associate frequently. We are deeply saddened when a resident of ours passes away … To protect resident privacy, we do not release further information beyond the information we provide to the state and other regulatory agencies.”WCPO also used this database to find out which Ohio nursing homes had the most COVID deaths. Of those 11 facilities, nine of them had a below-average staffing rating, according to Medicare.Mercy Franciscan is not one of those facilities. It has a four-star rating from Medicare for staffing.Although it’s unclear if there’s a direct relationship between staffing levels and the number of deaths at each facility, WCPO’s findings did not surprise Bob Vines.Vines is managing ombudsman for Pro Seniors in Cincinnati, a nonprofit advocacy group that serves seniors in Hamilton, Butler, Clermont, Clinton and Warren counties."Staffing was an issue before COVID ... It was difficult to hire folks and to retain folks," he said. "Now, I would imagine it’s even more difficult."The nonprofit is getting more calls now than when the pandemic began, some directly from nursing home residents, about cold meals and lack of attention, he said."People aren't getting baths, their nail care isn't getting done, they're not getting any incontinence care that they need,” Vines said.Some nursing homes don’t have enough staff to oversee outside visits between residents and family members, so they aren’t allowing visits at all, Vines said.Pete Van Runkle, executive director of the Ohio Health Care Association, which represents more than 1,000 nursing homes, home care and assisted-living facilities, said staffing is a challenge for some nursing homes.“They’re losing staff and, you know, we try to replace them, but again, that’s not always easy when we have a pandemic going on,” Van Runkle said. “This is really wearing on staff, to have a pandemic that’s gone on this long.”In an August interview, Van Runkle told WCPO he wouldn’t oppose the state releasing fatality rates at nursing homes.That’s exactly what Joy Gazaway is hoping for.“It’s our truth to get out there … so that no other family has to go through this,” Gazaway said. “I would have looked at how many rates of coronavirus there were and how many fatalities … It may have helped me assess whether it was even a place that I wanted my brother to be placed.” Court Allows More Ballot Drop Boxes But LaRose Will Appeal https://www.statenews.org/post/court-allows-more-ballot-drop-boxes-larose-will-appeal urn:uuid:cd70effb-78b8-3671-044e-5a84eed501e0 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 03:58:33 +0000 The Franklin County Common Pleas Court judge who ruled Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose should and could allow more ballot drop boxes has issued yet another ruling. Last night, the judge granted a preliminary injunction to allow county boards of elections to install drop boxes. Court Allows More Ballot Drop Boxes But LaRose Is Appealing The Decision https://www.statenews.org/post/court-allows-more-ballot-drop-boxes-larose-appealing-decision urn:uuid:d9cc3d41-2b86-6cd0-9d55-009bbf1ccf37 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 03:58:33 +0000 The Franklin County Common Pleas Court judge who ruled Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose should and could allow more ballot drop boxes has issued yet another ruling. Last night, the judge granted a preliminary injunction to allow county boards of elections to install drop boxes. Lawmaker Accuses PUCO Chair Of Having 'Personal Skin In The Game' For HB6 https://www.statenews.org/post/lawmaker-accuses-puco-chair-having-personal-skin-game-hb6 urn:uuid:e32f5051-2db9-c306-058d-8f74929a3152 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 02:48:58 +0000 The Ohio House committee holding meetings on a potential repeal of HB6, a sweeping energy law, heard testimony from the leader of Ohio's utility regulatory commission. The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio chair was accused of having his own conflict of interest when it comes to the bailout. University Police chief, director of public safety address safety notice controversy ahead of Thursday protest https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/university-police-chief-director-of-public-safety-address-safety-notice-controversy-ahead-of-thursday-protest/ The Lantern urn:uuid:fc9338d9-15e4-1a35-81e4-5798b2763231 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 01:19:49 +0000 Ahead of a second protest Thursday outside Bricker Hall, Ohio State Chief of Police Kimberly Spears-McNatt and Director of Public Safety Monica Moll addressed the controversy surrounding recent public safety notices regarding assaults classified as hate crimes and provided context for the classification in an interview with The Lantern Sept. 10. Spears-McNatt and Moll said [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183387" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183387" class="size-full wp-image-183387" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582.jpg" alt="Students gather outside Bricker Hall" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582-1440x960.jpg 1440w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_5582-original.jpg 2048w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183387" class="wp-caption-text">A student-led demonstration outside Bricker Hall, where the President&#8217;s office is located. A second protest is planned for Thursday. Credit: Jack Long | Managing Editor for Digital Content</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ahead of a second protest Thursday outside Bricker Hall, Ohio State Chief of Police Kimberly Spears-McNatt and Director of Public Safety Monica Moll addressed the controversy surrounding recent public safety notices regarding assaults classified as hate crimes and provided context for the classification in an interview with The Lantern Sept. 10.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Spears-McNatt and Moll said the department has reflected on the handling of the Sept. 3 safety notice, in which neither the slur used toward the victims nor the victims’ race were included in the notice sent to the community.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The notice attracted significant attention on social media and was the cause of a student protest outside University President Kristina M. Johnson’s office Sept. 8 over concerns that the situation would have been handled differently if the races were reversed.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The protesters individually emailed Johnson, Moll and Senior Vice President for Administration and Planning Jay Kasey a list of demands that included requests for the university to publicly address the June joint letter from three student governments to sever ties with Columbus Police, for Johnson to create an action plan to address a larger cultural issue at the university involving Black students and for Kasey to hold the Department of Public Safety accountable for its handling of the public safety notice.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A university spokesperson said in an email Wednesday that all three received the emails and that none appeared to request a meeting with any of the involved parties. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another protest is scheduled to take place outside of Bricker Hall at 1:30 p.m. Thursday.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Moll said excluding the slur was an “oversight and a mistake.” She said without including the slur and the race of the victims, the notice failed to provide necessary context to properly inform students about their safety.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Moll said the term was omitted because it was not the deciding factor in classifying the assaults as a hate crime, and it is not best practice to include derogatory terms in such safety notices.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the last-minute omission caused the victim’s race to be unclear and multiple marginalized groups to fear they were being targeted. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We had Jewish students, LGBTQ [students], Asians and others wondering if they were the targeted group, and people reaching out to us to ask,” Moll said. The online public safety notice was updated to clarify the victim’s race and another email was sent to students Sept. 4.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although the incidents fell under the federal law’s definition of hate crimes on or near higher education campuses, Ohio State students voiced concerns on social media that labeling attacks against white students as hate crimes failed to take into account how marginalized groups — such as racial minorities — are affected more by prejudiced actions than non-marginalized groups.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The chief and I recognize that derogatory terms against whites do not have the same impact as they may to marginalized groups,” Moll said. “We’re certainly not trying to say that they carry the same weight.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Spears-McNatt said although she understands the confusion and concern caused by the safety notice, as a Black woman, she finds the concerns that University Police does not care about the safety of Black students “disheartening.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Being an African American female and being in law enforcement, I personally take a lot of pride in making sure that we maintain a good relationship with our community. And the officers in OSUPD take that same pride. That’s embedded in our core values.” Spears-McNatt said. “For some members to feel that [I personally] am not concerned about the Black students on campus, that could be the furthest from the truth.”</span></p> Different approaches to COVID-19 data reporting points universities down different paths https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/different-approaches-to-covid-19-data-reporting-points-universities-down-different-paths/ The Lantern urn:uuid:e9eea5cd-f23e-7ad0-92ea-51ffc486ec82 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 01:19:38 +0000 COVID-19 reared its head on college campuses across all 50 states, but there is no national standard for universities to report its effects. As of Sept. 10, more than 88,000 cases of COVID-19 have been reported across more than 1,190 college campuses in the U.S., the New York Times reported. Many colleges and universities assembled [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183765" style="width: 1810px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title.jpeg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183765" class="size-full wp-image-183765" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title.jpeg" alt="Illustration of road signs pointing in different directions" width="1800" height="1200" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title.jpeg 1800w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title-530x353.jpeg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title-1024x683.jpeg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title-540x360.jpeg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title-768x512.jpeg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title-1536x1024.jpeg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title-1080x720.jpeg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/The_Lantern_title-1440x960.jpeg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1800px) 100vw, 1800px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183765" class="wp-caption-text">Credit: Donovan Collins | For The Lantern</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">COVID-19 reared its head on college campuses across all 50 states, but there is no national standard for universities to report its effects.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As of Sept. 10, more than 88,000 cases of COVID-19 have been reported across more than 1,190 college campuses in the U.S., the New York Times reported. Many colleges and universities assembled COVID-19 dashboards displaying data such as test positivity rates, cumulative case numbers and the availability of quarantine and isolation housing on campus.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State’s dashboard has this information and more, including data for daily cases, hospital capacity and transmission rates for both Ohio and Franklin County. Dr. Andy Thomas, chief clinical officer at the Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State, said contact tracers and leaders in the College of Public Health are analyzing transmission data specific to campus. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“As you contact trace, you try to determine how many people were infected from any one person,” Thomas said. “You want to try to keep your [transmission rate] to one or less than one, which means that we’re effectively isolating and quarantining people.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State’s dashboard also breaks down cumulative cases and positivity rates by on- and off-campus students. Data can be viewed cumulatively, as a seven-day average or a single-day average. The dashboard also includes the availability of personal protective equipment and compliance with enhanced cleaning requirements in classrooms, common spaces and high-touch areas and residence halls.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some universities provide additional metrics. West Virginia University, for example, requires students and staff tested outside of the university system to self-report positive cases that are displayed on the dashboard dating back to July 21. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This allows us to conduct effective contact tracing on campus, when the result could have been reported elsewhere, and helps to verify the needs to quarantine or isolate per the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] guidelines,” Dr. Carmen Burrell, medical director of Urgent Care and Student Health Services at West Virginia University, said in an email.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> “</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">It also allows us to provide any helpful resources to the students or staff when needed.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yale University posts a visual “Current Yale COVID-19 Alert Level” banner at the head of its dashboard. According to the website, the alert level ranges from green to red, indicating the severity of risk COVID-19 presents to campus. Each alert level outlines “what to expect” on campus. For example, under the red alert level, instruction may shift fully online with students expected to stay in their assigned rooms. At the time of publication, Yale is at alert level “Yellow: Low to Moderate Risk.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The University of Mississippi reports a “contact coefficient,” which is the average number of close contacts of each positive case. This metric is similar to the transmission rate but only accounts for contact, not confirmed transmission of the virus. Like the transmission rate, the contact coefficient is calculated through contact tracing. The University of Mississippi’s current contact coefficient is 1.90.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some universities use apps to contact trace. The University of Arizona “Covid Watch” app allows students to input their positive test result and notifies other app users when they come in close proximity with a person who is positive. The app uses Bluetooth to measure an exposed individual’s “risk level” depending on the length and distance of contact and recommended next steps </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">—</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">ranging from monitoring for symptoms to self-quarantining.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A number of universities, including the University of Texas at Austin, Harvard University and Arkansas State University, implemented similar apps to assist in contact tracing, but Covid Watch is the first fully anonymous tracing technology that does not require personal data or location tracking, according to the University of Arizona website.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although many colleges and universities actively release campus COVID-19 data, not all have announced a threshold for shutting down campus in the event of a serious outbreak.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Earlham College, a liberal arts college in Richmond, Indiana, will most likely require students to leave campus and return home if its positivity rate reaches 5 percent, Brian Zimmerman, director of media relations for the college, said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">About 600 students attend classes on campus at Earlham this semester, Zimmerman said. Given its positivity rate threshold, 35 positive cases could shut down the campus. Zimmerman said the threshold was established based on the limited capacity of quarantine and isolation housing on the small campus.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s based on physical space for us,” Zimmerman said. “We only have so many empty dorm rooms, so many buildings, so many places to put students in in a way that would obviously protect the rest of the student body while also making sure that we can support students and get them healthy.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State’s quarantine and isolation beds are at 63.7 percent capacity with 524 beds available at the time of publication, according to Ohio State’s COVID-19 dashboard. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Quarantine housing is for people who have been exposed to a disease, and isolation is for people who are sick with the disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Thomas said Ohio State monitors multiple metrics in order to inform decisions. He said these multiple measures come together to determine if the university can control the spread of the virus at its current level through contact tracing and quarantine and isolation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Much like a lot of complex situations, there’s not any one number that drives it,” Thomas said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Thomas said the daily positivity rates entering the second week of classes worried him as the overall student positivity rate reached 6.7 percent, but the current downward trend put him more at ease.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If the COVID-19 numbers were to begin trending up among students, faculty and staff on campus, Thomas said there are many steps the university can take in order to maintain control of spread before taking more drastic measures, like de-densifying residence halls or transitioning to fully virtual instruction, are necessary. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But he said if the university community continues to follow social distancing guidelines and other policies to limit the spread of the coronavirus, those measures won’t need to be implemented.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s been the students here, the faculty, the staff that are taking this seriously, that I think are going to be the real success story of making sure that we now are going to get to a point where we can maintain the rest of the semester safely and then return back with even a better understanding,” Thomas said.</span></p> Wexner Center for the Arts offers ‘Free Space’ for artists in response to COVID-19, election, protests https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/wexner-center-for-the-arts-offers-free-space-for-artists-in-response-to-covid-19-election-protests/ The Lantern urn:uuid:b78e1ad2-5e85-cb9b-144b-5265ec0a2c7c Thu, 17 Sep 2020 01:19:19 +0000 In a time when day-to-day lives aren’t as “free” as they used to be, an exhibition at the Wexner Center for the Arts is creating “Free Space” in response to the needs of the community.  “Free Space” is a community resource lounge offering daily microcinema — low-budget short film screenings — as well as other [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183753" style="width: 1510px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/Free-Space-picture.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183753" class="size-full wp-image-183753" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/Free-Space-picture.jpg" alt="" width="1500" height="1075" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/Free-Space-picture.jpg 1500w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/Free-Space-picture-530x380.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/Free-Space-picture-1024x734.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/Free-Space-picture-502x360.jpg 502w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/Free-Space-picture-768x550.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/Free-Space-picture-1080x774.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/Free-Space-picture-1440x1032.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1500px) 100vw, 1500px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183753" class="wp-caption-text">Columbus artist Lisa McLymont hand painted the title wall for &#8220;Free Space.&#8221; Credit: Courtesy of the Wexner Center for the Arts</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a time when day-to-day lives aren’t as “free” as they used to be, an exhibition at the Wexner Center for the Arts is creating “Free Space” in response to the needs of the community. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Free Space” is a community resource lounge offering daily microcinema — low-budget short film screenings — as well as other creative programs, according to the Wexner Center for the Arts’ website. The exhibition opened Thursday and will continue through Dec. 27.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The exhibition was created as an effort to respond to the stressful conditions of 2020 and the needs expressed by community members at Ohio State and in Columbus, according to the center’s website.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Presented amid the most contested presidential election in American history and massive social upheaval surrounding the entwined public health issues of systemic racism and the COVID-19 pandemic, the Wexner Center’s fall exhibitions highlight work from a diverse group of artists examining the tenets of American democracy, representative structures, and modes of political discourse,” the website reads.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although “Free Space” will be held in the Wexner Center’s entry gallery, Lucy Zimmerman, associate curator of exhibitions, said it isn’t a typical exhibition. Instead of patrons coming to view the art, Zimmerman said it is more of a collaborative and flexible environment for people to use.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Free Space” will be featuring a wide variety of programs, such as film screenings that are held two to three times a day. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We decided that the spine and underlying structure of each day would be this rotating film program,” Jennifer Lange, curator of the film and video studio program at the Wexner Center, said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There will be three sets of programs shown in the microcinema: “Film Activism: Cinetracts Expanded,” “Sequence 01: Diasporic Reckoning” and “Everybody’s got a little light, under the sun.” The first program will show from Thursday to Oct. 11, while the second will show from Oct. 13 to Nov. 8 and the third from Nov. 10 to Dec. 27, according to the center’s website. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are also ways for non-artist members of the community to contribute to the space. The “Free Space: Community Reel” —  a collection of one-minute-or-less short videos in response to current events — will be playing online and in the gallery, according to the website. The  “Free Space: Residue Wall” is a community collage of images and words that will be updated with new entries once every two weeks. Both projects will be composed of submissions from anyone who wants to contribute. Information regarding submission requirements and tips can be found at the center’s </span><a href="https://wexarts.org/read-watch-listen/free-space-what-you-can-do"><span style="font-weight: 400;">website</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What [“Free Space”] is on Sept. 17 is not gonna be what it is on Nov. 15 or on Dec. 15,” Lange said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Alongside its more artistic offerings, “Free Space” also provides a place for teachers to reserve and hold classes. Although classes cannot be larger than 20 people, Lange said the hope is that the size of the Wexner Center will allow for a space available to people who need it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This space won’t always be limited just to teachers though.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We also would love to expand to student groups or community organizations under a certain number for them to book the space,” Zimmerman said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Learning and Public Practice Department will hold office hours once a week to provide help with homework or any other projects, as well as act as a hotline for questions, Zimmerman said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Free Space” will be on display Thursday through Dec. 27 at the Wexner Center for the Arts. The exhibition is open Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Thursday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Admission is free.</span></p> Student Wellness Center changes structure but keeps same goal https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/student-wellness-center-changes-structure-but-keeps-same-goal/ The Lantern urn:uuid:8204b7f0-785f-305e-8408-b45d27e64fe1 Thu, 17 Sep 2020 01:19:05 +0000 In the midst of a pandemic when health is on the forefront of everyone’s mind, Ohio State’s Student Wellness Center is still providing care for its students.   Despite social distancing regulations that limit in-person contact, the wellness center is still maintaining all of its health care resources for students with some health care appointments, such [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_172607" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392.jpeg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-172607" class="size-full wp-image-172607" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392.jpeg" alt="" width="1920" height="1440" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392.jpeg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392-480x360.jpeg 480w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392-530x398.jpeg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392-768x576.jpeg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392-1024x768.jpeg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392-510x382.jpeg 510w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392-1080x810.jpeg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/10/IMG_1392-1440x1080.jpeg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-172607" class="wp-caption-text">Ohio State&#8217;s Student Wellness Center, located inside of the RPAC, is still providing care for its students in the midst of a pandemic. Credit: Cori Wade | Photo Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the midst of a pandemic when health is on the forefront of everyone’s mind, Ohio State’s Student Wellness Center is still providing care for its students.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite social distancing regulations that limit in-person contact, the wellness center is still maintaining all of its health care resources for students with some health care appointments, such as nutrition services, being moved online to host virtual appointments for patients. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Just like many other professionals on campus, Janele Bayless, wellness coordinator for nutrition education at the wellness center, said only one thing has really changed about her job: conducting appointments on her computer instead of seeing people in her office. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Other than providing appointments virtually through Zoom, everything, for the most part, has remained the same,” Bayless said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The online nutrition coaching process consists of a questionnaire — surveying one’s nutrition, physical activity and any additional health concerns — a food record and a scheduled meeting, Bayless said.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bayless said she has seen students whose eating habits may have been affected by the COVID-19 crisis. She said anxiety and depression stemming from the pandemic can cause someone to eat less or cause comfort eating.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“As a result of someone’s concerns about COVID, they might find themselves emotionally eating a little more,” Bayless said. “Some students express concerns around lack of physical activity too.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Services such as financial coaching, nutrition coaching, wellness coaching and the Buckeye Peer Access Line continued even when the university announced classes would resume virtually, Brendan Greisberger, associate director of the wellness center, said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Something that I think we are really proud of is just knowing that we adapted and students could still schedule appointments,” Greisberger said. “We met the demand that we were seeing really well.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now that school is back in session, Bayless said she is waiting to hear how students have adjusted their eating and exercise habits.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Maybe having a schedule, structure and some of the resources that have been made available through recreational sports, I’d like to think that students might feel like they are able to get back into a rhythm and routine, similar to what they were experiencing pre-COVID,” Bayless said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Greisberger said for other coaching resources, such as financial and wellness coaching and relationship education, the wellness center is able to make accommodations if students feel more comfortable meeting in person. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Additional information about the Student Wellness Center and types of coaching services can be found on the wellness center’s </span><a href="https://swc.osu.edu/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">website</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></p> Campus area crime map Sept. 8-15 https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/campus-area-crime-map-sept-8-15/ The Lantern urn:uuid:10f664fc-66f3-cafa-78c8-7d704b47b44a Thu, 17 Sep 2020 01:18:58 +0000 A theft was reported to Columbus Police as having occurred Sept. 8 between 1:50 and 1:56 p.m. at the United Dairy Farmers on North High Street near Frambes Avenue. According to the online police log, a woman stole two cases of Red Bull and drove away in a vehicle with no license plates. The incident [&#8230;] <p><iframe src="https://www.google.com/maps/d/embed?mid=1ue3bma29myHmw8zDzcQOIRBiPtV8qE1u" width="100%" height="480"></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A theft was reported to Columbus Police as having occurred Sept. 8 between 1:50 and 1:56 p.m. at the United Dairy Farmers on North High Street near Frambes Avenue. According to the online police log, a woman stole two cases of Red Bull and drove away in a vehicle with no license plates. The incident was recorded on security footage.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An attempted motor vehicle theft was reported to Columbus Police as having occurred Sept. 9 between midnight and 7:30 p.m. on East 13th Avenue near Summit Street. According to the online police log, unknown person(s) bent open the passenger door and unsuccessfully tried to hotwire the vehicle. The suspects then took a wallet with cash and gift cards from the vehicle, worth a total of $90.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A felony theft was reported to Columbus Police as having occurred Sept. 9 between 4 and 8 p.m. on Indianola Avenue near East 18th Avenue. According to the online police log, unknown person(s) took a backpack, wallet, laptop, earbuds, driver’s license and debit cards, worth a total of $1,320. All listed property was in the victim’s front yard.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An incident of criminal trespassing and possession of criminal tools was reported to University Police as having occurred Sept. 10 at 8:39 a.m. at Park-Stradley Hall, according to the daily crime log. The case is open pending arrest.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An incident of voyeurism with intent to film or photograph was reported to University Police as having occurred Sept. 10 at 2:59 p.m. at 18th Avenue Library, according to the daily crime log. The case is open pending arrest.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An incident of criminal trespassing was reported to University Police as having occurred Friday at 7:42 a.m. at Ohio Union North Parking Garage, according to the daily crime log.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An incident of breaking and entering was reported to University Police as having occurred Saturday at 3:30 p.m. at the Postle Hall construction site, according to the daily crime log.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A burglary was reported to Columbus Police as having occurred Sunday between 4 and 7 a.m. on East Oakland Avenue near Summit Street. According to the online police log, unknown person(s) broke into the victims’ residence and stole a television, two pairs of house and car keys, and one victim’s car, worth a total of $10,300.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A felony theft from a motor vehicle was reported to Columbus Police as having occurred Sunday between noon and 12:20 p.m. on East 17th Avenue near North High Street. According to the online police log, the victim parked his rental car and while he was inside a store, unknown person(s) broke the vehicle’s window and took a laptop, laptop accessories and two backpacks full of belongings, worth a total of $5,520.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A burglary was reported to University Police as having occurred Sunday at 2 p.m. in Morrill Tower, according to the daily crime log.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A conspiracy was reported to University Police as having occurred Monday at 3:20 p.m. at St. John Arena, according to the daily crime log.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An incident of criminal trespassing was reported to University Police as having occurred Tuesday at 11:52 p.m. at Ohio Stadium, according to the daily crime log.</span></p> Basketball: NCAA Division I Council sets Nov. 25 start date https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/basketball-ncaa-division-i-council-sets-nov-25-start-date/ The Lantern urn:uuid:425cc99c-bdd4-072c-6e91-3329a32f136c Wed, 16 Sep 2020 23:27:02 +0000 On the same day that the Big Ten brought football back, the NCAA is bringing basketball back.  The NCAA Division I Council announced a Nov. 25 start date for the basketball season with a maximum of 30 practices allowed to begin Oct. 14. The NCAA set a limit of 27 games that each team will [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_176968" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-176968" class="size-full wp-image-176968" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529.jpg" alt="Ohio State men's basketball team huddle together at mid-court under a spotlight before a game " width="1920" height="1283" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529-530x354.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529-1024x684.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529-539x360.jpg 539w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529-768x513.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529-1536x1026.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529-1080x722.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/01/DSC_0529-1440x962.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-176968" class="wp-caption-text">Ohio State men&#8217;s basketball team huddles together before the start of the game against Nebraska Jan. 14. Ohio State won 80-68. Credit: Cori Wade | Photo Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On the same day that the Big Ten brought football back, the NCAA is bringing basketball back. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The NCAA Division I Council announced a Nov. 25 start date for the basketball season with a maximum of 30 practices allowed to begin Oct. 14. The NCAA set a limit of 27 games that each team will be able to compete in the regular season, while teams must complete a minimum of 13 games to remain playoff eligible. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The new season start date near the Thanksgiving holiday provides the optimal opportunity to successfully launch the basketball season,” Dan Gavitt, NCAA senior vice president of basketball, said in the announcement. “It is a grand compromise of sorts and a unified approach that focuses on the health and safety of student-athletes competing towards the 2021 Division I basketball championships.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A transition period from Sept. 21-Oct. 13 will allow teams to train up to 12 hours per week with an eight-hour limit for skilled instruction. Starting Oct. 14, teams will be allowed to conduct 20 hours per week of training. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">No exhibition games or scrimmages will be played and the council recommends a minimum of four nonconference games.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State men’s basketball was originally set to tip off Nov. 11 against Oakland, while Ohio State women’s basketball did not have a schedule set. </span></p> Ohio Republican Party Statement Condemned And Leads To Call For Legal Action And https://www.statenews.org/post/ohio-republican-party-statement-condemned-and-leads-call-legal-action-and urn:uuid:8bf5fda3-4065-3baf-c2e8-47051452a40b Wed, 16 Sep 2020 22:07:48 +0000 The Ohio Democratic Party is asking the Franklin County Common Pleas Court that issued a ruling that allows for the addition of ballot drop boxes to take action against the Ohio Republican Party too. The comment is also being condemned by the Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court. Ohio Republican Party Statement In Dropbox Case Blasted By Chief Justice https://www.statenews.org/post/ohio-republican-party-statement-dropbox-case-blasted-chief-justice urn:uuid:39a82c69-d244-8b28-68de-acf382477f05 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 22:07:48 +0000 The Ohio Democratic Party is asking the Franklin County Common Pleas Court that issued a ruling that allows for the addition of ballot drop boxes to take action against the Ohio Republican Party too. The comment is also being condemned by the Chief Justice of the Ohio Supreme Court. Football: Big Ten decides best chance to play comes without fans https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/football-big-ten-decides-best-chance-to-play-comes-without-fans/ The Lantern urn:uuid:33f18afe-994e-4a3d-8100-9eda31f3c303 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 22:04:04 +0000 Although Ohio State football players will be returning to the field, it will be missing its 10th unit: the fans.   The Big Ten greenlighted a nine-game season for conference football starting Oct. 23, however, the decision came with the caveat that spectators would not be allowed to attend. Leaning on the advice of the Big [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_171234" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_0565.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-171234" class="wp-image-171234 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_0565.jpg" alt="Students in Block O hold up posters to spell “150” in honor of Ohio State’s sesquicentennial in the first half of the game against Cincinnati" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_0565.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_0565-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_0565-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_0565-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_0565-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_0565-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_0565-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-171234" class="wp-caption-text">Students in Block O hold up posters to spell “150” in honor of Ohio State’s sesquicentennial in the first half of the game against Cincinnati on Sept. 7. Ohio State won 42-0. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Former Managing Editor for Multimedia</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although Ohio State football players will be returning to the field, it will be missing its 10th unit: the fans.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Big Ten greenlighted a nine-game season for conference football starting Oct. 23, however, the decision came with the caveat that spectators would not be allowed to attend. Leaning on the advice of the Big Ten medical subcommittee, the Big Ten members prioritized giving the players the best chance to play. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Our primary objective, obviously, is get the game played,” Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith said Wednesday in a Zoom call. “I agree with the medical task force and their recommendation. Let’s see how the games emerge over time.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Smith said that the logistics of safely operating concession stands and bathrooms would be a challenge. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Let’s mitigate the risk,” Smith said. “Let’s make sure we get the games played and played in a safe way.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">President Kristina M. Johnson said that limiting the density of the crowd was a recommendation, so it could be revisited down the road, but Johnson said new evidence would have to become available on how it would be safe. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We would have to, again, have really informed, scientific evidence that we can actually have fans and not cause an epidemic,” Johnson said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the public sale of tickets will still not be permitted for the time being, the Big Ten is still searching for avenues to get the families of student-athletes and the coaching staff in the stands. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We are looking to see what we can do on a campus-by-campus basis to accommodate the families of our student athletes, both home and away, as well as the families of staff,” Penn State athletic director Sandy Barbour said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although some colleges, such as Florida State, and professional sports teams have allowed a reduced amount of fans in their stadiums, the Big Ten still made the decision to close the door on allowing fans in the stands. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jacqui Roemer, a first-year in finance, said the lost opportunity to spend a Saturday in Ohio Stadium upset her and pointed to how professional sports have had fans in the stands as a justification for the Big Ten to allow fans in. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I would say I’m sad about it mostly,” Roemer said. “It’s a small amount of frustration just because if professional sports are allowed to do it and they’re finding a way to do it safely then there’s a way to do it.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Vice President of Block “O”, Ohio State’s official student section, Catie Cleveland said that although she is disappointed, the return of football is important to the identity of Ohio State. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I think that is such a big part of the culture at Ohio State,” Cleveland, a third-year in pharmaceutical sciences, said. “Playing and not necessarily even being able to go to the games but just watching the games I think is a huge part of Ohio State’s culture and traditions.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cleveland said Block “O” is looking at virtual watch party options, but she says that they have “not given up” on doing something in person — possibly in the form of a watch party that utilizes distanced circles like those seen on the Oval. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although Alex Abbott, a second-year in accounting, believes football is better than no football, he shared in Roemer’s confusion over the Big Ten not allowing fans with other universities making a different call. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I was watching games the other weekend, and you look at Notre Dame, who’s in Indiana, and they have fans,” Abbott said. “And they got students and the band. Then there’s other teams that have fans in the stands, and it’s kinda upsetting that we can’t have fans while around the league there are other teams that have fans in their stands.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Roemer, who said she partially came to Ohio State to attend football games, feels the weekly testing of students would make her feel comfortable attending games. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At the May 29 deadline for Ohio State season-ticket renewals, 44,320 season tickets had been renewed for a renewal rate of 88 percent. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nathan Ricker, an Ohio State alumni and season-ticket holder for 25 years, said that he was not surprised by the Big Ten’s decision to not allow fans into the stadiums for the season. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That is exactly what I expected today is that there would be no fans,” Ricker said. “I knew the only way this would be accomplished, that we would have a season, is by not having fans in the stadium.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While Ricker said that he is upset he won’t be able to continue his 25-year streak in Ohio Stadium, he said that he’s happy that the Buckeyes get a shot to play. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What’s the lesser of two evils here? Not having college football, not watching my beloved Buckeyes play or me sitting in the stands, risking people getting sick and then canceling altogether after the fact?” Ricker said. “I think the best decision is just not allowing people into the stands whatsoever.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite missing out on gamedays at Ohio Stadium, Ricker said he’ll be using a new addition to his house to watch the renewed addition to the fall. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I built it for the intention of watching the non-Ohio State football games and watching the Browns play,” Ricker said. “Now, I guess, I’ll be using that pavilion to watch the Buckeyes play as well. But, I’m just very happy I’ll have the chance to watch the Buckeyes play this season.”</span></p> Football: Wyatt Davis says he wants to play following Big Ten decision https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/football-wyatt-davis-says-he-wants-to-play-following-big-ten-decision/ The Lantern urn:uuid:195ee581-fcb8-97a1-9e85-24a10a1a1cd2 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 21:55:17 +0000 Despite losing him to NFL pursuits Sept. 11, Ohio State could be getting one of their top players back. Redshirt junior guard Wyatt Davis announced in a tweet that he wants to return to Ohio State Wednesday evening. Davis’ message comes just hours after the Big Ten announced that it was reversing its original postponement [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_168273" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/04/IMG_0721-2fk6ntm.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-168273" class="wp-image-168273 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/04/IMG_0721-2fk6ntm.jpg" alt="Wyatt Davis blocking a Washington defensive lineman in the 2019 Rose Bowl game. " width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/04/IMG_0721-2fk6ntm.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/04/IMG_0721-2fk6ntm-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/04/IMG_0721-2fk6ntm-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/04/IMG_0721-2fk6ntm-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/04/IMG_0721-2fk6ntm-1024x683.jpg 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-168273" class="wp-caption-text">Ohio State then-redshirt freshman offensive lineman Wyatt Davis (52) looks to block a Husky in the first half of the the Rose Bowl Game featuring Ohio State and Washington in Pasadena, Calif. on Jan. 1, 2019. Ohio State won 28-23. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Former Manager for Multimedia</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite losing him to NFL pursuits Sept. 11, Ohio State could be getting one of their top players back.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Redshirt junior guard Wyatt Davis announced in a tweet that he wants to return to Ohio State Wednesday evening. Davis’ message comes just hours after the Big Ten announced that it was reversing its original postponement decision and plan to start the season the weekend of Oct. 23, and Davis had not yet signed with an agent. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I was incredibly happy to learn today about the Big Ten’s decision to play football this fall,” Davis said. “Thank you President (Kristina M.) Johnson, Mr. (Gene) Smith, Dr. (James) Borchers and to all who worked so hard for our safe return. I want Buckeye Nation to know that I want to play this season for Ohio State and I am working now to make that a reality.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Junior quarterback Justin Fields asked Davis to return via Twitter, retweeting a video of him and Davis dancing. </span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-width="550" data-dnt="true"> <p lang="en" dir="ltr">Fun times huh? <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/12.0.0-1/72x72/1f602.png" alt=" Democratic Absentee Ballot Requests Still Outpacing Republican Applications https://www.statenews.org/post/democratic-absentee-ballot-requests-still-outpacing-republican-applications urn:uuid:ec65f15c-c05d-1efa-9c22-5c60697fb79c Wed, 16 Sep 2020 20:31:07 +0000 Absentee ballot requests are flooding into boards of elections. Secretary of State Frank LaRose reports 1.4 million applications have been received so far, well more than the 1.2 million ballot requests received in all of 2016. And early voting doesn’t start till October 6. Lawsuit Contends Mask Mandate Is Unconstitutional https://www.statenews.org/post/lawsuit-contends-mask-mandate-unconstitutional urn:uuid:86c59d08-7e7c-fea6-13b0-0586bc80d77f Wed, 16 Sep 2020 18:53:09 +0000 More than two dozen parents, mostly in Northwest Ohio, are suing the state over the mandate that K-12 students be required to wear masks. Secretary Of State Responds To Court About Why He Won't Comply With Its Order https://www.statenews.org/post/secretary-state-responds-court-about-why-he-wont-comply-its-order urn:uuid:13602244-2047-daaa-6c7a-1afe49202def Wed, 16 Sep 2020 18:38:55 +0000 The Franklin County Court that yesterday ruled Secretary of State Frank LaRose could and should allow installation of more ballot drop boxes throughout Ohio has taken another action. That same court is asking LaRose to explain comments made by his office that indicate he’ll keep in place a directive that prohibits additional drop boxes. Football: Ohio State leadership reacts to Big Ten’s decision to reinstate the season https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/football-ohio-state-leadership-reacts-to-big-tens-decision-to-reinstate-the-season/ The Lantern urn:uuid:117cb8dc-29df-8b78-d8d5-e6d90cf5b1f7 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 17:33:44 +0000 For the second time in just over a month, the Big Ten conference delivered groundbreaking news to its members, but unlike the postponement decision Aug. 11, the news delivered Wednesday was largely optimistic.  The Big Ten announced Wednesday that it will move forward with its football season with an Oct. 23-24 weekend target for the [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183475" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183475" class="wp-image-183475 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy.jpg" alt="Outside of Ohio Stadium's rotunda entrance. " width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_0191-copy-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183475" class="wp-caption-text">Big Ten presidents and chancellors decided unanimously Wednesday to move forward with a football season. Credit: Sophia Tobias | For the Lantern</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For the second time in just over a month, the Big Ten conference delivered groundbreaking news to its members, but unlike the postponement decision Aug. 11, the news delivered Wednesday was largely optimistic. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Big Ten announced Wednesday that it will move forward with its football season with an Oct. 23-24 weekend target for the start of the season. Increased confidence from the Big Ten medical subcommittee and rapid testing has provided a pathway forward for Ohio State and the rest of the conference, and the varying levels of leadership for Ohio State are prepared to play. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Head coach Ryan Day said that although the past month has been difficult, the team is better because of it. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Our team is stronger right now than it was on Aug. 11 for going through this, and our young guys have seen what real leadership is,” Day said. “And now to be back on the field and play, it is an amazing feeling, but now we got to get back to work.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State has been participating in 12-hour training weeks since the postponement decision, but athletic director Gene Smith said that a discussion will be had Thursday about increasing training to 20 hours per week. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although Day, his players and the parents have been vocal about wanting a return of college football, it was Ohio State President Kristina M. Johnson who was tasked with voting on the decision. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Johnson said that the primary factor that allowed for the Big Ten to return was the introduction of the rapid, daily tests. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The testing protocol, think about it as two steps. In the first step, you get rid of all the candidates that are clearly negative and then you focus on confirming any of the individuals who have been tested to see if they’re positive,” Johnson said. “So you’re doing something that’s both highly accurate in specificity and sensitivity. You can guarantee a clean playing field.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In terms of playing nine games in nine weeks, Smith said the lack of flexibility to reschedule canceled games is not a concern because of the plan in place if a student-athlete tests positive mixed with the student-athletes being “self-policing.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Big Ten has established a minimum 21-day period that a student-athlete who tests positive for COVID-19 will have to remain away from game competition. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Big Ten schedule, which will conclude Dec. 19, will allow conference teams to compete for a spot in the College Football Playoff. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In terms of how a nine-game schedule will affect the Buckeyes’ chances of making the playoff, Smith said that he thinks the playoff committee may need to rely more on performance and appearance when selecting the best four teams. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I think it’s assumed by the committee and others that we may not have consistency in the number of games that a particular league will play,” Smith said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Over the past week, two key Ohio State players — redshirt juniors cornerback Shaun Wade and guard Wyatt Davis — announced their intentions to opt out of the season and begin training for the upcoming NFL draft. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Day said that he has kept in contact with both players and that if they want to return to Ohio State to play out the season, they should be granted that opportunity. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’ve been in communication with both those guys and their families. They wanted to play, and at the time, the information that they had was that we weren’t playing the season, but now that’s changed,” Day said. “If they want to play, I believe 1000 percent they should be allowed the opportunity to play.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Although the last few months have been uncharted territory for Ohio State and the Big Ten, Johnson has also had to deal with the transition into university president. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Johnson — who assumed the position Sept. 1 — has had an unusual start to her tenure, as she entered the role amidst a  pandemic and a period of social injustice. With the pandemic, she also faced pressure from student-athletes, parents and fans on the Big Ten’s postponement of the fall sports season. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Smith praised Johnson’s ability to adapt to the situations she has faced and her effort in getting a safe return-to-play for Ohio State’s student-athletes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“To think of a president coming into significant responsibility, and just leading Ohio State University in normal times is a significant challenge,” Smith said. “To come in at a time of a pandemic of this nature and social injustice issues that is plaguing our society and all the other issues that she inherited. To come in and deal with what we were dealing with in the athletic space is a daunting task and she’s been phenomenal.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For Day, the last few weeks have also been a challenge for him and the team. However, he hopes that the players can take what they experienced since early August and apply it to their everyday lives. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“A life lesson that I talked to them for a long time about is, ‘Life is about ups and downs. When things go well, go enjoy it and go get all you can get, I mean enjoy it, go get it all,’” Day said. “‘But when things aren’t going very well, you just hang on and you just manage through it and you hang on and you trust the people that you’re around. Because eventually it’s gonna turn and it’s gonna start going back up.’”</span></p> Group: Cities Could Lose Big If Work-From-Home Income Tax Law Changed https://www.statenews.org/post/group-cities-could-lose-big-if-work-home-income-tax-law-changed urn:uuid:d116a032-aa5e-6f27-2046-ddfa0e4efc65 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 14:54:20 +0000 There are two bills that would make changes in how income taxes are collected by the biggest cities in Ohio. And a group that advocates for municipalities is very worried about them. 11 AM: The Ohio State University holds briefing after Big Ten announces start of season in October https://www.news5cleveland.com/news/local-news/11-am-the-ohio-state-university-holds-briefing-after-big-ten-announces-start-of-season-in-october Ohio State urn:uuid:fa3ca5bd-bb24-90d4-e953-997479019b8d Wed, 16 Sep 2020 14:46:14 +0000 The Ohio State University President Kristina Johnson and Director of Athletics Gene Smith will hold a briefing Wednesday after The Big Ten announced a plan to open a 2020 football season by late October. The Ohio State University President Kristina Johnson and Director of Athletics Gene Smith will hold a briefing Wednesday after The Big Ten announced a plan to open a 2020 football season by late October.The press conference is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m. Watch it live below:In a statement released Wednesday, the conference said it plans to open its season by Oct. 23 and 24.Players will reportedly receive daily rapid COVID-19 tests.According to the conference's announcement, all players and coaches must test negative before stepping on the field for any practice or game.RELATED: Big Ten football to return in late October, conference announcesDownload the News 5 Cleveland app now for more stories from us, plus alerts on major news, the latest weather forecast, traffic information and much more. Download now on your Apple device here, and your Android device here.You can also catch News 5 Cleveland on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, YouTube TV, DIRECTV NOW, Hulu Live and more. We're also on Amazon Alexa devices. Learn more about our streaming options here. The Ohio State University holds briefing after Big Ten announces start of season in October https://www.news5cleveland.com/news/local-news/11-am-the-ohio-state-university-holds-briefing-after-big-ten-announces-start-of-season-in-october Ohio State urn:uuid:e51bfec6-35c7-7c68-6959-f336ae29fb8e Wed, 16 Sep 2020 14:46:14 +0000 The Ohio State University President Kristina Johnson and Director of Athletics Gene Smith will hold a briefing Wednesday after The Big Ten announced a plan to open a 2020 football season by late October. The Ohio State University President Kristina Johnson and Director of Athletics Gene Smith will hold a briefing Wednesday after The Big Ten announced a plan to open a 2020 football season by late October.In a statement released Wednesday, the conference said it plans to open its season by Oct. 23 and 24.Players will reportedly receive daily rapid COVID-19 tests.According to the conference's announcement, all players and coaches must test negative before stepping on the field for any practice or game.RELATED: Big Ten football to return in late October, conference announcesDownload the News 5 Cleveland app now for more stories from us, plus alerts on major news, the latest weather forecast, traffic information and much more. Download now on your Apple device here, and your Android device here.You can also catch News 5 Cleveland on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, YouTube TV, DIRECTV NOW, Hulu Live and more. We're also on Amazon Alexa devices. Learn more about our streaming options here. Football: Big Ten votes to bring back football with Oct. 23 start date https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/football-big-ten-votes-to-bring-back-football-with-oct-23-start-date/ The Lantern urn:uuid:d5481d5a-5ea7-4b83-e295-f751b182a375 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 14:00:06 +0000 Big Ten football is back — or at least it will be soon.  After an Aug. 11 decision from the Big Ten to postpone the football season, the conference has decided to move forward with the season. The new start date for Big Ten football is set for Oct. 23, according to a Big Ten [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_171243" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-171243" class="wp-image-171243 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602.jpg" alt="The Buckeyes take to the field prior to the start of the game against Cincinnati in front of an Ohio Stadium filled with fans. " width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-171243" class="wp-caption-text">The Buckeyes take to the field prior to the start of the game against Cincinnati on Sept. 7, 2019. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Former Managing Editor for Multimedia</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Big Ten football is back —</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">or at least it will be soon. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After an Aug. 11 decision from the Big Ten to postpone the football season, the conference has decided to move forward with the season. The new start date for Big Ten football is set for Oct. 23, according to a Big Ten release.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The conference will require individuals that are on the field for practices to participate in daily antigen testing, which will need to be completed before each practice and game, the Big Ten said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Everyone associated with the Big Ten should be very proud of the groundbreaking steps that are now being taken to better protect the health and safety of the student-athletes and surrounding communities,” Jim Borchers, head team physician at Ohio State and co-chair of the Return to Competition Task Force medical subcommittee, said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If a student-athlete tests positive, they will have to undergo cardiac testing and be cleared by a university cardiologist in order to return to play. The earliest a student-athlete can return following a positive COVID-19 test is 21 days.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The introduction of daily, rapid COVID-19 testing helped influence the conference to return before the spring, and daily testing will begin Sept. 30.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nine votes were needed to overturn the postponement ruling and university presidents and chancellors voted unanimously to bring the season back. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Big Ten originally voted 11-3 in favor of postponing the season. Ohio State President Kristina M. Johnson was among the three to vote against that decision. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">University of Wisconsin chancellor Rebecca Blank said Monday in a conference call with the media that the Big Ten member institutions are united in accepting the results of the vote. Therefore, all 14 teams are expected to play out the reinstated season. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I will say we’re all going to move together in the Big Ten,” Blank said. “This isn’t going to be a school-by-school thing.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since the decision to postpone, student-athletes and their parents have led the charge for a return to play. Numerous parent organizations in the Big Ten — including Ohio State, Nebraska, Iowa and Illinois — have sent letters and held rallies in support of a return-to-play decision.    </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The reinstatement of the season comes on the heels of two high-profile Buckeyes announcing their intentions to opt out of the season. Redshirt juniors cornerback Shaun Wade and guard Wyatt Davis both decided to opt out and prepare for the NFL draft, where they are both projected to land in the opening round. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State was set to begin its football season Sept. 3 after the release of the conference’s 10-game schedule Aug. 5.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ACC and Big 12 have already started their seasons with the SEC set to follow Sept. 26. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The College Football Playoff committee is scheduled to release its final rankings Dec. 20.</span></p> <p><em>This story will be updated as more information becomes available.</em></p> Pass/no pass options for academic year in discussions in University Senate council https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/pass-no-pass-options-for-academic-year-in-discussions-in-university-senate-council/ The Lantern urn:uuid:8729a6ce-d6b2-69af-5444-73ff8d71c6c9 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 13:50:22 +0000 Pass/no pass options might extend into the academic year, but the amount of options to be offered is currently up for debate.  The University Senate Council on Enrollment and Student Progress is discussing the potential implementation of a pass/no pass system for the fall semester, but disagreements over the specific type of system have slowed [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_166672" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/02/IMG_9047-2a5qyvg.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-166672" id="longdesc-return-166672" class="wp-image-166672 size-full" tabindex="-1" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/02/IMG_9047-2a5qyvg.jpg" alt="Students study in the Thompson reading room" width="1920" height="1280" longdesc="http://www.thelantern.com?longdesc=166672&amp;referrer=183741" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/02/IMG_9047-2a5qyvg.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/02/IMG_9047-2a5qyvg-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/02/IMG_9047-2a5qyvg-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/02/IMG_9047-2a5qyvg-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/02/IMG_9047-2a5qyvg-1024x683.jpg 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-166672" class="wp-caption-text">The University Senate Council on Enrollment and Student Progress is discussing the potential implementation of a pass/no pass system for the fall semester. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Former Managing Editor for Multimedia</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pass/no pass options might extend into the academic year, but the amount of options to be offered is currently up for debate. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The University Senate Council on Enrollment and Student Progress is discussing the potential implementation of a pass/no pass system for the fall semester, but disagreements over the specific type of system have slowed the process in a meeting Tuesday. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">University President Kristina M. Johnson and Executive Vice President and Provost Bruce McPheron support a trimodal system, which includes the option for students to take courses in a pass, low pass or no pass format, according to an email from Senior Vice Provost Kay Wolf obtained by The Lantern.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Under the trimodal system, a pass would be a C-minus or higher, a low pass would be any grade within the D range and a no pass would be below a D. Both the pass and low pass options would earn credit and not factor into students’ GPAs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pass and low pass grades can meet general education and elective requirements but will not count toward major or minor requirements under this recommendation, according to the email. After the university went online due to the pandemic spring semester, many individual colleges decided on their own to allow pass/no pass courses to count towards major and minor requirements.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The proposal will extend the deadlines for withdrawal and opting into the trimodal system to Nov. 20 for 14-week courses, Oct. 2 for courses taking place in the first seven weeks of fall semester and Nov. 20 for courses taking place in the second seven weeks of fall semester, according to the email. Previous deadlines were Oct. 30, Sept. 25 and Nov. 13, respectively. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, Undergraduate Student Government is in favor of a bimodal system identical to the one implemented in the spring semester, but still sees the benefits of a trimodal one, Student Body President Roaya Higazi said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In all cases, we would definitely advocate for the trimodal pass/no pass option over our regular grading system as it stands now for this semester,” Higazi said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Higazi said the discrepancy between bimodal and trimodal is small, but the push for bimodal is to not single out students who may receive D’s.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Higazi said USG is advocating for students to be able to use the pass/no pass system for major and minor courses, but the University Senate would need to add an amendment to the resolution to allow colleges to opt in to the decision.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We’re very much so advocating for that amendment to appear on the resolution again and highly encouraging colleges to opt into a pass/no pass option for their major and minor courses, similar to how many of them did last semester,” Higazi said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The University Senate is currently looking into an alternative to both systems. Amani Samuels, a second-year in international studies and USG representative to the Council on Enrollment and Student Progress, said this system would resemble what the University of Michigan is doing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to the University of Michigan’s Office of the Registrar website, it offers a pass/no record COVID grading option. A pass option would be any grade above a C-minus. Students who receive lower than that, including D’s, would receive a “No Record COVID” on their transcript and no course credit. This does not impact their GPA and students have the option of selecting which courses they want to convert. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Samuels said the bimodal option USG advocates is ideal, but because there is pushback from advising departments and deans about specific requirements, she said USG will support the </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If that (the trimodal system) is to go forward, then university student government would support that over, let&#8217;s say, Michigan’s system that they&#8217;re doing or keeping things the same way they are,” Samuels said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some faculty disagree with this perspective and the decision for a pass/no pass system all together. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In an email obtained by The Lantern sent Sunday, David Tomasko, associate dean for Undergraduate Education and Student Services and a professor in chemical and biomolecular engineering, said that making this change undermines the work faculty have done to prepare for the semester.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the email, Tomasko said accepting that students’ situations are no different than they were in the spring would admit that “the</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> tens of thousands of person-hours”</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> faculty, staff and administration spent preparing for the fall had “ZERO impact” on learning at the university. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What a depressing thought. I don&#8217;t believe it&#8217;s true,” the email reads. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tomasko said changing the system at this point of the semester would be asking faculty to do more work to adjust to the new rules. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tomasko also said that it is unfair to only apply the rules to general education courses. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Try as I might, I cannot find any rational way of applying the change to a subset of courses without resulting in unequal impact on students,” Tomasko said. “Students not enrolled in any GE courses this semester will receive no benefit whatsoever. In my mind, that&#8217;s completely unfair. If we proceed with this, it has to be all or nothing to be equitable.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tomasko said in an email Wednesday this proposal changes “the rules of engagement” for students and faculty and will only increase stress. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“All the colleges were in agreement this summer that we would revert back to a regular grading scale for this academic year,” Tomasko said. “Then students were notified in late July how their courses would be offered and given an opportunity to change their schedule.  Now that classes have started we are all trying to execute the best we can on plans we laid out.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He also said he still believes only offering any pass/no pass option for general education courses is unfair.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A quorum has not been reached at the meetings because there have not been enough voting members present, Samuels said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The details of the next meeting and discussion on the pass/no pass option are unknown at the time of publication. Minutes for Tuesday’s meetings were not provided by the time of publication.</span></p> Ohio political parties react to Sec. of State's 'one dropbox per county' order https://www.wcpo.com/news/government/state-government/ohio-state-government-news/ohio-political-parties-react-to-sec-of-states-one-dropbox-per-county-order Ohio State Government News urn:uuid:8959715f-8c8b-8755-1e50-2113e30f30f4 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 02:11:54 +0000 For Ohio voters, a dropbox is dropping a lot of controversy. “It says a lot that it’s turned into a fight when it’s a no-brainer for voters,” said Ohio Democratic Party chair David Pepper. “This is something that’s not a Republican or Democratic idea.” For Ohio voters, a dropbox is dropping a lot of controversy. Each of Ohio’s 88 counties will have exactly one dropbox for voters to deposit their ballots in this November, Secretary of State Frank LaRose ruled in August. Those who can’t or don’t want to make the trip will need to vote in person or mail their ballots in, as usual.“It says a lot that it’s turned into a fight when it’s a no-brainer for voters,” said Ohio Democratic Party chair David Pepper. “This is something that’s not a Republican or Democratic idea. It’s just something to make it easy for people in challenging time.”Pepper is in favor of having multiple voting dropboxes in different parts of each county at places like libraries and city halls."It also helps in Adams County where except for Route 32, there aren't as many major highways," Pepper said.A Franklin County Common Pleas judge didn’t block LaRose from enforcing his order. In fact, no order was issued by the judge, just his ruling.Ohio Secretary of State Frank Larose issued the single drop-box order to county board of elections in August. At that time, he said having more than one could invite lawsuits."Lacking that, today's ruling didn't change anything and the Secretary's Directive remains in place. The law is clear," read a statement from LaRose’s spokesperson.The current law says voters may personally deliver their absentee ballots to the director of the Board of Elections. Nothing in the law describes the use of drop boxes."Ohioans are fortunate that the judicial branch offers the opportunity to appeal a single trial judge's opinion,” LaRose’s office released.The Ohio Republican party also issued a statement: "Their rhetoric surrounding election security is incompatible with free and fair elections."Pepper said drop boxes aren’t a partisan issue."It's a box,” he said. “This isn't that hard. Government should be able to figure this out. If you can't figure it out maybe you're the wrong person."Pepper said he’s hopeful the courts will sort everything out before election day arrives. Football: Big Ten votes to bring back football with Oct. 23 start date. https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/football-big-ten-votes-to-bring-back-football-with-oct-23-start-date/ The Lantern urn:uuid:e9caf154-62cf-19f2-27ff-00d071d47b7f Wed, 16 Sep 2020 00:34:06 +0000 Big Ten football is back — or at least it will be soon.  After an Aug. 11 decision from the Big Ten to postpone the football season, the conference has decided tomove forward with the season. The new start date for Big Ten football is set for Oct. 23, according to a Big Ten release [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_171243" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-171243" class="wp-image-171243 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602.jpg" alt="The Buckeyes take to the field prior to the start of the game against Cincinnati in front of an Ohio Stadium filled with fans. " width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2019/09/IMG_1602-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-171243" class="wp-caption-text">The Buckeyes take to the field prior to the start of the game against Cincinnati on Sept. 7, 2019. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Former Managing Editor for Multimedia</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Big Ten football is back —</span> <span style="font-weight: 400;">or at least it will be soon. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After an Aug. 11 decision from the Big Ten to postpone the football season, the conference has decided tomove forward with the season. The new start date for Big Ten football is set for Oct. 23, according to a Big Ten release</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The conference will require individuals that are on the field for practices to participate in daily antigen testing, which will need to be completed before each practice and game, the Big Ten said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Everyone associated with the Big Ten should be very proud of the groundbreaking steps that are now being taken to better protect the health and safety of the student-athletes and surrounding communities,” Jim Borchers, head team physician at Ohio State and co-chair of the Return to Competition Task Force medical subcommittee, said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If a student-athlete tests positive, they will have to undergo cardiac testing and be cleared by a university cardiologist in order to return to play. The earliest a student-athlete can return following a positive COVID-19 test is 21 days.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The introduction of daily, rapid COVID-19 testing helped influence the conference to return before the spring, and daily testing will begin Sept. 30.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nine votes were needed to overturn the postponement ruling.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Big Ten originally voted 11-3 in favor of postponing the season. Ohio State President Kristina M. Johnson was among the three to vote against that decision. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">University of Wisconsin chancellor Rebecca Blank said Monday in a conference call with the media that the Big Ten member institutions are united in accepting the results of the vote. Therefore, all 14 teams are expected to play out the reinstated season. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I will say we’re all going to move together in the Big Ten,” Blank said. “This isn’t going to be a school-by-school thing.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since the decision to postpone, student-athletes and their parents have led the charge for a return to play. Numerous parent organizations in the Big Ten — including Ohio State, Nebraska, Iowa and Illinois — have sent letters and held rallies in support of a return-to-play decision.    </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The reinstatement of the season comes on the heels of two high-profile Buckeyes announcing their intentions to opt out of the season. Redshirt juniors cornerback Shaun Wade and guard Wyatt Davis both decided to opt out and prepare for the NFL draft, where they are both projected to land in the opening round. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State was set to begin its football season Sept. 3 after the release of the conference’s 10-game schedule Aug. 5.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ACC and Big 12 have already started their seasons with the SEC set to follow Sept. 26. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The College Football Playoff committee is scheduled to release its final rankings Dec. 20. </span></p> Spit supervisors: Student testing assistants have job like no other https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/spit-supervisors-student-testing-assistants-have-job-like-no-other/ The Lantern urn:uuid:440e9d27-f56d-7af4-a7cc-a8dc233e171e Wed, 16 Sep 2020 00:27:21 +0000 Vests, surgical masks, gloves and face shields aren’t typical workplace attire for TAs, but for student testing assistants helping seal tubes of spit, “typical” isn’t in the job description. For Regina Tamayo, a fifth-year in chemical engineering, this has been her normal since the end of August. Tamayo is a student testing assistant working in [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183680" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183680" class="wp-image-183680 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1.jpg" alt="Tables and purell stations set up for students to come and get tested at" width="1920" height="1371" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1-530x378.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1-1024x731.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1-504x360.jpg 504w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1-768x548.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1-1536x1097.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1-1080x771.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/screenshottess1-1440x1028.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183680" class="wp-caption-text">The Jesse Owens North Recreation Center is set up to allow for around 100 new randomly selected students to take a COVID test every 15 minutes. Credit: Owen Milnes | Campus producer</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Vests, surgical masks, gloves and face shields aren’t typical workplace attire for TAs, but for student testing assistants helping seal tubes of spit, “typical” isn’t in the job description.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For Regina Tamayo, a fifth-year in chemical engineering, this has been her normal since the end of August. Tamayo is a student testing assistant working in the Jesse Owens North Recreation Center. Her job is to walk around the testing floor and ensure students correctly self-administer COVID-19 saliva tests.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tamayo said she applied for the job after her academic adviser sent an email about it, asking for students with pipetting experience. A pipette is a dropper-like instrument used in laboratories.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I had taken a bio course a couple years ago, and I’ve done some research stuff, so I was like, ‘Oh, that would be fine,’” Tamayo said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She said the job ended up being markedly different from what was advertised — she said it described  more like “customer service” than a lab position — but she enjoys the work anyway.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tamayo is part of a team of about 80 students working at JO North, the COVID-19 testing hub for randomly selected off-campus students. Joanne Munshower, a third-year in marketing and a student testing assistant, said that since she started, testing capabilities have expanded at the location by about 1,000 students per day.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They do about 4,500 a day, and that’s between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m.,” Munshower said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Kyle Prete, a fifth-year in biology and another student testing assistant at JO North, said his role is to get students signed in and ready with their kits as smoothly as possible. Prete said testing assistants don’t play any part in the actual collection of samples; instead, they answer questions students have during the test and guide them through the process — specifically, checking that students fill vials with enough saliva.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Our job is also just to make sure they hit that line, and once they do, then we help them finish it up,” Prete said. “All the finishing process looks like is putting this cap on that has a liquid preservative in it, and they finish the steps on their phone.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After students seal their vials, they toss samples in a biohazard bin on their way out of the testing center. Prete said those samples are sent straight to New Jersey overnight to be tested by testing company Vault.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">All student testing assistants undergo an hour-long training during which they run through a typical shift, Prete said. He said students shadow employees from Drug Free Sport, an organization that typically facilitates drug tests for athletes but now administers COVID-19 tests.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At the end of training, Prete said new student testing assistants schedule their first shifts.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">During shifts, Tamayo said assistants wear gloves, masks, face shields and vests to avoid coming in contact with the coronavirus. When it comes to being tested themselves, however, Prete, Tamayo and Munshower said there is no protocol beyond random selection. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Even though we’re testing assistants and there on a weekly basis, we technically aren&#8217;t required to test every week,” Prete said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tamayo said her supervisors gave her the option to get tested after shifts, but it is not required.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite the uncommon nature of the position, Munshower, Prete and Tamayo said they were glad they applied.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If we can be a warm, welcoming face to them, that’s something that we pride ourselves on, aside from just helping them complete the steps of their test,” Munshower said. </span></p> Football: Ohio State looks to inexperienced secondary to fill starting roles https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/football-ohio-state-looks-to-inexperienced-secondary-to-fill-starting-roles/ The Lantern urn:uuid:49498412-4493-73eb-8d76-846a8a21f1af Wed, 16 Sep 2020 00:27:07 +0000 Ohio State’s secondary is seeming like a second thought to those who have declared for the draft as the season’s postponement continues.  With junior cornerback Shaun Wade deciding to opt out of the potential football season, Ohio State’s defensive backfield may be missing out on a first-round prospect in the 2021 NFL draft. The Buckeyes [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_160081" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/wade-2cov3ls.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-160081" class="size-full wp-image-160081" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/wade-2cov3ls.jpg" alt="Shaun Wade carries the football on the field during the game." width="1920" height="1476" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/wade-2cov3ls.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/wade-2cov3ls-468x360.jpg 468w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/wade-2cov3ls-530x407.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/wade-2cov3ls-768x590.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2018/10/wade-2cov3ls-1024x787.jpg 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-160081" class="wp-caption-text">Ohio State then-redshirt freshman cornerback Shaun Wade (24) runs on the field during the game against Rutgers on Sept. 8., 2018. Credit: Amal Saeed | Former Photo Editor</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ohio State’s secondary is seeming like a second thought to those who have declared for the draft as the season’s postponement continues. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With junior cornerback Shaun Wade deciding to opt out of the potential football season, Ohio State’s defensive backfield may be missing out on a first-round prospect in the 2021 NFL draft. The Buckeyes will have to rely on its youth and first-year defensive coordinator Kerry Coombs to keep their stout pass defense intact. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We got some guys back there that we have to replace — Damon (Arnette), Jeff (Okudah), Jordan (Fuller) — who were all playing really well yesterday and had great camps and did a great job for us last year — and now Shaun,” head coach Ryan Day said in an appearance on 97.1 The Fan’s “Buckeye Roundtable” Monday. “So it’s gonna be a brand new secondary back there.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wade announced his decision to opt out Monday on Twitter. The redshirt junior cornerback elected to return for a fourth season instead of following fellow cornerbacks Okudah and Arnette into the NFL this past spring. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a Monday interview with Dom Tiberi on 10TV, Wade said that the decision is not necessarily final, as he has not signed with an agent.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With a decision looming from the Big Ten to play football in the fall, Wade said that the return of fall football in the Big Ten would not guarantee his return to the team. He said that he will need to see the protocols and testing procedures along with the Buckeyes’ ability to compete for a national championship. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“At the end of the day, if they do come out with good protocols and they want to play a season, I’ll probably decide to come back, but it matters about the protocols — that’s probably the biggest thing for me,” Wade said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Buckeyes had the No. 2 pass defense in the country in 2019, allowing only 148.1 passing yards per game and seven passing touchdowns on the season. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 2019 starting secondary, composed of former Buckeyes Jeff Okudah, Damon Arnette, Jordan Fuller and the recently opted-out Wade, will not return to defend its aerial dominance. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Ohio State defense will also be without co-defensive coordinator Jeff Hafley, who was hired as the head coach at Boston College in December. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Coombs, who served as Ohio State’s cornerbacks coach from 2012-17, will take the reins of the defense and inexperienced secondary. Day said that Coombs’ college and NFL experience will greatly benefit the young defensive backfield. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s not the first time Kerry (Coombs) has been through this. He’s got great experience at all levels,” Day said. “Kerry is such a veteran guy, he’s really doing a wonderful job.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Back in an April 22 conference call, Coombs noted that the returning defensive backs would see expanded roles in the defense. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Calling out defensive backs Sevyn Banks, Cam Brown, Marcus Hooker, Josh Proctor, Marcus Williamson and Tyreke Johnson, Coombs said that the unproven players were competing at the beginning of spring practice and he has “every expectation of getting a lot of guys on the field.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I think it’s a talented group of players, just inexperienced, and so I would expect that a lot of those guys are going to play and compete in the fall and get ready to go and play a lot of them during the game,” Coombs said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Among the more seasoned players in the new-look defensive backfield is the junior cornerback Banks, who played in all 14 games for the Buckeyes in the 2019 season. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Coombs said that when he originally recruited Banks, he fit the mold of what the Buckeyes typically look for in their cornerbacks. With the past two seasons — which Coombs spent as the secondary coach for the Tennessee Titans — to strengthen up and gain experience, Coombs said he’s excited about Banks’ future with the team. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s weird when you get away from a guy for two years and you come back and they’re bigger, stronger and faster,” Coombs said. “I’m really excited for him. He’s taken great pride in what he’s doing right now, and I think he’s working really hard so I’m looking forward to having a chance to get back with him.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If Wade decides to remain in the draft, junior cornerback Brown and senior cornerback Williamson are each expected to get a bump in playing time. Both defensive backs received playing time in all 14 games last season. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Junior safety Proctor is expected to take over for Fuller, who he backed up the previous two seasons. Proctor played in 11 games last year, finishing with 13 tackles and an interception. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite Wade’s decision, the Buckeyes will have plenty of gaps to fill in their defensive backfield. Although the unit may be inexperienced, Day has confidence in Coombs’ ability to get the most of his players.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Obviously his energy is off the charts but it’s also his expertise on how to train secondary players,” Day said. “But then also bring them along maturity-wise so that they can step into a situation and perform.” </span></p> Cool beans: How to make the perfect cold brew at home https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/cool-beans-how-to-make-the-perfect-cold-brew-at-home/ The Lantern urn:uuid:a4280279-d010-4bdc-6992-7b388e68f943 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 00:26:49 +0000 Cold brew is not your average cup of joe — and when people are trying to go out in public less, it might make for your next quarantine craft.  Cold brew has gained popularity among coffee lovers for its condensed flavor, smooth profile and high caffeine concentration combined with its simple brewing process. Now, Ohio [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183726" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183726" class="size-full wp-image-183726" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee.jpg" alt="Cup with cold brew coffee" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee-1440x960.jpg 1440w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/coffee-original.jpg 2048w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183726" class="wp-caption-text">Unlike hot coffee, cold brew coffee requires hours, sometimes 24 hours, of brewing before being poured and served. Lantern Photo Illustration</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cold brew is not your average cup of joe — and when people are trying to go out in public less, it might make for your next quarantine craft. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Cold brew has gained popularity among coffee lovers for its condensed flavor, smooth profile and high caffeine concentration combined with its simple brewing process. Now, Ohio State students are finding their own way to brew the cold way and are sharing their recipes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">What makes a cup of cold brew different from a normal cup of coffee — or even iced coffee — is the lack of bitterness in the product that the process of brewing the cold brew creates, Emily Liebkemann, a third-year in international relations and Spanish, said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Liebkemann said she started making cold brew at home as a way to reduce harmful waste in the environment.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I like cold brew, but I don’t like the plastic waste that comes with purchasing a big jug of cold brew at the grocery store, and it’s just a lot cheaper to make your own,” Liebkemann said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Liebkemann starts by adding ground coffee beans to water in any container — for her, a mason jar — and letting it sit in the fridge overnight for about eight-to-twelve hours before straining the ground beans from the drink. She said she recommends using one part coffee for every four parts water. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At-home baristas can either buy pre-ground coffee beans from the store or grind them on their own as long as the beans are not ground too finely. Coarsely ground coffee is easier to strain, Liebkemann said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Before you can enjoy your tasty cup of cold brew, you have to find a way to filter the grounds from your coffee. For Alex Bajzer, a fourth-year in chemical engineering, this can be a challenge.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Like Liebkemann, Bajzer said he also uses mason jars when making cold brew, but he lets his coffee sit outside of his fridge for about 24 to 36 hours before filtering. Bajzer said he puts a coffee filter on top of an empty mason jar, puts the cap on top to hold the filter in place and pours his unfiltered coffee on top of the filter until he has a fresh cup of cold brew. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That’s kind of one of the only downsides, is that when you want a quick cup of coffee, you can’t just kind of pour it out into a cup. You have to let it filter for a little bit too,” Bajzer said. “There is a little more that goes into it, but I do think it’s worth that work.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Liebkemann said she suggests using a regular or reusable coffee filter, a cheesecloth or even a French press to strain the cold brew.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Both students offered helpful tips that can help maximize taste when preparing cold brew.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“One kind of drink I guess I’ve been making with it is using cold brew and then some caramel syrup and then chocolate milk,” Bajzer said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Liebkemann said leftover coffee from the cold brew can be frozen in an ice tray so that when the ice melts in the coffee, it won’t taste watered down. To add sweetness to a drink, Liebkemann said she cooks a cup of sugar combined with a cup of water until the sugar dissolves, making a simple syrup. She said regular sugar doesn’t dissolve well in a cup of cold brew. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“You can add cinnamon and nutmeg to the cold brew to add a little, tiny bit of pumpkin spice flavor, because it’s pumpkin spice season,” Liebkemann said. </span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>How to make cold brew (about 4 servings): </strong></p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Measure one cup of coarsely ground coffee beans and add to a mason jar.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Add four cups of cold water to the jar with the grounds.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stir to distribute the grounds in the water. </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Refrigerate for at least 12 hours for weaker brew or up to 36 hours for a strong brew. </span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">When ready to consume, attach a coffee filter or cheesecloth to another mason jar to filter the grounds out of the brew, or use a French press to strain the mixture.</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Serve over ice with your favorite additions. Add water to taste to dilute the brew if needed. </span></li> </ol> Women’s golf: Seumanutafa looks back at prolonged offseason, season postponement https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/womens-golf-seumanutafa-looks-back-at-prolonged-offseason-season-postponement/ The Lantern urn:uuid:f1897104-d06a-c363-7c8c-1ff7e5a6276b Wed, 16 Sep 2020 00:25:53 +0000 As many students try to follow Ohio State health guidelines in order to stay on campus, sophomore Aneka Seumanutafa just wants to stay on the golf course. Seumanutafa, the 2019 Big Ten Freshman of the Year and a 2019 Women’s Golf Coaches Association second-team All-American on Ohio State women’s golf team, is dealing with the [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183677" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption aligncenter"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546.jpg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183677" class="wp-image-183677 size-full" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546.jpg" alt="Aneka Seumanutafa swinging a golf club" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546.jpg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546-530x353.jpg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546-1024x683.jpg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546-540x360.jpg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546-768x512.jpg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546-1536x1024.jpg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546-1080x720.jpg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/IMG_1546-1440x960.jpg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183677" class="wp-caption-text">Ohio State woman golfer Aneka Seumanutafa golfing at the White Sands Invitational, which ran from Oct. 28-30. Credit: Ohio State Athletics</p></div> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As many students try to follow Ohio State health guidelines in order to stay on campus, sophomore Aneka Seumanutafa just wants to stay on the golf course.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Seumanutafa, the 2019 Big Ten Freshman of the Year and a 2019 Women’s Golf Coaches Association second-team All-American on Ohio State women’s golf team, is dealing with the realities of a fall semester without team events due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although practices remain for the golf team, team competition will not resume until January at the earliest, head coach Therese Hession said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hession said the absence of the fall schedule cuts four events from the Buckeyes’ docket, which Seumanutafa said was disappointing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I really wanted to play to represent Ohio State and be proud to be an Ohio State athlete,” Seumanutafa said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Seumanutafa completed her junior and senior year of high school online — she was homeschooled — so the academic transition from in person to online has been easy, she said.  </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on the 2020-21 golf season has been much more difficult, she said.   </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s kind of hard to not have the season,” Seumanutafa said. “It sucks because we all really wanted to play golf.” </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Seumanutafa said that she has had some concerns for her golf career due to the nature of the coronavirus.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Being an athlete and being in a long-term sport, it’s kinda scary to be around people,” Seumanutafa said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now, Seumanutafa’s collegiate season is reduced to a modified practice schedule and the possibility of individual events, she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Over the summer, Seumanutafa competed in the North &amp; South Women’s Amateur Championship in Pinehurst, North Carolina, and the U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship at Woodmont Country Club in her home state of Maryland. She finished ninth and 33rd, respectively, in the tournaments.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With temperature checks, daily rapid COVID-19 testing and face masks while not playing, Seumanutafa said the U.S. Women’s Amateur Championship took safety precautions more seriously than the championship in North Carolina, which did not require golfers to wear a mask. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The members of the Ohio State women’s golf team may be able to compete in some new tournaments as individuals, Seumanutafa said. However, the student-athletes would have to pay for the tournaments on their own.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“You want to be in competition for golf, especially because you want to keep that mojo going,” Seumanutafa said. “If you don’t feel like you’re in that competition, it just kind of brings your golf game down a little bit.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For Hession, who is in her 30th year of coaching, it is important to keep that competitive spirit alive this fall. The coach said that she would have a flexible practice schedule for those who wished to compete individually. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“There are some very nice clubs that are providing opportunities for college players to play,” Hession said. “So hopefully they can get in some competition that way, and for some of them, this will even be more competition than what they played in this summer.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hession said that the ability to compete locally will provide the players with increased safety, as the golfers will be able to drive their own cars and not have to stay in a hotel. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Further fueling the competitive energy, the team has been qualifying and having mini-short-game competitions with the men’s golf team in order to keep the players engaged, Hession said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Some things might be different than normal, but they can actually feel like they are competing,” said Hession.</span></p> What’s Up: 9/16 – 9/22 https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/whats-up-9-16-9-22/ The Lantern urn:uuid:5faaf35d-6e2b-e96d-6b44-3f471c9fd5b4 Wed, 16 Sep 2020 00:25:46 +0000 Whether you are looking to rock out, appreciate some art or pig out at a festival, The Lantern has you covered. Here you will find a heavily researched — but still tragically incomplete — list of happenings around Columbus this week. Click the title of any event for more info. Please note: Admission prices are [&#8230;] <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whether you are looking to rock out, appreciate some art or pig out at a festival, The Lantern has you covered. Here you will find a heavily researched — but still tragically incomplete — list of happenings around Columbus this week. Click the title of any event for more info.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Please note: Admission prices are listed before taxes/fees.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MUSIC AND PERFORMANCES</span></p> <p>Wednesday, Sept. 16</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/375763883828383/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Robert Mason Solo Piano at the Blū Note Jazz Cafe</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">7 p.m. at Blu Note Jazz Cafe (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>Thursday, Sept. 17</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/352842792749316/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>½ Way to St.Patrick’s Day Party</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">7 p.m. at Mclans ($80) </span></li> </ul> <p>Friday, Sept. 18</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/695129364433662/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Columbus Symphony Community Concerts</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">6:30 p.m. at National Veterans Memorial Museum </span></li> </ul> <p>Saturday, Sept. 19</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/837736860093094/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>DRIVE IN CONCERT Feat. MUSIQ SOULDCHILD + RAHEEM DEVAUGHN &#8220;LIVE&#8221; IN CONCERT</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">6 p.m. at West Side Mall ($125) </span></li> </ul> <p>Monday, Sept. 21</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/350652369406989/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Monday Karaoke at Thr3es!</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">7:30 p.m. at 2203 N. High St. (FREE)</span></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>FOOD AND DRINK</p> <p>Wednesday, Sept. 16</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/323454168873918/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Farmer’s Market </b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">4 p.m. at The CMN Memorial Garden (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>Thursday, Sept. 17</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/645117633056571/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>OSU Hospital East Maine Lobster Lunch</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">11 a.m</span><b>. </b><span style="font-weight: 400;">at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center East Hospital (FREE) </span></li> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/338257840550697/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Thursdays in the Garden Presented by CMA&#8217;s Loud &amp; Proud</b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> 5 p.m. at the Columbus Museum of Art ($9) </span></li> </ul> <p>Friday, Sept. 18</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/1179989742363461/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>2020 Oktoberfest Celebration! </b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">5 p.m. at Hofbrauhaus Columbus (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>Saturday, Sept. 19</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/2624398107875266/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Watershed Barrel Strength Bourbon Exclusive Release</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">9 a.m. at Watershed Distillery (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>Sunday, Sept. 20</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/353764779096979?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>German Village Makers Market </b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">11 p.m. at German Village Makers Market (FREE) </span></li> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/302651580736020/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>The Gahanna Farmers Market</b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> 6 p.m. at 73 W. Johnstown Rd. (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>ART AND FILM</p> <p>Wednesday, Sept. 16</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://blog.sigmaphoto.com/events/wildlife-photography-in-your-own-backyard-with-midwest-photo/"><b>Wildlife Photography In Your Own Backyard with Midwest Photo</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">3:30 p.m. online (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>Friday, Sept. 18</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://shortnorth.org/events/screen-on-the-green-edward-scissorhands/"><b>Screen on the Green: Edward Scissorhands</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">6:30 p.m. at Goodale Park (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>Saturday, Sept. 19</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/200028697773328/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Bob Ross Painting Courses &#8211; Quiet Mountain Rise </b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">10 a.m. at 400 W. Rich Ave. ($45) </span></li> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/1278720949135418/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>934 Outdoor Gallery 20/21 Annual Exhibition Opening</b></a> <span style="font-weight: 400;">12 p.m. at 934 Cleveland Ave. (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>Sunday, Sept. 20</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/410447083250756/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>We The People: Portraits of Veterans in America</b> </a><span style="font-weight: 400;">10 a.m. at the National Veterans Museum and Memorial ($12 with Student ID) </span></li> </ul> <p>Monday, Sept. 21</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/966035057190802/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Sidewalk Doodles </b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">8 a.m. at Grandview Heights Public Library Youth Services (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>OTHER</p> <p>Wednesday, Sept. 16</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/629882167650576/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>The Confidence Crisis: How to Build Girls’ Self-Esteem </b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">12 p.m. online ($20) </span></li> </ul> <p>Thursday, Sept. 17</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://cscarts.org/events/archive/csca-presents-keni-thacker/"><b>CSCA Presents: Keni Thacker</b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> 6:30 p.m. online (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>Friday, Sept. 18</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/1023782794723507/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>13th Floor Haunted House Columbus</b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> 7 p.m. at 2605 Northland Plaza Drive ($24.99) </span></li> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/2896544083805604/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Glass Pumpkin Sale 2020</b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> 11 a.m. at the Franklin Park Conservatory (FREE) </span></li> </ul> <p>Monday, Sept. 21</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/611517412938700/?acontext=%7B%22source%22%3A2%2C%22source_dashboard_filter%22%3A%22discovery%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22[%7B%5C%22surface%5C%22%3A%5C%22discover_filter_list%5C%22%2C%5C%22mechanism%5C%22%3A%5C%22surface%5C%22%2C%5C%22extra_data%5C%22%3A%7B%5C%22dashboard_filter%5C%22%3A%5C%22discovery%5C%22%7D%7D]%22%2C%22has_source%22%3Atrue%7D"><b>Monday Night Yoga Flow</b></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">  7:30 p.m. at Well Within Collective ($15) </span></li> </ul> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mayor Ginther: Investigations into citizen complaints prove need for police reform https://www.thelantern.com/2020/09/mayor-ginther-investigations-into-citizen-complaints-prove-need-for-police-reform/ The Lantern urn:uuid:b30debba-54f8-dbab-fed0-0f053f8069bb Tue, 15 Sep 2020 22:10:45 +0000 Investigations conducted for citizen complaints made against Columbus Police during summer protests downtown resulted in only one sustained instance of misconduct, Mayor Andrew Ginther announced in a press conference Tuesday. A team of 10 lawyers from Columbus law firm BakerHostetler conducted 36 investigations into complaints of police misconduct against demonstrators during protests at the end [&#8230;] <div id="attachment_183713" style="width: 1930px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><a href="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273.jpeg"><img aria-describedby="caption-attachment-183713" class="size-full wp-image-183713" src="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273.jpeg" alt="alt = &quot;&quot;" width="1920" height="1280" srcset="https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273.jpeg 1920w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273-530x353.jpeg 530w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273-1024x683.jpeg 1024w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273-540x360.jpeg 540w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273-768x512.jpeg 768w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273-1536x1024.jpeg 1536w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273-1080x720.jpeg 1080w, https://www.thelantern.com/files/2020/09/MG_4273-1440x960.jpeg 1440w" sizes="(max-width: 1920px) 100vw, 1920px" /></a><p id="caption-attachment-183713" class="wp-caption-text">A medic pours milk into a protester&#8217;s eyes after he was pepper-sprayed at protests in downtown Columbus over the summer. Credit: Sarah Szilagy | Campus Editor</p></div> <p>Investigations conducted for citizen complaints made against Columbus Police during summer protests downtown resulted in only one sustained instance of misconduct, Mayor Andrew Ginther announced in a press conference Tuesday.</p> <p>A team of 10 lawyers from Columbus law firm BakerHostetler conducted 36 investigations into complaints of police misconduct against demonstrators during protests at the end of May and beginning of June. The investigations resulted in officers exonerated in four cases, sustained allegations against one officer, nine unfounded complaints, two withdrawn complaints and 25 unsustained allegations, Jennifer Edwards, a partner at BakerHostetler, said.</p> <p>Edwards said findings were limited to five categories: exonerated, meaning the evidence suggests the officer participated in the alleged conduct but did so lawfully; sustained, meaning the complaint is supported by available evidence and violated police rules of conduct; unfounded, meaning evidence does not suggest the conduct occurred; withdrawn, meaning the complaining person retracted their complaint; and not sustained, meaning the evidence does not suggest either way whether unlawful conduct occurred.</p> <p>All findings are based on the preponderance of the evidence, a legal standard Edwards described as “more likely than not” that the incident and misconduct occurred.</p> <p>“I was surprised, and in many cases, angered at the results,” Ginther said. “The results from these investigations prove to me more clearly than ever before the need for police reform.”</p> <p>Ginther said BakerHostetler faced challenges during investigations due to the unwillingness of some officers to share information and incomplete or unfiled reports officers are obligated to submit following use of force, “making it virtually impossible” for the firm to identify the officers involved in some cases. Some officers’ actions were deemed to be within police policy, which Ginther said should be changed.</p> <p>Other investigative interview protections provided to officers as a result of bargaining between the city and the local chapter of the Fraternal Order of Police, the police union, also posed obstacles to the investigation, Edwards said. She also said in many instances, especially at the beginning of the protests, officers responded to calls for assistance and were not with their assigned units or squads.</p> <p>“There were several circumstances in which CPD has no record of where individual officers were, and the individual officers have no idea who was in the car with them or who was standing beside them,” Edwards said.</p> <p>The Lantern filed a citizen complaint after three Lantern editors were pepper sprayed during protests at Lane Avenue and North High Street June 1 after identifying themselves as members of the press.</p> <p>Twenty-one incidents were turned over to a retired FBI agent contracted by the city to investigate for criminal charges, Ginther said.</p> <p><strong><em>Sarah Szilagy contributed reporting.</em></strong></p> Data shows hundreds of Ohioans requesting Florida absentee ballots https://www.wcpo.com/news/government/elections-local/data-shows-hundreds-of-ohioans-requesting-florida-absentee-ballots Ohio State Government News urn:uuid:592330c7-5500-f3da-86b2-f58fdc711702 Tue, 15 Sep 2020 21:18:56 +0000 Andrew Ladanowski, a data expert, said he has found 856 people registered to vote in both Ohio and Florida are requesting Florida ballots be delivered to their Ohio homes. Andrew Ladanowski, a data expert, said he has found 856 people registered to vote in both Ohio and Florida are requesting Florida ballots be delivered to their Ohio homes. This isn't uncommon and it's not even illegal, unless they voters cast more than one ballot. "We need to have a system in place to ensure that people can only vote once in a presidential election," said Ladanowski. Gaps in voting safeguards do exist, and it wasn't until last month that Kentucky joined Ohio and 30 other states in joining the Electronic Registration Information Center (ERIC coalition), where states share data and matching registrations. "Now, that matching process is imperfect cause there's people with common names that we don't have a unique identifier across the country for voting purposes," said Trey Grayson, former Kentucky secretary of state. "But it's something to start with." Last year, Ohio's secretary of state, Frank LaRose, wrote a letter to Ohio attorney general Dave Yost claiming his office caught 10 people who voted in Ohio after turning in ballots in another state. Voter fraud is still rare, LaRose said, because states are stepping up and enforcing the law when fraud is caught. But one third of the United States separately vets voter rolls, leaving room for questions. "Viewers might be surprised to know states never shared data until 10-15 years ago," said Grayson. Most states also now have programs that send letters to people who haven't voted in awhile, because that can be a sign someone has moved. Returned letters then trigger a purge. Ohio plans to scrub more than 100,000 people from its voting rolls after the November election. DeWine Faces Questions On Challenges Finding New Health Director https://www.statenews.org/post/dewine-faces-questions-challenges-finding-new-health-director urn:uuid:819ceb1b-922f-0fb5-b99e-c9cc21f255ca Tue, 15 Sep 2020 20:43:02 +0000 Gov. Mike DeWine (R-Ohio) is getting questions about why his pick for state health director turned down the job, after she cited concerns about potential harassment as the reason for withdrawing from the role. Controversy Over The Decision To Not Allow Postage Paid Ballots Continues https://www.statenews.org/post/controversy-over-decision-not-allow-postage-paid-ballots-continues urn:uuid:32fa6457-56d7-2a41-c7f1-3c664f63c69c Tue, 15 Sep 2020 20:13:25 +0000 The leader of Democrats in the Ohio House is blasting a Republican controlled panel of lawmakers for its decision to deny a request by the Republican Secretary of State to pay for postage on ballots. Statehouse correspondent Jo Ingles reports. Opponents Say Poll Shows Little Support For HB6 https://www.statenews.org/post/opponents-say-poll-shows-little-support-hb6 urn:uuid:14a6b447-81e8-c70d-6dc4-564dfc79b55b Tue, 15 Sep 2020 20:13:04 +0000 A group calling for the repeal of a sweeping energy law that bailed out nuclear power plants says they have public opinion on their side. The coalition of organizations against HB6 says polling shows little support for the legislation at the center of a federal corruption investigation.